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Eugene/Spring/Rose/Alb/Corv News Releases for Mon. Aug. 3 - 8:06 am
08/03/15
Cable Crossing Fire Evening Update - Sunday, August 2, 2015 @ 10 p.m. PDT
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/03/15
Oregon Department of Forestry
Incident Management Team 3
Link Smith, Incident Commander

Cable Crossing Fire Evening Update
8/02/2015


COOLER WEATHER HELPS FIREFIGHTERS MAKE PROGRESS

After days of playing defense on the Cable Crossing Fire, today firefighters took advantage of cooler temperatures and higher humidity to go on the offensive. In this case, playing offense meant building and strengthening containment lines, getting water to the fire, and conducting burnout operations on small patches.

Local landowner cooperator/representative Jake Gibbs of Lone Rock Timber remarked, "ODF always has good plans and today they actually had the chance to implement those plans and took it."

If the theme of the day shift was seize the day, the theme of the night shift was be flexible. The lower temperatures and higher humidities may stymie burn out plans but these condition are ideal for conducting mop up operations and getting more water to the fire.
The focus remains the south portion of the fire that has been pushed by a predominately north wind since it started Tuesday afternoon.
Today's cloudy cooler weather of will give way to higher temperatures tomorrow. With forecasted temperatures in the 90s and variable winds expect an uptick in fire activity tomorrow.

The fire is currently 1613 acres and 20 percent contained. A Level 1 Evacuation Notification remains in effect along Little River Road from the Peel Store to the Wolf Creek Trail Head. A Level 1 also remains in effect for homes along Highway 138 in the vicinity of Evergreen Lane to Honeycut Road. For more information on evacuation notification levels and Ready, Set, Go, visit www.wildlandfirersg.org .

The fire area and forest roads remain closed to the public. Highway 138 remains open with the aid of a pilot car.


Fire At A Glance

Size: 1,613 acres
Cause: Under Investigation
Containment: 20%
Expected Containment: unknown
Crews and Equipment:
Crews: 2 - Type 1
44 - Type 2
Air Tankers: 2 Tankers
3 SEATS (Single Engine Air Tanker)
Helicopters: 6 - Type 1 (Heavy Lift)
5 - Type 2 (Med Lift)
4 - Type 3 (Light Lift)
Engines: 32
Dozers: 10
Hot Saw: 1
Water Tenders: 12
Total personnel: 1250
Estimated Cost to Date: $2,500,000
For More Information:
541-496-0902
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/
www.oregon.gov/odf

https://www.facebook.com/CableCrossingFire
#cablecrossingfire


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08/02/15
Stouts Fire Evening Update - Sunday, August 2, 2015 @ 8 p.m. PDT
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/02/15
Stouts Fire
Evening Update
Sunday, August 2, 2015 @ 8 p.m. PDT

Public Information Phone: (541) 825-3724 (7 a.m. to 9 p.m.)
Email: StoutsFire@gmail.com
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/
@StoutsFire
www.facebook.com/StoutsFire
#StoutsFire


Cloud cover with cooler temperatures and higher relative humidity moderated fire behavior on the
Stouts Fire today, allowing firefighters to make good progress on the fire lines. The fire is currently
estimated at 15,200 acres with 3% containment. The Upper Cow Creek Road Level 3 evacuation notice
was reduced to a Level 2, allowing residents to return home. Three residences along the Tiller Trail
Highway in Jackson County, were issued a Level 1 evacuation notice. The Umpqua National Forest
issued an emergency area closure for public health and safety on National Forest lands west of Forest
Service Road 1610, Devils Knob. A full description and a map of the closure area can be found on the
Stouts Fire Inciweb page.

Due to fire growth towards the east and southeast, Oregon State Fire Marshal resources were focused
towards structures in the Dixon Creek and Drew Valley areas. Firefighters were deployed to assess
structure protection needs and assist land owners with fuel modification. Both direct and indirect fire
line construction efforts continued on other flanks of the fire. Dozers opened old roads for contingency
lines and constructed line while hand crews dug and improved lines. Hose lays were installed to
provide for mopping up and holding established lines. The moderate weather conditions and heavy
smoke inversion today delayed some burnout operations along control lines and the inversion remained
over the fire area the entire day, grounding aerial resources.

A public meeting was held at the Milo Volunteer Fire Department tonight, allowing the community a
chance to hear an update of the containment efforts and ask questions on the Stouts Fire.
The Oregon State Fire Marshal Green Team, Oregon Department of Forestry Team 1, Roseburg
Resources and other landowners, and structural fire resources from Clackamas, Lane, Linn/Benton,
Lincoln, Marion and Yamhill counties are working with dozens of private contract crews on the Stouts
Fire. Approximately 1,265 people are currently assigned to the fire.

Evacuations Levels 1 and 2 remain in effect for 264 homes. Evacuation Level 1 (Ready) is in place for
the Milo Academy area and three residence along the Tiller Trail Highway in Jackson County. Level 2
(Set) evacuations are in place along the Upper Cow Creek Road on the south side of the fire;
Ferguson, Stouts Creek, and Conley lanes on the north side; and the Drew Valley along the Tiller Trail
Highway from milepost 28 to 39 on the east side. No Level 3 (Go) evacuations are in place at this time.

The Red Cross evacuation shelter remains at the Canyonville YMCA.

New contact information for the Stouts Fire is listed at the top of this page.
Crash East Of Roseburg Kills Glide Man - Douglas County
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 08/02/15
On August 1, 2015 at about 1:43PM, a 2004 garbage truck was traveling westbound on Highway 138E near milepost 35 when for unknown reasons, left the roadway and crashed down an embankment.

Upon emergency crews arriving on scene, they discovered the operator, Wesley BAUMEISTER, age 40, of Glide, deceased.

Preliminary investigation that the truck drifted from its lane and there were no attempts to brake or avoid its departure from the roadway. The truck came to rest next to the North Umpqua River and could not be immediately recovered. There was no fuel spills or hazardous materials concerns.

The investigation is still continuing and more information will be released when it is available. OSP was assisted by the US Forest Service, Glide Fire Department, Douglas County Fire District 2, the Douglas County Sheriff's Department and the Oregon Department of Transportation.
Stouts Fire Daily Update - Sunday, August 2, 2015 @ 9:45 a.m. PDT
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/02/15
STOUTS FIRE DAILY UPDATE
AUGUST 2, 2015

Public Information Phone: (541) 825-3724 (7 a.m. to 9 p.m.)
Email: StoutsFire@gmail.com
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/
@StoutsFire
www.facebook.com/StoutsFire
#StoutsFire

Firefighters continued to deal with extreme weather conditions on the Stouts Fire yesterday, as high
temperatures, low humidity, and low fuel moistures combined for a difficult day. Wind gusts of 10-20
miles per hour and temperatures over 100 degrees were observed. Growing to over 15,000 acres, the
fire pushed east and turned northeast on Saturday. An additional level 2 evacuation notice was issued
to the Drew area east of the fire.

"You've heard it already - 'bring your A-game,'" Incident Commander John Buckman reiterated to the
crews at a Saturday evening briefing. "You're going to need it for at least a few solid days for us to get
well-positioned. This is a tough fire and we'll be at it for a while."

Two of the three day shift structure protection task forces continued to work in the Upper Cow Creek
evacuation area yesterday in anticipation of the fire reaching that area. A task force consists of different
size engines and water tenders with 3-4 firefighters per engine. Residents' work on reducing fuels
around many of the structures over the last couple of years was evident and will hopefully give them the
upper edge if the fire moves through the area. The third task force moved to the Drew community to
survey the homes because the fire has been moving that direction. Wildland firefighters continue
building control lines between the fire and the community, but the terrain is steep and the heavy fuel
load is proving difficult, so contingency plans to protect the community are being developed.

Sunday's forecast of possible lightning could complicate this already difficult fire. About 400 structural
and wildland firefighters are working the day shift with landowners and companies, while another 400
are scheduled for the night shift. A community meeting in Azalea on Saturday night drew an audience
of 177 people. Another public meeting is being held at the Milo Fire Department tonight at 6:30 pm.

The Oregon State Fire Marshal Green Team, Oregon Department of Forestry Team 1, Roseburg
Resources and other landowners, and structural fire protection teams from Clackamas, Lane,
Linn/Benton, Lincoln, Marion and Yamhill counties are working with dozens of private contract crews on
the Stouts Fire. Over 1000 people are currently assigned to the fire.

Evacuations Levels 1 to 3 have been issued which affect 188 homes. Evacuation Level 1 (Ready) is in
place for the Milo Academy area. Level 2 (Set) evacuations are in place near the Galesville Dam up to
Snow Creek on the south side of the fire; Ferguson, Stouts Creek, and Conley lanes on the north side;
and Trail Highway in Tiller on the east side. Level 3 (Go) evacuations are in place for residents in the
Azalea area from Upper Cow Creek to Snow Creek East. The Red Cross set up an evacuation shelter
at the Canyonville YMCA.

New contact information for the Stouts Fire is listed at the top of this page.

###
Cable Crossing Fire Morning Update - Sunday, August 2, 2015 @ 9 a.m. PDT
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/02/15
Incident Management Team 3
Link Smith, Incident Commander

Cable Crossing Fire Morning Update
8/02/2015

FIREFIGHTERS PRESENTED "OPPORTUNITY"

The word of the day at this morning's Cable Crossing Fire briefing was "opportunity". While Mother Nature has had the upper hand over the first four days of the fire, presenting extreme fire behavior conditions, she will take a break today with lower temperatures, higher humidity and calmer winds. These favorable conditions will allow crews to use a more aggressive approach in efforts to halt the fire spread.

The focus remains the south portion of the fire that has been pushed by a predominately north wind since it started Tuesday afternoon. Crews will seize the break in the weather by using established dozer and hand lines to burn out from in small chunks. Several small burnout operations will take place throughout the fire perimeter to reduce ground fuels and ultimately keep the fire from jumping established containment lines.

"We still have a lot of work in front of us," said ODF Incident Management Team 3 Commander Link Smith. "But with the break in the weather, today will be a day of accomplishment."

The weather, that has routinely provided temperatures exceeding 100 degrees, will bring mid to high level cloud cover that will reduce the active fire behavior firefighters have been challenged with since they arrived.

The fire is currently 1,148 acres and 15 percent contained. A Level 1 Evacuation Notification remains in effect along Little River Road from the Peel Store to the Wolf Creek Trail Head. A Level 1 also remains in effect for homes along Highway 138 in the vicinity of Evergreen Lane to Honeycut Road. For more information on evacuation notification levels and Ready, Set, Go, visit www.wildlandfirersg.org .

The fire area and forest roads remain closed to the public. Highway 138 remains open with the aid of a pilot car.


Fire At A Glance

Size: 1,148 acres
Cause: Under Investigation
Containment: 15%
Expected Containment: unknown
Crews and Equipment:
Crews: 2 - Type 1; 39 - Type 2
Air Tankers: 2 Tankers; 3 SEATS (Single Engine Air Tanker)
Helicopters: 6 - Type 1 (Heavy Lift); 5 - Type 2 (Med Lift); 4 - Type 3 (Light Lift)
Engines: 10
Dozers: 4
Hot Saw: 1
Water Tenders: 10
Total personnel: 1212
Estimated Cost to Date: $1,500,000
For More Information:
541-496-0902
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/
www.oregon.gov/odf

https://www.facebook.com/CableCrossingFire
#cablecrossingfire


###
Inmate escapes from Columbia River Correctional Institution (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 08/02/15
Inmate Danny Spillers
Inmate Danny Spillers
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/1070/86654/thumb_spillers.jpg
An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) inmate escaped Sunday morning from Columbia River Correctional Institution (CRCI) in Portland. Oregon State Police and Portland Police Department are responding.

CRCI staff discovered inmate Danny Spillers missing at approximately 5:30 a.m., Sunday, August 2, after discovering a broken window in the kitchen area.

Spillers is a 35-year-old Caucasian male, 6 feet tall, 185 pounds, with red hair and hazel eyes. He is most likely wearing blue jeans with the word "inmate" and the DOC logo stenciled on the knee in orange (or red shorts), and a blue t-shirt with the word "inmate" and the DOC logo stenciled in orange on the front and back.

Spillers entered DOC custody on June 9, 2015, on four counts of burglary in the second degree and one count of unauthorized use of a vehicle out of Multnomah County. His earliest release date is April 13, 2017.

Anyone with information regarding Spillers whereabouts is asked to call Oregon State Police at 1-800-452-7888.

CRCI is a minimum-security facility that houses approximately 595 male inmates who are within four years of release. Located in the largest metropolitan area of the state, this facility is focused on cognitive programming, work programs, and preparing inmates for return to the community. CRCI is home to a 50-bed cognitive restructuring Alternative Incarceration Program (AIP). Individuals who successfully complete this 180-day in-prison program are released to the community for a 90-day transitional leave period. Individuals who successfully complete the transitional leave period are granted a reduction in their sentence and move to post-prison supervision. CRCI is located on a 26-acre site in northeast Portland and officially in opened in September 1990.

####


Attached Media Files: Inmate Danny Spillers
08/01/15
Cable Crossing Fire Evening Update - Saturday, August 1, 2015 @ 10 p.m. PDT
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/01/15
Oregon Department of Forestry
Incident Management Team 3
Link Smith, Incident Commander

Cable Crossing Fire Evening Update
8/01/2015 10:00pm

Community members pack the fire house to learn about the Cable Crossing Fire and Evacuation Notices

What is happening on the Cable Crossing Fire and what do these evacuation orders mean? These questions were on the minds of over 300 community members who attended a standing room only meeting at the Glide Fire Station. The leadership of ODF Team 3 shared critical information with community members and responded to their questions and concerns.

This afternoon the Cable Crossing Fire responded to the predicted extreme afternoon weather conditions and crossed containment lines on the south end of the fire. Firefighters re-engaged on safer portions of the fire to establish additional containment lines while aircraft dropped water and retardant to slow the fire's spread. Tomorrow's tactics call for strengthening existing fire line and burning out when conditions allow.

Firefighters faced extreme again conditions today. A Red Flag Warning was in place and, as predicted, resulted in another very active day of fire behavior. The fire remains 15 percent contained and has burned 1,148 acres.

In the Ready, Set, Go or 1, 2, 3 evacuation level system, a Level 1 "Ready" notification remains in place from the Peel Store to the Wolf Creek Trail Head on Little River Road.

Private forest landowners have closed their holdings to the public, Bureau of Land Management has also imposed a fire area closure. Highway 138 remains open. Forest roads remain closed in and around the fire area.

In addition, Industrial Fire Precaution Level IV is in effect throughout the Douglas District that prohibits forest operations due to extreme fire danger. Public use restrictions, such as campfires, mowing of dry grass and off-road driving have also been tightened.


Fire At A Glance

Size: 1,148 acres
Cause: Under Investigation
Containment: 15%
Expected Containment: unknown
Crews and Equipment:
Crews: 2 - Type 1; 39 - Type 2
Air Tankers: 2 Tankers; 3 SEATS (Single Engine Air Tanker)
Helicopters: 6 - Type 1 (Heavy Lift); 5 - Type 2 (Med Lift); 4 - Type 3 (Light Lift)
Engines: 10
Dozers: 4
Hot Saw: 1
Water Tenders: 10
Total personnel: 1212
Estimated Cost to Date: $1,500,000
For More Information:
541-496-0902
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/
www.oregon.gov/odf
Important Information Regarding the North Fork Park Fire ***Update*** (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/01/15
2015-08/1294/86651/NF_Fire.jpg
2015-08/1294/86651/NF_Fire.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/1294/86651/thumb_NF_Fire.jpg
All road closures have been reopened. There is still no admittance to the North Fork Park.



Fire Fighters have been working all day to contain a fire that broke out in the North Fork Park. The fire is now contained and crews are working to fell any affected trees and put out any remaining portions of the fire.

The park is closed and there will be no admittance for at least the next 3 days. Any personal items left behind by campers or visitors to the park have been collected by county employees and are being taken to the main Marion County Public Works Campus, located at 5155 Silverton Road NE, Salem.

Personal items can be collected Monday 08/03/15 by calling our Public Works Department at 503-588-5036. Road closures are remaining in effect and will be until the largest piece of fire apparatus can clear the fire scene.


Attached Media Files: 2015-08/1294/86651/NF_Fire.jpg , 2015-08/1294/86651/NF_Fire_2.jpg
Red Cross provides assistance after residential fire in Springfield
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/01/15
Disaster Action Team volunteers from the American Red Cross Cascades Region provided assistance to three adults, one child and one pet following a multi-family fire Saturday (Aug. 1) in the 3000 block of Gateway Street in Springfield, OR. Red Cross provided lodging, clothing, shoes, infant supplies, food, comfort kits and information about recovery services.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in communities across Oregon and southwest Washington. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 to schedule an appointment.

Know what to do before, during and after a home fire. Take a few moments to review your family's exit plan should there be a fire in your home. This information, and more, is available at www.redcross.org or in a free Prepare! Resource Guide published by the American Red Cross Cascades Region. The guide can be downloaded at http://rdcrss.org/1zq8XW6.
Red Cross provides assistance following single-family fire in Riddle in Douglas County
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/01/15
Disaster action team volunteers from the American Red Cross Cascades Region assisted two adults following a residential fire Saturday (Aug. 1) in the 400 block of Jordan Creek Road in Riddle, OR. Red Cross provided bedding and linens, clothing, shoes, food, comfort kits and information about recovery services and disaster health services.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in communities across Oregon and southwest Washington. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 to schedule an appointment.

Know what to do before, during and after a home fire. Take a few moments to review your family's exit plan should there be a fire in your home. This information, and more, is available at www.redcross.org or in a free Prepare! Resource Guide published by the American Red Cross Cascades Region. The guide can be downloaded at http://rdcrss.org/1zq8XW6.
Cable Crossing Fire - Aug. 1 update
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/01/15
Oregon Department of Forestry
Incident Management Team 3
Link Smith, Incident Commander

Very high temperatures, erratic winds, dry fuels and steep terrain combined to produce extreme fire behavior on the Cable Crossing Fire Friday afternoon. Although the fire size remained stable throughout the night at 1,110 acres, last night's smoke column generated a few new spot fires to the south of the main fire that firefighters quickly responded to. The fire remains 15 percent contained.

FIRE AT A GLANCE

Size: 1,110 acres
Cause: Under Investigation
Containment: 15%
Expected Containment: unknown
Crews and Equipment:
Crews: 2 - Type 1
40 - Type 2
Air Tankers: 3 Tankers
3 SEATS (Single Engine Air Tanker)
Helicopters: 6 - Type 1 (Heavy Lift)
5 - Type 2 (Med Lift)
4 - Type 3 (Light Lift)
Engines: 10
Dozers: 4
Hot Saw: 1
Water Tenders: 10
Total personnel: 1191
Estimated Cost to Date: $1,000,000
For More Information:
541-496-0902
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/
www.oregon.gov/odf

https://www.facebook.com/CableCrossingFire
#cablecrossingfire

Fire fighters are facing these same conditions today. A Red Flag Warning is in place with the forecast calling for afternoon winds, temperatures near 95, low humidity and a chance of thunderstorms--all of which make for very active fire behavior and hampers the efforts to slow the fire's advance.

Firefighters are utilizing bulldozers, helicopters and retardant dropping air tankers to harden contingency lines with hopes of conducting burnout operations under favorable conditions in the next couple of days. These tactics will eliminate fuels between control lines and the head of the fire, which will take away the fire's momentum

In the Ready, Set, Go or 1, 2, 3 evacuation level system, a Level 1 "Ready" notification remains in place from the Peel Store to the Wolf Creek Trail Head on Little River Road. As indicated, a Level 1 Evacuation notification encourages those affected to be ready should the fire continue to move towards these areas. This making preparations and precautionary movements of persons with special needs, livestock and pets.

ODF will be holding a community meeting Saturday evening at the Glide Fire Department at 7:00 p.m. where fire managers will provide information and answer questions. Residents from the local area are encouraged to attend.

The fire is burning on private and public lands in the heart of the North Umpqua Wild and Scenic Corridor six miles east of Glide. While private landowners have closed their holdings to the public, Bureau of Land Management has also imposed a fire area closure. Highway 138 remains open. Forest roads remain closed in and around the fire area.

In addition, Industrial Fire Precaution Level IV is in effect throughout the Douglas District that prohibits forest operations due to extreme fire danger. Public use restrictions, such as campfires, mowing of dry grass and off-road driving have also been tightened.
Stouts Fire Morning Update - August 1, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/01/15
"This is a tough fire," ODF Team 1 Incident Commander John Buckman explained this morning. "Because of the challenging terrain and abundant, dry fuel - large standing and downed trees - we have difficult work ahead to suppress this fire but I know these crews can do it."

Facing difficult weather - historically high temperatures and low relative humidity - and quick growth to about 8,500 acres since its start July 30. The drought created unusually dry forests prone to fast-spreading fires. Between yesterday and last night the fire grew 2,000 acres to the south and east.

The combined structural and wildland firefighting team of over 800 firefighters will split responsibilities based on their expertise. The Oregon State Fire Marshal (OSFM) Green Team's and ODF Team I are operating under a "unified command" to coordinate the structural and wildland firefighting efforts. While the city or structural firefighters work with homeowners to help prevent harm to their homes if the fire reaches them, the wildland firefighters will continue working to contain the fire to prevent the fire from spreading to the neighborhoods.

"The Douglas Forest Protective Association and the Umpqua National Forest gave us specific direction to suppress the fire and be safe," said OSFM Green Team's Incident Commander Ted Kunze. "It's great to see the teams partnering with the communities to protect our forests and the people living near them."

Yesterday, the Douglas County Sheriff's Office issued a Level 3 (Go) evacuation for residents in the Azalea area from Upper Cow Creek to Snow Creek East. There is a Level 2 (Set) evacuation for residents near the Galesville Dam up to Snow Creek. For the residents on Ferguson Lane, Stouts Creek, and Conley Lane - the level of evacuation was reduced to Level 2. The Red Cross set up an evacuation shelter at the Canyonville YMCA. Fire managers and structure protection teams continue evaluating the wildland-urban interface zones and preparing the areas to help blunt the fire if it reaches these areas. This includes the Milo, Tiller, Azalea, and Crew communities, in addition to the homes under Level II and III evacuations.

Governor Kate Brown invoked the Conflagration Act to bring structural firefighters in from around the state to help protect the neighborhoods close to the fire. The OSFM Office quickly mobilized statewide resources including task force teams from Clackamas, Lane, Linn/Benton, Lincoln, Marion and Yamhill counties to work with the Green Team.

More Information: (541) 621-4156 (7 a.m. to 9 p.m.) #StoutsFire StoutsFire@gmail.com http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/
www.dfpa.net
www.facebook.com/oregondepartmentofforestry www.twitter.com/ORDeptForestry
www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation www.twitter.com/DouglasFPA
RedCross provides assistance after morning residential fire in Eugene
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/01/15
Disaster Action Team volunteers from the American Red Cross Cascades Region provided assistance Saturday morning (Aug. 1) after a single-family residential fire in Eugene, OR. Two adults were affected by the fire in the 200 block of Stags Leap Court. Red Cross provided them with comfort kits and disaster recovery information.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in communities across Oregon and southwest Washington. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 to schedule an appointment.

Know what to do before, during and after a home fire. Take a few moments to review your family's exit plan should there be a fire in your home. This information, and more, is available at www.redcross.org or in a free Prepare! Resource Guide published by the American Red Cross Cascades Region. The guide can be downloaded at http://rdcrss.org/1zq8XW6.
07/31/15
Cable Crossing Fire Evening Update - Friday, July 31, 2015 @ 9:30 p.m.
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/31/15
Oregon Department of Forestry
Incident Management Team 3
Link Smith, Incident Commander

Cable Crossing Fire Evening Update
July 31, 2015


As predicted, the Cable Crossing Fire reared its head at about 4:00 p.m. this afternoon, producing a plume of smoke that could be seen from as far as Coquille. As the fire continues to grow to the south and west, firefighters have been taking advantage of opportunities when they present themselves and falling back to strengthen contingency lines when the fire behavior threatens firefighter safety. The fire is now estimated at 1,110 acres and 15 percent contained.

In the Ready, Set, Go or 1, 2, 3 evacuation level system, a Level 1 "Ready" notification is in place from the Peel Store to the Wolf Creek Trail Head. As indicated, a Level 1 Evacuation notification encourages those affected to be ready should the fire continue to move towards these areas. This making preparations and precautionary movements of persons with special needs, livestock and pets.

Working alongside bulldozers, helicopters and retardant dropping air tankers, crews continue to strengthen contingency lines with hopes of conducting burnout operations under favorable conditions in the next couple of days. These tactics will eliminate fuels between control lines and the head of the fire, which will take away the fire's momentum.
Weather continues to pose the biggest challenge. The threat of thunderstorm activity will continue to bring erratic winds to the fire area. High temperatures, low humidity and drought conditions are also hampering firefighting efforts.
A community meeting is planned for Saturday evening at the Glide Fire Department at 7:00 p.m. where fire managers will provide information and answer questions.
Highway 138 is remains open with a pilot car escort through the fire area.
The fire is burning on private and public lands in the heart of the North Umpqua Wild and Scenic Corridor six miles east of Glide. While private landowners have closed their holdings to the public, Bureau of Land Management has also imposed a fire area closure. Forest roads remain closed in and around the fire area. In addition, Industrial Fire Precaution Level IV is in effect throughout the Douglas District that prohibits forest operations due to extreme fire danger. Public use restrictions, such as campfires, mowing of dry grass and off-road driving have also been tightened.

For up to date fire information, follow us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/CableCrossingFire.

Fire At A Glance

Size: 1,110 acres
Cause: Under Investigation
Containment: 15%
Expected Containment: unknown
Crews and Equipment:
Crews: 1 - Type 1; 27 - Type 2
Air Tankers: 3 Tankers; 3 SEATS (Single Engine Air Tanker)
Helicopters: 2 - Type 1 (Heavy Lift); 3 - Type 2 (Med Lift)
Engines: 5
Dozers: 4
Hot Saw: 1
Water Tenders: 4
Total personnel: 785
Estimated Cost to Date: $800,000
For More Information:
541-496-0902
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/
www.oregon.gov/odf

https://www.facebook.com/CableCrossingFire
2nd Alarm field fire along with multiple fires (Photo)
Jefferson Fire Dist. - 07/31/15
Jefferson-Marion Rd Fire
Jefferson-Marion Rd Fire
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/1180/86640/thumb_IMG_1734_(2).JPG
On Friday July 31, 2015, at 6:20 p.m. Jefferson firefighters were dispatched to a two alarm grass fire at 3884 Jefferson-Marion Rd. SE. The field is leased by Tom Brawley. They were in the process of cutting wheat on that field. Only half the field had been cut at the time the fire had started. One of the owners was at a nearby mint distill located on Parrish Gap when he saw the smoke. He went to the field and called 911. The fire had started from wires that had arched, sparked and dropped on the field. The fire jumped the railroad tracks and burned about 10-20 feet before firefighters were able to stop the fire. The train was shut down temporarily. The fire burned approximately 4-5 acres of the wheat field. Half of the burn was uncut wheat. The fire was deemed under control at 7:15 p.m.

At 6:23 p.m. Jefferson was dispatched to 15684 Pletzer Rd to a mint pile that had been dumped and was burning. The power lines on Pletzer were knocked down which caused a power surge and caused the fire to start on Jefferson-Marion Rd and another fire on Skelton Road.

Another low risk grass fire on 153561 Skelton Road was dispatched at 6:27 p.m. This fire was also caused by the surge from the power lines. Aumsville, Turner, Scio and Stayton responded to the call. Albany Fire was dispatched but was able to turn around.

There were no injuries.


Attached Media Files: Jefferson-Marion Rd Fire
Red Cross helps one person after residential fire in Dillard in Douglas County
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 07/31/15
Disaster assistance volunteers from the American Red Cross Cascades Region assisted one adult following a fire in a multi-family triplex in Dillard Friday afternoon (July 31). Red Cross provided food and recovery information to the person after the fire in the 9600 block of Old Highway 99 South.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in communities across Oregon and southwest Washington. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 to schedule an appointment.

Know what to do before, during and after a home fire. Take a few moments to review your family's exit plan should there be a fire in your home. This information, and more, is available at www.redcross.org or in a free Prepare! Resource Guide published by the American Red Cross Cascades Region. The guide can be downloaded at http://rdcrss.org/1zq8XW6.
Red Cross Shelter in Canyonville Relocated
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 07/31/15
The Red Cross shelter in Canyonville, which is open to provide services to area residents affected by the Stout Fire, has been relocated to the Canyonville YMCA at 330 Sabbath Way in Canyonville.
Fire danger prompts Western Lane, So. Cascade districts to tighten restrictions
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/31/15
High temperatures and low humidity have set the stage for any new wildfires to burn hot and spread fast. In response, the Oregon Dept. of Forestry's South Cascade and Western Lane districts today further tightened fire safety restrictions in the forest. The changes include:

- Campfires are now banned completely in the two districts. Previously they were allowed in designated campgrounds but no longer. Campstove that use bottled fuels are allowed.
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- Mowing of dry, cured grasses is prohibited at any time.
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- Some other fire safety rules already in place include: bans on smoking except in a closed vehicle or building, grinding and welding of metal, driving/riding motorized vehicles off of established roads.

Firefighting personnel and equipment have become scarce due to the Cable Crossing and Stouts fires in Douglas County, and local fire managers are concerned that any new fires in South Cascade or Western Lane would stretch resources thin.

"Given the rapid growth of those fires south of us and the resulting drawdown of resources, we decided to increase restrictions here," said Phil Hunter, protection unit forester with the Western Lane District.

South Cascade District Forester Greg Wagenblast concurred, noting that all industrial activity in the forest has been shut down due to the extreme fire danger.

"These stepped-up rules for recreational activity aim for the same result: Reduce the chance of human-caused fire starts," he said.
Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Update - Friday, July 31, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/31/15
This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) fire update for Friday, July 31, 2015.

Fire Prevention: Fire danger remains extreme throughout Oregon, with high temperatures and low humidity in many areas continuing over the next several days and possible lightning predicted in southern, central, and eastern Oregon this evening and into the weekend. Oregon's State Forester and State Fire Marshal continue to ask for the public's help in preventing human-caused wildfires: reduce (or cancel) fire-prone activities - even if they are still allowed, know the fire restrictions in place where you will be working and recreating - realizing that many agencies and locations have increased those restrictions over the past couple of days, and, should a fire occur close to your home or community, be prepared in case you need to evacuate. Find out more at http://www.oregon.gov/odf/Pages/newsroom/newsreleases/2015/NR1532.aspx.

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA): Oregon Department of Forestry Incident Management Team 3 (Incident Commander Smith) assumed command of the Cable Crossing Fire yesterday morning, July 30. The fire, burning on ODF-protected private and public forestlands six miles east of Glide, showed minimal growth overnight, and is estimated this morning at approximately 830 acres and 15 percent contained. Private forestland owners have closed their forestlands to the public and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) also implemented a fire area closure. While no homes are currently threatened, a precautionary-only Level I (GET READY) evacuation notice has been put in place for some residents in the area should the need arise to leave. Highway 138 is being managed by the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT), with a pilot car to escort traffic through the fire area. Cooperating agencies and landowners on the fire include Douglas Forest Protective Association, BLM, U.S. Forest Service, Lone Rock Timber Company, Seneca Jones Timber Company, Forest Investments Associates, Roseburg Forest Products, ODOT, PP&L, and several local firefighters and forest workers.

Fire information for the Cable Crossing Fire:
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/
www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation
www.twitter.com/DouglasFPA

Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA): The Stouts Fire was reported on Thursday afternoon, July 30, burning 11 miles east of Canyonville near Milo. By mid-evening, the fire was estimated at 3,000 acres. Oregon Department of Forestry Incident Management Team 1 has been dispatched and assumed command of this fire today, July 31. The Douglas County Sheriff's Office has issued Level 2 (GET SET) and Level 3 (GO) evacuation notices for homes in the area, and Oregon Governor Kate Brown invoked the Conflagration Act this morning, allowing additional structural resources to be deployed to protect homes, and resources have subsequently been dispatched by the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal.

Fire information for the Stouts Fire:
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation
Twitter: https://twitter.com/douglasfpa


FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015, through today:
Lightning-caused fires: 194 fires burned 2474 acres
Human-caused fires: 439 fires burned 921 acres
Total: 633 fires burned 3395 acres

10-year average (January 1 through the present date in the year):
Lightning-caused fires: 123 fires burned 16,355 acres
Human-caused fires: 334 fires burned 2653 acres
Total: 457 fires burned 19,007 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.

When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Jeri Chase, 503-945-7201 (office) or 503-931-2721 (Cell), any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

For information on Oregon Department of Forestry protected lands view:
the department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
the Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.
the Douglas Forest Protective Association Twitter feed.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.
Traffic Crash Takes Life of Lincoln City Man (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 07/31/15
2015-07/1002/86630/close_up_2.jpg
2015-07/1002/86630/close_up_2.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/1002/86630/thumb_close_up_2.jpg
On July 31, 2015 just after 7:00AM, OSP troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a passenger vehicle versus a commercial vehicle on Highway 101 just south of Lincoln City.

Preliminary information revealed a 2007 Kenworth dump truck loaded with gravel, operated by Matthew NELSON, age 42, of Lincoln City, turned north onto Highway 101 near milepost 121. As the truck was accelerating, a northbound 2007 Saturn sedan collided with the back of it at highway speeds.

Upon emergency crews arriving they found the operator of the Saturn, Martin SAMPLE, age 53, of Lincoln City deceased. NELSON was not injured and is cooperating with the investigation. Initial investigation revealed there were no skid marks from SAMPLE's vehicle appeared he made no attempts to steer around the truck.

OSP was assisted by the Oregon Department of Transportation and the Depoe Bay Fire Department. This is an ongoing investigation and more information will be released when it becomes available.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1002/86630/close_up_2.jpg , 2015-07/1002/86630/97_mp_128_1.jpg
Battalion Chief Retires (Photo)
Salem Fire Dept. - 07/31/15
Battalion Chief Brian Hoaglin
Battalion Chief Brian Hoaglin
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/1061/86625/thumb_Battalion_Chief_Hoaglin.jpg
Battalion Chief Brian Hoaglin, a long-time member of the Salem Fire Department, retired today after a 33-year career in the fire service, with more than 28 years of service at the City of Salem.

Chief Hoaglin was hired as a firefighter/paramedic with Salem Fire in February of 1987. He first promoted to apparatus operator/engineer in 1992 and then to the rank of captain in 1996. After serving 6 years as a company officer, Brian promoted to the rank of battalion chief in 2002.

During his career with Salem Fire, he was involved in numerous committees and oversaw the department's apparatus and fleet maintenance program for 9 years. His most current assignment was commanding the north battalion of the city, housed at Fire Station #2.

The Salem Fire Department will miss the leadership and experience Brian brought to the organization and wish him well in his retirement.

###


Attached Media Files: Battalion Chief Brian Hoaglin
Date change for meetings to plan new state park near Tierra del Mar (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/31/15
New state park on the coast between Tierra del Mar and Cape Lookout in Tillamook County.
New state park on the coast between Tierra del Mar and Cape Lookout in Tillamook County.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/1303/86617/thumb_new-coast-park.jpg
Pacific City OR -- Meetings originally set for August 6 in Pacific City to kick off planning for a new state park on the Beltz property north of Tierra del Mar have been rescheduled to August 27. A desire to avoid overlapping with the Tillamook County Fair prompted the change.

The new meeting date is Thursday, August 27 at the Kiawanda Community Center, 34600 Cape Kiwanda Drive, Pacific City 97135. An advisory committee will meet from 1-4 p.m. The public meeting will follow from 6-8 p.m.. The public may attend and observe the advisory committee meeting, however only comments from the committee will be taken at this meeting. Everyone is welcome to participate in the evening meeting.

A neighborhood meeting on the same topic on August 1 in the Tierra del Mar Meeting Hall will still occur as scheduled.

More information on planning for the unnamed park is available online at http://beltzplan.com/


Attached Media Files: New state park on the coast between Tierra del Mar and Cape Lookout in Tillamook County.
Benton County Sheriff's Office Investigates Fatal Crash
Benton Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/31/15
On 7-30-2015 at 2351 hours, Benton County deputies were dispatched to a single vehicle crash at Highway 99W past the Old River Road in South Benton County. For an unknown reason,a Ford F150 drifted across the oncoming lane, onto the west side shoulder of Highway 99W and crashed into a tree. The victim was determined to be deceased upon arrival of medical and law enforcement personnel. The only occupant in the vehicle was the driver. There was no preliminary indication of drugs or alcohol use as a factor in the crash. Driver fatigue may be a contributing cause. The 18 year old male's identification is being held for family notification.
Cable Crossing Fire Morning Update - Friday, July 31, 2015 @ 10 a.m.
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/31/15
Oregon Department of Forestry
Incident Management Team 3
Link Smith, Incident Commander

Cable Crossing Fire Morning Update
July 31, 2015

The Cable Crossing Fire showed minimal growth overnight and is still estimated at about 830 acres this morning. The fire containment is estimated at 15 percent.

The fire is burning on private and public lands in the heart of the North Umpqua Wild and Scenic Corridor six miles east of Glide. While private landowners have closed their holdings to the public, Bureau of Land Management has also imposed a fire area closure. Forest roads remain closed in and around the fire area. In addition, Industrial Fire Precaution Level IV is in effect throughout the Douglas District that prohibits forest operations due to extreme fire danger. Public use restrictions, such campfires, mowing of dry grass and off-road driving have also been tightened.

Pushed by afternoon winds out of the north, the fire continues to test containment lines on the south end of the fire. While no homes are currently threatened, a Level I evacuation notice has been put in place prompting some residents to be ready should the need arises to leave. The notice is only precautionary at this time.

Fire danger remains extreme with temperatures expected to rise over 100 degrees over the next several days and lightning predicted for the weekend. Conditions have taken their toll with several heat related injuries to firefighters.

Current resources on the fire include seven engines, 28 hand crews, five helicopters and six retardant dropping air tankers.

Highway 138 is being managed by ODOT with a pilot car to escort traffic through the fire area.

Cooperating agencies and landowners on the fire include Douglas Forest Protective Association, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Forest Service, Lone Rock Timber Company, Seneca Jones Timber Company, Forest Investments Associates, Roseburg Forest Products, ODOT, PP&L, and several local firefighters and forest workers.

Fire At A Glance

Size: 830 acres
Cause: Under Investigation
Containment: 15%
Expected Containment: unknown
Crews and Equipment:
Crews: 1 - Type 1; 27 - Type 2
Air Tankers: 3 Tankers; 3 SEATS (Single Engine Air Tanker)
Helicopters: 2 - Type 1 (Heavy Lift); 3 - Type 2 (Med Lift)
Engines: 5
Dozers: 4
Hot Saw: 1
Water Tenders: 4
Total personnel: 785
Estimated Cost to Date: $800,000
For More Information:
541-496-0902
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/
www.oregon.gov/odf
No Criminal Charges for Newberg City Manager
Marion Co. Dist. Attorney's Office - 07/31/15
The Marion County District Attorney's Office has declined to file any criminal charges against Newberg City Manager Jacque Betz related to her decision to place Newberg-Dundee Police Chief Brian Casey on administrative leave.

See formal declination letter attached.

Police Reports may be obtained by contacting the Oregon State Police.


Attached Media Files: Declination Letter
Stouts Fire Morning Update - Friday, July 31, 2015 @ 8 a.m.PDT
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/31/15
Douglas Forest Protective Association

1758 N.E. Airport Road
Roseburg, Oregon 97470
www.dfpa.net
www.twitter.com/DouglasFPA
www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
7-31-15

CONTACT: Kyle Reed FAX: (541) 440-3424
OFFICE: (541) 672-6507 X 136 CELL: (541) 817-7186 E-MAIL: kyle.reed@oregon.gov

Stouts Fire: Morning Update

The Stouts fire actively burned late into the night, moving in a southeast direction from the point of origin before laying down in the early morning hours. Firefighters assigned to the fire last night focused their efforts on opening access roads to the fire and anchoring into the heel of the fire to being constructing fire line. Approximately 450 firefighters are on scene of the Stouts Fire today and will continue working where night shift left off. Fire activity is expected to increase throughout the day today as hot, dry weather is once again forecasted for the area. Due to predicted weather conditions, the National Weather Service has issued a Red Flag Warning for the Umpqua Basin. The fire is currently estimated at 6,000 acres and the cause of fire is currently under investigation.

Last night, the Douglas County Sheriff's Office issued a Level 3 (GO) evacuation notice for homes on Stouts Creek Road, Ferguson Lane, and Conley Lane. A Level 1 (READY) evacuation notice was issued for all homes on Upper Cow Creek, east of Snow Creek Road. A Red Cross Shelter was opened at the Canyonville Elementary School, located at 124 N. Main Street in Canyonville.

The Oregon Department of Forestry Incident Management Team 1 arrived at the Stouts Fire this morning and has been briefed by the Douglas Forest Protective Association. ODF IMT 1 is scheduled to assume command of the fire later this morning. The Incident Command Post for the Stouts Fire will be located at Days Creek Charter School.

An Inciweb site has been created for the Stouts Fire: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/

Information about the Stouts Fire will also be posted to DFPA's social media accounts.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation
Twitter: https://twitter.com/douglasfpa

###


Kyle Reed
Fire Prevention Specialist
Douglas Forest Protective Association
Office: (541) 672-6507 ext. 136
Cell: (541) 817-7186
www.dfpa.net
www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation
07/30/15
Stouts Fire Evening Update - Thursday, July 30, 2015 @ 11 p.m.
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/30/15
Douglas Forest Protective Association

1758 N.E. Airport Road
Roseburg, Oregon 97470
www.dfpa.net
www.twitter.com/DouglasFPA
www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
7-30-2015

CONTACT: Kyle Reed FAX: (541) 440-3424
OFFICE: (541) 672-6507 X 136 CELL: (541) 817-7186 E-MAIL: kyle.reed@oregon.gov

Stouts Fire Update

The Stouts Fire, located approximately 11 miles east of Canyonville near the community of Milo was reported Thursday at 1:00 p.m. Firefighters from the Douglas Forest Protective Association and numerous volunteer fire departments responded to the fire. When firefighters arrived on scene, they found a fast moving fire already several acres in size. Hot, windy conditions combined with very dry fuels caused the fire to grow extremely fast and sparked numerous spot fires in front of the main fire. The intensity of the main fire, combined with the numerous spot fires in front of itself, caused the Stouts Fire to "blow up," going from several hundred acres to approximately 6,000 acres in a matter of hours.

Several homes in the area were threatened by the fire, however no homes have been burned. The Douglas County Sheriff's Office issued a level 3 (GO) evacuation notice for homes on Stouts Creek Road, Ferguson Lane, and Conley Lane. A Red Cross Shelter was opened at the Canyonville Elementary School, located at 124 N. Main Street in Canyonville.

An Oregon Department of Forestry Incident Management Team (ODF IMT 1) has been ordered for the Stouts Fire and will assume command of the fire tomorrow after being briefed by the Douglas Forest Protective Association.

An Inciweb site has been created for the Stouts Fire: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/

Information about the Stouts Fire will also be posted to DFPA's social media accounts.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation
Twitter: https://twitter.com/douglasfpa

###
Cable Crossing Fire Evening Update - Thursday, July 30, 2015 @ 10 p.m.
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/30/15
Below is this evening's news release on the Cable Crossing Fire from Oregon Department of Forestry Incident Management Team 3. Also, a closure for the fire area is posted on the fire's Inciweb site. The direct link to open that closure notice is:
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/photos/OR73S/2015-07-29-2320-Cable-Crossing-Fire/related_files/pict20150631-002020-0.pdf .

-----
INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM 3
LINK SMITH, INCIDENT COMMANDER

Fire Information: (541) 496-0902
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 30, 2015

CABLE CROSSING FIRE EVENING UPDATE
Fire Crews Beat Back the Heat and the Flames

Firefighters are working round the clock under extreme fire behavior conditions to stay ahead of the Cable Crossing Fire. Following two consecutive days of Red Flag Warning weather, that brings high temperatures, low humidity and gusty winds, the fire has grown to 830 acres. Containment is estimated at 15 percent.

Supported by a host of helicopters, retardant dropping air tankers, bulldozers and engines, fire crews made considerable progress under extreme temperatures. Objectives were accomplished by holding established containment lines on the north and west end of the fire. With the fire pushing to the south and east, crews kept up with spot fires before they could gain any momentum. The day shift set a nice table for crews working through the night when the fire activity is expected to subside under cooler conditions. The Red Flag Warning is predicted to stay in place through the weekend with a chance of thunderstorms arriving Friday.

Oregon Department of Forestry's Incident Management Team 3 assumed command of the Cable Crossing Fire Thursday afternoon in an effort to bring in additional resources from around the region and provide needed relief to local fire crews.

Cooperating agencies and landowners on the fire include Douglas Forest Protective Association, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Forest Service, Lone Rock Timber Company, Seneca Jones Timber Company, Forest Investments Associates, Roseburg Forest Products, ODOT, PP&L, and several local firefighters and forest workers.

###
Red Cross provides assistance following residential fire in Springfield
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 07/30/15
American Red Cross Disaster Assistance Team volunteers assisted two adults and one pet Thursday evening (July 30) following a single-family home fire in the 1200 block of Main Street in Springfield, OR. Red Cross provided lodging, food, clothing and comfort kits.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in communities across Oregon and southwest Washington. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 to schedule an appointment.

Know what to do before, during and after a home fire. Take a few moments to review your family's exit plan should there be a fire in your home. This information, and more, is available at www.redcross.org or in a free Prepare! Resource Guide published by the American Red Cross Cascades Region. The guide can be downloaded at http://rdcrss.org/1zq8XW6.
Linn Deputies Arrest Several People During Narcotic Investigations (Photo)
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 07/30/15
2015-07/2993/86593/Heroin_2.jpg
2015-07/2993/86593/Heroin_2.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/2993/86593/thumb_Heroin_2.jpg
Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley reports that within the last week, the Linn County Sheriff's Office concluded two narcotic investigations.

In October of 2014, narcotic detectives began an investigation into a case involving heroin being brought into Albany and Lebanon from Los Angeles, California. As the investigation continued, investigators learned that Jeremy Brian Buchanan, 28 years old of Albany, was traveling by commercial airline from the Eugene Airport to the Los Angeles International Airport on a regular basis to purchase heroin in the Los Angeles area.

On July 24, 2015, investigators from the Linn County Sheriff's Office, Albany Police Department, and Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) traveled to northern California in an attempt to locate Jeremy Buchanan who investigators learned was traveling back from Los Angeles. Investigators discovered that Jeremy Buchanan was traveling on a Greyhound bus in route to Oregon. Investigators followed the Greyhound bus to Eugene where Jeremy Buchanan got off the bus and into a vehicle. The vehicle was stopped with assistance from the Lane County Interagency Narcotics Enforcing Team (INET) and the Springfield Police Department. Jeremy Buchanan was detained after he struggled with law enforcement officers conducting the traffic stop. Investigators located approximately nine ounces of heroin in Jeremy Buchanan's property.

As a result of the investigation, Jeremy Buchanan was arrested for Unlawful Delivery of Heroin, Unlawful Possession of Heroin, and Conspiracy to Deliver Heroin.

The Linn County Sheriff's Office was assisted in this case by the Albany Police Department, Springfield Police Department, Eugene Police Department - Eugene Airport detail, Roseburg Police Department, Lane County INET, and the Drug Enforcement Administration (Eugene, Medford, and Los Angeles California divisions).


The second narcotic investigation concluded on July 30, 2015, after the Linn County Regional S.W.A.T. team served a search warrant in the 49200 block of Santiam Highway in Cascadia at approximately 7:05 a.m. Six adults, all who live at the location, were present at the time the search warrant was served.

Among the items seized from the scene were methamphetamine, unlawfully possessed prescription medication, methamphetamine and heroin paraphernalia, a digital scale, packaging material, a rifle, and the frame and motor from a stolen pickup. The pickup had been reported stolen to the Linn County Sheriff's Office in December 2013. The pickup had been stripped of the cab and bed.

As a result of the investigation, David Robert Patterson, 61 years of age and a resident of the address, was arrested and charged with Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine and Unlawful Possession of a Firearm.

Kimberly Jean Allen, 54 years of age and a resident of the address, was arrested and charged with Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine and Unlawful Possession of a Firearm.

Debra Jean Massey, 57 years of age and a resident of the address, was arrested and charged with Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine.

Dustin Kyle Coughran, 25 years of age and a resident of the address, was cited and released on the charge of Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine.

Gerald Lee Stroud, 52 years of age, a resident of Cascadia, was cited and released for Driving While Suspended Misdemeanor.

The Linn County Sheriff's Office was assisted by the Lebanon Police Department, Sweet Home Police Department, Albany Police Department, and Drug Enforcement Administration.

Additional booking photos were not available at the time of this press release. Refer to the sheriff's office website (www.linnsheriff.org) at a later time for booking photos.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/2993/86593/Heroin_2.jpg , 2015-07/2993/86593/Heroin_1.jpg , 2015-07/2993/86593/Jeremy_Buchanan.jpg
Red Cross Opens Shelter for Evacuees in Douglas County Due to Wildfire
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 07/30/15
Douglas County Sheriff's Office has issued a Level 3 (GO) evacuation for the homes on Ferguson Lane, Stouts Creek, and Conley Lane. The American Red Cross is establishing a shelter located at the Canyonville Elementary School in at 124 N. Main St. in Canyonville.

The Red Cross advocates disaster preparedness and encourages community members to know what to do before, during and after a wildfire. The Red Cross Wildfire App (http://www.redcross.org/mobile-apps/wildfire-app) provides a wide range of information, including wildfire news and updates, tips to prepare your family/home/pets, leting loved ones know that you are safe even if the power is out. The app is a must have for anyone who lives in an area that is susceptible to wildfires or has loved ones who do.

Additional wildfire and other disaster preparedness information is available in the Prepare! Resource Guide, complied by the American Red Cross Cascades Region. It can be viewed by visiting the Preparedness Toolkit at www.redcross.or/portland/preparedness-toolkit.
Department of Revenue satellite offices closed August 4-7
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 07/30/15
SALEM, Oregon--The Oregon Department of Revenue's Coos Bay and Newport satellite offices will be closed August 4-7 so staff can attend training. The offices will reopen on Monday, August 10 at 8 a.m.

Taxpayers needing immediate assistance can call the Tax Services Unit at (503) 378-4988.

The Coos Bay office is located at 1155 S 5th St, Suite A. They can be reached during normal business hours at (541) 266-0214. The Newport office is located at 119 4th St NE #4. Their phone number is (541) 265-5139.

Visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax information, check the status of your refund, or make payments. You can also email questions.dor@oregon.gov or call (503) 378-4988 or (800) 356-4222 (toll-free).
- 30 -
Tigard Man Arrested For Eluding Law Enforcement In Central Oregon (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 07/30/15
2015-07/1002/86586/100_0522.JPG
2015-07/1002/86586/100_0522.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/1002/86586/thumb_100_0522.JPG
On July 29, 2015 at about 2:30PM, Oregon State Police (OSP) observed a 2015 Kawasaki Ninja motorcycle operated by Tyler HARP, age 27, of Tigard, carrying a passenger at 90 mph in a 55 mph zone traveling northbound on rural HWY 31 near milepost 48 in Lake County. The Trooper attempted to stop the motorcycle and it accelerated to an excess of 120mph fleeing from the Trooper.

At about 2:45PM, a second Trooper located the motorcycle and pulled in front of it on HWY 31 near milepost 7 in Klamath County, lights activated and motioned the operator to the shoulder. HARP refused to stop and trooper declined to pursue the operator. Shortly after the motorcycle was reportedly spotted by a Deschutes County Deputy on HWY 31 at Beal Rd. at speeds reported of 149mph and continued onto US 97 northbound operating recklessly.

At about 4:00PM OSP observed the motorcycle and attempted to stop the vehicle a third time on US 97 at milepost 164 (south of LaPine) in Deschutes County. The motorcycle again fled traveling onto side roads and was later observed entering US 97 northbound where OSP declined to pursue the fleeing vehicle. At about 4:50PM, OSP again located the motorcycle and attempted a traffic stop on US 97 at milepost 149. Initially HARP slowed and pulled to the shoulder and then accelerated away from the traffic stop colliding with a Black Dodge SUV then fleeing on foot.

HARP was apprehended a short time later. HARP and his passenger, Chelsea JACKS, age 20, of Portland received non-life threatening injuries and were transported to St. Charles Hospital in Bend by ground ambulance. HARP was then taken into custody at St. Charles Hospital and lodged into Deschutes County Jail on multiple charges including Attempting to Elude in a Vehicle, Attempting to Elude on Foot, Reckless Driving and Reckless Endangering.

Additional charges are Pending in Lake and Klamath Counties.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1002/86586/100_0522.JPG , 2015-07/1002/86586/Deschutes_County_SO.jpg
Media Alert: Private College Week Camp To Help Rural, Low-Income Students Explore Options
Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges & Universities - 07/30/15
OREGON GEAR UP AND THE ALLIANCE PARTNER TO BRING HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS FROM ACROSS THE STATE FOR 1-WEEK CAMP

WHEN: Sunday, August 2 at 6:00 pm (welcome dinner); entire summer program runs August 2-7, 2015.

WHERE: Lewis & Clark College, Gregg Pavilion; 0615 SW Palatine Hill Rd, Portland, OR

WHAT: In conjunction with Oregon Private College Week, Oregon GEAR UP and The Alliance are hosting a one-week summer program for rural, low-income students to explore educational opportunities available at private, nonprofit colleges across the state.

WHO: The Oregon GEAR UP program - which stands for Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Program - is designed to increase the number of low-income students who are prepared to enter and succeed in college. Rising seniors from five GEAR UP communities will attend the camp. The Alliance represents and serves private, nonprofit colleges and universities across the state.

WHY: Rural and low-income students are less likely to attend higher education, less likely to attend a four-year college, and less-likely to attend a private college. This camp will help students "find the right fit", explore higher education options at several of Oregon's private, nonprofit colleges and universities, and complete a college application.

CONTACT: Adrienne Enriquez, Program Manager, Oregon GEAR UP, 503.926.6073, adrienne.enriquez@oregonstate.edu; Brent Wilder, Vice President, The Alliance, 503.639.4541, brent@oaicu.org

For more information about Oregon GEAR UP, visit oregongearup.org. For more information about The Alliance, visit oaicu.org.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/4829/86577/Alliance_Fact_Sheet_Infographic_Print_Version.pdf , 2015-07/4829/86577/OPCW_Media_Alert_73015.docx
Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Update - Thursday, July 30, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/30/15
This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) fire update for Thursday, July 30, 2015.

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA): Overnight, fire crews worked to build fire trails around the east side of the Cable Crossing Fire where it escaped containment lines yesterday afternoon. As of this morning, the fire is estimated at 600 acres. Approximately 500 firefighters will be on scene of the fire today. No homes are currently threatened and no evacuations have been issued. The Oregon Department of Forestry Incident Management Team 3 (Incident Commander Smith) was dispatched and arrived at the Cable Crossing Fire this morning, and received their fire briefing from the DFPA. The IMT will assume command of the fire at 10:00 a.m. today. The Incident Command post for the Cable Crossing Fire will be established at the French Creek Ranch near Glide.

Fire information for the Cable Crossing incident can be found at:
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/
www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation
www.twitter.com/DouglasFPA

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015, through today:
Lightning-caused fires: 192 fires burned 2472 acres
Human-caused fires: 432 fires burned 920 acres
Total: 624 fires burned 3392 acres

10-year average (January 1 through the present date in the year):
Lightning-caused fires: 120 fires burned 16,344 acres
Human-caused fires: 328 fires burned 2642 acres
Total: 448 fires burned 18,986 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.

When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Jeri Chase, 503-945-7201 (office) or 503-931-2721 (Cell), any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

For information on Oregon Department of Forestry protected lands view:
the department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
the Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.
the Douglas Forest Protective Association Twitter feed.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.
Pendleton Historic Trail Marker reincarnation (Photo)
Oregon Travel Experience - 07/30/15
Newly restored Pendleton Historic Trail Marker
Newly restored Pendleton Historic Trail Marker
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/4010/86571/thumb_pendleton_marker.jpg
On Thursday, August 6, 2015 at 11:00 a.m., the public is invited to attend the dedication of a newly revised and hand-crafted Oregon Historical Marker. The Pendleton Historic Trail marker has been installed at the same site as the original (as SE Court Ave becomes Hwy 30) at the east end of the city. The marker is located in a small pull-off on the right side of the highway on the outskirts of Pendleton.

The new cedar board is sponsored by the 2015 Leadership Pendleton Class. During their eight-month course, class participants study Pendleton's history, education, agriculture, and business---and complete a community project as part of their requirements.

"Our class was initially interested in beautifying an entrance to town, said Buffy Farber, a Financial Analyst at the Pendleton Branch of Columbia Bank, and Leadership Pendleton Class member and spokesperson.

"We looked at a few entrances and signs coming into town. We chose the historic trail marker as our project after seeing the extremely poor condition it was in," Farber said.

"The leadership class secured donations of wood and other materials, as well as funding for the routing and installation of the new sign," said Annie von Domitz.

Von Domitz is the Oregon Historical Marker Program Administrator for Oregon Travel Experience (OTE), the semi-independent state agency responsible for overseeing all 111 of the state's official historical markers.

"The original historic trail marker was very old," von Domitz noted. "Perhaps dating back to the 1950s or 60s---and the cedar was rotting away."

Volunteers from across the state participate on OTE's Oregon Historical Marker Committee. Their work includes vetting marker nominations for accuracy and accessibility, and interacting with local communities who wish to preserve existing markers and create new interpretive or regional historical markers.

"When our committee heard the leadership class was interested in bringing the old marker back to life, the committee members coordinated a text revision," said von Domitz. "Marker volunteers worked with the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation to ensure that history was accurately portrayed."

Farber said the Pendleton team worked with local businesses and organizations to gather financial and in-kind contributions for the project.

"Kelly Lumber Supply and Les Schwab Tire Center provided us with the lumber, Altrusa International of Pendleton and CHI St. Anthony Hospital contributed funds to cover the routing and other expenses," said Farber.

Leadership Pendleton Class member Megan Lauer was excited to see the new marker installed.

"We want to thank Oregon Travel Experience for being so easy to work with and those organizations who donated towards this project," said Lauer.

"This has all come together better than anyone had planned," added Farber. "We were just in the right position at the right time. It will be nice to see the updated wording in place."

Bobbie Conner of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation will speak at the new marker dedication, as will Leadership Pendleton class members, local dignitaries, and OTE representatives.

[Sub-header] New Marker Text

HISTORIC TRAIL MARKER

"This location marks a travel corridor for Plateau Tribes moving seasonally from the Columbia River to the Blue Mountains.In 1811, members of the Astor Party under the leadership of Wilson Price Hunt camped here on their way west. They traded with the Cayuse people for horses.The Imatalam Wana (Umatilla River) abounded with beaver and salmon then. Oregon Trail migrations began passing this way in 1841. In 1868, the emerging town of Pendleton was named for George Hunt Pendleton, US Senator from Ohio."

[Sub-header] About the sponsoring organizations

For more information on the Oregon Historical Marker Program, visit the OTE website at http://ortravelexperience.com/oregon-historical-markers/about-historical-markers/ or contact Annie von Domitz at 1-800-574-9397.

Leadership Pendleton application information may be obtained by contacting the Pendleton Chamber of Commerce at 541-276-7411.


Attached Media Files: Newly restored Pendleton Historic Trail Marker
Oregon's Adjutant General, Daniel R. Hokanson, appointed as Deputy Commander, United States Northern Command/Vice Commander, U.S. Element, North American Aerospace Defense Command (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 07/30/15
2015-07/962/86568/Hokanson_Official_Photo.jpg
2015-07/962/86568/Hokanson_Official_Photo.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/962/86568/thumb_Hokanson_Official_Photo.jpg
SALEM, Oregon--Oregon National Guard Major General Daniel R. Hokanson has been appointed to the rank of lieutenant general, and assignment as Deputy Commander, United States Northern Command (NORTHCOM), Vice Commander, United States Element, North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD), Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado.

Hokanson is currently serving as The Adjutant General, Oregon. Oregon Governor Kate Brown will select and appoint a new Adjutant General as Hokanson transitions to NORTHCOM and NORAD.

In his new role, Hokanson will help lead the command in anticipating, preparing and responding to threats and aggression aimed at the United States, its territories and interests within the assigned area of responsibility to include Canada, Mexico and the Bahamas, as directed by the President or Secretary of Defense. He will also provide defense support to civil authorities including consequence management operations.

"I am truly humbled by today's announcement", Hokanson said. "It will be an honor to continue serving our great Nation in such an important capacity."

Hokanson has served as The Adjutant General since 2013. Highlights of his tenure include the overseas deployment of over 1400 service members, development and implementation of the Cascadia Playbook, restructuring of the Military Department, and implementing a strategic planning system to posture it for the future. The Cascadia Playbook, recognized at the national level, is one of the first "Playbooks" to coordinate and synchronize efforts in response to a major disaster; specifically Oregon's response to a Cascadia Fault event.

"My family and I will miss being part of the Oregon Military Department family," Hokanson added. "Over the past 20 years I have had the honor to serve alongside some of our Nation's greatest Citizen-Soldiers, Airmen and Civilians; and under the command of three Oregon Governors. It has been incredible to be part of this great organization and all it has accomplished. I look forward to following your future accomplishments and will never forget my military heritage and what it means to be an Oregon Guardsman."

Major General Hokanson's biographical information can be found at the following link: http://www.nationalguard.mil/Leadership/ngbgomo/bioshow.aspx?id=2295

A description of NORTHCOM's mission can be found at the following link: http://www.northcom.mil/AboutUSNORTHCOM.aspx


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/962/86568/Hokanson_Official_Photo.jpg
07/29/15
Cable Crossing Fire Update - Wednesday, July 29, 2015 @ 8:30 p.m.
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/29/15
Douglas Forest Protective Association

1758 N.E. Airport Road
Roseburg, Oregon 97470
www.dfpa.net
www.twitter.com/DouglasFPA
www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
7-29-2015

CONTACT: Kyle Reed FAX: (541) 440-3424
OFFICE: (541) 672-6507 X 136 CELL: (541) 817-7186 E-MAIL: kyle.reed@oregon.gov

Cable Crossing Fire Update

The Cable Crossing Fire, located 5 miles east of Glide near Highway 138 East, mile post 23 jumped containment lines today at approximately 5:00 p.m. As aviation and ground resources moved to attack the new spot fire, a wind shift caused the fire to quickly grow out of control. At this time, the fire is estimated at 500 acres and is moving in a southeast direction. Currently, no homes are threatened and no evacuations have been ordered.

Oregon Department of Forestry Incident Management Team 3 (Incident Commander Smith) has been called in to manage the Cable Crossing incident. ODF IMT 3 will arrive on the Cable Crossing Fire tomorrow morning and assume command at 10:00 a.m. The Incident Command Post will be established at the French Creek Ranch near Glide.

For continued updates on the Cable Crossing Fire, visit www.dfpa.net or follow DFPA's Facebook and Twitter accounts.


###
Roseburg Public Schools Registration
Roseburg Sch. Dist. - 07/29/15
ROSEBURG PUBLIC SCHOOLS
REGISTRATION INFORMATION

Roseburg Public Schools has released registration information for elementary, middle and high school students for the 2015-16 school year.

Kindergarten students must be 5 years old and first graders must be 6 years old on or before September 1, without exception. Parents or guardians of registrants must present proof of age by providing a birth certificate, baptismal record, passport or certified adoption papers. In addition, all students must have evidence of immunization. Forms are available at the Douglas County Health Department, the school and physician offices.

Registration for Elementary Students through fifth grade will be held on Wednesday, August 12th, from 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. and 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. "Meet Your Teacher Day" will be held on Thursday, August 27th, from 8:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. Students are welcome to bring their school supplies to "Meet Your Teacher Day".

Eastwood Elementary: 2550 SE Waldon St.
Information: 440-4180

Fir Grove Elementary: 1360 W Harvard Blvd.
Information: 440-4085

Fullerton IV Elementary: 2560 W Bradford Dr.
Information: 440-4081

Green Elementary: 4498 SW Carnes Rd.
(New students are welcome to register in the library on "Meet Your Teacher Day" as well.)
Information: 440-4127

Hucrest Elementary: 1810 NW Kline St.
Information: 440-4189

Melrose Elementary: 2960 Melrose Rd.
Information: 440-4077

Sunnyslope Elementary: 2230 SW Cannon Rd.
Information: 440-4192

Winchester Elementary: 217 Pioneer Way
Information: 440-4183


The first day of school for elementary students is Monday, August 31, 2015.

Este dia tendremos interprete
para estudiantes de ELD.


John C. Fremont Middle School: 850 W Keady Court.
Information: 440-4055

Registration- Thursday, August 20th, 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Late registration- Monday, August 31st, 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

August 20th - Grades 6-8
Time/Last Name begins with:
7:30 - 8:30 / W-Z
8:30 - 9:30 / A-C
9:30 - 10:30 / D-F
10:30 - 11:30 / G-K
11:30 - 12:30 / L-O
12:30 - 1:30 / P-R
1:30 - 2:30 / S-T
2:30 - 3:30 / U-V
3:30 - 6:00 students unable to make designated time


Joseph Lane Middle School: 2153 NE Vine St.
Information: 440-4104

August 18 - 7th Grade
Time/Last Name begins with:
7:30 - 8:30 / A-C
8:30 - 9:30 / D-K
9:30 - 10:30 / L-R
10:30 - 11:30 / S-Z

August 18 - 8th Grade
Time/Last Name begins with:
11:30 - 12:30 / A-C
12:30 - 1:30 / D-K
1:30 - 2:30 / L-R
2:30 - 3:30 / S-Z


August 19 - 6th Grade
Time/Last Name begins with:
7:30 - 8:45 / A-C
8:45 - 10:00 / D-K
10:00 - 11:15 / L-R
11:15 - 1:00 / S-Z


The first day of school for sixth grade Middle School students is Monday, August 31st. Seventh and eighth grade students will begin classes on Tuesday, September 1st. Classes begin 7:35 a.m. and end at 2:15 p.m.

Roseburg High School: 400 W Harvard Avenue
Information: 440-4131

Registration times for RHS students, grades 9 - 12 are as follows:

Tuesday, August 18
Time/Last Name begins with:
8:00 - 9:30 / S
9:30 - 11:00 / F, T, X, Y, Z
11:00 - 12:30 / A, G

Wednesday, August 19
Time/Last Name begins with:
8:00 - 9:30 / B
9:30 - 11:00 / H
11:00 - 12:30 / N, R, U, V

Thursday, August 20
Time/Last Name begins with:
8:00 - 9:30 / W, Q
9:30 - 11:00 / L, K
11:00 - 12:30 / J, D

Friday, August 21
Time/Last Name begins with:
8:00 - 9:30 / M
9:30 - 11:00 / C, E
11:00 - 12:30 / I, O, P

Parking Registration Dates:
Seniors - Thursday, August 20th
Juniors - Friday, August 21st


High School students new to the Roseburg School District should call 440-4131 beginning August 3rd, to schedule an appointment to enroll.

The first day of school for High School students is as follows: Monday, August 31st, for freshmen only. Sophomores, juniors and seniors will begin classes on Tuesday, September 1st.
Wildfire risk soars in Lane, Linn counties
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/29/15
Ongoing drought and warm weather have elevated wildfire danger this summer, and severe conditions forecast for the rest of this week could cause it to soar.

"The potential for fires to start and then grow rapidly will be high due to hot temperatures and low humidity," said Greg Wagenblast, ODF's South Cascade District forester.

Already in Lane and Linn counties, a number of timber companies have closed their lands to the public due to the risk of human-caused fires. Recreationists can learn which corporate forestlands in the district are open by checking the ODF website, www.oregon.gov/odf/FIRE/Closures/Corporate%20Closures.pdf

The district forester said it is important to remember that fuels in the wildland areas are primed to burn. The intensity of fire starts under the current conditions would require more firefighting resources. And once on site, firefighters will face limited sources of water in streams and reservoirs to extinguish the fires.

Jude McHugh, public affairs officer with the Willamette National Forest, said fire conditions are similar on U.S. Forest Service lands.

"Unfortunately, the Willamette National Forest this year as of July 21 has had 47 human-caused fires out of 103 total fires," she said. The PIO advised visitors to the Willamette that "campfires are allowed only in designated campgrounds with fire rings and need to be 'Dead Out' when leaving your campsite."

Wagenblast likewise reminded recreationists visiting state-protected forestlands and parks to be particularly aware of the wildfire risk. As on the National Forest, campfires and other open fires on ODF's protection jurisdiction are prohibited except in designated campgrounds. Motorized vehicles must be operated only on established roads. Smoking is restricted to inside closed vehicles or buildings. Other fire safety restrictions can be obtained by contacting the jurisdictional agency.
Sharing the Road with Farm Equipment
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 07/29/15
Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley would like to remind citizens to be aware of farm implements on Linn County roadways. With the nice weather we have been experiencing, our farming community has been out in full force.

When traveling on Linn County roadways, you may encounter farm equipment. Farm equipment is wider than most other vehicles and travels at much slower speeds. The Sheriff's Office would like to remind citizens of safety tips to help everyone travel safely on our county roadways.

Please be patient and don't assume the farm equipment can immediately move aside. Roadway shoulders may be soft or steep and the farm equipment might not pull off at the first available safe location to allow you to pass.

Remember to Yield to wide vehicles when approaching from the opposite direction. On some occasions, it will be necessary to pull off the roadway and allow the equipment to pass you. Please be aware of other vehicles around you if you pull over.

Please do not assume the driver of the farm equipment knows you are there. Most operators of farm equipment will regularly check for traffic behind them. However, the equipment is very loud and it is difficult to see around the machinery. Oregon Department of Transportation recommends before you attempt to pass, sound your vehicles horn to warn the equipment operator that you are there. When passing, pass with caution. Be watchful of other vehicles and do not pass when you are in a no passing zone.

If you have any questions regarding slow moving farm equipment, please visit the Oregon Department of Transportation website at: http://www.oregon.gov/ODOT
Update: Health advisory on Upper Klamath and Agency lakes extended downstream to Keno Dam July 29 (Photo)
Oregon Health Authority - 07/29/15
2015-07/3687/86551/UpperKlamathAgencyHABv2-small.jpg
2015-07/3687/86551/UpperKlamathAgencyHABv2-small.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/3687/86551/thumb_UpperKlamathAgencyHABv2-small.jpg
July 29, 2015

High toxin levels found in Klamath County water bodies

The health advisory issued July 28 for Upper Klamath and Agency lakes is being extended downstream to Keno Dam. An additional sample collected from the Link River just before it enters Lake Ewauna at the north end contained toxins at levels that could be harmful to health.

The advisory issued July 28 now includes Upper Klamath and Agency lakes, the Link River downstream to Lake Ewauna and the Klamath River downstream to Keno Dam. The original advisory was due to toxins at levels that could pose a risk to human health in Upper Klamath Lake, located just north of Klamath Falls along Highway 97 in Klamath County.

Continuous cold water conditions in Pelican Bay have prevented blue-green algae from growing there, so Pelican Bay is not included in this advisory.

Routine water monitoring by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and United States Bureau of Reclamation has confirmed the presence of blue-green algae toxins. These toxins, called cyanotoxins, are present at concentrations that can be harmful to humans and animals.

In areas covered by the advisory, swallowing or inhaling water droplets should be avoided. Drinking water directly from areas under an advisory is especially dangerous. Skin contact with the algae can also cause rashes in individuals with sensitive skin.

Oregon Public Health officials advise campers and other recreational visitors that toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating the water with camping-style filters.

People who draw in-home water directly from areas under advisory are advised to use an alternative water source because private treatment systems are not proven effective at removing algae toxins. However, public drinking water systems can reduce algae toxins through proper filtration and disinfection. If people on public water systems have questions about treatment and testing, they should contact their water supplier.

Oregon health officials recommend that people who choose to eat fish from waters where algae blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, because toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Public health officials also advise people to not eat freshwater clams or mussels from areas under advisory and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations do not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

Exposure to toxins can produce symptoms of numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems, and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of skin irritation, weakness, diarrhea, nausea, cramps and fainting also should receive medical attention if they persist or worsen. Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity.

The public will be advised when the concern no longer exists.

With proper precautions to avoid water contact, people are encouraged to enjoy activities such as camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, fishing and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0400.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website. To find out if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, visit www.healthoregon.org/hab and select "algae bloom advisories," or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767.

# # #


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/3687/86551/UpperKlamathAgencyHABv2-small.jpg
New studies examine Oregon coastal flood hazards
Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries - 07/29/15
NEWPORT, Ore. - New mapping and analyses offer better-than-ever scientific understanding of Oregon's coastal flood hazards.

The Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) has released new coastal flood hazard studies for Clatsop, Tillamook, Lincoln and Curry counties. These studies include detailed hazard zones developed for the open coast using new coastal engineering analyses, decades of ocean wave and water level data, refined modeling approaches, and technology - including use of high-resolution lidar data.

"These reports offer state-of-the-art coastal engineering science," says Jonathan Allan, DOGAMI coastal geomorphologist. "The information is critical not only for further study, but for local, state and federal mitigation planning, risk analysis and disaster response to 1-percent-annual-probability, or 100-year, extreme storm events."

The work included mapping the geomorphology of the coast, assessing recent and historical patterns of coastal change, field measurements of beaches and bluffs, and new bathymetric surveys of the surf. Oregon State University investigator Peter Ruggiero, a key technical partner, led the wave modeling and the bathymetric surveying campaigns.

Collection of nearshore bathymetric surveys for much of the Oregon coast also provides an all-new look at the ocean floor from the beach out to depths of approximately 60 feet.

"These types of data have never been collected before," Allan says. "Prior to this the area from the shore out through the surf was a black hole for data in Oregon."

The detailed science contained in the reports will be used to update regulatory flood insurance rate maps. Specifically, the new analyses reflect updated extreme wave runup and water level calculations, which ultimately help to guide the determination of Special Flood Hazard Areas (SFHAs) maintained by the Federal Emergency Management Agency.


The four reports are available for free download:
- Open-File Report O-15-07, Coastal flood hazard study, Curry County, Oregon, by Jonathan C. Allan, Peter Ruggiero, Nick Cohn, Jed T. Roberts, and Laura L. Stimely. Download: http://www.oregongeology.org/pubs/ofr/p-O-15-07.htm
- Open-File Report O-15-06, Coastal flood hazard study, Lincoln County, Oregon, by Jonathan C. Allan, Peter Ruggiero, Nick Cohn, Gabriel Garcia, Fletcher E. O'Brien, Laura L. Stimely, Jed T. Roberts. Download: http://www.oregongeology.org/pubs/ofr/p-O-15-06.htm
- Open-File Report O-15-05, Coastal flood hazard study, Clatsop County, Oregon, by Jonathan C. Allan, Peter Ruggiero, Gabriel Garcia, Erica L. Harris, Jed T. Roberts, and Laura L. Stimely. Download: http://www.oregongeology.org/pubs/ofr/p-O-15-05.htm
- Special Paper 47, Coastal flood hazard study, Tillamook County, Oregon, by Jonathan C. Allan, Peter Ruggiero, Gabriel Garcia, Fletcher E. O'Brien, Laura L. Stimely, and Jed T. Roberts. Download: http://www.oregongeology.org/pubs/sp/p-SP-47.htm

Funding for these projects was provided by FEMA.
Smart, simple energy-saving tips to beat the heat (Photo)
Bonneville Power Administration - 07/29/15
Here are smart, simple actions you can take to stay cool and save energy during the heat.
Here are smart, simple actions you can take to stay cool and save energy during the heat.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/1236/86546/thumb_Thermostat-Heat-Wave-4x6.jpg
Portland, Ore. - As summer temperatures heat up again, the Bonneville Power Administration is sharing simple tips that can help consumers stay cool and save energy.

"There are a lot of easy things folks can do to stay cool and not get hit with a big electric bill," said Richard Genece, vice president of Energy Efficiency for BPA.

Since 1980, BPA and Northwest publicly owned electric utilities have helped homeowners, businesses, industrial facilities, farmers and irrigators collectively save about 1,500 average megawatts of electricity or about $955 million on their electric bills.

These 10 tried-and-true tips can help you trim your energy use this summer.

1. Circulate. If you don't have air conditioning, use portable or ceiling fans to move air throughout your home. Even a mild breeze can make you feel 3 to 4 degrees cooler.
2. Ventilate. In the morning or evening, open a window high on the cool side of your house and another one low on the opposite side to promote natural cross-ventilation.
3. Set and save. If you have A/C, set your thermostat to 78 degrees or higher. For every degree above 75, you can save about 5 percent on your bill. And a programmable thermostat helps you avoid unnecessary cooling costs while you're away.
4. Clean. A new or clean air filter can reduce your air conditioner's energy consumption by 5 to 15 percent and help it operate more safely and efficiently.
5. Clear. Make sure your air vents aren't blocked by furniture or other items.
6. Block the sun. Use shades, curtains and window coverings to create an extra layer of insulation. According to the Department of Energy, medium-colored draperies can reduce heat gain by 33 percent and reflective blinds can reduce it by about 45 percent.
7. Power down. Turn off heat-generating devices, such as TVs, computers, stereos and lamps when you're not using them. And only wash full loads of dishes and clothes.
8. Fire it up. Avoid using your oven on hot days. Grill outside, cook on the stovetop or use your microwave oven instead. (Always check for local fire restrictions.)
9. Swap your bulbs. Changing your bulbs can reduce lighting-related heat. A standard 100-watt light bulb produces 10 percent light and 90 percent heat, but new compact fluorescents or LEDs are much cooler and cheaper to operate.
10. Look for Energy Star. If you're purchasing an air conditioner, fan or appliance, choose an Energy Star-certified model that uses less energy and is cheaper to use.

Here are a few more tips from BPA's utility customers throughout the region.

The City of Ashland, Ore., encourages night flushing. By opening windows and other vents at night, you can flush out the mass of warm air that builds up during the day. The Eugene Water & Electric Board (Ore.) shares cooling tips with its customers and reminds those keeping their windows open at night to take precautions to ensure security.

If you have a central system, Clark Public Utilities, an electric and water utility that serves the Vancouver area, recommends running the fan to circulate air, especially in the early morning and evening when the outside air is cooler.

Flathead Electric in northwest Montana reminds ceiling fan owners to adjust the rotation so it's blowing downward (as opposed to upward when you want circulate heat in colder months). You can also check out Flathead's 26 Great Energy Habits to Adopt at www.flatheadelectric.com/energy/energy.html.

Have you looked in your attic lately? That's one of the questions Franklin PUD asks its Pasco-area customers in Washington. Without adequate ventilation, attic temperatures can exceed 140 degrees. And if you can see the wood rafters, you probably don't have enough insulation.

Consumers Power Inc., an Oregon electric cooperative serving Benton, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion and Polk counties, encourages its members to call them first for energy-saving advice.

"Sometimes little things like sealing up cracks and leaky doors and windows can make a huge difference. Other times we point our members to a ductless heat pump, which can keep them cool in summer and warm in winter," said Thomas Elzinga, energy services manager at Consumers Power.

Central Electric Co-op, which serves seven counties in central and eastern Oregon, suggests planting trees on the south- and west-facing sides of your house to diffuse the hot sun before it hits your home. One of Salem Electric's energy-saving ideas is to plant trees or shrubs around your air conditioner since a shaded unit uses less electricity.

Washington's Benton PUD encourages its Kennewick-area customers to help one another. Through its Helping Hands program, customers can donate to their low-income neighbors faced with high bills this summer.

The Department of Energy also offers energy-saving tips at www.energy.gov/energysaver.

To learn more about energy-saving upgrades, improvements and incentives, contact your local electric utility.


Attached Media Files: Here are smart, simple actions you can take to stay cool and save energy during the heat.
Fire protection agencies seek public cooperation
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/29/15
High temperatures and threat of lightning forecasted

As the heat returns to the region this week, fire managers are once again spreading the word of caution in efforts to prevent human-caused fires. Fire weather meteorologists are anticipating temperatures in the high 90's and low 100's midweek with a chance of lightning in southern and eastern Oregon arriving Friday. A Red Flag Warning is also in effect for much of the Willamette Valley and southern Oregon calling for hot and dry unstable conditions combined with low fuel moisture levels.

As fire season hits full stride, the chances of fires starting and spreading rapidly are of grave concern.

"We're looking at a formidable fire weather forecast," said Oregon State Forester Doug Decker. "The benefit of any recent moisture we've received has now evaporated, and we're looking straight at record-breaking temperatures, extremely low humidities, and dry lightning: the trifecta of bad wildfire conditions."

"This is the time for all Oregonians and visitors to be extremely aware of fire danger. One wrong move with power equipment, a cigarette, or any open flame can spell trouble."

Homeowners and outdoor enthusiasts alike can contribute to the fire prevention campaign by reducing fire prone activities. Campfires are only allowed in designated campgrounds on public lands and prohibited entirely on all private lands under ODF's protection. Outdoor debris burning also remains prohibited throughout much of the state. While logging activity is being curtailed under these extreme conditions, many large industrial landowners have also closed their gates to public access in efforts to reduce possible ignitions from off-road driving, target shooting, smoking and campfires; all of which are illegal during fire season.

Should a fire occur close to communities, State Fire Marshal Jim Walker is urging homeowners to be prepared in case an evacuation is necessary. "A serious wildfire can come up in a moment's notice, so residents need to prepare now in case they have to leave their home, Walker said. "Make sure to put together a "Go Kit" and make a plan where your family will go and how you will stay in contact." Find out more at www.wildlandfirersg.org .

To date, 621 fires have burned 3,393 acres on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry and forest protective associations. Of these, 429 have been caused by people. ODF protects about 16 million acres of private and public forest and grazing land from wildfire in Oregon.
***Update*** Statewide Investigation Into Suspicious Mail Received At Government Buildings
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 07/29/15
On July 27, 2015 multiple government offices received suspicious letters which drew concern they may be contaminated with hazardous materials.

Hazardous material teams responded to these locations as well as investigators from multiple law enforcement agencies. Preliminary testing from the hazardous material teams could not detect any harmful substances.

On July 28, investigators identified Lance T STORM, age 34, of Eugene, as a person of interest. He was located and interviewed regard this investigation. STORM was very forthcoming and eager to discuss the letters he mailed. STORM told investigators the communications were not intended to cause alarm and he denied the inclusion of harmful substances.

STORM did not appear to present any violent or dangerous behavior and was not perceived as a threat to the community. He was released and the reports containing detailed information obtained during the investigation involving will be forwarded to several district attorney offices for consideration of charges.

The following counties where letters are known to be received were Grant, Harney, Umatilla, Klamath, Lake, Grant, Jackson, Wasco, Marion, Polk, Lane, Sherman, Tillamook, Gilliam, Columbia, Linn, Jefferson, Wheeler, Union, Douglas, Baker, Yamhill, Wallowa and Coos.

The Oregon State Police was assisted by the FBI, US Postal Service, The Oregon State Fire Marshal's Office, and law enforcement agencies from counties where the letters were received.
End Update

Previous Release:
The Oregon State Police and multiple partners are conducting a statewide investigation after multiple government offices around the state received suspicious mail, some with an unknown substance.

Hazardous Materials Teams and investigators have responded to these reports. This is a preliminary release and more information will be released when it is available.

As a reminder people receiving suspicious packages or mail should be cautious of mail that has excessive postage, no return address, excessive tape to secure parcel, misspelled words, misspelled title with name, incorrect or title only, strange odors, and oily stains, discolorations, crystallization on packaging.
North Bend School District Public Meetings - August 2015
North Bend Sch. Dist. - 07/29/15
Below are North Bend School District public meetings currently scheduled for August:

August 4, 2015
Special School Board Meeting at 5:30 p.m.
North Bend School District Office
1913 Meade St., North Bend OR

August 10, 2015
Regular School Board Meeting at 7:00 p.m. with Executive Session at 6:00 p.m.
to conduct deliberations with persons designated by the governing body to carry on labor negotiations, pursuant to ORS 192.660(2)(e)
North Bend City Council Chamber
835 California St., North Bend, OR

The schedule is subject to change.
Visit www.nbend.k12.or.us for agenda information.
FWD: Update @ 10:10 a.m. - Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Update for Wednesday, July 29, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/29/15
NOTE: CABLE CROSSING FIRE SIZE UPDATE @ 10:10 a.m.:
The Cable Creek Fire, located near Highway 138 East, mile post 23, is now estimated at 270 acres. The increase in fire size IS NOT due to additional fire growth. Smokey conditions near the fire area last night made it difficult for observation aircraft to get an accurate size. This morning, smoke near the fire has dispersed enough to get a better look at the fire; however, this is still an estimated size and that it may be several days before firefighters get an accurate GPS reading. In addition to a more accurate size-up, the observation aircraft on the Cable Creek Fire located one small spot fire this morning, less than 1/4 acre in size and located about 1/4 mile south of the main fire. Air and ground resources are currently on the scene and are making good progress on it.



This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) fire update for Wednesday, July 29, 2015.

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA): The Cable Crossing Fire was reported on Thursday afternoon, July 28, burning east of Glide near Highway 138 East, MP 23. Spot fires were also detected across the highway and the North Umpqua River. Firefighters made good progress overnight on the fire, with crews able to complete fire trail around about 90 percent of the fire last night despite fairly active fire behavior due to dry forest fuels and strong winds. This morning, the fire is estimated as 10 percent contained, at approximately 150 acres. Today, firefighters will work to complete fire trail and install hose lays around the fire. Firefighting resources assigned to the Cable Crossing Fire today include aviation resources (helicopters and fixed wing observation aircraft, as well as single engine air tankers available if needed) and ground resources including approximately 180 firefighters.

Safety for firefighters and the general public remains the number one priority. Due to heavy fire traffic in the area, along with hazard trees which need to be removed near the fire along Highway 138 East, ODOT still has the highway closed near the fire area. Fire crews are working with ODOT to minimize the hazards along the highway before it is reopened for non-fire traffic. For more information about the Highway 138 East closure, visit www.tripcheck.com.

The latest information on this fire is available from DFPA at www.dfpa.net, www.twitter.com/DouglasFPA, and/or www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation.

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015, through today:
Lightning-caused fires: 192 fires burned 2472 acres
Human-caused fires: 429 fires burned 920 acres
Total: 621 fires burned 3392 acres

10-year average (January 1 through the present date in the year):
Lightning-caused fires: 116 fires burned 13747 acres
Human-caused fires: 322 fires burned 2634 acres
Total: 438 fires burned 16,381 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.

When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Jeri Chase, 503-945-7201 (office) or 503-931-2721 (Cell), any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

For information on Oregon Department of Forestry protected lands view:
the department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
the Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.
the Douglas Forest Protective Association Twitter feed.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.

OTHER LINKS
Fire weather

Wildfire smoke forecasts

Wildfire smoke and air quality

Keep Oregon Green


Follow us on Twitter & Facebook

###

Jeri Chase | Public Information Officer/
Agency Web Coordinator
Oregon Department of Forestry
2600 State Street, Salem, OR 97310
Office: 503-945-7201
Cell: 503-931-2721
Jeri.Chase@oregon.gov
Deputies Investigating Runaway Semi Crash (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/29/15
2015-07/1294/86533/IMG_20150729_074841_165.jpg
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Deputies are on scene and investigating how a semi truck lost control on Delaney Road SE near Battle Creek Road SE, spilling its load of lumber. Deputies know that the semi was traveling east toward Turner Lumber when the driver experienced brake failure causing the truck to careen through an intersection, into a rock retaining wall and finally coming to a stop in the yard of a neighboring residence.

Traffic in the area is delayed while crews clean up the massive spill and remove the truck. Deputies are estimating that it will take beyond the lunch hour before traffic will resume normally. No injuries have been reported and motorists are being asked to seek alternate routes.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1294/86533/IMG_20150729_074841_165.jpg , 2015-07/1294/86533/IMG_20150729_074742_359.jpg
Deputies on Scene of Fatal Motor Vehicle Crash (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/29/15
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/1294/86502/thumb_CRash_2.jpg
Deputies have identified the drivers in Sunday's fatal traffic crash as Neal Meusling, age 35 of Hubbard. Mr. Meuseling was the only occupant in his red, Porsche, Boxster when it crashed earlier this week. Deputies do believe speed was a factor.



Deputies are currently on scene and investigating the cause of a single vehicle crash on Crosby Road NE near Butteville Road NE. Crosby Road is currently closed between Butteville and Arbor Grove while investigators determine the cause of the crash.

Sadly Deputies have determined that the cars single occupant was killed in the crash. The Sheriff's Office does not intend to release the name of the driver until next of kin can be notified.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1294/86502/CRash_2.jpg , 2015-07/1294/86502/Crash_1.jpg
07/28/15
Red Cross Provides Assistance after Roseburg Home Fire
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 07/28/15
Red Cross disaster team volunteers provided assistance to four adults and one infant following a residential fire Tuesday evening (July 28) in the 200 block of Oakway in Roseburg, Oregon. Red Cross provided lodging, food, clothing, infant supplies, comfort kits and stuffed animals.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in communities in Oregon and southwest Washington. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 to schedule an appointment.

Know what to do before, during and after a home fire. Take a few moments to review your family's exit plan should there be a fire in your home. This information, and more, is available at www.redcross.org or in a free Prepare! Resource Guide published by the American Red Cross Cascades Region. The guide can be downloaded at http://rdcrss.org/1zq8XW6.
Fatal Single Vehicle Crash Investigation - Umatilla County
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 07/28/15
On July 28, 2015, at about 11:16 a.m., the Oregon State Police Southern Command Center received a report of a vehicle that ran off the roadway and down a ditch on Hwy 395 near milepost 36B (near Ukiah). Troopers from the Pendleton Office of the Oregon State Police, Umatilla County Sheriff's Office, and The Pendleton Police Department responded to the scene.

Officers found the lone 79 year old male occupant of the vehicle had been ejected during the crash and was deceased. The vehicle had traveled approximately 200 yards down a draw and rolled before coming to a rest.

Members of the Umatilla County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue , Pendleton Fire and The Department of Forestry worked together in order to remove the deceased driver from the scene. At this time there is no evidence to suggest that speed or intoxicant impairment were factors in the crash.

The identity of the deceased driver who is from out of State will be released on Wednesday to allow for the notification of next of kin.
Photos of Oregon 138 E Wildfire - 6 miles east of Glide (Photo)
ODOT: SW Oregon - 07/28/15
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Oregon 138E (North Umpqua Highway) remains closed due to a wildfire six miles east of Glide.
Motorist on the east side will be advised of the closure near Diamond Lake at the intersection of Oregon 138 and 230. Commercial trucks will be turned around at the checkpoint.
Not ETA on reopening the highway, although it may extend into the evening hours.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1202/86525/Oreogn138Fire_4.jpg , 2015-07/1202/86525/OR138Fire_3.jpg , 2015-07/1202/86525/OR138Fire_2.jpg , 2015-07/1202/86525/OR138Fire_1.jpg
A New Mexico resident arrested following a multi-state pursuit that ended in Baker County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 07/28/15
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On July 28, 2015 at about 10:35 a.m., Idaho State Police were in pursuit of a Grey 2014 Ford Mustang with temporary plates westbound on Interstate 84 at milepost 82, west of Mountain Home Idaho. The pursuit originally started as a driving complaint reporting reckless driving at milepost 82 and quickly evolved into a pursuit.

Oregon State Police Troopers from the Ontario Area Command picked up the pursuit at the Oregon-Idaho line and attempted to spike the vehicle but were unsuccessful. The pursuit continued westbound on I-84 with speeds ranging from 58 MPH and 146 MPH. Troopers went into slack pursuit once an OSP aircraft was deployed due to two construction zones on I-84. ODOT was notified of the pursuit and relayed information to the construction workers so they could clear their construction zone area prior to the pursuit reaching their location.

Baker County Sheriff's Office, Baker Police Department and Oregon State Police La Grande Area Command Troopers assisted as the vehicle continued near Baker City, Oregon. The vehicle was successfully spiked by an Oregon State Police Trooper on I-84 at milepost 295, near North Powder. A tactical vehicle intervention was conducted at milepost 292, near North Powder and the vehicle was brought to a stop and the operator was taken into custody without further incident.

The driver was identified as Curtis Alvon GENTRY, age 33 years old, of Albuquerque, New Mexico. He was taken to the Baker County Jail and lodged for Reckless Driving and Attempt to Elude-Vehicle.

OSP Ontario Area Command Troopers and OSP La Grande Area Command Troopers were assisted by the Idaho State Police, Payette County Sheriff's Office, Ontario City Police, Baker City Police, and Baker County Sheriff's Office.


Attached Media Files: Photo1
Health advisory issued July 28 for Upper Klamath and Agency lakes (excluding Pelican Bay) (Photo)
Oregon Health Authority - 07/28/15
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July 28, 2015

High toxin levels found in Klamath County water bodies

A health advisory is being issued today due to toxins at levels that could pose a risk to human health in Upper Klamath Lake and Agency Lake, located just north of Klamath Falls along Highway 97 in Klamath County.

Continuous cold water conditions in Pelican Bay have prevented blue-green algae from growing there, so Pelican Bay is not included in this advisory.

Routine water monitoring by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) has confirmed the presence of blue-green algae toxins. These toxins, called cyanotoxins, are present at concentrations in the water that can be harmful to humans and animals.

In areas covered by the advisory, swallowing or inhaling water droplets should be avoided. Drinking water directly from Upper Klamath or Agency lakes is especially dangerous. Skin contact with the algae can also cause rashes in individuals with sensitive skin.

Oregon Public Health officials advise campers and other recreational visitors that toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating the water with camping-style filters.

People who draw in-home water directly from Upper Klamath or Agency lakes are advised to use an alternative water source because private treatment systems are not proven effective at removing algae toxins. However, public drinking water systems can reduce algae toxins through proper filtration and disinfection. If people on public water systems have questions about treatment and testing, they should contact their water supplier.

Oregon health officials recommend that people who choose to eat fish from waters where algae blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, because toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Public health officials also advise that people not eat freshwater clams or mussels from Upper Klamath or Agency lakes and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations do not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

Exposure to toxins can produce symptoms of numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems, and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of skin irritation, weakness, diarrhea, nausea, cramps and fainting should also receive medical attention if they persist or worsen. Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity.

The public will be advised when the concern no longer exists.

With proper precautions to avoid water contact, people are encouraged to enjoy activities such as camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, fishing and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

For local information, contact Sara Eldridge with the USGS at 541-273-8689 extension 203. For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0400.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website. To find out if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, visit www.healthoregon.org/hab and select "algae bloom advisories," or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767.

# # #


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/3687/86519/UpperKlamathAgencyHAB-small.jpg
DEA Announces 10th National Prescription Drug Take-Back
DEA Seattle - 07/28/15
July 28 - (Seattle, WA) - DEA Acting Administrator Chuck Rosenberg today announced that the 10th National Prescription Drug Take-Back will take place September 26th from 10 am-2 pm local time. As with the previous nine Take-Back events, sites will be set up throughout communities nationwide so local residents can return their unwanted, unneeded, or expired prescription drugs for safe disposal.

Collection sites in every local community can be found by going to www.dea.gov . This site will be continuously updated with new take-back locations.

The National Prescription Drug Take-Back addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. Many Americans are not aware that medicines that languish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse, and abuse. Rates of prescription drug abuse in the U.S. are at alarming rates, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs. Studies show that many abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet. In addition, many Americans do not know how to properly dispose of their unused medicine, often flushing them down the toilet or throwing them away - both potential safety and health hazards.
"Prescription drug abuse is a huge problem and this is a great opportunity for folks around the country to help reduce the threat," Rosenberg said. "Please clean out your medicine cabinet and make your home safe from drug theft and abuse."


When the results of the last nine Take Back Days (2010-2014) to date are combined, residents of Washington, Idaho, Oregon, and Alaska have turned in 234,537 pounds (117.2 tons) of prescription medications.



The following are the combined results of all nine events broken down by state:
Washington -108,399 pounds (54.2 tons) removed from circulation.

Idaho - 36,364 pounds (18.2) removed from circulation.

Oregon - 69,359 pounds (34.6 tons) removed from circulation.

Alaska - 20,415 pounds (10.2 tons) removed from circulation.

Nationwide totals for the previous nine Take-Back events resulted in the collection of 4,823,251 pounds, or 2,411 tons of prescription medications.
Statement on Suspicious Letters
FBI - Oregon - 07/28/15
The FBI, Oregon State Police and the U.S. Postal Inspection Service are working with affected Oregon counties to determine the origin and nature of a series of suspicious letters that started arriving in the mail on Monday, July 27th. To date, field testing by hazardous materials crews has shown NO toxic substance on any letter or in any envelope. In addition, at this time there is no evidence of a visible powder to be found in any of the envelopes/letters.

There are approximately 20 known letters delivered and all were addressed to Oregon sheriffs or their offices. Law enforcement is collecting the letters and transporting them all to the FBI and/or the Oregon State Public Health Laboratory for analysis as appropriate.

Due to the on-going nature of this investigation, we are not releasing any further information.

Further updates will be posted at www.flashalertportland.net as appropriate.
Fatal Motor Vehicle Crash Interstate 5 in Jackson County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 07/28/15
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Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation of Monday afternoon's single vehicle fatal crash on I-5 in Jackson County.

According to Sergeant First Class Jeff Proulx, on July 27, 2015 at about 1:30 p.m. OSP troopers responded to a fatal crash on Interstate 5 at the northbound exit 40 off ramp. When troopers arrived on scene they found that a 2010 Toyota pickup, driven by PRICILLA ROSE, age 49, from Medford was northbound on Interstate 5 and took the exit 40 off ramp at a very high rate of speed. Once on the off ramp ROSE lost control of the pickup and it collided head on with a guardrail. The pickup rolled several times and came to an uncontrolled rest at the top of the exit.

ROSE was extricated from the pickup and was transported by ground ambulance to Rogue Regional Medical Center where she is being treated for serious injuries. The passenger, DEBBRA LYNN MAULDIN, age 46, from Medford was pronounced deceased at the scene of the crash.

Investigators believe that speed and alcohol are contributing factors in the crash. Seatbelt usage is undetermined.

OSP was assisted at the scene by ODOT, Fire District 3 and Mercy Flights.

No further information will be released unless authorized by the Jackson County District Attorney's Office.

Photographs courtesy of OSP.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1002/86507/I5_Exit_40_(2).jpg , 2015-07/1002/86507/I5_Exit_40.jpg
Oregon Health Policy Board to hold conference call Aug. 4
Oregon Health Authority - 07/28/15
July 28, 2015

Contact: Jeff Scroggin, 541-999-6983 (meeting information or accommodations)

The Oregon Health Policy Board will hold its monthly meeting August 4 via conference call.

The meeting will focus on a review of charters and membership for the Sustainable Health Expenditures Workgroup and the Health Information Technology Oversight Council.

When: Tuesday, Aug 4, 8:30 -9 a.m.

Where: Members of the public can call in to listen by dialing 1-888-808-6929, participant code 915042#. Minutes from the meeting will be posted on the board's meeting page following the meeting.

Agenda:

-- Review of Sustainable Health Expenditure Workgroup Charter
-- Review of Health Information Technology Oversight Council Charter and membership
-- Adjourn

For more information on the meeting, visit the board's meeting page at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/2015-OHPB-Meetings.aspx.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Individuals may request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodation by calling the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-1699, TTY 711, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

# # #
The Construction Contractors Board (CCB) is moving to new location/Offices closed Aug. 3
Construction Contractors Board - 07/28/15
Salem - After more than 25 years in the same building, the Construction Contractors Board is moving to downtown Salem.

Starting Aug. 4, the agency that regulates construction contractors will be on the sixth floor of the Beardsley Building at 201 High St. SE.

The Public Utility Commission and a Department of Human Services adult abuse prevention program share space in the same building.

The CCB has been housed in the Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs since 1988, not long after the state's Department of Commerce was disbanded and the then-Builders Board became an independent agency. About 60 people work for the agency.

The new location offers a smaller, more modern space. Customers will enjoy free parking and on-site meeting space for public meetings and training events.

"This location will allow us to serve the public much better. The ease of access, customer parking and public meeting space make it ideal for the CCB; and it allows us to operate more efficiently in downsized quarters," CCB Administrator James Denno said.

The agency phone numbers and mailing address remain the same.

Online services temporarily closed
During the move - from 5 p.m. July 31 through 5 p.m. Aug. 3, contractors will be unable to renew licenses or use other online services.

The agency will be closed Monday, Aug. 3, while phones and online services are tested. The CCB reopens Tuesday, Aug. 4.

#
07/27/15
Salem Hospital celebrates Magnet(R) redesignation
Salem Health - 07/27/15
The American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) has officially redesignated Salem Hospital as a Magnet hospital. Only 7 percent of hospitals nationwide can claim the coveted honor. Magnet designation recognizes health care organizations for quality patient care, clinical excellence and innovations in professional practice.

"Magnet designation is about who we are and what we do every day," said Sarah Horn, Salem Health chief nursing officer. "It is about our interdisciplinary, collaborative culture, which fosters excellent patient care in an environment that focuses on continuous improvement. Magnet ultimately benefits our patients and community."

The ANCC Magnet Recognition Program(R) is a rigorous vetting process that takes a demonstrated track record of excellent outcomes to prove quality care is truly delivered in a health care setting. ANCC Magnet surveyors spent several days at Salem Hospital in June to conduct a thorough review. The appraisers spoke with staff and patients throughout the hospital, plus received community input.

"Achieving and maintaining Magnet status is not easy because the standards increase every year," said Margo Halm, Salem Health director of nursing research, professional practice and Magnet. "We have 40 to 50 specialty practice teams focused on continually improving patient care. Those vital efforts contribute to improving outcomes for our patients."

Salem Hospital first achieved Magnet designation in 2010 after seven years of dedicated focus by clinical and professional staff--nearly 4,000 employees--in partnership with community physicians and volunteers. Together, they developed and implemented patient care standards that meet and exceed Magnet criteria across all aspects and areas of care in the hospital.

Salem Hospital is a part of Salem Health, along with West Valley Hospital, Willamette Health Partners and other affiliated health care organizations offering exceptional care to people in and around Oregon's mid-Willamette Valley. The prestigious 2015 Truven Health 50 Top Cardiovascular Hospitals named Salem Hospital among the highest performing hospitals in the nation--and the only Oregon hospital, and one of two Pacific Northwest hospitals, to receive this honor. Visit us at salemhealth.org; "Like" us on facebook.com/salemhealth; follow us on Twitter: @salemhealth; and view us at youtube.com/salemhealth.
ODF Fire Update for Monday, August 27, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/27/15
FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS

Rye Fire
Progress has been made on the lightning-caused Rye Fire located approximately 38 miles north of Enterprise in steep rocky terrain in Northern Wallowa County. The fire is currently 763 acres. The decrease in size is due to more accurate mapping by crews on the ground. The fire is now estimated at 80% contained and weather is cooler today. A fire camp has been established near Flora, Oregon to help support firefighters and limit the amount of traffic on area roads. The team is transitioning to a Type 4 Incident Commander in the local unit later today.

Fires on other lands
The Oak Canyon Fire (BLM) reported July 24 burning in grass and brush 9 miles SE of Dufur has the following resources assigned: two 20-person crews, 6 engines, 4 helicopters and 2 Single Engine Air Tankers (SEATS). The fire, estimated at 930 acres, is now 90 percent contained.

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015 through July 27, 2015:
Lightning-caused fires: 188 fires burned 3,807 acres
Human-caused fires: 417 fires burned 777 acres
Total: 605 fires burned 4,584 acres

10-year average (January 1 through July 27):
Lightning-caused fires: 111 fires burned 13,673 acres
Human-caused fires: 313 fires burned 2,257 acres
Total: 350 fires burned 6,916 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.

When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

NEWS MEDIA
News media may contact the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Cynthia Orlando, 503-945-7421 (office), 503-510-7972 (mobile), or Cynthia.A.Orlando@oregon.gov any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call.
Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

For information on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands view:
the department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
the Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.
the Blue Mountain Fire Information Blog with information about wildfire activity in the Blue Mountain area of NE OR and SE WA.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.

OTHER LINKS
Fire weather

Wildfire smoke forecasts

Wildfire smoke and air quality

Keep Oregon Green

Follow the Oregon Dept. of Forestry on Twitter & Facebook

Connect with us:
www.oregon.gov/ODF | social media | State Forests Online Community
NW Natural Board of Directors Names David H. Anderson President (Photo)
NW Natural - 07/27/15
David H. Anderson
David H. Anderson
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/3843/86485/thumb_Anderson_HR.jpg
PORTLAND, Ore. -- The board of directors for Northwest Natural Gas Company, dba NW Natural (NYSE:NWN), appointed David H. Anderson as president of the company effective August 1, 2015. Anderson will also continue to serve as NW Natural's chief operating officer. The Oregon-headquartered natural gas utility, founded in 1859, is the region's largest independent local distribution company.

"NW Natural has a long record of thoughtful succession planning and David's appointment is another step in that tradition," said Tod Hamachek, NW Natural chairman of the board. "David is ready to assume these responsibilities and we congratulate him on his promotion."

"Over the past 11 years, David has demonstrated exceptional leadership skills and helped build a strong utility that delivers great value to its customers and shareholders," said Gregg Kantor, NW Natural's CEO. "As David moves into the president role, he will continue to be responsible for the bulk of the day- to-day operations of the company and will continue to report directly to me."

Previously, Anderson had served as executive vice president of operations and regulations, and as senior vice president and chief financial officer upon joining NW Natural in 2004.

"It's a privilege for me to be given the opportunity to lead our 156-year-old company into the future," said Anderson. "Every day NW Natural employees deliver natural gas safely, reliably and affordably to our customers, and I'm honored to oversee our commitment to the community."

Before coming to NW Natural, Anderson was senior vice president and CFO at TXU Gas, and controller and chief accounting officer for TXU Corporation.

Anderson is a trustee and Investment Committee chair on the Portland State University Foundation Board and also chairs the Association of Oregon Industries Fiscal Policy Committee. He is past president of Oregon Partnership, past chair of the American Gas Association Finance Committee, and Fiscal and Tax Committee. He has also served on the boards of the Northwest Gas Association, Oregon Mentors, PSU School of Business and the Oregon Department of Education business advisory team. Anderson is an accounting graduate of Texas Tech University, and is a CPA and CGMA. He, his wife Susan and their two sons live in Portland.

About NW Natural
NW Natural (NYSE: NWN) is headquartered in Portland, Ore., and provides natural gas service to about 707,000 residential, commercial, and industrial customers through 14,000 miles of mains and service lines in Western Oregon and Southwest Washington. It is the largest independent natural gas utility in the Pacific Northwest with $3 billion in total assets. NW Natural and its subsidiaries own and operate underground gas storage facilities with designed storage capacity of approximately 31 Bcf in Oregon and California. Additional information is available at nwnatural.com.
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Attached Media Files: David H. Anderson
Department of Revenue seeks customer service feedback
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 07/27/15
SALEM, Oregon -- The Department of Revenue is conducting a survey to find ways to improve the customer service experience for Oregon taxpayers.
More than 7,000 people will receive the survey this week. This sample group was randomly selected from more than 205,000 taxpayers who contacted the department from January through May. The department encourages everyone who receives the survey to complete and return it.
"The best way for us to find ways to better serve you is to ask for your opinions directly," explained Ken Ross, the department's sponsor for the survey project. "This is your chance to let us know how we're doing and share your suggestions for how we can help you in the future."
The survey is part of a study being conducted by Oregon State University Survey Research Center. All responses are confidential and no identifying information will be provided to the department with OSU-SRC's final report.
After reviewing the results and identifying trends, leadership will work on developing strategies to improve customer service throughout the department, Ross said.
Visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments; or call 1-800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish); 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon; or email, questions.dor@oregon.gov. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), call 1-800-886-7204.
Business Oregon Commission to meet in Pendleton on Friday
Business Oregon - 07/27/15
The Business Oregon Commission will hold a regular meeting at 8 a.m. on Friday, July 31 in Pendleton at the Oxford Suites Hotel, 2400 S.W. Court Place.

AGENDA

8:00 am to 8:15 am: Welcome remarks & introductions
8:15 am to 8:20 am: Review proposed meeting minutes
8:20 am to 8:40 am: Public comment
8:40 am to 9:15 am: Director Sean Robbins' report
9:15 am to 9:30 am: Pendleton regional economy overview
9:30 am to 9:40 am: Break
9:40 am to 10:10 am: Innovation & Entrepreneurship presentation
10:10 am to 10:40 am: Unmanned aerial systems
10:40 am to 11:10 am: Trade & Logistics
11:10 am to 11:30 am: Other business
11:30 am Adjourn

For more information: Ryan Frank, communications manager, 971-804-2530; ryan.frank@oregon.com
Pacific Power Joins 'American Business Act on Climate Pledge' (Photo)
Pacific Power - 07/27/15
Proud US Business for Climate Action Logo
Proud US Business for Climate Action Logo
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Pacific Power, as part of Berkshire Hathaway Energy, is first energy company to join pledge further strengthening commitment to cleaner energy future

Portland, Ore. - Pacific Power, as part of Berkshire Hathaway Energy, is the first energy company to join the American Business Act on Climate Pledge. This pledge further demonstrates the company's on-going efforts to move in a measured way towards a cleaner energy future.

"Pacific Power is transitioning to a lower emitting, lower carbon future," said Stefan Bird, president and CEO of Pacific Power. "Berkshire Hathaway Energy, as the first energy company to join this pledge, is reinforcing its commitment to invest in more renewable energy. Pacific Power is doing its part with plans to further strengthen its own renewable portfolio and transition away from coal towards newer, cleaner technologies."

As part of this pledge, Pacific Power, as part of PacifiCorp, has committed to:

Add more than 1,000 megawatts of incremental solar and wind capacity through long-term power purchase agreements to PacifiCorp's owned 1,030 megawatts of wind generating capacity. PacifiCorp is the nation's second largest owner of wind generation among regulated, investor-owned utilities. This incremental renewable generation, expected to be online by the end of 2017, would bring PacifiCorp's non-carbon generating capacity to more than 4,500 megawatts which equates to approximately 22 percent of PacifiCorp's retail energy load in 2017.

Invest in transmission infrastructure in the West to support the integration of renewable energy onto the grid.

Support and advance the development of markets in the West to optimize the electric grid, lower costs, enhance reliability and more effectively integrate renewable resources.


These actions follow on the recent announcement of PacifiCorp's long range plans to reduce emissions by closing or converting 10 coal-fired generation units between 2015 and 2029, and reduce its coal generation from current levels by 40% by 2030. The company's plans also include investment in energy efficiency that is expected to satisfy 86% of its forecast load growth for more than the next decade.

PacifiCorp is also working to transform the electric grid in the west to make it cleaner, more reliable and more affordable. This work includes the Energy Imbalance Market launched in November 2014 with the California Independent System Operator (CA ISO) which is already delivering benefits to customers and optimizing renewables across six states. Utilities in other states are scheduled to join later this year and next fall. The company also announced in April 2015 that it would explore the creation of a regional ISO with the CA ISO to capture further efficiencies, enable renewable expansion and maximize use of renewable energy across the west.

###

About Pacific Power
Pacific Power provides electric service to more than 730,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. The company works to meet growing energy demand while protecting and enhancing the environment. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with almost 1.8 million customers in six western states. Information about Pacific Power is available on the company's website, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube pages, which can be accessed via pacificpower.net.


Attached Media Files: Proud US Business for Climate Action Logo
Oregon National Guard to participate in statewide disaster exercise August 4-5
Oregon Military Department - 07/27/15
SALEM, Oregon--Oregon Army and Air National Guard units are scheduled to participate in the Pathfinder Minuteman 2015 Exercise at Camp Rilea in Warrenton, Oregon, Aug. 4-5.

Pathfinder Minutemen 2015 is a Joint Multiagency Cascadia Subduction Zone Response exercise and conference sponsored by Oregon's Joint Force Headquarters, and hosted by the 173rd Fighter Wing's Medical Group.

More than 225 participants from U.S. Northern Command (NORTHCOM), U.S. Air Force Reserve, Oregon Army and Air National Guard, civilian organizations, and state and county agencies. Air National Guard units from six states are expected to participate. There are currently two C-130 missions as well as a rotary aeromedical evacuation training scheduled to take place during the Pathfinder Minuteman exercise.

From the Oregon National Guard, the 173rd Medical Group, 142nd CBRNE Enhanced Response Force Package (CERFP), 142nd Force Support Squadron, 125th Special Tactics Squadron and the Oregon National Guard's Medical Command and Oregon Army National Guard aviation units from Pendleton and Salem are scheduled to participate.

According to researchers, the Pacific Northwest is overdue for a powerful earthquake of magnitude 8.0 or higher due to stresses created by the Cascadia Subduction Zone. Events such as The Great Oregon Shakeout and other notional exercises involving local and regional first responders is geared toward training for such a response scenario.

"In a Cascadia Subduction Zone event, security and medical forces will be critical elements of the initial response," said Col. Kristen Leist, 173rd Medical Group Commander. "Pathfinder-Minuteman is an opportunity for military and civilian responders to build relationships as well as train together and learn each other's capabilities. This type of training and networking opportunity will provide a more seamless medical response when called upon," she added.

Media tours are scheduled for 12:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, August. 5. To RSVP for the media tour, or for more information on the event, contact Nick Choy, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs, 503-269-6470.
07/26/15
***Update*** Josephine County Sheriff's Office Seeking Public's Help In Locating Missing Portland Man (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 07/26/15
2015-07/1002/86475/w3.jpg
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GAZLEY-ROMNEY has been located and is safe with his family. This is a preliminary release and more information will be released when it is available.
End update

Previous release:

The Josephine County Sheriff's Office is seeking the public's help in locating Michael GAZELEY-ROMNEY, age 25, of Portland. GAZELEY-ROMNEY has a condition that causes him to have amnesia; he does not know who he is.

On July 25, 2015 at about 2:30PM, GAZELEY-ROMNEY wandered away his father's work site in the North Valley area of Josephine County. The family searched until 7:00PM and then requested assistance from the sheriff's department. Search and Rescue was activated and has been actively looking for the subject.

The area he went missing from is near the Interstate 5 Manzanita Rest Area southbound. He was last seen wearing a purple shirt, blue pants and white shoes. He has an athletic build (5'11"/170 lbs), brown hair and blue eyes. He has no cell phone or money.

If spotted or his location is known, please contact the Josephine County Sheriff's Department at 541-218-7153 or the Oregon State Police at 541-664-4600.

(Attached flyer from the Josephine County Sheriff's Department.)


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1002/86475/Romney_flyer.doc , 2015-07/1002/86475/w3.jpg , 2015-07/1002/86475/3245.jpg
07/25/15
ODF Fire Update for Saturday, July 25, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/25/15
FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS

Lulay Field Fire
The Lulay Field Fire was reported burning in grass yesterday on the North Cascade District. The fire reached 22 acres in size and has now been controlled.

Cause is under investigation.

Rye Fire
The lightning-caused Rye Fire near the Oregon / Washington border approximately 38 miles north of Enterprise in Northern Wallowa County, is estimated at 763 acres and was reported Thursday night. Extended attack occurred yesterday amidst erratic winds but the forward spread has been stopped. 125 personnel are assigned to this fire.

A local Type 3 incident management team supported by ODF and USFS personnel assumed control of the fire Thursday. Additionally, air resources including helicopters, single engine air tankers (SEATs) and heavy air tankers are being utilized to try and minimize the amount of acres burned and damage to natural and cultural resources.

Fires on other lands

ODF personnel assisted with fire suppression Friday on a 210-acre fire near Monmouth burning mostly on agricultural lands with some forested ground as well. The fire was approximately 1/4 mile from the West Oregon District Protection Boundary; several homes were evacuated. ODF's Dalles Unit assisted, providing a type 2 helicopter and other resources and coordinating with the Rural Fire District. Fire spread has been stopped and the helicopter released.

The 0451 RN Fire was reported burning yesterday 9 miles SE of Dufur, OR. in grass and brush near a high-use campground. The fire is approximately 400 acres and 0 % contained. Lead agency is B.L.M.

NEWS MEDIA

News media may contact the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Cynthia Orlando, 503-945-7421 (office), 503-510-7972 (mobile), or Cynthia.A.Orlando@oregon.gov any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call.

Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION

For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:

the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, http://gacc.nifc.gov/nwcc/ or

the national Incident Information System site, http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/ .

For information on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands view:

the department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.

the Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.

the Blue Mountain Fire Information Blog with information about wildfire activity in the Blue Mountain area of NE OR and SE WA.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE

This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.

# # #
07/24/15
Lane County Man Dies In Crash Near Sisters - Deschutes County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 07/24/15
2015-07/1002/86454/IMG_2350.jpg
2015-07/1002/86454/IMG_2350.jpg
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On July 24, 2015 just before 6AM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a single vehicle crash off the roadway on Highway 20 near milepost 98 (just west of Sisters).

Initial information indicates a 1996 Honda was traveling eastbound on Highway 20 when it left the roadway and struck a tree. The vehicle came to rest on it's side. Upon emergency crews arriving, the found the operator, Troy A CRABB, age 35, of Blue River, deceased.

It appears fatigue is a contributing factor to the crash. OSP was assisted by the Deschutes County Fire Department and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

This is an ongoing investigation and more information will be released when it is available.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1002/86454/IMG_2350.jpg
Oregon Dairy Farmers Association Applauds Bi-Partisan Support and Passage of Voluntary GMO Food Labeling - HR 1599
Oregon Dairy Farmers Assn. - 07/24/15
July 24, 2015 - Salem, Oregon - The Oregon farming community has a reason to celebrate with the bipartisan support and passage of HR 1599 - The Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act by the House of Representatives. This legislation will create a framework for voluntary labeling as opposed to different labeling protocols in every state. The challenges of a state-by-state labeling system would be extremely unmanageable and result in confusion and cost to the consumers.
Despite the existing confusion over GMOs, there are many Oregonians who understand the importance of protecting our food supply through responsible scientific practices. When the farm community has access to crops that require less water and reduced chemical use, the benefits translate through the production, harvest and processing all the way to the grocery store where consumers can choose from a variety of products.
HR 1599 creates a voluntary, non-GMO label that will be overseen by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), similar to the USDA Organic program. It will provide consumers with the information and ability to select foods they desire.
The Oregon Dairy Farmers Association appreciates the support of Congressman Schrader and Congressman Walden in the passage of HR 1599. We now look forward to this legislation moving to the Senate for debate and passage. Every consumer deserves to be informed in their grocery purchasing decisions.
The Oregon Dairy Farmers Association was established in 1892 for the purpose of representing and advocating on behalf of Oregon's hardworking dairy farm families. The Association is located in Salem, Oregon.
Grants available for Oregon heritage and history projects
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/24/15
The Oregon Heritage Commission is offering grants for qualified projects for the conservation, development and interpretation of Oregon's cultural heritage. Awards typically range between $5,000 and $20,000. Projects can include anything related to Oregon heritage, and priority will be given to projects that preserve, develop or interpret threatened heritage resources or heritage resources of statewide significance. The grant application deadline is Sept. 30.

Projects may include theatrical performances, collections preservation and access, exhibits, oral history projects, public education events, organizational archives projects, films and more. Oregon Black Pioneers received funding for its most recent exhibit. Cascade AIDS Project collected oral histories and made them accessible. Portland State University hosted the Archaeology Roadshow. Southern Oregon Historical Society completed seismic upgrades to its collections storage.

"We hope to see a variety of projects that engage Oregonians in heritage," states Kyle Jansson, Oregon Heritage Commission coordinator. "We encourage the documentation, preservation and exploration of all aspects of Oregon's heritage."

Simple grant applications are online. There is plenty of support for preparing them.

"Our goal is to support organizations of all sizes all over the state in their valuable work. We provide assistance in the application process," notes Kuri Gill, the grants program coordinator.
Oregon Heritage grants programs staff is happy to discuss projects and review applications in advance.

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The commission's mission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity.

To learn more about the grants, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.

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ODF Fire Update for Friday, July 24, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/24/15
FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS

Rye Fire
The lightning-caused Rye Fire is burning near the Oregon / Washington border in grass and brush approximately 38 miles north of Enterprise in Northern Wallowa County, including Nez Perce Precious Lands near the Joseph Canyon area. The nature of the terrain and dry fuel conditions are making control difficult. The fire is estimated at 800 acres and was reported last night.

A local Type 3 incident management team supported by ODF and USFS personnel has taken control of the fire today. By the end of the day there are expected to be approximately 125 personnel on the fire. Additionally, air resources including helicopters, single engine air tankers (SEATs) and heavy air tankers are being utilized to try and minimize the amount of acres burned and damage to natural and cultural resources.

The near-term weather report calls for warm temperatures and a slight chance of more thunderstorms. The public is reminded that ODF is currently in Regulated Use Closure in Northeast Oregon. Fire managers recommend that the public check fire regulations before heading out to enjoy the forest.

NEWS MEDIA
News media may contact the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Cynthia Orlando, 503-945-7421 (office), 503-510-7972 (mobile), or Cynthia.A.Orlando@oregon.gov any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call.
Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

For information on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands view:
the department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
the Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.
the Blue Mountain Fire Information Blog with information about wildfire activity in the Blue Mountain area of NE OR and SE WA.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.

OTHER LINKS
Fire weather

Wildfire smoke forecasts

Wildfire smoke and air quality

Keep Oregon Green

Follow the Oregon Dept. of Forestry on Twitter & Facebook

Connect with us:
www.oregon.gov/ODF | social media | State Forests Online Community

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Deputies Serve Search Warrant (Photo)
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 07/24/15
2015-07/2993/86443/DSC_6733_comp.jpg
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Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley reports that on July 23, 2015, at about 7:07 a.m., the Linn County Sheriff's Office served a narcotics related search warrant at in the 30100 block of Horseshoe Loop in Lebanon. Five adults and a minor child, all who live at the location, were present at the time of the search.

Among the items seized from the residence was methamphetamine, packaging material, digital scales, surveillance equipment, drug paraphernalia, a police scanner, over $550 in U.S. Currency, three firearms, and stolen property. The stolen property consisted of 36 street/road signs, two all-terrain vehicles, and a Toyota Tacoma pickup. The property was stolen from Linn County, Lane County, and Marion County.

As a result of the investigation, Gary Dean Nofziger, 57 years of age, a resident of the address, was arrested and charged with Unlawful Delivery of Methamphetamine, Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine, Felon in Possession of a Firearm (three counts), Child Neglect in the First Degree, and Possession of Stolen Vehicle (three counts).

Frances Lea Branton, 59 years of age, a resident of the address, was arrested and charged with Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine and Endangering Welfare of a Minor.

Penny Sue Decosta, 54 years of age, a resident of the address, was arrested and charged with Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine and Endangering Welfare of a Minor.

The minor 16 year old child, who was Nofziger's granddaughter, was released to her mother.

The Linn County Sheriff's Office was assisted by the Lebanon Police Department, Sweet Home Police Department, Albany Police Department, Benton County Sheriff's Office and Drug Enforcement Administration.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/2993/86443/DSC_6733_comp.jpg , 2015-07/2993/86443/Penny_Decosta_2015.jpg , 2015-07/2993/86443/Gary_Nofziger_2015.jpg , 2015-07/2993/86443/Frances_Branton_2015.jpg
Equipment upgrades require overnight electricity interruption August 1 for Pacific Power customers
Pacific Power - 07/24/15
Area affected is the North Santiam Canyon including the communities of Gates, Lyons, Mehama, Mill City and surrounding areas.

North Santiam Canyon , Ore. - Approximately 3,000 Pacific Power customers in the Gates, Lyons, Mehama, and Mill City, as well as surrounding rural sections of the North Santiam Canyon, will be without electricity for part of Saturday, August 1st so Pacific Power crews can safely upgrade essential electrical equipment and facilities.

The outage is scheduled to begin at 2 a.m. Saturday August 1st and could last until 10 a.m., although power will be restored at the first opportunity.

Customers in the affected area have been notified individually about the outage. Lodging and restaurant operators are encouraged to make sure their guests are aware of the interruption, as well.

If customers have questions about the planned outage, they can call Pacific Power at 1-888-221-7070. Any outages during that time in other parts of the community should continue to be reported to Pacific Power at 1-877-508-5088.

###

About Pacific Power
Pacific Power provides electric service to more than 730,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. The company works to meet growing energy demand while protecting and enhancing the environment. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with almost 1.8 million customers in six western states Information about Pacific Power is available on the company's website, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube pages, which can be accessed via pacificpower.net.
Florida Man Killed, LaPine Woman Seriously Injured in Hwy 97 Crash
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 07/24/15
On July 23, 2015 at just after 9:00PM, OSP received at least one driving complaint of a southbound dark blue or black Ford Pickup driving on the shoulder of Highway 97 in southern Deschutes County.

At around 9:30PM, a trooper who had been attempting to locate the vehicle, observed it traveling at a high rate of speed on Highway 97 near milepost 176 (south of Lapine in Klamath County). The trooper checked it's speed on radar at or close to 100mph. While the trooper was attempting to overtake the vehicle, it crashed head-on with a northbound 2000 Honda Accord.

The subject of the driving complaint, Jeffery L BAUGHER, age 72, of Sarasota, FL, was pronounced deceased on scene. The operator of the Honda, Chamreun M NEWTON, age 30, of Lapine, was provided first aid by the trooper until medics arrived. She was subsequently taken by air ambulance to St Charles Bend for serious injuries.

Highway 97 was closed for several hours while the investigation was conducted. OSP was assisted on scene by Crescent Fire and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

This is a preliminary release; more information will be released when it becomes available.
07/23/15
Coos Bay Public Schools Public Meeting Schedule for late July & August, 2015
Coos Bay Sch. Dist. - 07/23/15
Below is the list of Coos Bay Public Schools Public Meetings currently scheduled for the end of July and the month of August, 2015. All meetings are held at Milner Crest Education Center, 1255 Hemlock Ave., Coos Bay, unless otherwise noted. The schedule is subject to change.

Special Board Meeting: July 28. The Board will convene in Executive Session at 4:30 PM based on ORS 192.660(2)(f) to consider information or records exempt by law from public inspection. The Special Board Meeting will begin at approximately 5:00 PM. The agenda is posted at the following link: http://cbd9.net/schoolboard/agendas. It is subject to change.
Policy Committee: August 10 at 9:00 AM. For more information, contact Adrian DeLeon at adriand@coos-bay.k12.or.us or 541-297-8115.
Special Board Meeting - Data Workshop: August 21 at 5:30 PM. Agenda and packet will be posted by August 18 at the following link: http://cbd9.net/schoolboard/agendas. It is subject to change.

Special Board Meeting - Annual Work Session: August 22 at 9:00 AM. Agenda and packet will be posted by August 18 at the following link: http://cbd9.net/schoolboard/agendas. It is subject to change.

For a list of all public meetings scheduled, go to http://cbd9.net/public-meetings-schedule

All Coos Bay School District Board Meetings are subject to the Public Meetings Law (ORS 192.610-192.710). The public is welcome to attend. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. Request for other accommodations should be made to Peggy Ahlgrim at 541-267-1310, 541-269-5366 (fax) or peggya@coos-bay.k12.or.us

Peggy Ahlgrim
Secretary to Superintendent and School Board
Coos Bay School District
1255 Hemlock Ave.
Coos Bay, OR 97420
541-267-1310 Ext. 1002
541-267-1308 Fax
Oregonians urged to deeply water trees (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/23/15
Water-starved trees like these in Eugene and Springfield can also be spotted in Portland and southern Oregon
Water-starved trees like these in Eugene and Springfield can also be spotted in Portland and southern Oregon
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/1072/86422/thumb_TreesAndWater.JPG
Oregon's weather this spring and summer has been anything but the norm, and while conditions have cooled off temporarily this week there's no doubt those high temps will return.

It's a good time to take stock of the numerous water-starved trees still being spotted in Oregon communities and urban centers.

"Recently planted trees are most susceptible to drought, but even established trees suffer," says Erik Burke, Eugene Director with Friends of Trees.

"If they aren't well-watered, warm weather and prolonged drought eventually make trees more susceptible to insect and disease problems," adds Burke.

"In Oregon, summer rains rarely provide the deep water that trees need," says Brighton West, Deputy Director in the Portland office of Friends of Trees. "If we get less than an inch of rain in a week, we go out watering trees," he adds.

When temperatures in Oregon get warm and stay warm, it can take a toll on trees as well as people. The Oregon Department of Forestry suggests a few tips for keeping your trees healthy during times of heat stress.

Symptoms of drought
One of the first signs that a deciduous tree (i.e., trees like birches or maples that drop leaves in the winter) needs water is that its leaves begin to look dull, and sometimes, limp.

More advanced symptoms of needing water are browning of leaves, wilting, and curling at the edges. Leaves may also develop a scorched or burned look, turning yellow or brown on outside edges, or between leaf veins. Leaves may even appear smaller than usual, drop prematurely, or turn brown but remain on the tree.

When drought-stressed, the needles of conifers (evergreen trees such as Ponderosa Pine or Douglas-fir) may turn yellow, red, purple or brown.

Watering tips

Given their benefits, longevity, and contributions to the environment, give your trees higher watering priority than lawns. Keep in mind that if trees are only provided with shallow water every so often, they're probably only getting a fraction of what they need. Watering trees for short periods of time encourages shallow rooting, which can lead to future health problems for the tree.

To make sure your tree gets the water it needs, saturate the soil within the drip line - that's the circle that could be drawn on the soil around the tree directly under the tips of its outermost branches. Using a regular hose or a soaker hose, water deeply and slowly - slowly is important, so the water doesn't run-off. To make sure it gets enough water, keep moving the hose around different areas under the tree.

For conifers, water 3 to 5 feet beyond the drip line on all sides of the tree. Also, if you have a choice, water trees during the cooler part of the day. Another way to water trees slowly is to put a nail hole in the bottom (near the edge) of a five gallon bucket. Fill the bucket with water, and leave the slowly leaking bucket under the canopy of the tree. Do this twice or three times per tree, moving the bucket each time.

Other tips: Use mulch
Using mulch is an excellent way to care for trees in warm weather as it helps the soil below trees retain moisture and stay cool. Mulch can be made of bark, wood chips, leaves and evergreen needles.

Apply mulch within the drip line, at a depth of four inches, leaving a six-inch space between the mulch and tree trunk. Mulch will also help discourage weeds.

Good tree care = a good investment

Trees and forests enhance quality of life in many ways, providing shade, wildlife habitat, clean air, wood and other products, raising property values, and providing clean, healthy streams. What's more, on hot days, we all rely on the shade of the trees in our yards and communities. Therefore, it is a really good idea to keep our trees healthy and watered.

Proper tree care - including deep watering of trees during hot summer and warm fall months - pays big dividends in the long run.

~ ~ ~

For more information about trees and tree care:
www.isa-arbor.com/
www.treesaregood.com/treecare/treecareinfo.aspx


Attached Media Files: Water-starved trees like these in Eugene and Springfield can also be spotted in Portland and southern Oregon , FriendsofTreesMascotDoug
Historic day as WOU transitions to independent board of trustees, new president
Western Oregon University - 07/23/15
MONMOUTH, Ore. - The inaugural Western Oregon University (WOU) Board of Trustees held its first meeting since taking on governance responsibility for the university on Wednesday, July 22. The board began by welcoming new President Rex Fuller. Both Fuller and the board began their roles on July 1. This historic event is the culmination of a year-long planning process that established the board.

The board approved repairing major electrical wiring at a cost from the general fund of approximately $500,000, and adopted the university's mission statement (see below). Fuller commented of the former that it's an "opportunity to invest in a one-time cost while maintaining a healthy reserve." The board also heard presentations from its committee chairs as well as several campus administrators, faculty and staff on topics such as student success, finance and administration, and governance.

Fuller was among those presenters. He discussed his first three weeks in office, and set forth his vision for WOU's future, detailing the important role it will play for students and the state of Oregon. "It's the personal touch that sets Western apart from other schools in the country," he said, adding that it's imperative that the campus moves forward thinking about how to build legacies and fulfill dreams. He said a critical piece of that is keeping WOU affordable for students.

"The inaugural meeting of the board in its official capacity was exciting and meaningful. I am pleased with the board's leadership and the interaction committee chairs have had with university leadership," Fuller said. "Todays' meeting established a very positive working relationship that will help the university move forward."

"The board is committed to Western's students and to the long term success of the university," said Jim Baumgartner, chair of the board. "We have organized a system of shared governance that will serve the university well. I am pleased with the dedication demonstrated by the board's trustees and by their commitment to make timely important decisions in support of Western."

WOU's mission statement
Western Oregon University is a comprehensive public university, operating for the public good, which:
?,? Provides effective learning opportunities that prepare students for a fulfilling life in a global society;
?,? Supports an accessible and diverse campus community; and,
?,? Improves continuously our educational, financial, and environmental sustainability.

The statement includes three core themes, which can be found at wou.edu/provost/MissionStatement.php.

About WOU
Western Oregon University (WOU), founded in 1856 and located in Monmouth, is Oregon's oldest public university. The university has received national recognition for excellence for its focus on student learning and success by the Education Trust, US. News and World Report, American Association of State Colleges and Universities, National Association of Academic Advisors, and Parade Magazine. In 2010 WOU was recognized by the Education Trust as being the top university in America at eliminating the Latino graduation gap. WOU is fully accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities.
It's Time to Get Ready: Join Us For Natural Disaster Preparedness Events
NW Natural - 07/23/15
American Red Cross, NW Natural and Community Partners Host Free Get Ready Events in September

PORTLAND, Ore. - With the next big earthquake on the minds of those in the Pacific Northwest, the American Red Cross and NW Natural are teaming up for the fourth year in a row to host a series of
Get Ready events throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington.

The events will be held during National Preparedness Month in September to help communities prepare for natural disasters and other emergencies. This year, Get Ready will be held in the seven communities of Portland, Vancouver, Salem, The Dalles, Lincoln County, Coos Bay, and the North Coast.

"Being prepared for an emergency will help give you and your family peace of mind," said Cara Sloman, regional disaster program officer for the American Red Cross Cascades Region. "These events are an effective way to get started with emergency planning because attendees will receive a lot of helpful information and giveaways."

Get Ready is free to the general public, and there is no need to register. Free lunch will be provided at most locations, as well as safety demonstrations, materials from local emergency groups, and kids' activities. The first 100 families at each event will receive a free emergency kit/tube. Attendees will also have the chance to enter a drawing to win an American Red Cross emergency kit.

"Each year, we're proud to partner with the Red Cross on these important community events," said Von Summers, NW Natural community affairs manager. "We want to make sure our customers are prepared for any disaster that might occur."

Local fire departments, police departments, and other emergency teams will join the American Red Cross Cascades Region and NW Natural at the following dates, times and locations:

Saturday, September 12, 2015:
Get Ready Salem - 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the State Capitol State Park Grounds in Salem.
Get Ready Lincoln County - Noon to 3 p.m. at the Lincoln County Fairgrounds in Newport.
Get Ready Vancouver - 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at CRESA Building, 710 W. 13th Street in Vancouver.
Get Ready Happy Valley - 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at City of Happy Valley's city hall outdoor area.
Get Ready Coos Bay - 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Coos Bay Fire Department, 450 Elrod Ave.

Saturday, September 19, 2015:
Get Ready The Dalles - 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Mid-Columbia Fire & Rescue, 1400 W. 8th Street in The Dalles.
Get Ready North Coast - 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Lum's Auto Center, 1605 SE Ensign Lane in Warrenton.

About the American Red Cross
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies more than 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or join our blog at redcross.org/or/portland.

About NW Natural
NW Natural (NYSE:NWN) is headquartered in Portland, Ore., and provides natural gas service to about 707,000 residential, commercial, and industrial customers in Oregon and Southwest Washington. It is the largest independent natural gas utility in the Pacific Northwest. Additional information is available at nwnatural.com.

# # # #
Rare Signed Copy of FDR's Inaugural Address Now on Display at the Oregon Historical Society (Photo)
Oregon Historical Society - 07/23/15
2015-07/2861/86413/FDR_Inaugural_Address_3.jpg
2015-07/2861/86413/FDR_Inaugural_Address_3.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/2861/86413/thumb_FDR_Inaugural_Address_3.jpg
Portland, OR - July 23, 2015 - One of the most iconic speeches ever given by a United States President is the first inaugural address of Franklin D. Roosevelt, delivered on March 4, 1933. Hoping to rally a nation suffering through the Great Depression and 25% unemployment, Roosevelt proclaimed, "Let me assert my belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself."

Part of the Portland-based Mark Family Collection, this rare copy, personally signed by Franklin Roosevelt, has been added to the Society's current exhibition World War II: A World at War, A State Transformed, on display at the museum now through December 7, 2015.

"We are delighted that the Mark family has added this priceless document to their collection, and are sharing it with the public through our newest exhibition," said Oregon Historical Society Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk. "FDR's eloquence inspired countless Americans to persevere through tough times, and it would later inspire our country, with its allies, to victory over the Axis powers."

Also recently acquired by the Mark Family Collection is a telex message written on May 7, 1945 from Dwight Eisenhower to the troops announcing the end of the war in Europe, and the cease fire order from Ronald Frederick King Belchem sent to the 21st army after the surrender of German forces in Northwest Germany, Holland, and Denmark. Both items will be added to the World War II exhibition this weekend.

The Oregon Historical Society's museum is open seven days a week, Monday - Saturday from 10am - 5pm and Sunday from 12pm - 5pm. Admission is $11, and discounts are available for students, seniors, and youth. OHS members and Multnomah County residents receive free admission every day. Thanks to a generous donation from Columbia Sportswear, all United States military veterans and active duty military will receive free admission throughout the run of the exhibit.



About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state's collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon's history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon's cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/2861/86413/FDR_Inaugural_Address_3.jpg , 2015-07/2861/86413/FDR_Inaugural_Address_2.jpg , 2015-07/2861/86413/FDR_Inaugural_Address.jpg
BPA announces new wholesale power and transmission rates (Photo)
Bonneville Power Administration - 07/23/15
BPA and the Bureau of Reclamation are refurbishing six hydroelectric turbines at Grand Coulee Dam in northeast Washington. The $275 million project is funded by BPA ratepayers.
BPA and the Bureau of Reclamation are refurbishing six hydroelectric turbines at Grand Coulee Dam in northeast Washington. The $275 million project is funded by BPA ratepayers.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/1236/86408/thumb_Grand-Coulee-Overhaul-G24-Runner-Removal.jpg
Portland, Ore. - The Bonneville Power Administration today adopted a 7.1 percent average wholesale power rate increase and a 4.4 percent average transmission rate increase for fiscal years 2016 and 2017. The rate increases support investments in the federal hydropower system and expansion of BPA's high-voltage transmission system to meet regional needs. The new rates will take effect Oct. 1.

"BPA has spent the past two years working with our customers and other regional partners to meet the collective needs of the Northwest in the most reliable, cost-effective and environmentally sustainable way possible," said BPA Administrator and CEO Elliot Mainzer. "The rates in the final record of decision reflect that collaborative effort."

Power rates
The increase in power rates is due to the expiration of debt management actions that reduced capital costs in the current BP-14 rate case; other capital-related costs; and expense increases for hydroelectric system operations and maintenance. Additional drivers behind the increase are: expected cost increases for fish and wildlife programs; an automatic cost escalation under the long-term 2012 Residential Exchange Program settlement, which provides benefits from the low-cost federal power system to eligible Northwest residential and small farm customers; an increase in BPA's cost of acquiring energy and transmission services to meet obligations to deliver power to off-system customers; and a reduction in BPA's long-term firm power sale to Alcoa.

To avoid a greater increase, BPA significantly cut its controllable costs through additional debt management actions, interest savings on expensing energy efficiency, reductions in undistributed internal expense and a decrease in operations and maintenance expenses for the Columbia Generating Station.

Transmission rates
The transmission rate increase stems mainly from the need for new construction and replacement of existing assets that will help maintain reliability; the facilitation of renewable resource integration; and the costs of requirements for reliability, cyber and security compliance.

With his final record of decision today, the administrator also adopted the settlement agreement that customers and BPA staff reached last September on most of the rates for ancillary and control area services.

The new rates will affect local retail utilities differently depending on the amount of power and type of services they purchase from BPA. Local utilities ultimately determine the retail impact of BPA rates on businesses and residents they serve.

Rate-setting process
BPA is a self-funded federal power marketing agency under the U.S. Department of Energy. It receives no congressional appropriations and sets its rates to ensure full recovery of its costs, including obligations to repay its debt to the U.S. Treasury. BPA reviews its wholesale power and transmission rates every two years through several public processes.

In January 2014, BPA, its utility customers and other stakeholders began an extensive nine-month review of Bonneville's programs, budgets and costs. This process, called the Integrated Program Review, provided parties an opportunity to review, challenge and comment on BPA's program spending levels. Following the IPR, BPA began the formal rate case in December by presenting its proposed rates for fiscal years 2016-2017 and supporting analysis.

In June, the administrator issued a draft decision on the rates. The formal rates process concluded today with the administrator's final record of decision. BPA's final rates will be filed with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission by the end of July to provide the required 60 days for review and interim approval. Final approval usually takes about a year. For more information about BPA's rate case process, visit: www.bpa.gov/goto/ratecase.

The decisions in this rate case set the stage for continuing regional discussions on issues that would benefit from further collaboration, including BPA's capital investments in the hydropower and transmission systems and BPA's program delivery models, including energy efficiency. It is expected that these discussions will begin this fall.


Attached Media Files: BPA and the Bureau of Reclamation are refurbishing six hydroelectric turbines at Grand Coulee Dam in northeast Washington. The $275 million project is funded by BPA ratepayers.
Marine Patrols Jet Off to Advanced On-Water Training (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 07/23/15
On water training during the Marine Board's 2014 Jet School
On water training during the Marine Board's 2014 Jet School
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/4139/86411/thumb_JetTng2014.JPG
The Oregon State Marine Board will conduct its weeklong law enforcement jet boat course on Rogue River during the week of July 26 - July 30. This intensive course focuses on boat operation, marine law, swift water rescue, and boat trailering.

The training focuses on honing boat operating skills. "This is critical training and this is the best place to do it," says Dale Flowers, Law Enforcement Training Coordinator for the Marine Board. "We've moved the training dates to this week so we have a minimal impact on recreation, but we still need to give the students room to work because they will be very focused -the wider the berth, the better." Students who attend the Marine Board's Whitewater Jet Boat Training bring a range of skills from the novice operator to advanced operator. "One of the goals of the training is to pair up an experienced marine deputy with a new jet boat operator. It's a one-of-a-kind learning opportunity for everyone who participates, and the only course in the nation with this level of attention," Flowers adds.

Signs will be posted at local access sites about the training operations and notices have also been sent to all the registered fishing guides in the area. In addition to boat handling exercises in whitewater conditions, marine deputies will also learn how to dis-assemble, service and reassemble jet pumps, learn anchoring and chocking techniques, and how to navigate all stages of whitewater rapids. "This kind of training is so important because fast action and skill can mean the difference between a saved life or not," Flowers says.

The Marine Board contracts with 32 Sheriff's Offices and the Oregon State Police for marine law enforcement services, including search and rescue operations, and boating safety education. Contracts with the County Sheriff's Offices are paid for through motorboat registrations and titling fees.

For more information about the Marine Board and law enforcement services, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/BoatLaws/pages/index.aspx.
###


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/4139/86411/WhitewaterJetTng2015.mp3 , On water training during the Marine Board's 2014 Jet School
State offers free retirement readiness seminars to employers, employees
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 07/23/15
Salem - A recent study found that nearly two-thirds of workers feel they are behind schedule planning and saving for retirement; only half have attempted to calculate how much money they will need in retirement. Oregon employers can help their employees tackle this difficult issue by hosting a free on-site retirement readiness seminar presented by the Department of Consumer and Business Services.

The department's Division of Finance and Corporate Securities, in partnership with the Social Security Administration, is offering free 45-minute retirement readiness seminars to all Oregon employers, regardless of size or if they offer retirement benefits. Seminars will discuss basic investing tools; cost of retirement living; how to choose a financial professional; protecting investments against scams and fraud; and Social Security retirement, disability, and survivor benefits. The seminars give employees online tools to track and apply for Social Security benefits, as well as printed materials. It is perfect for employee training or lunch breaks. The division also has a number of retirement and investment resources online at dfcs.oregon.gov.

"With the creation of the Oregon Retirement Security Fund by the Oregon Legislature this year, there has never been a better time for a discussion about retirement planning in the workplace," said David Tatman, division administrator. "Helping its employees prepare themselves for retirement is one of the most impactful things a business can do. These retirement readiness seminars provide a wealth of unbiased information and I hope that all employers in Oregon take advantage of this resource."

To schedule a retirement readiness seminar, contact Diane Childs at diane.m.childs@oregon.gov.

Before investing, remember that Oregon law requires firms and individuals offering investment products and providing advice to be licensed with the division. Always check that you are working with licensed professionals before you invest. This can be done online at dfcs.oregon.gov or by calling 866-814-9710 (toll-free).

###

The Division of Finance and Corporate Securities helps ensure that a wide range of financial products and services are available to Oregonians and protects consumers from financial fraud and abuse. It does that by licensing financial institutions and service providers, regulating the sale of securities in Oregon, investigating complaints and alleged violations of financial-service laws, and providing education and other resources to consumers.
07/22/15
Lebanon and other Linn County Fire Departments kept busy
Lebanon Fire Dist. - 07/22/15
Linn County Fire Departments were kept busy in and around Lebanon Wednesday when sparks from farm machinery started 3 small fires and and one large fire. Wheat stubble fields burned North of Lebanon near Honey Sign Rd in both the Lebanon and Albany Fire Districts. The 3 fires in that area burned approximately 3 acres total, with no damage to equipment or exposures. The fourth and largest fire was in the Brownsville Fire District with Lebanon Fire District assisting other Linn County Fire Departments.
Willamette Humane Society Announces Kitten-Kaboodle, a Salem Center Mall Adoption Center and Kitten Library! (Photo)
Willamette Humane Society - 07/22/15
Kitten Kaboodle Storefront
Kitten Kaboodle Storefront
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/4008/86398/thumb_Kitten_Kaboodle_Window_Cling.jpg
(Salem, OR)-- Willamette Humane Society's foster network is growing, saving more lives, and more adoption outlets are needed in the community to find homes for the animals!

Starting on Saturday, July 25th, you can adopt a kitten at the Salem Center Mall on Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday thanks to donated store space from Jones Lang LaSalle and Salem Center! Dogs will also be available for adoption on Wednesday market days. Visit Kitten-Kaboodle Adoption Center and support shelter pets!

The most exciting part of the new Salem Center store-front is that everyone can enjoy the Kitten Library, whether they intend to adopt or not! With a $10 donation, Salem Center visitors can check-out kittens of their choice and cuddle and play with them in the Kitten Library. The kitten library serves a dual purpose- providing socialization and enrichment for the kittens, and adoption awareness and entertainment for visiting families!

Willamette Humane Society invites the public to join in the fun starting on Saturday, July 25th at 12 pm as Kitten Kaboodle opens its doors for the first time, serving Salem Center visitors seasonally until November. The store will be primarily staffed with Willamette Humane Society volunteers, including foster parents and its youth service group- Humane-a-Teens. The kittens will come directly from their volunteer foster homes to the store during the day, and return with them in the evenings if not adopted. Adoptable animals at Kitten-Kaboodle won't spend any time in the store or at the shelter during closed hours.

Kitten-Kaboodle is located at Salem Center on the ground level by the Liberty and Chemeketa Street Entrance (by Chico's and Baskin-Robbins). Open hours are 1 - 5 pm on Wednesday, and 12 - 6 pm on Saturday and Sunday.

###

Willamette Humane Society (WHS) was founded in 1965 by local civic leaders to serve Marion and Polk Counties, Oregon. In 2013-2014, Willamette Humane Society provided compassionate services to 8,804 pets and 61,740 people. WHS offers pet adoption services, shelters surrendered or homeless cats and dogs, teaches responsible pet care, behavior and training -- and reduces pet over-population through its low-cost Spay and Neuter Clinic. WHS is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that relies on donor support and fees to accomplish its mission. It is governed by a volunteer Board of Directors and includes a 37 FTE member staff, and 980+ volunteers. For more information about Willamette Humane Society, visit whs4pets.org.


Attached Media Files: Kitten Kaboodle Press Release , Kitten Kaboodle Storefront , Kitten Library , Kitten Kaboodle Store , Kitten Kaboodle Logo
Oregon CAP To Conduct State Wide Exercise (Photo)
Oregon Civil Air Patrol - 07/22/15
Specially equipped Cessna 182 search aircraft will be used by the Oregon CAP for it's state wide exercise
Specially equipped Cessna 182 search aircraft will be used by the Oregon CAP for it's state wide exercise
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/1184/86389/thumb_Airborne-2.jpg
Portland, OR -

The Oregon wing of the Civil Air Patrol will be conducting a state wide exercise this coming weekend, July 25-26 with a collection of scenarios to train for, and test, the Oregon CAP's capability and preparedness to respond to various types of historically supported emergency situations.

With incident command centers located in Medford, Bend and Aurora, the CAP will conduct responses to both natural disasters, air search and rescue, and related operations that could be requested by state, local and federal authorities. Six aircraft and up to 100 members from around the state will comprise ground and air crew personnel to conduct various emergency flight and ground operations. These operations could be communications support to local authorities, search operations to locate missing persons or aircraft, high resolution digital photo reconnaisance, emergency medical support flights and transporting of critical supplies, equipment and personnel among other possible responses.

In addition to adult aircrew and ground staff, the CAP will utilize it's teenaged cadet members in various ground support operations such as communications, mission base operations, ground search and rescue operations and aircraft flightline activities under the guidance of an experienced adult member.

"Our cadet members are a crucial force multiplier during our missions" said LtCol Rosenberg. They perform essential tasks that have a tremendous impact on the success of our multitude of operational missions"

"The training we conduct during these evaluated tests and more routine training operations during the year are important to keep our skills current, apply new technology and procedures and to train our newer members who are interested in serving their communities and their country in time of emergency." he said.

The Oregon CAP has been credited with 5 search finds and 2 lives saved so far this year by the United States Air Force Rescue Coordination Center on actual search missions.

Civil Air Patrol, the official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force, is a nonprofit organization with more than 60,000 members nationwide. CAP, in its Air Force auxiliary role, performs 90 percent of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center and has been credited by the AFRCC with saving more than 100 lives this fiscal year. Its volunteers also perform homeland security, disaster relief and counterdrug missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies. The members play a leading role in aerospace education and serve as mentors to over 25,000 young people currently participating in CAP cadet programs. CAP has been performing missions for America for more than 68 years. For more information on CAP, please visit www.gocivilairpatrol.com

MEDIA NOTE:
Members of the media are encouraged to visit the CAP mission bases at the Medford Airport and
Aurora State Airport (North end) during the exercise. No media flights will be conducted, but there will be opportunities to conduct interviews. PLEASE RSVP so we know if you will be coming to thomtra@aol.com


Attached Media Files: Specially equipped Cessna 182 search aircraft will be used by the Oregon CAP for it's state wide exercise
Keizer Man Indicted On Murder
Marion Co. Dist. Attorney's Office - 07/22/15
Christopher Marquis Lauderdale (date of birth 9/30/1987) was arraigned today at the Marion County Court Annex before the Honorable Donald D. Abar on an indictment alleging Murder with a Firearm for the death of Roderick Adams on July 9, 2015. The indictment also charges Mr. Lauderdale with Felon in Possession of a Firearm, Unlawful Use of a Weapon, and Attempted Felon in Possession of a Firearm. A criminal investigation led by the Salem Police Department has been ongoing since.

Lauderdale is currently being held at the Marion County Jail without bail. The matter has been assigned to the Honorable Vance D. Day. The case will be before Judge Day on Wednesday, July 29, 2015 at 1:10 p.m. for a status conference at the Marion County Courthouse located at 100 High Street in Salem.

Murder is an unclassified felony in Oregon and carries a mandatory sentence of life imprisonment with a minimum of 25 years.

As this case is pending, the Marion County District Attorney's Office will not release further details at this time.
Nominate for 2015 Oregon Governor's Volunteer Awards
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 07/22/15
yearernororr

Kathleen Joy, Oregon Volunteers
(503) 725-8037
kathleen@oregonvolunteers.org

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 22, 2015

Last Two Weeks to Nominate for 2015 Oregon Governor's Volunteer Awards

PORTLAND, Ore. -- Nominations are now being accepted for the 2015 Governor's Volunteer Awards, conducted by Oregon Volunteers Commission for Voluntary Action and Service. These awards distinguish individuals, programs and organizations for creating positive change through volunteerism across the state. Thanks to the generous support of Wells Fargo, our event presenting sponsor, a cash award of up to $500 will be given to a non-profit chosen by each state and regional volunteer award recipient.

"I am inspired by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s call to action," said Governor Kate Brown. Dr. King said "Everybody can be great...because anybody can serve. You don't have to have a college degree to serve. You don't have to make your subject and verb agree to serve. You only need a heart full of grace. A soul generated by love."

"I believe Oregon is great," continued Governor Brown, "because so many Oregonians serve their communities by volunteering their time and expertise. I want to call on all Oregonians to nominate outstanding volunteers throughout Oregon for this year's Governor's Volunteer Awards."

Governor's Volunteer Awards information and the nomination form are online at www.oregonvolunteers.org/events/gva. There is no cost to enter a nomination. The nomination deadline is 11:59 p.m. on Sunday, August 2, 2015.

The awards are given at both the regional and statewide levels in the following categories:
- Adult Volunteer or Duo (age 19-64)
- Elder Volunteer or Duo (age 65 or better)
- Youth Volunteer or Duo (age 18 and younger)
- Lifetime Achievement (individual or duo - at least 10 years of service in Oregon)
- Youth Volunteer Program
- Small Business Volunteer Program (15 or fewer employees)
- Large Business Volunteer Program (16+ employees)
- Community Based Volunteer Program
- Statewide Business Volunteer Program (any size - active in 3 or more regions)
- Statewide Community Based Volunteer Program (active in 3 or more regions)
- AmeriCorps Alumni (recognizes the volunteer efforts of members AFTER they have completed a year of AmeriCorps service)

Through an intense review process, award recipients will be chosen and then honored at a luncheon October 12, 2015, at the Salem Conference Center.

# # #
Oregon Folklife Network to receive National Endowment for the Arts Grant Award
Oregon Arts Commission - 07/22/15
[Eugene, OR]-- Through its grant-making to thousands of nonprofits each year, the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) promotes opportunities for people in communities across America to experience the arts and exercise their creativity.

In the second major grant announcement of fiscal year 2015, the NEA will make a $30,000 award to the Oregon Folklife Network to continue its ongoing statewide Folklife Survey which began in 2013. The NEA will make 1,023 awards totaling $74.3 million nationwide in this funding round.

NEA Chairman Jane Chu said, "The NEA is committed to advancing learning, fueling creativity, and celebrating the arts in cities and towns across the United States. Funding these new projects like the one from Oregon Folklife Network represents an investment in both local communities and our nation's creative vitality."

OFN's Executive Director, Riki Saltzman, commented, "We are thrilled to have this support to continue our documentation of Oregon's living cultural heritage. This award will fund Oregon's folklife survey in Union, Wallowa, Baker, Grant, Wheeler, Crook and Deschutes counties."

During the next year, through July 2016, the Oregon Folklife Network will work with veteran folklorist Douglas Manger to identify culture keepers in eastern Oregon. Manger will also be mentoring emerging folklorists as he documents regional, ethnic, and occupational folklore of Asian, Latino, and European groups as well as such occupations as ranching, logging, mining, hunting, railroad and orchard working, farming, fishing, and other waterways traditions along with foodways, music, quilting, rodeo-related activities, cowboy poetry, saddle making, trapping, storytelling, and more.

The OFN's statewide survey has so far identified over 80 folk and traditional artists in 11 counties along the Columbia River Gorge and Southern Oregon as well as at the Klamath Tribes, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, the Confederated Tribes of Umatilla, and the Burns Paiute. OFN not only preserves this documentation in archives for research and education, but partners with local and state organizations to refer tradition bearers and folk artists for programs in parks, arts organizations, libraries, or festivals.

Please contact Riki Saltzman, riki@uoregon.edu, or Emily West, eafanado@uoregon.edu, by email or phone 541-346-3820, if you know of folks who should be contacted.

To join the Twitter conversation about this announcement, please use #NEASpring2015. For more information on projects included in the NEA grant announcement, go to arts.gov
2015 Albany Police Citizen's Academy
Albany Police - 07/22/15
The 2015 Albany Police Department Citizen's Police Academy will be held on Tuesday evenings, 6:00 p.m. - 9:00p.m., September 1-November 10, 2015. The Citizen's Police Academy is a unique concept in law enforcement and community relations. As part of a continuing commitment to develop citizen awareness and understanding of the role of law enforcement, the Albany Police Department has designed an academy course for citizens of all backgrounds and occupations. The Academy is offered free to Albany citizens who are 18 years or older and who pass a criminal background check.

The Citizen's Police Academy consists of interactive classroom and hands-on instruction. Topics include, but are not limited to: patrol procedures, investigation skills, K-9 unit, building searches, crime prevention, and use of firearms.

If you would like to participate in this year's Academy, please complete an application online at http://www.cityofalbany.net/departments/police/about-apd/citizens-police-academy. Applications are due by Friday, August 21, 2015. If you have questions or need additional information, please contact Community Education Specialist Sandy Roberts at 541-917-3206.

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Oregon Virtual Academy
Oregon Virtual Academy - 07/22/15
Regular meeting of the Board of Directors July 27, 2015.
OSP Continuing Shooting Investigation - Josephine County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 07/22/15
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2015-07/1002/86372/Courtesy_JCSO.jpg
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On July 21, 2015 at about 6:00PM, OSP Troopers and the Josephine County Sheriff's Department responded to the report of a menacing at 808 Placer Road in Sunny Valley. An initial 911 call to Josephine County 911 indicated that the caller had a gun pointed at him. While troopers were responding, information came in that shots had been fired and two people had been shot.

Upon arriving on scene, emergency personnel found two males suffering from gunshot wounds. Brian LEQUE, age 42, and Robert GREINKE, age 41, both of Sunny Valley, were suffering from gunshot wounds. Both were taken to a local hospital for treatment.

Preliminary investigation reveals that both LEQUE and GREINKE reside at the same residence and are neighbors to Donald W BARRETT, age 65. A disturbance occurred which resulted in BARRETT shooting LEQUE and GREINKE. BARRETT was subsequently arrested and lodged at the Josephine County Jail for two counts of Assault I and two counts of Unlawful Use of a Weapon.

This is an ongoing investigation and further information will be released when it is available.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1002/86372/Courtesy_JCSO.jpg
07/21/15
Eugene Man Loses Life In Motorcycle Crash - Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 07/21/15
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On July 21, 2015 at about 12:30PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a motorcycle versus dump truck crash on Highway 99S near Dillard Road (just north of Creswell).

Preliminary information is that a 1979 Mack dump truck towing a dump trailer (both registered to McKenzie Trucking and loaded with crushed rock) was traveling southbound on Highway 99S when it turned eastbound onto Dillard Road and into the path of a northbound 2006 Suzuki motorcycle. The motorcyclist, Kevin K PESCHEL, age 43, of Eugene, collided with the right front corner of the truck and was seriously injured. PESCHEL was transported to a local hospital where he died from his injuries.

The driver of the truck, Adam J METTEER, age 29, of Springfield, was not injured and is cooperating with the investigation. OSP was assisted by the Lane County Sheriff's Department, South Lane Fire and EMS, and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

This is an ongoing investigation and more information will be released when it is available.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1002/86369/100_0330.JPG
Injured Wildland Fire Fighter Rescued
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 07/21/15
Linn County Undersheriff Jim Yon reports on Monday July 20, at 10:10pm, the Sheriff's Office received a call from the U.S. Forest Service requesting assistance from Linn County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue for an injured Wildland fire fighter. Michael Lee Burri, 31 years old from Estacada, sustained a broken leg while working with a 21 person Mount Hood Initial Attack Fire Team that had been fighting a small fire near road 11 off Quartzville road.

Sweet Home Fire Department paramedics initially were dispatched to the scene. Two medics hiked in approximately 3 miles to Burri. Once on scene, they recognized an air rescue would be the safest way to remove Burri.

Linn County SAR worked in coordination with Oregon Air National Guard to get a United States Coast Guard helicopter to the area to attempt a rescue. The Coast Guard helicopter arrived in the area at 03:00am. As the Coast Guard helicopter attempted to land, air from the blades caused the fire to quickly stir up. The fire, along with the rough terrain, made the rescue not possible. The Coast Guard helicopter did not attempt another rescue.

Linn County SAR had been on standby up until this point and now responded to the trailhead. They cleared a secondary landing zone for a helicopter. At day light, a National Parks Service MD 900 helicopter, out of Redmond, was successfully able to air lift Burri out. They had to use a rope and harness because the helicopter was not able to land. Burri was taken to the secondary landing area, loaded into the helicopter, and then transported to the Albany Municipal Airport. Burri was transferred to an Albany Fire Department ambulance and taken to Good Samaritan Hospital in Corvallis.

Linn County Sheriff's Office had a total of 18 members from SAR involved with the operation, along with 2 members from the Sweet Home Fire Department. Other agencies involved were the U.S. Forest Service, United States Coast Guard, and the National Parks Service.
Sheriff Jason Myers Promotes Two Sergeants to Lieutenant (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/21/15
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Today friends, family and co-workers gathered as Sheriff Jason Myers administered the oath of office to his two newest Lieutenants. The ceremony was commenced in the court yard located at the Marion County Jail.

Lieutenant Nick Hunter will be assigned to our Enforcement Division and Lieutenant Jay Bergmann to our Parole and Probation Division. Please help us in congratulating our newest Lieutenants in their promotion and wishing them well in their new career path.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1294/86365/IMG_6275.JPG , 2015-07/1294/86365/IMG_6194_1.JPG
Second Annual Camp Prepare! on August 1 Aims to Get People Prepared for a Major Disaster (Photo)
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 07/21/15
All it takes is a tent, a disaster kit and a parcel of grass to participate in Camp Prepare!
All it takes is a tent, a disaster kit and a parcel of grass to participate in Camp Prepare!
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Over the past two weeks, much attention has been given to the Cascadia Subduction Zone (https://www.google.com/search?q=new+yorker+cascadia), and the havoc and devastation wreaked by this severe seismic activity. When this quake occurs, you want to be ready!

Camp Prepare! on Saturday, August 1, is a great way to test your disaster kit and see what it would be like to survive after a calamity. Conceived by the American Red Cross Cascades Region in 2014, the event aims to get people to live off their disaster kit for one night by camping out - whether it's pitching a tent in your back yard or packing up your camping gear and heading to a state park. The idea is to spend one night living without the comforts of electricity, running water or technology (with the exception of Red Cross apps).

"There is a lot of overlap in what people have in a preparedness kit and what you would bring on a camping trip," says Melinda McGoldrick, preparedness and partnerships manager for the American Red Cross Cascades Region. "Camp Prepare! is a great reason to update your kits and find out if your current supplies are going to work in a real post-disaster situation."

Common items used for camping such as water, canned food, flashlights, extra batteries and first aid supplies are just a few of the items that should be in a disaster preparedness kit. While the Red Cross recommends at least a three-day supply of food and water, larger disasters may require people to have enough supplies to live comfortably for several weeks as may be the case when the Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake hits.

Henry Soderberg, preparedness coordinator for the Southwest Oregon Chapter of the American Red Cross, took part in the first Camp Prepare! He says that having an opportunity to check out his kit in advance to get ready for the camp out was a great way to see what items he needed to add or update. "I camped with other Red Cross team members," says Henry," and we shared food and other items. This really highlighted the importance of being part of a community that is prepared."

To participate and become an official "camper," visit www.redcross.org/campprepare. In addition to camping registration, the website also offers useful information about what belongs in a typical Preparedness Kit and what to do before, during and after common disasters

Participants are encouraged to take photos, post to Facebook, Tweet or share their experience in other ways. Registrants who submit a photo, or post to Facebook and "share" with the Red Cross, will be entered in a drawing for a Red Cross T-shirt!


About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies more than 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit www.redcross.org/cascades. Or, read about Red Cross volunteers at http://redcrosscascade.blogspot.com/.


Attached Media Files: All it takes is a tent, a disaster kit and a parcel of grass to participate in Camp Prepare! , During the first Camp Prepare!, in 2014, Red Cross volunteers group camped at Champoeg Park outside of Newberg to test their disaster kits.
BPA shares new collection of historical films (Photo)
Bonneville Power Administration - 07/21/15
BPA is sharing seven films from the 1950s, '60s,'70s and '80s that showcase the innovation and expertise behind designing, operating and maintaining the Northwest power system.
BPA is sharing seven films from the 1950s, '60s,'70s and '80s that showcase the innovation and expertise behind designing, operating and maintaining the Northwest power system.
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Portland, Ore.- The Bonneville Power Administration is sharing a new collection of movies about the history of energy in the Northwest. "BPA Film Collection, Volume Two, 1950-1987," features five BPA-produced films from the 1950s, '60s,'70s and '80s, plus two bonus films.

BPA is offering a free DVD of the films. To receive a copy, contact the BPA Library and Visitor Center at 800-622-4520 or visitorcenter@bpa.gov. You can also view, share and learn more about the seven films at www.bpa.gov/goto/films.

After promoting the development of the Federal Columbia River Power System and the concept of public power in its earlier films, BPA began telling stories about the challenges and successes of operating the Northwest power grid, and educating the public about the many benefits of its low-cost electricity.

"This chapter of BPA films showcases the innovation and expertise behind designing, operating and maintaining the Northwest power system. And a lot of that equipment is still in use today," says BPA librarian Kaye Silver.

The collection is a highly-anticipated follow-up to "BPA Film Collection, Volume One, 1939-1954," the first group of films from BPA's archives. Since its release last year, BPA has distributed about 3,000 copies to electric utilities, libraries, museums and individuals throughout the Northwest, every corner of the country and beyond. Requests came from as far away as Scotland.

"The first volume was a historian's delight and volume two proves to be just as fascinating," says Laurence Cotton, who specializes in regional history and guides history-themed cruises on the Columbia and Snake Rivers.

The collection opens with "Stringing and Sagging a High-Voltage Transmission Line" (1950), a richly detailed film about power engineering that uses animation, tower models and field footage to show how Bonneville built the largest long-distance transmission system of its kind in the nation. The next BPA movie, "The World Behind Your Light Switch" (1966), explains the thousands of uses of electricity and shows crews repairing power lines in bad weather. It includes footage of the first repair of the underwater cable serving the San Juan Islands, the laying of which was depicted in a 1952 BPA film called "25,000 Volts Under the Sea," part of the first collection.

In 1963, BPA and the Bureau of Reclamation co-produced "Great River," which covers many aspects of delivering electricity and water to the people of the Northwest. A decade later, it was re-released with a new beginning and ending by Portland-area newscaster Ted Bryant. The 1973 version is included in the set.

The final two BPA-produced films in the collection won numerous awards. "Intertie" (1969) showcases the construction of the Pacific Northwest-Pacific Southwest Direct Current Intertie, a high-voltage electric superhighway that helps the two regions balance power needs in the West and share surplus electricity. It features spectacular aerial footage, bluegrass music and time-lapse construction of the Celilo Converter Station, the line's northern terminus in The Dalles, Ore.

Made for Bonneville's 50th anniversary in 1987, "River of Power" is the most comprehensive BPA film. It looks at the geology of the Columbia River Basin and the development of the river, incorporating footage from earlier BPA films. It also features alternate recordings of some of the Columbia River songs written by Woody Guthrie for BPA in 1941.

There are two bonus films in the collection. "Action on the Columbia" (1964) captures the Canadian perspective on the Columbia River Treaty, the international agreement between Canada and the United States that guides the management of water resources and helps prevent major floods. It features spectacular aerial views of the upper Columbia River in British Columbia before the dams went in. With permission of BC Hydro, this film is included in the collection in honor of the 50th anniversary of the treaty.

The collection closes with a rediscovered version of BPA's first film, "Hydro." Vice President Henry Wallace took this shorter version of the 1939 film on a goodwill visit to Russia, Mongolia and China in the spring of 1944. BPA writer-producer Stephen Kahn also screened this version for audiences in New York City. Until recently there was no copy of it in BPA's archives. But last spring, a BPA electrical engineer bought a 16-millimeter reel from an antique store in Vancouver, Wash., which turned out to be the lost international version of "Hydro."

For more information or to host a screening of the films, email BPA librarian Libby Burke at eaburke@bpa.gov. Transcripts of the films are also available.


Attached Media Files: BPA is sharing seven films from the 1950s, '60s,'70s and '80s that showcase the innovation and expertise behind designing, operating and maintaining the Northwest power system. , To receive your free DVD, contact the BPA Library and Visitor Center at 800-622-4520 or visitorcenter@bpa.gov.
31st Annual Bike MS to Cycle through the Willamette Valley Countryside July 31 - Aug. 2 (Photo)
National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Oregon Chapter - 07/21/15
Bike MS Willamette Valley July 31- Aug 2
Bike MS Willamette Valley July 31- Aug 2
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For Immediate Release: Tuesday, July 21,2015

National MS Society, Oregon Chapter holds recreational cycling event to benefit multiple sclerosis research, support programs

PORTLAND - With 100 Bike MS rides across the U.S. in 2015, there's a Bike MS ride coming soon to Oregon. In the first weekend of August, the 31st annual 2015 Bike MS Willamette Valley takes cyclists on two days of recreational rides through the rolling hills, wildlife preserves, historic towns, and water features of the Willamette Valley countryside.

The 2015 Bike MS Willamette Valley ride kicks off Friday, July 31 at Western Oregon University in Monmouth, Oregon with an opening night party and karaoke sing-a-long. On Saturday, Aug. 1, riders of all levels loop anywhere from 33-100 miles, refuel at fully-stocked rest stops, enjoy BBQ, a beer garden, and movie night under the stars. Event participants roll to a close on Sunday, Aug. 2 with a 35 or 50 mile ride and lunch.

Anyone 12 or older is invited to participate. Participants receive free campsites and RV spaces near event festivities (first come, first served), on-route bike repair and safety support, before/after-ride meals and entertainment, and a celebration back at Western Oregon University. Riders cycle with others at their own pace, and gain a sense of accomplishment by crossing a finish line that helps the Society get that much closer to finding a cure.

The 31st annual ride marks one of the largest fundraisers for the National MS Society, Oregon Chapter. Cyclists pay a registration fee of $35 - $95 and commit to raising at least $250. Those raising more than $5,000 are given a pass to all one hundred Bike MS rides across the country. Nearly 75% of what's raised directly funds programs and services to help those impacted by MS lead their best lives, and helps researchers find both a cause and a cure.

As Sheila Mawdsley, Bike MS Willamette Valleys's 2015 "I Ride with MS" co-ambassador says, "You don't have to ride 100 miles--you don't even have to ride 33. Just do what you can and be a part of the synergy created with hundreds of other people wanting to end MS in its tracks. You are important to the cause."

Register for the event at bikeMS.org > Oregon

Where Does the Money Go?

The 2014 Bike MS Willamette Valley ride generated $655,000; the goal for 2015 is $761,000. Our supporters' generous contributions help serve local friends and neighbors affected by MS by: supporting research and training projects aimed at finding the cause of MS, better treatments and a cure. Informing and educating people with MS about a variety of issues through newsletters, publications, education seminars and conferences, and at-home teleconferences. Providing direct support and financial assistance for the FDA-approved medications, medical equipment, counseling services, respite, care management, college scholarships, and other emergency assistance. Supporting emotional health and physical well-being through wellness programs, wellness grants, exercise classes, retreats, a network of self-help groups, a peer support telephone program, and so much more.

What is Multiple Sclerosis (MS)?

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with more than twice as many women as men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

Learn More About Bike MS
Visit bikeMS.org > Oregon
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About the National Multiple Sclerosis Society

The Society mobilizes people and resources to drive research for a cure and to address the challenges of everyone affected by MS so that they can live their best lives as we stop MS in its tracks, restore what has been lost, and end MS forever. In 2014, the Society invested $50.2 million to advance more than 380 research projects around the world. Through our comprehensive nationwide network of programs and services, we also invested $122.2 million to help more than one million individuals affected by MS connect to the people, information and resources needed to live their best lives.

More About the Oregon Chapter

The Oregon Chapter serves more than 8,100 individuals with MS and their families in Oregon and SW Washington. We help people affected by MS by funding cutting-edge research, driving change through advocacy, facilitating professional education, and providing programs and services that help people with MS and their families move their lives forward. The Oregon Chapter was established in 1963.

National MS Society, Oregon Chapter
5331 SW Macadam Ave, Ste. 290
Portland, OR 97239
www.DefeatMS.com

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Attached Media Files: Bike MS Willamette Valley July 31- Aug 2
Beware of phone scam targeting utility customers
Pacific Power - 07/21/15
Pacific Power urges customers to verify any phone calls about their account by calling
1-888-221-7070

PORTLAND, Ore. - Pacific Power is warning its customers and the public of a phone scam targeting utility customers in the Northwest where criminals posing as utility customer service agents are trying to get money and steal personal information.

The fraud is occurring nationwide, but recent days have seen an upsurge in the Northwest. The thieves sometimes use sophisticated deceptive tactics that make it appear to Caller ID systems that the scam call is coming from the utility when it is not. If customers receive such a call, hang up and instead call 1-888-221-7070 to verify the call's origins.
Pacific Power call center agents can be reached any time day or night, toll free at 1-888-221-7070. That is the only number to call for any customer service you need or if you suspect a call may not actually be from Pacific Power.

"So far, this has affected a relatively small number of cust
omers, but any customer being taken advantage of in this way is one too many," said Valerie Smith, director of customer service. "We encourage any customer who has been contacted in this manner to report the contact to local law enforcement."

In order to help customers recognize the fraudulent calls, in general, the scam goes like this:
Scammers call residential or business customers demanding payment for overdue bills. Sometimes, the caller tells the intended victim that they owe a specific amount of money. The thief then typically advises the customer to make a payment by going to a local store to purchase a pre-paid card and provide the pre-paid card's code to the phony "agent."
Pacific Power wants customers to be aware that this is a scam and not a legitimate request. Pacific Power does not use these methods. If such a call is received, hang up and call 1-888-221-7070 to inquire about the call with Pacific Power.

When Pacific Power contacts a customer, the representative will always already have the customer's account number. Even then, if you are contacted by phone and have any concerns about the validity of the call, it is always appropriate to let the caller know you prefer to call them back at the utility's published customer service number--1-888-221-7070.
Pacific Power cautions that customers should never provide unsolicited callers or visitors with credit card numbers or any other information that may compromise their financial security.

Anyone receiving such calls or other contact regarding their utility account or bill is encouraged to pay close attention to any information - such as the phone number they are asked to call, a number that appears on caller ID, an address where they're told to send money- and then call 1-888-221-7070 to report the incident to local police and Pacific Power.
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About Pacific Power
Pacific Power provides electric service to more than 730,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. The company works to meet growing energy demand while protecting and enhancing the environment. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with almost 1.8 million customers in six western states Information about Pacific Power is available on the company's website, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube pages, which can be accessed via pacificpower.net.
07/20/15
Burglary Suspect Arrested In Harrisburg
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 07/20/15
Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley reports his deputies assisted the Lane County Sheriff's Office with the apprehension of a home invasion burglary suspect on Sommerville Place in Harrisburg.

Yesterday at 10:01 A.M. Linn County deputies arrived at a home located on Sommerville Place to assist the Lane County Sheriff's Office with locating a home invasion burglary suspect, 39-year-old James David Reese, a transient from Lane County. Deputies were granted entry to the residence and could hear movement in the attic. Deputies discovered that Reese made entry to the attic of the residence through the bathroom ceiling in an attempt to hide from deputies.

Deputy Sheriff Dave Francis and his K-9 partner Barry were called to the scene. Verbal commands were given to Reese to come out of the attic with no response. K-9 Barry was sent into the attic and found Reese hiding under ceiling insulation. Reese refused to comply with commands, at which time K-9 Barry bit Reese on the right hip. Reese continued to resist while K-9 Barry held him for deputies to place him in handcuffs.

During this incident, Reese sustained minor injuries to his right hip area. Reese was taken into custody by the Lane County Sheriff's Office and transported to River Bend Hospital in Eugene for medical treatment. Reese was later lodged in the Lane County Jail for charges of Burglary I, Robbery III, Theft I and Possession of Methamphetamine.
Linn Search & Rescue Assist Injured Climber (Photo)
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 07/20/15
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Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley reports on Sunday July 19, at 9:05 a.m. his office received a call stating a male had fallen approximately 20 feet while climbing in the Mt. Washington wilderness area. 47-year old Jeffry Scott Hess from Corvallis sustained a broken ankle after a rock gave way causing him to fall.

Hess's climbing partner Jake Ford 31-years old from Lebanon along with the assistance of three other climbers in the area, started carrying Hess down the mountain. Members of Linn County Search and Rescue hiked in and helped carry Hess out to the Pacific Crest Trail Head arriving over 11 hours after receiving the original call. Hess was transported to Good Samaritan hospital in Corvallis.

Linn County Search and Rescue (SAR) had 28 members respond to the search. SAR members were assisted by six members from Corvallis Mountain Rescue.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/2993/86340/sar.7.19.15.jpg
10 Ways to Strengthen Oregon Communities and Create a Culture of Preparedness (Photo)
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 07/20/15
As AmeriCorps members with the American Red Cross Shiela Peralta (left) and Kelsey Decker conducted outreach activities around the state and presented disaster preparedness programs to more than 6,000 students in the Portland metropolitan area.
As AmeriCorps members with the American Red Cross Shiela Peralta (left) and Kelsey Decker conducted outreach activities around the state and presented disaster preparedness programs to more than 6,000 students in the Portland metropolitan area.
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The Oregon State Service Corps (AmeriCorps) is accepting applications for positions with the American Red Cross in Oregon

July 20, 2015 - PORTLAND, OR. - Kelsey Decker and Shiela Peralta are as different as two young women can be. Kelsey traveled the world working with non-profit groups. Shiela is interested in business and a social media maven. They found commonality at the American Red Cross Cascades Region last fall when they came on board as Emergency Preparedness Coordinators as part of the Oregon State Service Corps AmeriCorps program. Over the past year they learned new skills, gained program management experience, contributed to community-program building, acquired self-confidence, made business contacts and new friends.

In the course of her participation in AmeriCorps with the Red Cross, Shiela says she found herself becoming more assertive, more outgoing and better able to work with diverse audiences. "This has been a great experience and I am glad that I was able to contribute in such a meaningful way to our community," she says.

AmeriCorps is a National Service movement with roots in the Peace Corps and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). AmeriCorps provides thousands of Americans of all ages and backgrounds with an opportunity to address pressing community needs by completing a year of service. In exchange for their service, AmeriCorps members receive a small living allowance and an education award.

Program Director Mark Johnson says that AmeriCorps placement opportunities are available in the areas of disaster services, education, healthy futures, economic opportunity, veterans and military families, and/or volunteer generation. "These are priority areas," says Mark. "In disaster services, for example, members' service will help individuals and communities prepare, respond, recover and mitigate disasters and increase community resiliency."

The following positions are currently open within the American Red Cross Cascades Regions. While many are based in Portland, there are opening in other communities such as Eugene, Bend, Salem and Medford.

Disaster Preparedness and Safety Coordinator (Eugene)
Disaster Preparedness Coordinator (Portland-2, Salem-1, Bend - 1, Medford-1)
Disaster Services Recruitment Coordinator (Portland)
Humanitarian Services Recruitment Coordinator (Portland)
Red Cross Preparedness Communication Coordinator (Portland)
Red Cross Youth Club Coordinator (Portland)

To apply for any of these positions, visit http://www.osscamericorps.org/#!openpositions/cee5. Applications will be accepted through July 30, 2015.


About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies more than 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit www.redcross.org/cascades. Or, read about Red Cross volunteers at http://redcrosscascade.blogspot.com/.


Attached Media Files: As AmeriCorps members with the American Red Cross Shiela Peralta (left) and Kelsey Decker conducted outreach activities around the state and presented disaster preparedness programs to more than 6,000 students in the Portland metropolitan area.
Camp Rosenbaum: America's Best Kept Secret, unique citizenship camp aims to keep at-risk kids off drugs, and in school
Oregon Military Department - 07/20/15
WARRENTON, Oregon -- The Oregon National Guard partners once again with Home Forward (formerly the Housing Authority of Portland) and the Portland Police Bureau, as well as other local law enforcement and fire agencies to host an annual summer camp for at-risk youth, July 20 - 24, 2015 at Camp Rilea in Warrenton, Oregon.

Camp Rilea is located at; 33168 Patriot Way, Warrenton, Oregon, 97146.

Camp Rosenbaum, one of the most unique camps for underprivileged and at-risk children, hosts approximately 160 children, ages 9-11. Attendees experience a one-of-a-kind camp that aims to teach good citizenship skills, motivate kids to stay in school, remain drug-free and out of gangs and encourages them to set positive goals for the future.

What started in 1970 as a way to help at-risk youth living in public housing in Oregon and Southwest Washington, has since resulted in thousands of children experiencing this life-changing camp. Staff and volunteers from the Oregon Air National Guard, Portland Police Bureau, Home Forward (formerly the Housing Authority of Portland), and other housing authority employees throughout Oregon and SW Washington, emergency responder personnel and volunteers who come together to make this camp a magical and memorable week for the kids.

"There is no other camp in the U.S. that's as collaborative nor as determined as we are to keep kids off drugs and in school," says current Camp Director, Oregon Air National Guard Lt. Col. Sara Perkins.

In addition to participating in various camp activities, all campers attend a two-hour Gang Resistance and Education Training course, taught by a Portland Police officer, and receive mentorship on contributing to their communities in positive ways.

"We do our very best to set them up for success," Perkins said. "We model good citizenship behaviors, engage and motivate our campers and encourage them to make good decisions for their future and fend off peer pressure. We want our campers to know that good citizens are everywhere in their community."
07/19/15
Linn Deputies Investigate Double Fatal Crash (Photo)
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 07/19/15
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Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley reports his deputies are investigating a double-fatal motor vehicle crash that occurred today at the intersection of Spicer Drive and Kennel Road which is approximately four miles east of Albany.

Today at about 12:27 P.M. the Sheriff's Office received a call reporting two vehicles crashed and at least one person was deceased. Witnesses on scene described to deputies that a gold 2007 Honda Odyssey van, driven by 57-year-old Janice Elaine Kummer of Lebanon, was headed north on Kennel Road approaching the intersection of Spicer Drive.

The second vehicle, a silver 2012 Honda Pilot driven by 42-year-old Bradley Carl Creager of Albany, was traveling west on Spicer Drive. Bradley's wife, 36-year-old Holly Renee Creager, was also in the vehicle seated in the front passenger seat. Witnesses stated Kummer did not stop at the stop sign, entered the intersection and crashed into the Honda Pilot.

Janice Kummer and Holly Creager were pronounced dead at the scene. Bradley Creager was transported by ambulance with non-life threatening injuries to the Good Samaritan Hospital in Corvallis. The Linn County Medical Examiner was contacted and the bodies were taken to the Fisher Funeral Home in Albany.

Everyone involved were wearing seat belts.

As a result of the crash a power pole was knocked down and a patch of grass in the ditch caught fire from the downed power lines. Albany Fire Department was able to put out the fire before it spread from the ditch. PP&L responded to replace the power lines and power pole.

Deputies were assisted by Major Accident Investigation Team, Oregon State Police, Albany Fire Department, Linn County Medical Examiner's Office and Linn County Road Department.
At this time it appears that alcohol and speed were not a factor in the crash.

The investigation is continuing.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/2993/86325/DSCN2387.JPG
Upset boaters confront Sheriff's Deputies (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/19/15
Detroit Lake Marina Annex
Detroit Lake Marina Annex
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A group of boaters confront Deputies who were conducting a boating while intoxicated investigation. On Saturday July 18th, Marion County Sheriff's Marine Patrol Deputy Zahn made contact with the driver of a pontoon boat at the Detroit Lake Marina Annex at 6 PM. Deputy Zahn attempting to contact the driver based on a boating while intoxicated investigation. It was reported to Deputy Zahn the pontoon boat had almost run into two other boats where the operators of those boats had to push the pontoon boat away from hitting their boats. Marina staff who rented the boat had to jump on board and dock it for the subjects.

The driver was with a group of 3 other pontoon boats with approximately 35-40 subjects in the group. Another subject in the group began to argue with Deputy Zahn and interfere with his investigation while the driver began to walk away from the scene. Deputy Zahn was able to again contact the driver on the dock when 15-20 subjects began walking toward him.

Several of the second group began yelling and a couple subjects were throwing empty beer cans at Deputy Zahn. Deputy Zahn was able to call for cover and place the driver into handcuffs. Luckily Deputy Zahn had two Marion County Cadets with him and was able to let the cadets escort the driver off the dock while Deputy Zahn continued to attempt to keep the crowd back.

Deputy Zahn backed away from the crowd toward the shore as cover units arrived. 2 subjects in the group continued to advance toward Deputy Zahn and Officer Armenta being more aggressive and argumentative. Deputy Zahn and Officer Armenta took one of the aggressors into custody when he approached them yelling and swinging his arms while approaching the officers.

A third subject approached the two cadets who were escorting the driver up the shore toward a vehicle and was stopped by several off duty Marion County Sheriff's Deputies who just arrived at the marina. The third subject was arrested at this point.

This was a very dangerous situation where Deputies were dealing with intoxicated subjects on a dock and were greatly outnumbered by the subjects in the group. The deputies showed a great deal of restraint and were able to resolve the situation with no injuries to anyone involved.

The driver of the boat is 22 year old Edward Ramirez from California and he has been charged with Boating under the influence of Intoxicants. Ramirez had a blood alcohol content one and a half times the legal limit. The other two subjects that were arrested are 23 year old Ivan Barajas and 26 year old Ernesto Barajas who are both from California. They have been charged with Disorderly Conduct 2 and Interfering with a Police Officer and were lodged at the Marion County Jail.

The Sheriff's Office would like to remind people to have a plan prior to leaving the dock as to who is going to be the designated driver. Although it is legal to consume alcoholic beverages on a boat, it is not legal for the driver to be intoxicated. More than half of all boating accidents involve alcohol. We would also like to remind citizens that you do not have any legal right to interfere with a criminal investigation and should comply with any police officers commands.


Attached Media Files: Detroit Lake Marina Annex
Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Fire Update for Sunday, July 19, 2015.
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/19/15
This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Fire Update for Sunday, July 19, 2015.

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS

Winslow Road Fire - Using 2 SEATS, single engine air tankers, the team quickly stopped fire's spread at 10-12 acres. The Winslow Road Fire was located about five miles southwest of Dufur in the ODF Central Oregon District, The Dalles sub-unit. The fire's cause remains under investigation. The fire danger level throughout the central Oregon District remains high. This will be the only update for this fire.

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015 through July 18, 2015:
Lightning-caused fires: 171 fires burned 1,675 acres
Human-caused fires: 367 fires burned 721 acres
Total: 538 fires burned 2,396 acres

10-year average (January 1 through July 15):
Lightning-caused fires: 87 fires burned 5,050 acres
Human-caused fires: 263 fires burned 1,866 acres
Total: 350 fires burned 6,916 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.

When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

NEWS MEDIA
News media may contact the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Nick Hennemann, 503-945-7248 (office), 503-910-4311 (mobile), or nick.hennemann@Oregon.gov, any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

For information on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands view:
the department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
the Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.

OTHER LINKS
Fire weather
Wildfire smoke forecasts
Wildfire smoke and air quality
Keep Oregon Green
Follow the Oregon Dept. of Forestry on Twitter & Facebook

Connect with us:
www.oregon.gov/ODF | social media | State Forests Online Community

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07/18/15
***Photographs Added*** Tillamook County Crash Takes Life Of Beaverton Woman (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 07/18/15
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On July 17, 2015 at approximately 3:00PM OSP Troopers and Tillamook County Sheriff's Deputies responded to a four vehicle crash on Highway 6 near milepost 25.

According to Trooper John King, a 2004 Honda Element, operated by Carl S PETERSON, age 49, of Portland, was driving eastbound on Highway 6 and passing through a road construction when it crossed the centerline and struck a group of westbound vehicles stopped for the construction.

Joyce K HAMREUS, age 64, of Beaverton, had been standing outside her 2013 Ford Fusion when PETERSON's vehicle struck her and her vehicle. PETERSON's vehicle then struck the next vehicle in line, a 2016 Lincoln MKZ, operated by Mary E LOVELL, age 55, of Tillamook. This impact pushed the Lincoln into the next vehicle, a 2008 BMW Sedan, operated by Frederick C ADAMI, age 45, of Madison, New Hampshire

HAMREUS was critically injured and was pronounced deceased while being transported to the hospital by medics. LOVELL, was transported by ambulance to a local hospital for minor injuries. PETERSON has been fully cooperative with the investigation which is still ongoing.

The Oregon State Police is leading the investigation, assisted by Tillamook County Sheriff's Office, Tillamook County District Attorney's Office, Tillamook County Medical Examiner, and Oregon Department of Transportation.

More information will be released when it becomes available.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1002/86303/101_0995.JPG , 2015-07/1002/86303/101_0994.JPG
07/17/15
Oregon Health Policy Board to meet July 21 in Portland at PSU
Oregon Health Authority - 07/17/15
July 17, 2015

Contact: Stephanie Tripp, 503-269-5689 (media inquiries)
Stephanie Jarem, 971-273-6844 (meeting information or accommodations)

Oregon Health Policy Board to meet July 21 in Portland at PSU
The Oregon Health Policy Board will hold its monthly meeting July 21 in Portland. The meeting will be held at Portland State University. The meeting will focus on a review of the 2015 legislative session, including discussions about HB2294, HB3100, and SB440. Public testimony will be heard during the meeting, beginning at 11:45 a.m.

When: Tuesday, July 21, 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Portland State University, Smith Memorial Student Union Room327/8, 1825 SW Broadway, Portland. The meeting will also be available via live web stream. A link to the live stream and a recording of the meeting will be posted on the board's meeting page. Members of the public can also call in to listen by dialing 1-888-808-6929, participant code 915042#.

Agenda:
-- Director's report;
-- Legislative session general overview;
-- OHPB & HITOC (HB 2294);
-- Public Health Modernization (HB3100);
-- SB 440;
-- Review of OHPB strategies and work plan;
-- Public testimony.

For more information on the meeting, visit the board's meeting page at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/2015-OHPB-Meetings.aspx.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Individuals requiring accommodation may request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations by calling the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

# # #
Corvallis Police Arrest Car Prowler Caught in Act by Victim
Corvallis Police - 07/17/15
On July 16, 2015, at about 5:20am, Corvallis Police responded to a 911 call about a fight in progress in the 1600 block of SW Martin Ave. The caller reported his neighbor was in a physical fight with an unknown person in the front of the residence.

When officers arrived, they found two males in the bark dust/flower bed of a residence. One of the males appeared to be holding the second male, later identified as 18 year old Brad Jenkins of Corvallis, on the ground.

Officers discovered that the male holding Jenkins on the ground was actually the victim of a car prowl by Jenkins on SW County Club Dr. Neither the victim, nor Jenkins, was injured during the incident.

According to the victim, he walked out of his front door to let his dogs out. Once outside, the door of his car shut about 10 feet away, and Jenkins ran from the victim's vehicle. The victim realized Jenkins had broken into his car and chased Jenkins down SW Country Club Dr. and then down SW Martin Ave. to where officers found them. The victim took Jenkins to the ground and held him until police arrived with the assistance of the neighbor who had called 911.

When officers had completed the investigation of the incident, they determined that Jenkins was not only responsible for the car prowl on SW County Club Dr., but was also responsible for other car prowls in the area. Jenkins was charged with three counts of Unlawful Entry of a Motor Vehicle, Theft in the 1st Degree, Theft in the 2nd Degree, and Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine. Jenkins was also found in possession of $8,500 of forged checks and stolen credit cards from a car prowl. He was charged with Identity Theft, Forgery in the 1st Degree and Fraudulent Use of a Credit Card based on items discovered by officers.

Jenkins was transported to the Benton County Jail where he was booked and released,

A mug-shot photo is available at the following link:

http://www.co.benton.or.us/sheriff/corrections/inmate_detail.php?bn=1500001344
Oregon working to be prepared not scared for "The Really Big One" (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 07/17/15
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A recent article in the "New Yorker" called "The Really Big One" has drawn a lot of attention both locally and nationally to the damage a Cascadia earthquake and tsunami will cause, and emergency planners have been taking the opportunity to raise awareness about how individuals can prepare, and how the region and Oregon is also continuing to prepare and mitigate for the looming threat.

"We want Oregonians to be prepared not scared," said Oregon Office of Emergency Management (OEM) Director Andrew Phelps. "What we do now to prepare will save lives and property during any disaster."

One project Oregon OEM and others are working on is a Cascadia Playbook to synchronize state and Emergency Support Function partners during Cascadia and other emergencies. The Cascadia Playbook is a cross-cutting emergency management tool for the State of Oregon that supports various, existing plans and efforts for the first 14-days of a catastrophic incident.

Oregon has also committed to being a full partner with Washington, Idaho and FEMA, in the development and presentation of a regional exercise called Cascadia Rising. The statewide exercise planning is in concert and collaboration with the regional effort for Oregon's largest emergency management exercise ever that is scheduled for Spring 2016.

Dr. Althea Rizzo, the Geologic Hazards Coordinator for Oregon OEM said that the success of what emergency management partners are doing to prepare Oregon for Cascadia and other emergencies is one aspect of preparedness, and that individuals and families should strive to be self-sufficient during a disaster. A good goal is to work toward having two-weeks of emergency supplies to be ready for an emergency.

"Now is a perfect time for everyone to evaluate a family emergency plan and update or establish emergency kits," Rizzo mentioned. "Make sure you and family members know about established exit routes, contacts, meeting places, etc., after a disaster."

For emergency kits, Rizzo said it is a good idea to add new items, over time.

"You don't have to run out and spend a lot of money," she added. "If you go camping, you probably have a lot of your preparedness already done."

Rizzo said everyone should practice what to do during an earthquake and know where tsunami routes are if they live near the coast. Oregon OEM is urging all Oregonians to participate in the Great Oregon ShakeOut earthquake drill on Oct. 15 at 10:15 a.m. It is part of the nation's largest earthquake drill, and last year more than 390,000 Oregonians participated. Register at http://shakeout.org/oregon/register/ and take steps to make your family safer.

For more information on preparedness go to the Oregon Office of Emergency Management preparedness page: http://www.oregon.gov/OMD/OEM/Pages/preparedness_information.aspx.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/3986/86288/130826-FS713-8.jpg
Nurse of the Year Awards - Call for Nominations
March of Dimes - 07/17/15
Nominations for the Fifth Annual Nurse of the Year Awards are now open. This year, March of Dimes will honor finalists from Oregon and SW Washington and award 16 of these nurses for their constant care of and compassion for patients.

Nominations may be submitted online at marchofdimes.org/oregon through September 11th. There is no fee to submit a nomination and you may submit multiple nominations. Award recipients will be determined by a selection committee comprised of healthcare professionals. Winners will be announced at the Nurse of the Year Awards breakfast on November 13, 2015, at the Sentinel Hotel in downtown Portland.

"Through the Nurse of the Year Awards, March of Dimes brings the health care community together to pay tribute to the profession of nursing and the often unsung heroes and heroines who save the lives and improve the health of others," said Elizabeth Joscelyn, State Director for March of Dimes, Greater Oregon Chapter.

Nurse of the Year Awards is sponsored by Legacy Health and Providence Health and Services.

The nominating categories are as follows:

Adult Acute Care
Advance Practice
Ambulatory/Clinic Care
Case Management, Occupational Health & Utilization Review
Community Health
Critical Care (Adult/Pediatric/Neonatal)
Emergency
Hospice, Home Health, Long Term Care, Rehab and Palliative Care
Nurse Educator
Nurse Leader
Nurse Specialty
Pediatric Acute Care
Rising Star
Small Hospital
Surgical Services
Women's Health

For more information visit marchofdimes.org/oregon.

March of Dimes is the leading nonprofit organization for pregnancy and baby health. For more than 75 years, moms and babies have benefited from March of Dimes research, education, vaccines, and breakthroughs. For the latest resources and information, visit marchofdimes.org or nacersano.org. Find out how you can help raise funds to prevent premature birth and birth defects by walking in March for Babies at marchforbabies.org. Find out what's going on in the Greater Oregon Chapter by visiting OregonMOD.com.
Sheriff's Office Seeking Public's help in locating Missing / Stolen Firearm (Photo) **Updated Release-Firearm Located**
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/17/15
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Updated Release

The missing/stolen firearm has been located and has been returned to The Sheriff's Office. On Wednesday afternoon, an observant construction worker located the firearm along Interstate 5 near Market St in Salem. The firearm was taken to the Oregon State Police-Albany Office and given to Troopers.

We have confirmed this is the missing/stolen firearm and are currently conducting an investigation to determine how the firearm ended up on Interstate 5. At this time, we do not know if the firearm was stolen and dumped along Interstate 5 but the firearm has scrape marks and damage on it from sliding down the highway. The Sheriff's Office would like to thank the citizen who located the firearm and turned it into the Oregon State Police.

If anyone has information regarding this incident, please call 503-588-5032




Marion County Sheriff's Office is asking for the public's help in finding a missing / stolen firearm. It is believed the firearm came up missing today around 4:00 a.m. from a southeast Salem neighborhood. The weapon is a Glock model 21, S.F. (slim frame) .45 caliber. The gun has a black upper slide and a lower OD green frame. On top of the slide is "A185" and on both sides of the slide is "Wally" K9. The gun has a fully loaded magazine and one round in the chamber and is equipped with a tac light mounted to the gun.

If you locate this firearm, please use caution as the weapon does not have a safety. We would prefer you keep an eye on the firearm and not handle it, call for law enforcement immediately and wait for law enforcement to recover it. In the event you decide to handle the weapon, remember your gun safety and that it is loaded, always keep the gun pointed in a safe direction and keep you finger off of the trigger.

Anyone with information about this incident and or where the firearm may be should contact the Marion County Sheriff's Office at (503) 588-5032.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1294/86166/Glock_21_(2).JPG , 2015-07/1294/86166/Glock_21_(1).JPG
07/16/15
Photos of I-5 Truck Crash @ MP 71 (Photo)
ODOT: SW Oregon - 07/16/15
2015-07/1202/86276/I-5_MP71_TruckCrash.jpg
2015-07/1202/86276/I-5_MP71_TruckCrash.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/1202/86276/thumb_I-5_MP71_TruckCrash.jpg
A northbound truck loaded with lumber crashed about 1:30 this afternoon coming down Sexton Summit into Sunny Valley.
The truck is off the shoulder, but the northbound slow lane is blocked for recovery.
Motorists should use caution coming down the summit.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1202/86276/I-5_MP71_TruckCrash.jpg , 2015-07/1202/86276/I-5_TruckCrash_MP71_2.jpg , 2015-07/1202/86276/I_5_TruckCrashMP71_3.JPG
OHA Retail Marijuana Scientific Advisory Committee meets July 23
Oregon Health Authority - 07/16/15
What: The Oregon Health Authority's Retail Marijuana Scientific Advisory Committee is holding its monthly meeting. The meeting is open to the public.

Agenda: Review purpose/agenda; review/approve June 25, 2015, draft meeting minutes; brief legislative update; continue discussion of effects of marijuana use on a developing fetus and breastfeeding infants, and public messaging for pregnant and breastfeeding women; wrap-up/future topics; public comment.

When: Thursday, July 23, 3-5 p.m. The public comment period begins at 4:45 p.m. All comments are limited to two minutes, or can be submitted to marijuana.science@state.or.us.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1-A, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland.

Why: The Oregon Health Authority's Retail Marijuana Scientific Advisory Committee, based at the Public Health Division, provides scientific input to inform public health recommendations related to retail marijuana in Oregon. The committee is examining adverse health effects of retail marijuana use; and impacts of time, place, and manner of retail sale of potentially addictive substances.

For more information about the committee, visit http://public.health.oregon.gov/About/Pages/Retail-Marijuana-Scientific-Advisory-Committee.aspx.
Suction dredge legislation did not advance in 2015 session - Moratorium will go into effect Jan. 2, 2016
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 07/16/15
Salem - Senate Bill 830, which proposed to consolidate state regulation of placer mining activities, including suction dredging and upland placer mining adjacent to streams, did not pass in this year's legislative session.

The bill named the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) as the lead regulatory agency, and would have increased natural and cultural resource protections. It also would have lifted a moratorium on in-stream and upland motorized placer mining directed by a bill passed in the 2013 Oregon Legislature (Senate Bill 838).

As a result of Senate Bill 830's demise during the 2015 session, the moratorium is scheduled to go into effect in January 2016 and sunset in 2021.

What this means for miners
From now until the end of 2015, there are no changes to how motorized placer mining is regulated:

- The Oregon Department of State Lands (DSL) issues General Authorizations for this activity in Oregon waterways. SB 838 made some changes to regulations for waterways that are designated Essential Salmon Habitat (ESH) that remain in effect until the end of 2015.

- Motorized in-stream and upland placer mining operations also require a water quality permit from DEQ, and in-stream operations using non-motorized mining equipment must comply with applicable permit terms.

Moratorium
Starting Jan. 2, 2016, miners will be prohibited from motorized mining in the following circumstances:

- In all streams above the lowest extent of spawning habitat in rivers and tributaries containing ESH or naturally reproducing populations of bull trout.

- In upland areas within 100 yards of these streams if the mining results in the removal or disturbance of vegetation in a manner that may affect water quality.

An interactive map shows the moratorium areas (see below).

The DEQ and DSL will continue to regulate motorized mining under current law, and will work over the next six months to inform miners, natural resource agencies, law enforcement and other groups about the 2016 moratorium and how/where placer mining operations may lawfully take place.

The Oregon Legislature in 2013 (SB 838) directed the Governor's Office to consult with affected stakeholders and make recommendations to the legislature by November 2014 on a proposed regulatory framework for placer mining in Oregon. These recommendations helped shape SB 830 which was introduced during the 2015 session by the Senate Environment and Natural Resources Committee.

Additional information:

Moratorium FAQs: http://www.oregon.gov/dsl/Aquatic_Resource_Management/Documents/Moratorium%20QA%207-10-15.pdf

Interactive map: http://geo.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=b9850ba265e546c8b528e9900e9300de

Department of Environmental Quality: http://www.deq.state.or.us/wq/wqpermit/mining.htm

Department of State Lands: http://www.oregon.gov/dsl/PERMITS/Pages/ga_placerinfo.aspx

SB 838 Study Group: http://www.oregon.gov/dsl/Pages/SB%20838%20Study%20Group.aspx.




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Milton-Freewater awarded $75,000 NEA Our Town grant
Oregon Arts Commission - 07/16/15
Salem, Ore.-- National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Chairman Jane Chu yesterday announced 69 Our Town awards totaling almost $5 million in the program's fifth year of funding, including a $75,000 to the city of Milton-Freewater in Oregon. The NEA received 275 applications for Our Town this year and will make grants ranging from $25,000 to $200,000.

NEA's Our Town grant program supports creative place-making projects that help to transform communities into lively, beautiful and resilient places with the arts at their core. Since the program's inception in 2011 and including these projects, the NEA will have awarded 325 Our Town grants totaling almost $26 million in all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia.

The Milton-Freewater grant will support TALK PLAY DREAM: HABLAR JUGAR SO?'AR, a series of bilingual cultural programs to enliven the city and bring together disparate populations. The project will engage community members in cultural asset mapping, creative pop-up events, workshops, performances and festivals. The City of Milton-Freewater, Shakespeare Walla Walla, PearlDamour and other partners intend to bridge the divide between the city's Anglo and Latino communities, fostering conversation through shared stories. The City of Milton-Freewater has a population of 7,060, more than 40 percent of which is Latino, nearly double that of 30 years ago.??NLG

"Milton-Freewater demonstrates the best in creative community development and whose work will have a valuable impact on its community," said Chairman Chu. "Through Our Town funding, organizations continue to spark vitality that support neighborhoods and public spaces, enhancing a sense of place for residents and visitors alike."

"We are thrilled to have Milton-Freewater's project selected as one of the nation's finest creative place-making projects," said Brian Rogers, Arts Commission executive director. "Their vision for TALK PLAY DREAM demonstrate the power of art to engage community and diverse populations."

For a complete listing of projects recommended for Our Town grant support, please visit the NEA web site at arts.gov. Project descriptions, grants listed by state and by project type, and resources are available as well. The NEA's online resource, Exploring Our Town, features case studies of more than 70 Our Town projects along with lessons learned and other resources.

The Twitter hashtag is #NEAOurTown15
? ? ? ? ?
The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of the Oregon Business Development Department in 1993 in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities.

The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature, federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts and funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust.
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Oregon Food Bank cooks up Local Food Challenge (Photo)
Oregon Food Bank - 07/16/15
Farmers' market bounty
Farmers' market bounty
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People who like to eat can become food system change makers


Portland, Oregon - July 16, 2015 - Stop by a farmers' market on any summer Saturday and you're likely to find a hive of activity. Stalls overflow with locally grown and produced food, while shoppers smell, taste and talk about what is in season. This August, Oregon Food Bank is challenging everyone to look for and purchase more local foods.

The Local Food Challenge is designed to get people thinking about their food sources and connect with their community. Local means items grown, raised or caught within 200 miles of their residences. Anyone can participate by pledging to spend at least ten percent of their food budget on locally grown foods for 31 days.

"Our goal is to get people to think about where their food comes from, strengthen local farms and explore new tastes and recipes," says Oregon Food Bank CEO Susannah Morgan. "This is about giving every community food system a boost. We believe a strong community food system will help decrease the number of people who are hungry." A strong community food system empowers and engages all members to work together to ensure everyone has enough to eat.

Signing up for the Local Food Challenge is simple.
1) Visit www.oregonfoodbank.org/localfoodchallenge and create a profile.
2) Estimate the amount you spend on groceries each month.
3) Choose the percentage of your food budget you want to dedicate to locally grown food.
4) Logon to your account after every shopping trip to record the amount you spent locally. We'll do the math to let you know if you're on track to meet your goal.

To learn more visit www.oregonfoodbank.org/localfoodchallenge where there are links to healthy recipes along with guides to farmers' markets and produce stands. Special thanks to Flowerpot Media (www.flowerpotmedia.com) for creating and supporting the website.

About Oregon Food Bank
With sufficient public will and support of the entire community, we believe it is possible to eliminate hunger and its root causes. Oregon Food Bank collects and distributes food through a network of four Oregon Food Bank branches and 17 independent regional food banks serving Oregon and Clark County, Washington. The Oregon Food Bank Network helps nearly 1 in 5 households fend off hunger. Oregon Food Bank also leads statewide efforts to increase resources for hungry families and to eliminate the root causes of hunger through advocacy, nutrition education, garden education, and helping communities strengthen local food systems. For more information visit www.oregonfoodbank.org
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Attached Media Files: Farmers' market bounty
Oregon State Library Executive Committee Meeting Press Release, July 30, 2015
Oregon State Library - 07/16/15
The Executive Committee of the Oregon State Library Board of Trustees will meet by phone on Thursday, July 30th. Aletha Bonebrake of Baker City will chair the meeting, which will begin at 1:30 p.m.

Members of the public who wish to attend the meeting may come to Room 205 at the Oregon State Library.

Sign language interpretation will be provided for the public if requested prior to 48 hours before the meeting; notice prior to 72 hours before the meeting is preferred. Handouts of meeting materials may also be requested in alternate formats prior to 72 hours before the meeting. Requests may be made to Jessica Rondema at 503-378-2464.

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OREGON STATE LIBRARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING
July 30, 2015
1:30 p.m.
Oregon State Library Room 205
Aletha Bonebrake, Chair

Agenda

1:30 p.m. Report of the State Librarian Dahlgreen

2:00 Discussion of the Board Meeting for August 21, 2015 Bonebrake

2:15 Other business Bonebrake

2:30 Adjournment Bonebrake

NOTE: The times of all agenda items are approximate and subject to change.
Stream buffers, Elliott State Forest update on Forestry Board agenda
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/16/15
The Oregon Board of Forestry is scheduled to provide direction on rules designed to keep stream temperatures cool, receive an update on future scenarios for the Elliott State Forest, and hear a status report on the 2015 wildfire season when it meets July 23 in Salem.

The meeting is open to the public.

AGENDA HIGHLIGHTS:

DRAFTING RULES FOR STREAMSIDE SHADE BUFFERS
Working with all interests to set stream buffer sizes that keep streams cool, and balance environmental and economic outcomes, the Board will continue work on a streamside (also known as riparian) buffer rule analysis process. Streamside buffer rules ensure streams are shaded and provide a blueprint for where to leave trees during a timber harvest. The Board last revised these streamside buffer rules in the 1990s to further protect water quality, and included monitoring to ensure effectiveness.

In 2012 as part of their adaptive management approach, the Board began analyzing streamside buffer rules based on Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) monitoring results for small and medium fish streams. The research showed that the rules fell short of the "protecting cold water (PCW)" standard, which means stream temperature should not rise more than one-half degree Fahrenheit due to human activity, where salmon, steelhead, and bull trout are present. ODF staff will present additional information for evaluating streamside rules and a policy framework for informing a decision on which solutions to further pursue for rulemaking.

ELLIOTT STATE FOREST ALTERNATIVES PROJECT UPDATE
The Department of State Lands (DSL) will update the Board of Forestry on a project to develop alternative ownership and management options for the Elliott State Forest located between Coos Bay and Reedsport. DSL owns most of the Elliott State Forest, which is chiefly Common School Forestland. The Department of Forestry manages the forest for DSL under the purview of the State Land Board.

2015 FIRE SEASON UPDATE
Fire Protection Division staff will provide the Board a status report on the 2015 wildfire season, including ongoing coordination with forest landowners and ODF's federal, state and local agency partners in Oregon's fire protection system.

OFRI WOOD PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROGRAM
The Oregon Forest Resources Institute (OFRI) is one of six programs in Oregon to receive a U.S. Department of Agriculture Wood Innovations Grant. OFRI's executive director, Paul Barnum, will provide an overview of how the grant dollars will be used to develop a statewide wood products promotion and education program.

BARRED OWL REMOVAL
The Board will receive a briefing on discussions between ODF and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFW) regarding USFW's Barred Owl Removal Research Project, including ODF's participation and related discussions on a Safe Harbor Agreement. As part of the recovery plan for the threatened Northern Spotted Owl, USFW is implementing a research project to evaluate the effects of Barred Owl removal on Northern Spotted Owl populations.

EXECUTIVE SESSION
The Board will meet in executive session for the purpose of consultation with legal counsel, in this instance on the subject of threatened and endangered species in state-owned forests. The session is closed to the public, but members of the news media may attend, under provisions of ORS 192.660. The Board holds such sessions from time to time to discuss various ongoing legal cases as well as to confer on attorney-client privileged communication. By law, no decisions are to be made in an executive session.

MEETING DETAILS
The meeting will run from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Tillamook Room, Administration Building (C), at the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters, 2600 State St., in Salem.

A general public comment period on items not listed on the agenda is scheduled near the start of the meeting. Public comment on specific agenda items will be received as the board deliberates.

Agenda materials will be available prior to the meeting at: www.oregon.gov/odf/Pages/board/index.aspx, under the 2015 meeting link.

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services or assistance can be arranged by calling the department's Public Affairs Office at least 48 hours in advance, at (503) 945-7200.

ABOUT THE BOARD
The Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the state forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon's 30 million-acre forestland base. More information on the board is available at www.oregon.gov/odf. ODF is on Facebook and other social media sites, accessible at: www.oregon.gov/odf/Pages/odfsocialmedia.aspx
"Good guy" wins $71,527 Keno 8-spot (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 07/16/15
Paul Krutsch of McMinnville
Paul Krutsch of McMinnville
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/4939/86232/thumb_Paul_Krutsch_McMinnville_71k_Keno_8-spot.JPG
July 15, 2015 - Salem, Ore. - Paul Krutsch of McMinnville had sat back and watched his friends win their Keno games at the American Legion and hoped that one day he would win more than $2.

"I have one friend who won $45,000 and always wins the bigger prizes," Krutsch said. "My other friend is always winning $70, $80, $90. Meanwhile, I am the guy who is always winning $2."

Krutsch said he was talking about that very subject, when he was comforted by his pals.

"They said as good as I am to my kids, I was sure to win the big one at some point," he said. "That's when my numbers started popping up on the Keno monitor, one right after another. It was amazing."

Sure enough, after this conversation Krutsch won the Keno 8-Spot rolling jackpot prize of $71,527.70 while playing with his friends at the McMinnville American Legion.

"We had a ton of fun, and it was really exciting," he said. "I had a sleepless night I was so worked up."

Krutsch, who has been married 45 years, said he has three children in their 40s who he is always helping out and giving advice to.

"This money is going towards my retirement," he said. "Now I won't feel so bad the next time I hang out!"

Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned over $9 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

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Attached Media Files: Paul Krutsch of McMinnville
07/15/15
Coffee Creek Correctional Facility participates in summer children's event (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 07/15/15
Governor Kate Brown with a CCCF mother and her children
Governor Kate Brown with a CCCF mother and her children
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In partnership with the local Wilsonville Rotary Club, Coffee Creek Correctional Facility held its annual Through a Child's Eyes (TACE) event on July 11 and 12. This year, Governor Kate Brown attended the festivities on Saturday. She was able to speak with many mothers, children, and staff - and was impressed by what she witnessed.

TACE is an opportunity for women in custody and their children to spend the afternoon in a setting promoting family bonding and interaction. Mothers and their children come together in a setting that enables them to interact in a more relaxed and friendly environment. These families share a BBQ meal and participate in a variety of outdoor activities that encourage pro-social behaviors, while the mothers utilize the parenting skills they have learned during incarceration.

TACE has almost 200 volunteers including DOC staff, Rotarians, religious representatives, service-oriented business members, and dozens more who help with this unique program and make the weekend a success. The TACE event is open to minimum and medium-custody inmates who have at least six months clear conduct and have completed parenting education (or are enrolled in the classes).

CCCF is a multi-custody prison in Wilsonville accommodating all of Oregon's female inmates (approximately 1,260). The prison has cell and dormitory housing, inmate work programs, skills training, treatment programs, health services, religious services, physical plant, a central records unit, and administrative areas. CCCF participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises, including a contact center, auto CAD, and document scanning. In addition, CCCF houses the state's intake center, which provides intake and evaluation of all inmates committed to state custody by the courts. The intake center houses approximately 400 male inmates. CCCF's minimum facility opened in 2001, and the medium facility opened in 2002.

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Attached Media Files: Governor Kate Brown with a CCCF mother and her children
This Week Is National Parole and Probation Officer's Week (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/15/15
2015-07/1294/86237/MCSO_P_and_P.JPG
2015-07/1294/86237/MCSO_P_and_P.JPG
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The Marion County Board of Commissioners have proclaimed July 12-18 as Parole and Probation Officer Week. Since 1841, the practice of probation and parole has played a vital role in our justice system. Nationally, there are over 8 million adults on some form of community supervision. As a state, we supervise over 32,000 persons, of which about 3,700 reside within Marion County and are supervised by the Parole & Probation Division of the Sheriff's Office. Although different states and different jurisdictions have applied a variety of organizational structures to manage this population, the basic premise of our responsibility, regardless of location, remains the same: Hold clients accountable, prevent criminal activity, and promote the reformative process. Simply put, community corrections professionals help create stronger and safer communities.

Over the last several years, the talented and dedicated staff of the Marion County Sheriff's Office Parole & Probation Division has engaged in a number of "evidence-based" efforts to provide support services, lower our recidivism rates, and enhance public safety. As examples, we have fully implemented the Effective Practices in Community Supervision program (EPICS) model of supervision. Our Transitional Services Unit, a part of the greater Marion County Reentry Initiative (MCRI), has been nationally recognized. Our SB 416 program is being utilized statewide as a model prison diversion program, and our Jail Reentry Program has just completed its first year of programming. In early 2016, we are excited to receive additional legislative funding to expand our prison diversion programming through our Drug Endangered Children's Unit.

As a division, we strive for efficiency by focusing precious public resources towards our highest risk population and targeting specific risks that are linked to criminal behavior. Within any given day, any of our staff may help a client find a job, arrest an absconder, or make a referral to transitional housing or treatment to help overcome years of addiction. Our employees have a difficult and complicated job. They are trained to be part coach, mentor, counselor, problem solver, crime prevention specialist, motivator, educator, and police officer.

The citizens of Marion County can and should be proud of the service their parole and probation professionals provide. Year in and year out our staff provide sound cost-effective services and supervision practices which have been proven effective. The fruits of these efforts have culminated in a recidivism rate which has steadily been in decline since 2006. Although the term "recidivism" can sound overly simplistic, the collateral effects can be impressive: lower crime rates, obtaining viable employment, individuals overcoming years of addiction(s), families reuniting, and lowering the costs associated with prosecution and incarceration.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1294/86237/MCSO_P_and_P.JPG
Linn County Sheriff's Office Hosts 2nd Annual Dog Fest
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 07/15/15
Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley is pleased to announce the second annual Linn County Sheriff's Office Dog Fest and open house. The event will be held July 25, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM at Linn County Animal Shelter, located at 3008 Ferry St SW Albany.

The Shelter is offering a voluntary late fee waiver on all new and delinquent dog license purchases. All adoptions will be offered at half price for $50.00 each, which includes registration of the micro-chip. We are also offering a $15.00 micro-chip clinic, dog washing, a pet food give-away and a raffle.

There will be a dog show contest for kids 12 years and younger (details will be given at the event). BBQ hot dogs/sausage dogs and beverages are going to be served during the event with generous donations made by Coastal Farm Supply of Albany and Pepsi Cola of Corvallis.

Linn County Sheriff's Office K-9 Deputy and Albany Police Department K-9 Officer will be providing public K-9 demonstrations.

C.A.R.E. Preventive & Veterinary Services will be at the event to provide a low cost vaccine clinic, as well as other veterinary services.

Donations will be accepted and all proceeds will go towards the care of our shelter animals.

Please come by and show your support for the Linn County Sheriff's Office Animal Shelter and enjoy fun for the entire family!!
Graveyard patrol nabs car clouter in action (Photo)
Salem Police Dept. - 07/15/15
Salem Police Department K-9 Enzo
Salem Police Department K-9 Enzo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/1095/86231/thumb_071515_CR2013_Salem_Police_Dept.K9_Enzo.jpg
July 15, 2015 Salem, OR: In the early morning hours of Wednesday, July 15, Salem Police officers responded to the report of an attempted car clout on the 800 block of Fran ST SE. Thanks to the activation of a car alarm, the owner was alerted to the activity, and called police.

Officers responded to the area for a search including K-9 Enzo and his handler, Senior Officer Miranda. It was the duo who came upon a vehicle driving suspiciously through the neighborhood near where the vehicle break-in had occurred.

The vehicle, driven by 27-year old Nicholas Gutierrez-Didlot, was traveling without its headlights on, and without noticing the patrol vehicle following. Upon realizing the presence of the police, Gutierrez-Didlot drove backward down the street, and crashed into a tree and mailbox post.

Gutierrez-Didlot attempted to flee the scene on foot; however, once Senior Officer Miranda deployed K-9 Enzo, the police dog easily caught up to the suspect, and apprehended him.

"Our patrol staff works diligently to respond to suspicious activity calls which include our K-9 teams," said Lt. Dave Okada, Public Information Officer for the Salem Police Department.

The investigation revealed several items stolen from vehicles in the area, as well as a small quantity of methamphetamine. Officers were able to contact multiple victims, and return their property.

#S #P #D


Attached Media Files: Salem Police Department K-9 Enzo , Gutierrez-Didlot, Nicholas
Office of Developmental Disability Services (ODDS) Community Forum - Salem
Oregon Dept. of Human Services - 07/15/15
The Office of Developmental Disability Services (ODDS) would like to invite you to attend a Community Forum to discuss our vision for the future of services for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). There will be a short presentation followed by a group discussion. There will be three separate forums--one for providers, one for Community Developmental Disability Programs (CDDP) and Brokerages, and one for individuals and families who receive services.

Forums will be held at:
Marion County CDDP Office, 2421 Lancaster Dr. NE, Salem, OR 97305
For Individuals and Families: Wednesday July 29, 2015 from 6:00pm - 8:00pm
The State Fire Marshal Office, 4760 Portland Rd NE, Salem, OR 97305
For Providers: Thursday July 30, 2015 from 9:00am - 12:00pm
For CDDP's and Brokerages: Thursday July 30, 2015 from 1:00pm - 4:00pm

Interpreters for people who are non-English speakers, who are deaf or hard of hearing or other accommodations for people with disabilities are available. Please contact Brenda Autry at 503-269-5767 or brenda.g.autry@state.or.us to make arrangements at least 48 hours before the meeting.
Office of Developmental Disability Services (ODDS) Community Forum - Corvallis
Oregon Dept. of Human Services - 07/15/15
The Office of Developmental Disability Services (ODDS) would like to invite you to attend a Community Forum to discuss our vision for the future of services for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). There will be a short presentation followed by a group discussion. There will be three separate forums--one for providers, one for Community Development Disability Programs (CDDP) and Brokerages, and one for individuals and families who receive services.

Forums will be held at:
The Benton County Library, 645 NW Monroe Ave., Corvallis, OR 97330
For Individuals and Families:
o Thursday July 30, 2015 from 6:00pm - 8:00pm
For Providers:
o Friday July 31, 2015 from 9:00am - 12:00pm
For CDDP's and Brokerages:
o Friday July 31, 2015 from 1:00pm - 4:00pm

Interpreters for people who are non-English speakers, who are deaf or hard of hearing or other accommodations for people with disabilities are available. Please contact Brenda Autry at 503-269-5767 or brenda.g.autry@state.or.us to make arrangements at least 48 hours before the meeting.
Marine Board Approves Round One Grants for the Mid-Valley Boating Facilities
Oregon Marine Board - 07/15/15
The Oregon State Marine Board approved several grants for boating access facility improvements in the Mid-Willamette Valley counties at their last quarterly Board meeting, held on June 23, in Salem. The agency received 34 applications for Round 1 Grants that identified $11 million in project needs with $6.2 million requested from the Marine Board. The Board awarded $2,404,966 in state funds and $1,951,296 in federal funds for the 2015-2017 boating facility improvement projects.

For a comprehensive list of the financial contributions to the projects, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/news/2015/EugSpringRoseAlbR1Grants.pdf.

Linn County will receive general Clean Vessel Act funds and state boater funds to pay for the installation of a new pumpout and dump station for the Edgewater Marina on Foster Reservoir for recreational boaters who have onboard sanitation or portable sanitation devices (Port-A-Potty). Having a pumpout and dump station on Foster Reservoir, a very popular boating destination, will help keep the waterway free from sewage being discharged into the water.

Lane County will use the grant funds to pay for the necessary permits required for future boat ramp construction for Phase II of the Hendricks Bridge Wayside on the McKenzie River. The future improvements will include a single-lane concrete ramp, will expand the asphalt parking, maneuver and staging areas, treat stormwater runoff and provide better accessibility to the ramp.

The City of Lebanon will replace the existing portable toilet with a new, ADA-accessible flush restroom on Cheadle Lake, and will include striping in the parking lot with designated ADA parking.

The City of Albany will replace and relocate the flush restroom for Bowman Park on the Willamette River, closer to the boat trailer parking area which will improve safety and reduce vandalism since it will be located in a more visible location.

The Marine Board is funded by registration fees and marine fuel taxes paid by boaters. No general fund tax dollars are used to support the agency or its programs. Boater-paid fees go back to boaters in the form of law enforcement services (on-the-water enforcement, training and equipment), education/outreach materials and boating access facilities. Fees charged by waterway managers for parking and launching, reduces Maintenance Assistance Program funds the Marine Board provides for qualifying grant recipients.

For more information about boating facility grants, visit www.boatoregon.com.
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Improve your home energy knowledge at free workshop
Pacific Power - 07/15/15
Contact: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tom Gauntt, Pacific Power, July 15, 2015
503-813-7291

Improve your home energy knowledge at free workshop
Co-sponsored by Pacific Power and Energy Trust of Oregon, a series of seminars across Oregon will tell customers about saving energy
PORTLAND, Ore. - How much electricity and money can you save? What is the single biggest energy user in your home? Do you need to install insulation or change your habits? How can you reduce your energy usage? What incentives are available for new appliances, lighting or other energy efficiency changes?
Discover solutions and suggestions to these and other energy efficiency questions at a series of the free seminars offered this summer throughout Pacific Power's Oregon service area. Besides getting the low-down on energy-saving opportunities, customers also will receive the information they need to create an energy saving action plan.
The evening workshops, set for 23 cities throughout Oregon, will explore how energy works in a home and how homeowner actions can make significant impacts on energy usage. Those attending will develop a deeper understanding of home energy use, the effects of appliances and systems on their energy bills and how simple changes can reduce an individual's energy use and carbon footprint.
Learn about the different types of heating and cooling equipment, which are the most energy efficient and why. Get up close to a ductless heat pump.
See a demonstration of a water heater and its components, and learn how a leaky water heater can be a costly energy waste.
Discover the difference between incandescent, CFL and LED lighting.
Register online at pacificpower.net/bewattsmart to reserve your spot.
Participants also learn how to utilize Energy Trust of Oregon incentives to reduce costs, increase comfort and improve indoor air quality and discover what diagnostic testing can do for one's home. The workshop will help homeowners decide whether a project is do-it-yourself or if it requires professional services
After attending, participants will better understand how to:
Recognize the most cost-effective energy improvements for the home
Save energy and improve their home's comfort, health and safety
Insulate from rising energy costs
Save money with Energy Trust of Oregon cash-back incentives
Workshop Schedule
All sessions are from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. and refreshments will be served.
July 21 - Lakeview, Lake District Hospital
July 22 - Klamath Falls, Ross Ragland Cultural Center
July 28 - Madras, The Inn at Cross Keys Station
July 29 - Prineville, Room 1868
July 30 - Bend, McMenamins Old St. Francis School
July 31 - Redmond, Comfort Suites Redmond Airport
Aug. 11 - Pendleton, Pendleton Convention Center
Aug. 12 - Enterprise, Lear's Pub & Grill
Aug. 18 - Corvallis, Comfort Suites
Aug.19 - Albany, Phoenix Inn Suites
Aug. 20 - Dallas, BeckenRidge Vineyard
Aug. 21 - Sweet Home, Sweet Home Elk's Lodge
Aug. 25 - Astoria, The Loft at the Red Building
Aug. 26 - Seaside, Seaside Civic & Convention Center
Aug. 27 - Lincoln City, Chinook Winds Casino
Sept. 1 - Coos Bay/North Bend, Mill Casino
Sept. 2 - Cottage Grove, Village Green Resort
Sept. 3 - Roseburg, Holiday Inn Express
Sept. 9 - Portland, McMenamins Kennedy School
Sept.10 - Hood River, Best Western Hood River Inn
Sept. 15 - Medford, Inn at the Commons
Sept. 16 - Grants Pass, Taprock Event Center
Sept. 17 - Cave Junction, Carlos Restaurante

-30-.

About Energy Trust of Oregon
Energy Trust of Oregon is an independent nonprofit organization dedicated to helping Oregonians benefit from saving energy and tapping renewable resources. Our services, cash incentives and energy solutions have helped customers of Pacific Power, Portland General Electric, NW Natural and Cascade Natural Gas save nearly $600 million on energy costs. Our work helps keep energy costs as low as possible and builds a sustainable energy future. For more information visit www.energytrust.org or call 1-866-368-7878.
Pacific Power
Pacific Power provides electric service to more than 730,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. Our goal is to provide our customers with value for their energy dollar, and safe, reliable electricity. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with almost 1.8 million customers in six western states. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net.
Oregon timber harvest remains steady above four billion board feet for the second year (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/15/15
A forest thinning operation on the Deschutes National Forest.
A forest thinning operation on the Deschutes National Forest.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/1072/86206/thumb_Deschutes_National_Forest_Legislative_Tour_102214.jpg
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Distribution: Major Media
July 15, 2014

Contacts Brandon Kaetzel, ODF Principal Economist, 503-945-7413; brandon.kaetzel@oregon.gov
Jeri Chase, ODF Public Information Officer, 503-945-7201 (office), 503-931-2721 (cell), jeri.chase@oregon.gov

For the second year, Oregon's timber harvest has remained above four billion board feet. While private lands have remained steady, the real story is on our state's federal lands. Overall, Oregon had a 1.74 percent decrease in timber harvest for a 2014 total of 4.13 billion board feet.

Approximately 49 percent, or 30.2 million acres, of Oregon is forested. Federal forestlands account for 60 percent of these forestlands, industrial forestlands for 19 percent, family forestland owners own 15 percent, state-owned forests comprise three percent, and all other forestland owners (counties, Tribal, etc.), three percent.

The largest increases, by percentage, in timber harvest were on Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands (almost entirely west of the Cascades) and on United States Forest Service (USFS) lands east of the Cascades. The BLM harvest increased 26.67 percent to 209 million board feet. This can mostly be attributed to salvage logging from the Douglas Complex fire and 36-month contracts on green timber that purchasers harvested while prices were high. The USFS overall had a decrease in harvest of 1.28 percent (statewide) to 387 million board feet. However, the USFS had a 32 percent increase in harvest east of the Cascades, buoyed by significant increases in Lake County (468 percent increase) and in Grant and Harney counties (41 percent increase, combined). The Lake County increase is due to the implementation of the Fremont-Winema National Forest's accelerated landscape restoration efforts, while increases in Grant and Harney counties are the result of local collaborative agreements and full implementation of the 10-year Stewardship Contract on the Malheur National Forest.

State lands had a decrease from 252 million board feet in 2013 to 230 million board feet in 2014 for an 8.7 percent decrease in harvest.

Private industry harvest decreased statewide by 4.96 percent from 2013 to 2014 to 2.63 billion board feet. These decreases were present on both sides of the Cascades, but were most prominent on the east side, as a percentage, where private industry harvest declined by approximately 35 percent. Non-industrial private landowners had a 9.2 percent increase (statewide) in harvest to a 2014 total of 558 million board feet.

Harvests on Native American forestlands decreased approximately 14 percent from 66 million board feet in 2013 to 57 million board feet in 2014.

Looking forward, it is expected that harvests will remain around the four billion board feet mark. Issues with exports and port access, along with housing starts not materializing to the 1.5 million start mark that some experts had expected, may keep the harvest rate from rising any further or could lead to slight decreases. The BLM is currently working toward adopting a new management plan for western Oregon that could also affect public harvests west of the Cascades in years to come, an important source of fiber to southern Oregon mills. Likewise, federal funding levels for the USFS, the extent of collaborative agreements, and adequate market outlets for small-diameter trees provide uncertainty around the harvest levels on the east side.

A link to the 2014 report, as well as links to previous years' annual reports, is available on the department's website at www.oregon.gov/ODF/pages/STATE_FORESTS/FRP/annual_Reports.aspx.


NOTE: One board foot of lumber is one foot wide, one foot long, and one inch thick, or the equivalent in volume. Construction of an approximately 1,800-square-foot house requires about 10,000 board feet.

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Attached Media Files: A forest thinning operation on the Deschutes National Forest.
Central Oregon Man Loses Life In Linn County Crash
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 07/15/15
On July 14, 2015 at about 9:45PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a passenger vehicle versus a motorcycle on Highway 34 just east of I-5.

According to Sergeant Nathan House, a 1995 Toyota Camry had been traveling southbound on Seven Mile Lane and stopped at the intersection with Highway 34. The operator, Robert C WILLCOXEN, age 20, of Albany, turned eastbound onto Highway 34 and into the path of the motorcyclist.

The operator of the motorcycle, Robin M GALUSHA, age 56, of Terrebonne, was deceased upon emergency crews arriving on scene.

WILLCOXEN is cooperating with the investigation which is still ongoing. OSP was assisted by the Linn County Multi-Agency Investigation Team, the Tangent Fire Department and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

More information will be released when it is available.
Grants Pass Man Loses Life In Single Vehicle Crash Near Cave Junction - Josephine County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 07/15/15
2015-07/1002/86200/20150715_011541.jpg
2015-07/1002/86200/20150715_011541.jpg
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On July 14, 2015, at around 11:15PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to HWY 46 (Caves Highway) near milepost 6 on the report of a rollover serious injury crash.

According to Sergeant Jeff Proulx, a 1990 Toyota 4runner was eastbound on HWY 46 when it left the roadway and struck a large tree. The operator, Dalton H BROWN, age 24, of Grants Pass was pronounced deceased upon emergency crews arriving on scene.

Initial investigation appears speed may have been a factor. OSP was assisted by the Illinois Valley Fire Department, American Medical Response and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

The investigation is continuing and more information will be released when it is available.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1002/86200/20150715_011541.jpg
Oregon Lottery Facebook page offers prizes that cost nothing
Oregon Lottery - 07/15/15
Most people think of winning Oregon Lottery prizes when they buy tickets for Scratch-it games, a big jackpot game like Oregon's Game Megabucks or Powerball, or games like Keno and Win for Like. Thanks to social media, there's a way to win great Oregon Lottery prizes that cost nothing.

For a chance to win tickets to the Cape Blanco Music Festival or an all-expense-paid trip to Michigan to watch the Oregon State Beavers play the Michigan Wolverines this football season, the Lottery's Facebook page is the place to go. "For over a year, the Lottery has been offering great prizes on our Facebook page," said Oregon Lottery Online Marketing Manager Shad Barnes. "By simply following us on Facebook and commenting on one of our giveaways, people are entered for a chance to win some really outstanding prizes."

Currently, over 46,000 people have become Oregon Lottery Facebook followers. Given the odds of winning games like Powerball or Mega Millions, the odds of winning a Lottery Facebook prize are much better. "Here are some tips to help make sure people don't miss any of the amazing chances to win posted on our Facebook page," said Barnes. "Be sure to prioritize our posts in your news feed. First, go to the Lottery's Facebook Timeline page. Then, hover over the 'Following' button. Finally, select 'See First,' that way you'll be sure to always see these posts when we put them online."

Go to the Oregon Lottery Facebook page and be watching for other great prizes including tickets to Portland Timbers and Thorns matches, the Bi-Mart Country Music Festival as well as 100 of the new "10X" Scratch-it tickets.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned over $9 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

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07/14/15
Sheriff's Office Cold Case Squad Seeks Public's Help with a 28 year old Homicide Investigation (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/14/15
2015-07/1294/86194/Butterfly.jpg
2015-07/1294/86194/Butterfly.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/1294/86194/thumb_Butterfly.jpg
The Marion County Sheriff's Office, Cold Case Squad, is requesting the public's help in identifying a Hispanic male, whose decomposing body was found by fishermen in the area of Horseshoe Lake, near St. Paul, Oregon on October 25, 1986. The Oregon State Medical Examiner determined that this death was a homicide. The victim is believed to have been young, perhaps 20 to 30 years old, approximately 5' 4" tall with a slender to medium build. Most importantly, the victim possessed numerous distinctive tattoos, which included: a lady's head with a teardrop under her eye; a large butterfly; a lady's head wearing a sombrero; a scorpion under initials which appear to be "R.M.F." or "H.M.F" and the name "Felix" in stylized script. Drawings of these tattoos are being made available with this release.

Investigators suspect that the victim may have lived and worked in the greater Woodburn-St. Paul area. It is hoped that someone might recall a former employee, co-worker, neighbor or friend who could fit the description of the unidentified man and who simply dropped out of sight without notice in the late summer or fall of 1986.

Anyone who believes that they might have information which could assist this investigation is encouraged to contact the Marion County Sheriff's Office, Cold Case Squad, telephone (503) 540-8006, or Detective Mike Myers, telephone (503) 540-8096. In addition, information can be provided to email address: mmyers@co.marion.or.us.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1294/86194/Butterfly.jpg , 2015-07/1294/86194/WomanWearingSombrero.jpg , 2015-07/1294/86194/WomanTearyEyed.jpg , 2015-07/1294/86194/StylizedLetters.jpg , 2015-07/1294/86194/Scorpion.jpg
Leaburg Hydroelectric Project Historic District listed in the National Register of Historic Places (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/14/15
Leaburg Hydroelectirc Project Historic District
Leaburg Hydroelectirc Project Historic District
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/1303/86183/thumb_OR_Lane_Leaburg_Leaburg_Hydro_District_WEB.jpg
The Leaburg Hydroelectric Project Historic District in Lane County is among Oregon's latest entries in the National Register of Historic Places.

The Leaburg Hydroelectric Project was put into service in January 1930 and continues to generate electric power as part of the Eugene Water & Electric Board system, a municipally owned utility located in Lane County, Oregon. It is located along approximately five miles of the McKenzie River in the vicinity of Leaburg, and consists of the dam and powerhouse; the reservoir, canal and tailrace; and Leaburg Village, built to house dam workers.

The Leaburg Hydroelectric Project was constructed between 1928 and 1930 and completed as originally envisioned in June 1950. Designed by the Portland engineering firm of Stevens & Koon, the facility is significant for its engineering design, incorporating innovative technological features such as the Broome Self-Closing Sluice Gate and three 100'-long roller gates. It is also significant for its art and architecture. The powerhouse was designed by Ellis Lawrence, the founder of the University of Oregon school of architecture. The bas relief panels on the building were created by the nationally prominent sculptor Harry Camden Poole. The powerhouse is considered one of the finest examples of Art Deco architecture used in an industrial setting in Oregon.

Oregon's State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the site's nomination in their February 2015 meeting. The Leaburg Hydroelectric Project Historic District is only the second property in the Leaburg area to be listed in the National Register, the first being the Old McKenzie Fish Hatchery Historic District. The National Register is maintained by the National Park Service under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon lists is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on "National Register" at left of page).


Attached Media Files: Leaburg Hydroelectric Project Historic District National Register nomination , Press Release , Leaburg Hydroelectirc Project Historic District
NW Natural Gives Nearly $28,000 to Leading Local Environmental Stewards
NW Natural - 07/14/15
PORTLAND, Ore. - From the region's rivers to forests, NW Natural (NYSE:NWN) is helping to protect our natural treasures by giving $27,500 to five local nonprofit organizations that focus on sustainability and the environment.

"As one of our core values, environmental stewardship plays a significant role in our work," said Von Summers, community affairs manager for NW Natural. "It's a part of everything we do - from business practices to energy efficiency. These donations to leading conservation and sustainability groups help us further our commitment in this area."

This year, NW Natural shareholders are awarding grants to the following environmental organizations:

$7,500 Grant Recipient: Friends of Trees
With a mission to bring people together to plant and care for city trees and green spaces in Pacific Northwest communities, Friends of Trees has planted nearly half a million trees and native plants since 1989.

$5,000 Grant Recipient: The Freshwater Trust
The Freshwater Trust builds and implements the tools and methods that can accelerate results for freshwater ecosystems.

$5,000 Grant Recipient: SOLVE
SOLVE takes action every day to keep Oregon clean and green. Mobilizing more than 35,000 volunteers, SOLVE organizes more than 1,000 cleanup and restoration projects throughout the state.

$5,000 Grant Recipient: The Nature Conservancy
The Nature Conservancy is the leading conservation organization working around the world to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people, including approximately 30 project sites in Oregon.

$5,000 Grant Recipient: Tualatin Riverkeepers
Tualatin Riverkeepers is dedicated to holistic watershed management of the Tualatin River and its 27 creeks, which provide drinking water to nearly 400,000 homes and businesses in Washington County as well as water for industry, agriculture and a rich variety of wildlife.

These grants represent just one portion of NW Natural's commitment to giving back to the community. In fact, NW Natural shareholders donate more than $1 million each year as part of its Corporate Philanthropy Fund. In addition to environmental causes, the company gives to nonprofit organizations that help improve health and community services, education, youth services, as well as arts and culture.

About NW Natural
NW Natural (NYSE:NWN) is headquartered in Portland, Ore., and provides natural gas service to about 707,000 residential, commercial, and industrial customers in Oregon and Southwest Washington. It is the largest independent natural gas utility in the Pacific Northwest. Additional information is available at nwnatural.com.

# # # #
Rollover Crash Kills Cottage Grove Woman - Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 07/14/15
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On July 13, 2015 at approximately 6:24PM, the Lane County Sheriff's Office responded to a single vehicle motor vehicle crash on Row River Road near milepost 13 in the Cottage Grove area. Troopers from the Springfield Area Command responded to assist with the collision reconstruction and subsequent investigation.

Preliminary information revealed that a 1985 GMC 1500 pickup, operated by Kyle A BOND, age 25, of Eugene, was traveling westbound on Row River Road near milepost 13. BOND had five passengers, two in the cab and three riding in the bed of the pickup.

For unknown reasons, BOND, traveled off of the roadway, and veered back onto the roadway losing control of the vehicle. The vehicle collided with a concrete barrier and overturned ejecting the three occupants in the bed of the pickup.

Amber L COBISKEY, age 20, of Cottage Grove was pronounced deceased on scene by emergency crews.

Three passengers, Tyler J STUNER, age 18, Jonathan M BELLONE, age 21, and Forest COBISKEY, 18 (all of Cottage Grove) were transported to the Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend in Springfield for serious injuries. A sixteen year old juvenile male was also a passenger and was not injured.

BOND was arrested and lodged at the Lane County Jail on the charges of Manslaughter in the Second Degree, 2 counts of Assault in the Third Degree, five counts of Reckless Endangering and DUII.

Oregon State Police was assisted by the Lane County Sheriff's Office, the Lane County District Attorney's Office and South Lane Fire and Rescue.

This is an ongoing investigation and more information will be released when it is available.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1002/86176/DSCN0483.jpg , 2015-07/1002/86176/DSCN0319.JPG
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Employment in Oregon June 2015 News Release
Oregon Employment Dept. - 07/14/15
Oregon's Unemployment Rate Rises in June, Job Growth Continues


Oregon's unemployment rate was 5.5 percent in June, a slight increase from May's rate of 5.3 percent. The increase was not a surprise because one characteristic of Oregon's labor market following the Great Recession has been small increases in the unemployment rate during the summer months. Unemployment typically rises each summer as movers to Oregon, recent graduates, and students on summer break look for jobs. However, the influx of unemployed during each of the past four summers was larger than expected, which led to temporary increases in the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate. This summer could be showing a similar pattern.

Despite the slight increase in June, the unemployment rate remained significantly lower than the June 2014 rate of 7.0 percent.

Oregon's unemployment rate in June remained close to the national unemployment rate of 5.3 percent.

Oregon's labor force participation rate was 60.3 percent in June, the lowest participation rate since comparable records began in 1976. Put another way, three out of every five Oregonians, 16 years and over, are working or looking for work. Labor force participation has been falling as a larger share of the population reaches retirement age and leaves the labor force. Oregon's trend is similar to the nation's. The national labor force participation rate was 62.6 percent in June, the lowest it has been since 1977.

Oregon's payroll employment added a seasonally adjusted total of 2,300 jobs in June, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retail trade added 3,100 jobs, bouncing back from a loss of 1,400 jobs in May. The government sector added 1,800 jobs, most of which were in local government. Other industry sectors registered smaller job gains or losses, resulting in the total gain of 2,300 jobs.

Taking a longer-term view, payroll employment grew by 52,100 jobs since June 2014. The resulting over-the-year job growth rate was 3.0 percent in Oregon, much faster than the national job growth rate of 2.1 percent. Oregon's over-the-year job growth has consistently outpaced the nation since 2013.

Next Press Releases
The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the June county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, July 21st, and the statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for July on Tuesday, August 18th.
Notes:
All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted except for the detailed industry employment components.

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources.

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this official Oregon series data unless noted otherwise. This month's release incorporates the October, November and December 2014 tax records data. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS.



The pdf version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon Centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program -- auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For the Deaf and Hard of Hearing population, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/930/86174/employment_in_Oregon_--_June_2015_--_press_release.pdf
07/13/15
Corrections Officers and Deputies to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy
Oregon Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/13/15
The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST)is pleased to announce the graduation of Basic Corrections Local #BCL019 on Friday July 24, 2015 at the Oregon Public Safety Academy, 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. The event will begin at 11 am with a reception to follow after the ceremony.

All family and friends of students, supervisors, department heads and city and county officials are welcome to attend.

# Officers and Deputies in Basic Corrections Class #

Deputy Sheriff Tori Amundson
Washington County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Christopher Anderson
Umatilla County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Lonie Brown
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Zachary Childers
Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Curran Deede
Marion County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Jeffrey Dukleth
Jefferson County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Raykeem Eason
Linn County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Michael Frieze
Marion County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Christopher Gardner
Lane County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Josh Griffith
Malheur County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Semaj Harris
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Joshua Heldt
Clackamas County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Matthew Hitson
Lane County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Kyle Holmes
Lane County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Nathaniel Holte
Washington County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Jonathan Ianos
Washington County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Alex Jarmer
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Kinsey Kaylor
Lane County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Drew Lay
Lane County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Benjamin Lefever
Clackamas County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Seth Lewis
Lincoln County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Kaylin Marron
Washington County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Christopher McCune
Washington County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Elizabeth Norvald
Columbia County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Charles Patton
Josephine County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Michael Pfeiff
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Marco Reyes
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Cory Schindler
Northern Oregon Correctional Facility

Deputy Sheriff Kurt Simmons
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Denver Spears
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Daniel Szarowski
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Corrections Officer Daisy Thomas
Warm Springs Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Sara Tolley
Klamath County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Juan Valdez
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Michelle Vandenburg
Columbia County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Randy Vergeson
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Branden Walton
Lane County Sheriff's Office

Corrections Officer Ross Williams
Springfield Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Naomi Wishart
Lane County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Jeffrey Woods
Deschutes County Sheriff's Office


## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Chief Kent Barker of the City of Tualatin Police Department serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for training and certification of city, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.
First National Bank of Bandon listed in National Register of Historic Places (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/13/15
2015-07/1303/86153/OR_CoosCounty_MasonicTemple_WEB.jpg
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The First National Bank of Bandon in downtown Bandon is Oregon's latest entry in the National Register of Historic Places.

The temple-front bank was designed by Bror Benjamin Ostlind, a well-known and prominent architect from Marshfield, Oregon, present-day Coos Bay. Ostlind was born in Karlstad, Sweden in 1885, and moved to Marshfield in 1906. He was an active community member, starting the Long Fellows Club, an organization for extra tall men (he was 6'4"). In this role, he was instrumental in putting pressure on large hotels and Pullman cars to install accommodations for extra-tall persons. He was also a successful businessman, owning several enterprises in the community.

In the bank building's design, Ostlind combined the use of a relatively new and structurally robust material, concrete with "cold twisted rod" reinforcement. The Neoclassical style of the building resulted in an attractive and functional commercial bank building that conveyed the stability of the institution to the community, while providing a secure and fire-resistant location for the bank. The design was successful, and the building survived the Great Fire of 1936 that razed downtown Bandon. Since 1955 the upper floor of the building has been the home of Bandon Lodge No. 130 Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. The ground floor currently houses two retail shops.

Oregon's State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the building's nomination at their meeting in February 2015. More than 2,000 properties in Oregon are now listed in the National Register, which is maintained by the National Park Service under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon listings is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on "National Register" at left of page).


Attached Media Files: First National Bank of Bandon National Register nomination , First National Bank of Bandon , 2015-07/1303/86153/OR_CoosCounty_MasonicTemple_WEB.jpg
OHA issues advisory for soft-shell clams along Oregon Coast
Oregon Health Authority - 07/13/15
EDITORS: Oregon Public Health Division staff members will be available for interviews from 4 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. TODAY (July 13) in Room 1-A (first floor), Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St.

July 13, 2015

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

OHA issues advisory for soft-shell clams along Oregon Coast
Removing skin from clam's siphon dramatically reduces arsenic levels, public health officials say

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) is issuing a health advisory for the length of the Oregon Coast for soft-shell clams because they contain high levels of naturally occurring arsenic.

The advisory is most important for people who dig their own clams and target the specific species Mya arenaria, since these clams are not commercially available in markets or restaurants.

The advisory, issued today by the OHA Public Health Division, recommends removing the skin from the siphon, or "neck," of soft-shell clams before eating them. Soft-shell clams are found primarily in estuary and intertidal regions of the Oregon coast. This advisory stems from tests the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) performed on a variety of shellfish species collected along the Oregon coast as part of its Water Quality Toxics Monitoring Program.

DEQ's tests found that when analyzed whole without the shell, soft-shell clams contained unusually high levels of inorganic arsenic. Most of the arsenic was concentrated in the skin covering the clam's siphon. Researchers found that by removing the skin covering the siphon before eating, the arsenic can be greatly reduced, to levels that are not harmful.

Arsenic levels varied along the Oregon coast: Clams on the north coast had the most arsenic; clams on the south coast had the least arsenic; clams on the central coast were in between.

Those planning to eat soft-shell clams with siphon skins intact should review the OHA's recommended meal limits, which are available at www.healthoregon.org/fishadv.

The advisory does not include other species of shellfish. In addition to soft-shell clams, DEQ tested Olympia oysters (a native species of oyster), California mussels, and purple varnish clams, and determined these species are not of concern. The tests looked for a wide range of potential contaminants, including other metals such as cadmium, mercury, and selenium; chlorinated pesticides like DDT and chlordane; polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs); dioxins and furans; tributyl tin; and brominated flame retardants (polybrominated diphenyl ethers, or PBDEs). None of these other contaminants were present at high enough concentrations to pose a public health risk.

Public health officials say that since the arsenic contaminating the clams is naturally occurring, the advisory is likely to be permanent.

By issuing the advisory, health officials hope to increase the public's awareness of shellfish species to be avoided, those to keep eating, and ways to reduce exposure to known contaminants when possible. While it is important for people to know about contaminants in shellfish, it is equally important to keep shellfish on the table. Health officials continue to encourage everyone to eat a variety of shellfish as part of a healthy diet.

OHA officials emphasize the advisory is about encouraging people to be cautious about certain kinds of shellfish, not all types of shellfish, and to prepare them correctly.

"Because eating shellfish and other aquatic species can be an important part of a healthy diet, we want people to continue eating shellfish," said toxicologist David Farrer, Ph.D., of OHA's Public Health Division. "If they plan to consume soft-shell clams, we just recommend they remove the siphon skin before eating them."

To learn more online about why fish is good for you and get information about fish consumption advisories in Oregon, visit www.healthoregon.org/fishadv.

# # #
Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Update - Monday, July 13, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/13/15
This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Fire Update for Monday, July 13, 2015.

No fires 10 acres or larger were reported starting on ODF-protected forestlands in the past 72 hours.

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
(Final Report): Northeast Oregon District - Pendleton Unit: The lightning-caused Table Rock Fire, which started on July 9 and burned in grass and brush on ODF-protected lands approximately 8 miles northeast of Pilot Rock, was reported as 100 percent contained at 218 acres on Friday afternoon, July 13. More information: http://bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com.

(Final Report): North Cascade District - Santiam Unit: The Niagara Fire, reported on July 4 burning on state forestlands adjacent to Highway 22 near Big Cliff Dam, is now 100 percent contained at approximately 79 acres and in full mop-up. The cause of the fire remains under investigation. More information: http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/.

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015 through July 13, 2015:
Lightning-caused fires: 158 fires burned 1,129 acres
Human-caused fires: 342 fires burned 707 acres
Total: 500 fires burned 1,836 acres

10-year average (January 1 through July 13):
Lightning-caused fires: 69 fires burned 839 acres
Human-caused fires: 237 fires burned 1,809 acres
Total: 306 fires burned 2,648 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.

When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

NEWS MEDIA
News media may contact the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Jeri Chase, 503-945-7201 (office), 503-931-2721 (mobile), or Jeri.Chase@Oregon.gov, any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF proves fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting effort on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.

###

Jeri Chase, ODF PIO
PH: 503-945-7201
Cell: 503-931-2721
jeri.chase@Oregon.gov
07/12/15
Harrisburg Man Arrested After Fatal Crash (Photo)
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 07/12/15
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Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley reports today at 04:15 a.m. his deputies responded to a single motor-vehicle crash that killed 19-year-old Zachary James Triplett from Harrisburg. The crash occurred on Peoria Road just south of Nixon Drive which is approximately three miles north of Harrisburg.

The preliminary investigation reveals the 1993 Toyota Previa minivan was traveling southbound on Peoria south of Nixon Drive. The driver of the minivan, 20-year-old Nicholas Matthew Norman, also from Harrisburg, failed to negotiate a left-hand curve and traveled off the east side of the road rolling the minivan several times. Triplett was ejected approximately 50 feet from the vehicle.

Norman was taken to Good Samaritan Hospital in Corvallis by Corvallis Medics with non-life threatening injuries. Passengers Turner W. Reed, 18 years old from Harrisburg, and Haley N. Hankinson, 18 years old of Junction City, were also taken to Good Samaritan Hospital in Corvallis by Corvallis Medics with non-life threatening injuries.

Triplett was pronounced deceased on scene and was taken to Fisher Funeral Home in Albany.

Speed, alcohol, and drugs likely are contributing factors to the crash. There was evidence to show that Norman was over twice the legal limit of alcohol and had also used cocaine and marijuana.

All occupants, with the exception of Triplett, were wearing seat belts.

Upon being released from the hospital, Norman was taken into custody at approximately 1:00 p.m. and lodged in the Linn County Jail for Manslaughter II, Assault II, and DUII.

Linn County deputies were assisted by Multi-Agency Investigative Crash Team members from the Lebanon Police Department and the Sweet Home Police Department. Harrisburg, Halsey and Corvallis Fire Departments also responded to the scene.

The investigation is ongoing. If anyone has any information regarding this crash, please call Detective Jeff Schrader at the Linn County Sheriff's Office, 541-967-3950.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/2993/86138/017.jpg
Sheriff's Office Searching for A Missing 10 Year Old Boy in Rural South Marion County (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/12/15
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Miguel has been located healthy and well at a local park. He is being reunited with his family.



Deputies along with search and rescue are on scene looking for a 10 year old boy, Miguel Reyna, who was last seen near his residence in the 2700 block of Pebble Ln S. Around 4:00 p.m. yesterday, Miguel was playing soccer on their property with his brother when their mother called them in to the house. Miguel went over the fence to retrieve the soccer ball, but never returned to the house.

Miguel is described as a Hispanic male, 4 feet 7 inches tall, 85 pounds and was last seen wearing a blue "Oregon coast surfer" t-shirt, black shorts with a red & white stripe and brown boots. There were a couple citizen reports of possible sightings of Miguel, which deputies are following up on.

Anyone with information of Miguel's whereabouts and or sightings of him should call the Marion County Sheriff's Office at 503-588-5032


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1294/86129/Modified_copy_of_IMG_20150712_071755_026.jpg
Red Cross Provides Assistance After Weekend Fires
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 07/12/15
The American Red Cross Cascades Region provides immediate emergency assistance for individuals and families affected by disasters throughout Oregon and southwest Washington. These residential fires all occurred the weekend of July 10:

A July 10 single-family fire in the 200 block of SE Third Street in Irrigon, Morrow County, Ore. affected two adults, one child, and two pets. The Red Cross provided food, clothing, and recovery information.

A July 11 multi-family fire in the 4700 block of Teralee Lane in Eugene, Lane County, Ore. affected four adults, three children and two pets. The Red Cross provided comfort kits and information on disaster stress management.

A July 10 single-family fire in the 300 block of SE 105th Ave in Vancouver, Clark County, Wash. affected two adults and one child. The Red Cross provided comfort kits and information on disaster stress management.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in communities across Oregon and southwest Washington. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 to schedule an appointment.

Know what to do before, during and after a home fire. Take a few moments to review your family's exit plan should there be a fire in your home. This information, and more, is available at www.redcross.org or in a free Prepare! Resource Guide published by the American Red Cross Cascades Region. The guide can be downloaded at http://rdcrss.org/1zq8XW6.
07/11/15
Ehlen Road Construction Notice
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/11/15
Ehlen Road Chip Seal and Railroad Crossing Replacement

July 13 to July 21

Construction Notice

July 13 through July 17: Marion County will apply a chip seal surface treatment on Ehlen Rd from the City of Aurora to Arbor Grove Rd. Traffic will be controlled by flaggers and pilot cars. Work hours are from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Ehlen Rd will be shut down to one lane, through the crossing area of the railroad tracks, between the hours of 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

July 18 through July 21: Ehlen Rd will be closed at the Portland and Western Railroad crossing so that the crossing can be replaced and the road approaches repaved. No traffic will be allowed across the crossing during the closure. Traffic will be detoured via Bents, Arndt, and Butteville Roads.

Marion County contact: Bill Brownlee at 503-588-7918.
Oregon State Police Continuing Vehicle vs Pedestrian Crash In Linn County
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 07/11/15
On July 11, 2015, at 3:36 AM, Linn County 911 received a call of a male pedestrian in the roadway on Highway 20 near milepost 23 (just east of Lebanon).

At 4:00AM, Linn County Sheriff's Office Lieutenant Craig Vogt was checking the area of Highway 20, milepost 21, when he struck an adult male in the eastbound lanes of Highway 20 with his 2008 Ford Expedition patrol vehicle. Lieutenant Vogt started first aid and requested medics.

The adult male was transported to Lebanon General Hospital and then to Good Samaritan Hospital in Corvallis with serious injuries. The male was identified as Elliott Curtis DUKE, age 32, of Lebanon, Oregon.

According to Lieutenant Vonn Schleicher, OSP, preliminary investigation showed that DUKE was wearing all black clothing and standing in the middle of the lanes of travel. This is a rural area and this section of Hwy 20 has no street lights and minimal lighting from surrounding residences.

Oregon State Police is the lead investigating agency. The eastbound lanes of HWY 20 were closed for approximately four hours while the investigation was conducted. OSP was assisted by the Linn County Sheriff's Office, Lebanon Fire Department and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

This is an ongoing investigation and more information will be released when it is available.
OSP Continuing Fatal Crash Investigation - Jefferson County
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 07/11/15
On July 10, 2015 at about 9:20PM, a Jefferson County Sheriff's Deputy attempted to stop a vehicle near Culver when it fled. The vehicle fled for several miles when it lost control and crashed into a tree near SW Feather Drive and SW Imo Lane in Culver.

The driver of the vehicle was pronounced deceased. The passenger was taken to St Charles Bend for serious injuries.

The Oregon State Police is conducting the crash investigation. All inquiries should be directed to the Jefferson County Sheriff's Office. More information will be release when it becomes available.
07/10/15
***Contact Telephone Update*** Multiple Arrests Are Made Following Investigation Surrounding Charter Company - Lincoln County
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 07/10/15
The Oregon State Police is continuing an investigating relating to charges that have been brought against Tradewinds Charters of Depoe Bay, Oregon and associated parties for alleged criminal conduct involving the sale of fishing licenses to angling charter customers. It is alleged that customers were charged for fishing licenses and then were either not issued licenses or were given receipts and told those receipts were valid fishing licenses. Any potential victims of this activity, and/or you have information regarding this activity, you are requested to contact the Oregon State Police at 503-375-3555.
End Release

Previous Release:
Oregon State Police Troopers from the Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division along with the Lincoln County District Attorney's Office received grand jury indictments stemming from an ongoing investigation into activities by the Tradewinds of Depoe Bay Charter Company.

In March of 2015, the Oregon State Police executed a search warrant on the company's premises. The company was under investigation for a variety of theft charges based on various allegations. This included allegations the company had charged customers for daily angling licenses but never purchased these licenses from the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife nor provided an actual license to customers.

On July 2, 2015, the company owners, employees and some of the charter boat captains were indicted by a grand jury on the following felony and misdemeanor charges:

Tim HARMON, age 67 (of Lake Oswego), Julie HARMON, age 52 (of Lake Oswego), Eva HARMON, age 24 (of Lincoln City), Noelie ACHEN, age 30 (of Depoe Bay) and Dustin COUCH, age 30 (of Depoe Bay) were all indicted for Racketeering - 2 counts, Theft in the First Degree - 4 counts, Aggravated Theft in the First Degree - 2 counts, Conspiracy to Commit Theft in the First Degree - 4 counts, Conspiracy to Commit Aggravated Theft in the First Degree - 2 counts, Failure to Remit Moneys from License Sales, Conspiracy of Failure to Remit Moneys from License Sales, Assisting Another to Violate Oregon Wildlife Laws, and Conspiracy in Assisting Another to Violate Oregon Wildlife Laws.

Bradley HAIGHT, age 48 (of Depoe Bay), Craig CALKINS, age 45 (of Depoe Bay), Daniel ZIMMERMAN, age 60 (of Depoe Bay), Richard NEWTON, age 67 (of Depoe Bay), and Roman SMOLCIC, age 31(of Lincoln County) were indicted for Racketeering - 2 counts, Conspiracy in Assisting Another to Violate Oregon Wildlife Laws, and Assisting Another to Violate Oregon Wildlife Laws - multiple counts.

On July 8th and July 9th, all above subjects were arrested and lodged at the Lincoln County Jail. This is an ongoing investigation and any inquiries should be made to the Lincoln County District Attorney's Office. If someone feels they have any information on this investigation or similar incidents they are urged to contact the Oregon State Police - Newport Area Command at 541-265-5354.
Linn County SAR Rescues Injured Horseback Rider
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 07/10/15
Linn County Undersheriff Jim Yon reports on July 9th at 6:10 pm, Linn County Search and Rescue members were called out for an injured female and horse that slid down a hill after a US Forest Service trail gave way in the Marion Lake area.

Sixteen Linn County SAR members, six Linn County Mounted Posse members, and Corvallis Mountain Rescue responded to the area to locate the female victim. There were a total of five individuals, ages ranging from 12 yrs old to 70 yrs old, traveling with 7 horses.

The injured rider, Angela Shelby, 50 yrs old from Crook River, sustained a sprained ankle, and her horse sustained minor injuries when they were attempting to cross a log that was lying across the trail. The trail gave way, causing the horse and rider to slide into a large hole. The party members tried to repair the trail and ended up staying Wednesday night at that location. The next day, one of the companions rode to a elevated position to call for help.

Responding SAR teams had some difficulty locating Shelby and her party. They were ultimately located at 04:30 am today. After providing medical care to Shelby, the entire group proceeded to Bingham Ridge trailhead, where they arrived at 1:00pm. Once there, they were given food, water, and a ride to their horse trailers. The names of the other individuals are not available at this time.
Photo Release: Oregon Air National Guard's 142nd Fighter Wing dedicates new alert barn at Portland Air National Guard Base (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 07/10/15
2015-07/962/86120/150710-Z-CH590-128.jpg
2015-07/962/86120/150710-Z-CH590-128.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/962/86120/thumb_150710-Z-CH590-128.jpg
Photo Release

150710-Z-CH590-117
Oregon Air National Guard Col. Paul T. Fitzgerald, 142nd Fighter Wing commander, addresses attendees at the offical ribbon cutting ceremony for a new alert barn at the Portland Air National Guard Base, Ore., July 10. Fitzgerald emphasized the use of the third alter barn as a key factor in the Aerospace Control Alert mission that the 142nd Fighter Wing performs to protect the skies over the Pacific Northwest. (Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. John Hughel, 142nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs/Released)

150710-Z-CH590-128
Oregon Army National Guard Maj. Gen. Daniel R. Hokanson, Adjutant General, Oregon, discusses the role of the 142nd Fighter Wing with regard to its Aerospace Control Alert mission during the offical ribbon cutting ceremony for the new alert barn at the Portland Air National Guard Base, Ore., July 10. The 142 Fighter Wing is tasked with protecting the skies over the Pacific Northwest, from northern California to the Canadian border, and extending out along the Pacific coastline. (Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. John Hughel, 142nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs/Released)

150710-Z-CH590-053
Oregon Air National Guard Col. Paul T. Fitzgerald, 142nd Fighter Wing commander, center right, and Oregon Army National Guard Maj. Gen. Daniel R. Hokanson, Adjutant General, Oregon, center left, along with other dignitaries, take part in a ribbon cutting ceremony for a new alert barn at the Portland Air National Guard Base, Ore., July 10. The third alter barn will play a key role in the Aerospace Control Alert mission that the 142nd Fighter Wing performs to protect the skies over the Pacific Northwest. (Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. John Hughel, 142nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs/Released)

150710-Z-CH590-040
Oregon Air National Guard Col. Paul T. Fitzgerald, 142nd Fighter Wing commander, addresses attendees at the offical ribbon cutting ceremony for a new alert barn at the Portland Air National Guard Base, Ore., July 10. Fitzgerald emphasized the use of the third alter barn as a key factor in the Aerospace Control Alert mission that the 142nd Fighter Wing performs to protect the skies over the Pacific Northwest. (Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. John Hughel, 142nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs/Released)


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/962/86120/150710-Z-CH590-128.jpg , 2015-07/962/86120/150710-Z-CH590-117.jpg , 2015-07/962/86120/150710-Z-CH590-053.jpg , 2015-07/962/86120/150710-Z-CH590-040.jpg
State Housing Council Meeting
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 07/10/15
AGENDA

Date: July 17, 2015
Time: 9:00 a.m.
Location: OHCS; Conference Room 124a/b;
725 Summer Street NE, Suite B, Salem Oregon 97301
Call-In: 1-877-273-4202; Room Number: 4978330


1. Roll Call

2. Public Comment

3. Draft Meeting Minutes for Approval
June 5, 2015

4. Update on Columbia Knoll Apartments - Ryan Miller, Asset Management & Compliance Manager

5. 2015 NOFA Offerings, Progress Update - Julie Cody, Assistant Director Housing Finance

6. 2015 Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) Award Recommendations - Director Van Vliet

a. Overview and Staff Presentation, Julie Cody, OHCS
i. HOME Projects
?,? Statewide

ii. Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) Projects by Region
?,? Metro
?,? Non-Metro
?,? Balance of State

b. Public Comment

7. Legislative Session Wrap-up -Director Van Vliet; Rem Nivens, Assistant Director of Public Affairs

8. Report of the Director

9. Report of the Chair

Adjourn State Housing Council meeting.


Next meeting:
The next meeting is scheduled for September 11, 2015 at 9:00 a.m. in OHCS, Conference Room 124a/b. Call-In: 1-877-273-4202; Participant Code: 4978330.

Please note the change in meeting schedule - the regularly scheduled meeting in August has been cancelled.
Corvallis Police Arrest Suspect for Public Indecency
Corvallis Police - 07/10/15
On July 8, 2015, at about 5:00pm, Corvallis Police Officers responded to a public indecency complaint in the 5000 block of SW Technology Lp.

A female caller reported she was sitting in the back patio area of her apartment when she was approached by a male subject who asked her if he could sit in the shade near the patio. The subject sat in the shade for a few moments, and after a short time stood up and moved a short distance away. The suspect began masturbating while he was standing, and then turned to face the victim while he continued to masturbate. The victim went inside to call the police, and when she went back outside the suspect was gone.

While she was waiting for the police to arrive, the suspect returned, saying he had lost his keys. The victim noticed a key(s) on the ground where the suspect initialy sat down. She put her foot on the key(s) in the hopes of keeping him there until police arrived. The suspect did leave prior to police arriving on scene and he was not initially located. However, the victim did take a photograph of the suspect with her cell phone as he looked for his missing key(s). Officers examined the photo and recognized the suspect as 46 year old Steven Fairbanks or Corvallis.

On July 9, 2015, Fairbanks was located driving on SW Philomath Blvd. His vehicle was stopped and Fairbanks was arrested on one count of Public Indecency. He was transported to the Benton County Jail where he was booked and released.

A mug-shot photo is available at the following link:

http://www.co.benton.or.us/sheriff/corrections/inmate_detail.php?bn=1500001309
DOGAMI Governing Board to meet July 24 in Bend
Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries - 07/10/15
PORTLAND, Ore.-The Governing Board of the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) will meet from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Friday, July 24 in Bend.

Among the items slated for discussion is recruitment for the position of State Geologist. The State Geologist serves as the Agency's Executive Director. Public comment will be taken on the recruitment process, timeline and hiring standards and criteria, which will be posted at www.OregonGeology.org one week before the meeting.

A full meeting agenda is available here: http://bit.ly/1MiIpd2

The meeting will take place at Mount Bachelor Village, 19717 Mount Bachelor Drive, Bend, in the Summer Twilight conference room.

The DOGAMI Governing Board sets policy and oversees general operations, and adopts a strategic plan every six years to guide DOGAMI's mission and objectives. The Board meets at least quarterly at sites around the state. As active members of their communities, Board members provide an important connection between Oregonians and DOGAMI's mission of providing earth science information and regulation to make Oregon safe and prosperous.
Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Update - Friday, July 10, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/10/15
This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Fire Update for Friday, July 10, 2015.

Widespread thunderstorms and lightning moved throughout much of Oregon yesterday and last night, igniting numerous small fires on forestlands throughout Oregon, including those protected by ODF. Some of that lightning came with some precipitation, which is predicted to continue as an overall cooler weather pattern moves into and throughout much of Oregon. Cooling and minor amounts of rainfall have not appreciably decreased fire danger, however, and the public is still urged to continue to be fire-safe while enjoying or working in Oregon's fires.

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
(Initial Report): Northeast Oregon District - Pendleton Unit: Firefighters from around the area have responded to a fire ignited by a thunderstorm on Thursday evening on lands protected by Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla (CTUIR). The Table Rock Fire, burning approximately 8 miles northeast of Pilot Rock, was estimated at 400 acres. This morning, the fire is 100 percent lined and in mop-up. The fire suppression is being led by ODF, with firefighters and/or equipment assisting from Helix, Echo, Stanfield, and Pilot Rock Rural Fire Departments, Pendleton Fire Department, Bureau of Indian Affairs, CTUIR Tribal Fire, and Umatilla National Forest. Burning in mostly grass and brush, this morning the fire is 100 percent lined and in mop-up. Unless the situation warrants more reports, this will be the only report on this fire. More information: http://bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com

(Updated Report): North Cascade District - Santiam Unit: The Niagara Fire, reported on July 4 burning on state forestlands adjacent to Highway 22 near Big Cliff Dam, remains at approximately 79 acres and is now estimated as 85 percent contained, with full containment expected around Monday (July 13). Approximately 120 firefighting personnel remained on this fire late yesterday afternoon, however resources continue to be released as the fire is more fully contained. The cause of the fire remains under investigation. More information: http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/.

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015 through July 10, 2015:
Lightning-caused fires: 130 fires burned 1,014 acres
Human-caused fires: 329 fires burned 673 acres
Total: 459 fires burned 1,687 acres

10-year average (January 1 through July 10):
Lightning-caused fires: 53 fires burned 501 acres
Human-caused fires: 223 fires burned 1,428 acres
Total: 276 fires burned 1,949 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.

When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

NEWS MEDIA
News media may contact the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Jeri Chase, 503-945-7201 (office), 503-931-2721 (mobile), or Jeri.Chase@Oregon.gov, any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF proves fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting effort on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.
Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet July 17 in Wilsonville
Oregon Health Authority - 07/10/15
July 10, 2014

Contact: Jennifer Uhlman, 503-739-5267 (meeting information or accommodations)

What: The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Metrics and Scoring Committee will meet in Wilsonville Friday, July 17. The primary focus of the meeting will be to review the 2014 HST Performance Report; finalize 2016 measure selection; and begin 2016 benchmark selection. Public testimony will be heard at 11:30 a.m.

When: Friday, July 17, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Room #211, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E, Wilsonville

Attendees can also join through a listen-only conference line at 1-888-808-6929, participant code 915-042.

Agenda:

-- Welcome and consent agenda;
-- Elections;
-- Updates;
-- Presentation: 2014 HST Performance Report and Quality Pool Distribution;
-- Public testimony;
-- Finalize 2016 measure selection;
-- Begin 2016 benchmark selection;
-- Wrap-up / adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at www.oregon.gov/oha/Pages/metrix.aspx.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Individuals requiring accommodation may request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations by calling the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

# # #
Benton County Sheriffs Office DUII patrol to coincide with the Philomath Frolic.
Benton Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/10/15
Results from extra DUII saturation patrol on Independence Day Weekend & upcoming DUII patrol to coincide with the Philomath Frolic.

The Benton County Sheriff's Office, participated in extra DUII saturation patrol during Independence Day Weekend, July 3-5, 2015. Those who worked the extra patrol arrested 3 people for DUII, 2 for Reckless Driving, and wrote 20 citations for traffic violations. The Benton County Sheriff's Office as a whole arrested 3 people for DUII, 3 people on outstanding warrants, investigated 1 traffic crash, arrested 2 for possession of controlled substances, and wrote a total of 41 traffic citations for violations committed over the weekend. Deputies also responded to the regular calls for service and criminal investigations.

The next DUII saturation patrol is scheduled July 9-12, 2015 for the Philomath Frolic weekend in Philomath.

Driver impairment and speeding are the most common causes of injury crashes. Oregon's DUII enforcement program is committed to reducing the amount of crashes and impaired drivers on our roadways by keeping them off the roadway and arresting them when they choose to drive. For more info on impaired driving, visit www.StopImpairedDriving.com.
Free community skin cancer screenings
Salem Health - 07/10/15
Are you without insurance or unable to afford important health screenings? You may qualify for a free skin screening by a local dermatologist. Salem Cancer Institute is offering the screenings through a partnership with Dermatology Clinic, P.C. and Silver Falls Dermatology & Allergy.

Prevention and early detection are the best ways to keep your skin healthy. Learn ways to protect you and your family and how to do a monthly self-exam at home.

Appointments must be scheduled in advance. Please call Salem Cancer Institute at 503-562-4321 for more information and to schedule an appointment.

Screening dates and locations:

Saturday, Aug. 8
9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Dermatology Clinic, P.C.
2441 Grear St NE, Salem

Saturday, Aug. 22
8 a.m. to Noon
Silver Falls Dermatology & Allergy
1793 13th Street SE, Salem

Salem Cancer Institute is a part of Salem Health, which is comprised of Salem Hospital, West Valley Hospital, Willamette Health Partners and other affiliated health care organizations offering exceptional care to people in and around Oregon's mid-Willamette Valley. The prestigious 2015 Truven Health 50 Top Cardiovascular Hospitals named Salem Hospital among the highest performing hospitals in the nation--and the only Oregon hospital, and one of two Pacific Northwest hospitals, to receive this honor. Visit us at salemhealth.org; "Like" us on facebook.com/salemhealth; follow us on Twitter: @salemhealth; and view us at youtube.com/salemhealth.
Waterfront Blues Festival raises nearly $870,000 despite heat wave (Photo)
Oregon Food Bank - 07/10/15
Love Bomb GoGo credit: Brit Forbes
Love Bomb GoGo credit: Brit Forbes
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/620/86103/thumb_Love_Bomb_GoGo_credit_Brit_Forbes.jpg
Festival donations allow Oregon Food Bank to help thousands in need

Portland, Oregon - July 10, 2015 - The 28th annual Safeway Waterfront Blues Festival, presented by First Tech Federal Credit Union, raised $869,214 for Oregon Food Bank through donations at the gate, festival passes, after-hours concerts and blues cruise tickets over the July 4th weekend.

"We can't thank our attendees enough for their generous support," said Susannah Morgan, CEO of Oregon Food Bank. "The donations we received will provide 2.6 million meals for families and individuals struggling with hunger in Oregon and Clark County, Washington."

"While total attendance was roughly 80,000 - down from our historical average of about 105,000 for a four-day festival - the good news is that a higher percentage of attendees made financial contributions at the gate," added Morgan. "Thank you to everyone who came out in the heat to support Oregon Food Bank and Waterfront Blues Festival."

This year, contribution rates rose five percentage points with 57 percent of attendees giving to Oregon Food Bank. In the past, only 52 percent of festival attendees contributed. Donors at the gate for this year's festival were given a sticker saying, "I am the 52%." Oregon Food Bank board members roamed the entry areas in sandwich boards proclaiming, "Grow the 52%" and "$10 = 30 meals."

Thursday through Sunday, blues fest fans were treated to more than 100 acts on four stages including:
BUDDY GUY GREGG ALLMAN GALACTIC with MACY GRAY BIG BAD VOODOO DADDY ALLEN TOUSSAINT CHARMAINE NEVILLE PHIL & DAVE ALVIN THE PALADINS DEVON ALLMAN CHUBBY CARRIER

The 29th Safeway Waterfront Blues Festival is slated for Friday through Monday, July 1-4, 2016.

Major sponsors: Safeway, First Tech Federal Credit Union, Coors, Delta Music Experience, Deschutes Brewery, FedEx, iQ Credit Union, KINK.fm, KOIN-TV, The Oregonian

Supporting sponsors: The Boeing Company, Schwindt & Co, Capital One, Health Net, Caring Ambassadors, Larabar, Highgrove Farms, EartH20, Nathan's, Columbia Crest Grand Estates, Pepsi, Frito Lay, Umpqua Ice Cream, Snapple, Bear Naked, Mission Foods, Portland Comm College, KBOO, NW Natural, Pape' Rents, EcoShuttle, Creative Safety Supply, 24 Hour Fitness, Winthrop R&B Fest, Clackamas County Tourism, Mississippi Music Trails, Hotel Rose, Marriott Portland Downtown Waterfront, Marriott North Harbor Group, Riverplace Hotel, University Place Hotel


Attached Media Files: Love Bomb GoGo credit: Brit Forbes , Fourth of July at Safeway Waterfront Blues Festival credit: Brit Forbes , Christone "Kingfish" Ingram credit: Brit Forbes
Living History Days set for July 18-19 at Fort Yamhill State Heritage Area
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/10/15
Fort Yamhill State Heritage Area presents a look at the fort more than 150 years ago when soldiers watched over the Willamette Valley during the Civil War. The event is July 18-19 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. both days.

Costumed interpreters will share stories of the soldiers who served their country in an isolated, yet important military installation. Park visitors can walk through the tent camp and watch the soldiers drilling on the historic parade ground and standing sentry. Park staff will also lead guided tours of the fort grounds. Call (503) 879-5814 for more information.

The event and parking are free. Fort Yamhill State Heritage Area is located on Highway 22, just north of the Highway 18/22 junction.
07/09/15
Summer Boating Requires Good Decision-Making (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 07/09/15
Water rescue on the Willamette River of a boater who got caught in a log jam and strainer. The boater was successfully rescued.
Water rescue on the Willamette River of a boater who got caught in a log jam and strainer. The boater was successfully rescued.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/4139/86088/thumb_WillametteRescue2014.jpg
Summer is boating season, compelling flocks of people to visit Oregon's waterways to cool off and escape the heat. Boating started early with a warm spring, and this summer is turning out to be one for the record books. When heading out to the water, bring your boat and your gear, but don't forget to bring your good judgment as well.

Your judgment could be the difference between a great day on the water and a tragic end. Oregon already has 11 boater deaths this year and we are only half way through the year. This compares to seven deaths in 2014. Of the 11 fatalities, nine were not wearing life jackets, seven were in non-motorized watercraft, and five are being investigated for being under the influence of alcohol and drugs. Many of these deaths were preventable.

"This year, "partying" turns out to be a serious killer. Alcohol and drugs are implicated in nearly half the fatalities and it's like we've turned back the clock a decade," says Randy Henry, Boating Safety Manager for the Marine Board. "Even a small amount of alcohol, when combined with sun and wind can impair your judgment. If you intend to recreate on Oregon's waters, leave the alcohol and drugs behind, get the right gear, wear your lifejacket and pay attention to your surroundings," Henry adds.

It is essential for boaters to carry the proper equipment, including lights for nighttime operation that conform with state law, even on paddlecraft. Waterways are becoming more crowded as the weather warms and water levels recede, so it is important for smaller craft to be visible, and for all boaters to know the rules of the road. Be vigilant by keeping a constant lookout to the front, the sides and even behind you. On moving water, this includes scouting ahead for obstructions, and not getting into water beyond your abilities.

Since June 1, marine patrol deputies have issued more than 300 citations to boat operators, where 37% were for life jacket violations (a $260 fine), and 11 individuals were arrested for Boating Under the Influence of Intoxicants (3.5% of all cites, up to a year in jail, $6,000 in fines). Nearly 26% of all citations relate to violations of the state's aquatic invasive species laws - either not having an AIS permit, or driving past a signed, mandatory AIS check station when transporting a boat (including paddlecraft on car rooftops). Other common citations include lack of a fire extinguisher when required ($160 fine), violating slow-no-wake zone rules ($260), or not carrying a Boater Education Card ($110).

For more information about equipment requirements, rules of the road for paddlecraft and motorized boats, and boating laws and rules, visit www.boatoregon.com.

###


Attached Media Files: Water rescue on the Willamette River of a boater who got caught in a log jam and strainer. The boater was successfully rescued.
Planned Parenthood Receives Federal Grant Funding for Teen Pregnancy Prevention
Planned Parenthood of Southwestern Oregon - 07/09/15
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: July 9, 2015

Planned Parenthood Receives Federal Grant Funding for Teen Pregnancy Prevention

This week, Planned Parenthood Columbia Willamette (PPCW) and Planned Parenthood of Southwestern Oregon (PPSO) received federal grant funding to continue playing a pivotal role in helping teens get the information, education and health care they need to delay parenthood until they're ready.

The grants from the Office of Adolescent Health (OAH) will support capacity-building assistance; deliver inclusive health care to reduce pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer youth; and implement pregnancy prevention programs to those living in rural communities. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) oversees the OAH and coordinates efforts related to adolescent health promotion and disease prevention.

"We are thrilled that our programming, expertise and experience were recognized by the OAH," said Camelia Hison, Vice President of Education at Planned Parenthood Columbia Willamette. "Planned Parenthood is proud to provide evidence-based programming and to empower students, parents, teachers, community members and professionals to help teens prevent unintended pregnancies. While we're gratified that Oregon's teen pregnancy rate is at a historic 40-year low, we still have work to do. Access to quality health care, resources and information is a fundamental right for all people and shouldn't depend on who we are or where we live."

PPCW and PPSO will work with the Northwest Coalition for Adolescent Health (NWCAH), a dynamic group of Planned Parenthood affiliates covering a large portion of the western United States. The group also includes Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest and the Hawaiian Islands (PPGNHI), Planned Parenthood of Montana (PPM), Planned Parenthood of Utah (PPU) and Mt. Baker Planned Parenthood (MBPP).

NWCAH received a total of $18.75 million to pursue the following grants over the next five years:

?--? Improving the Lives of Teens: Deliver evidence-based programs in at least three implementation settings to impact teen birth rates and disparities, addressing the unique needs in each community. The project will reach 9,100 youth over a four-year period.
?--? INclued: Aims to reduce pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections in the LGBTQ youth population by harnessing the power of youth-led interventions to increase healthcare inclusivity and access. The project will reach 1,800 youth and 150 healthcare professionals in 12 communities over five years.
?--? Linking Families and Teens (LiFT): Delivers teen pregnancy prevention education to students in ninth and 10th grades as well as parents and caregivers living in rural communities. The project will reach more than 2,000 people in Oregon, Washington, Utah, Idaho, Alaska and Hawaii over five years.
?--? Stronger Together: Provide capacity-building assistance in a tiered approach over a three-year period that helps community-based organizations implement, integrate and sustain evidence-based programming.

In addition, Multnomah County Health Department received a $6.25 million grant to implement evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs that serve populations at greatest need. In Multnomah County, the most alarming disparities in teen birth rates are among American Indians/Alaskan Natives, Blacks/African Americans and Latinas. The grant will be implemented by community organizations including Planned Parenthood Columbia Willamette, Native American Youth and Family Center, Self Enhancement Inc., Latino Network and Boys and Girls Clubs of Portland Metropolitan Area.

"For years, we at Planned Parenthood have been providing life-changing sexual education programs that provide information and resources about relationships, sexuality and sexual health," said Mary Gossart, Vice President of Education at Planned Parenthood of Southwestern Oregon. "We are excited to expand our services in the Rogue Valley to include capacity building for local partner organizations that work with youth experiencing a number of risk factors, including homelessness and difficulty in school."

In 2010, NWCAH was awarded $20 million by the Office of Adolescent Health to replicate the Teen Outreach Program, an evidence-based youth development program aimed at reducing teen pregnancy. Over the past five years, the program was primarily focused on the Northwest and addressed teen pregnancy and health disparities. The results are scheduled to be released in the fall and will show the outcomes of the past five years.

For more information about NWCAH or the grant curricula, please contact Jimmy Radosta at jimmy.radosta@ppcw.org or Sarah Moseley at sarah.moseley@ppsworegon.org.

###

Planned Parenthood Columbia Willamette is the largest nonprofit provider of sexual and reproductive health care and youth education programs in Oregon and Southwest Washington. Since 1963, PPCW has successfully carried out its mission of providing, promoting and protecting access to quality reproductive and sexual health care. Each year, more than 55,000 women, men and teens visit one of PPCW's health centers.

Planned Parenthood of Southwestern Oregon has been dedicated to providing expert reproductive health care and sexuality education in Southwestern Oregon for 50 years. PPSO sees 24,000 patients each year at six health centers. PPSO is also the region's most respected provider of medically accurate sexuality education for young people and adults, as well as training programs for professionals who work with youth and families.
Health advisory issued July 9 for Willamette River's Ross Island Lagoon
Oregon Health Authority - 07/09/15
EDITORS: Members of the Oregon Public Health Division's Environmental Public Health staff will be available for interviews from 4 to 4:30 p.m. TODAY (July 9) in Room 1-E (first floor), Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St.

July 9, 2015

A health advisory is being issued today for the Willamette River at the Ross Island Lagoon, including the mouth where it enters the Holgate Slough. Ross Island is located about one river mile south of downtown Portland in Multnomah County.

Water monitoring has confirmed the presence of blue-green algae in the lagoon, and toxin analysis is being performed to confirm the presence or absence of toxins. Until toxin testing can be completed and data received, the Oregon Health Authority is issuing the advisory based on visible scum and the bright green layers of cells that are visible in the water column. Once toxin data are received, the advisory will be updated or lifted based on the results.

Oregon Public Health officials advise people to avoid swallowing or inhaling water droplets as a result of swimming or high-speed water activities such as water skiing and power boating, in areas where blooms are identified.

Drinking water directly from the river where a bloom is identified is especially dangerous since any toxins produced cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating the water with camping-style filters. People who may draw water directly out of this area for drinking or cooking are advised to use an alternative water source. No public drinking or potable water systems are affected.

Oregon health officials recommend that people who choose to eat fish from waters where algae blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, because toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Public health officials also advise people to not eat freshwater clams or mussels from any freshwater source affected by a bloom and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations do not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

Exposure to toxins can produce symptoms of numbness, tingling, and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems, and require immediate medical attention. People who experience symptoms such as weakness, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, cramps and fainting should also receive medical attention if they persist or worsen.

Contact with cells from a bloom can cause skin irritation and a rash in individuals with skin sensitivities or who develop rashes easily.

Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to areas where blooms are identified should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in the water.

The public will be advised when the concern no longer exists.

People are encouraged to visit the river and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, bird watching, and boating at low speeds, but should limit water activities that can expose them to ingestion or inhalation in those areas where a bloom is identified or an advisory is in place. The Willamette is a big river and blooms can develop in areas along its course where low flow and slow-moving water can be found. If you see areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish-red, follow the motto "When in doubt, stay out."

For more information or to report a human or pet illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0400.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website. To find out if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at www.healthoregon.org/hab and select "algae bloom advisories," or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767.

# # #
Marion County Deputy District Attorney Jean Kunkle Honored By Animal Legal Defense Fund (Photo)
Marion Co. Dist. Attorney's Office - 07/09/15
2015-07/1416/86077/Jean2.jpg
2015-07/1416/86077/Jean2.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/1416/86077/thumb_Jean2.jpg
The Marion County District Attorney's Office would like to recognize Deputy District Attorney Jean Kunkle for her tireless efforts in fighting animal cruelty, abuse, and neglect. In February 2014 during National Justice for Animals Week, Kunkle was honored as one of America's top 10 animal defenders by the Animal Legal Defense Fund (ALDF). Kunkle received an honoree plaque declaring "Fighting Animal Abuse, Honoring Animal Victims" and was featured on the ALDF website. http://aldf.org/national-justice-for-animals-week/national-justice-for-animals-week-2014/americas-top-10-animal-defenders/

The ALDF is a national, nonprofit organization of attorneys who specialize in the protection of animals and who work to ensure the enforcement of existing animal protection laws. The ALDF seeks protection for abused animals through the criminal justice system, which is supported by more than 100,000 members nationwide.

Jean Kunkle has been a deputy district attorney in Marion County, Oregon since 1988. She is the trial team supervisor of the Domestic Violence Team, which consists of six attorneys responsible for the prosecution of crimes involving domestic violence, animal abuse, and neglect. Her team is committed to holding offenders accountable for their crimes, and assisting victims of crime--whether human or animal. For example, she gained convictions against a defendant charged with the neglect and starvation of sixteen horses, and the defendant was sentenced to two years in jail. Recently she prosecuted three board members of the Willamette Animal Rescue for multiple counts of neglect involving 149 dogs. This extreme hoarding case directly led to a change in Oregon law, making the neglect of 10 or more animals a Class C Felony, under Senate Bill 6 (2013).

She has been a legal instructor at the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training since 1998, where she instructs new police officers on Oregon laws regarding animal abuse and neglect. She served on the Board of Directors for the Willamette Humane Society and is an enthusiastic supporter of The Pongo Fund and Fences for Fido, as well as other animal welfare organizations. She has been a member of the Oregon District Attorneys Association Legislative Committee and has worked with community partners to pass legislation regarding animal abuse and neglect.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1416/86077/Jean2.jpg
North Bend School District Public Meetings - July 2015
North Bend Sch. Dist. - 07/09/15
Below are North Bend School District public meeting currently scheduled for July:

July 13, 2015
Regular School Board Meeting at 7:00 p.m.
North Bend City Council Chamber
835 California St., North Bend OR

The schedule is subject to change.
Visit www.nbend.k12.or.us for agenda information.
Deputies Investigating After Man Was Struck By a Train Early This Morning ***Update*** (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/09/15
2015-07/1294/86029/IMG_20150708_085147661_(1).jpg
2015-07/1294/86029/IMG_20150708_085147661_(1).jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/1294/86029/thumb_IMG_20150708_085147661_(1).jpg
The man killed in yesterday's train crash has been identified as Brian Beheler, age 36, of Washington County. Mr. Beheler was reported as a missing person after he left his apartment in May of this year without taking any belongings.

According to family Mr. Beheler suffered from mental illness. Mr. Beheler had been in the Jefferson area for at least two days and tragically was last seen walking on the tracks just prior to being struck by the train. The Sheriff's Office thoughts are with Mr. Beheler's family during this difficult time.



This morning at about 7:50 a.m., Deputies with the Marion County Sheriff's Office were called to a train versus pedestrian crash near 103 Old Pacific Highway in Jefferson. The preliminary investigation is showing that an adult male was walking on the railroad tracks when he was struck by a Union Pacific Freight Train and killed.

Investigators with the Sheriff's Office and the Railroad remain on scene while they determine exactly what happened. As of this time there are no further details regarding the crash or the person struck. Traffic is not being affected in the area and additional updates will be provided when they become available.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1294/86029/IMG_20150708_085147661_(1).jpg , 2015-07/1294/86029/Beheler_Brian.jpg
Oregon's Hospitals Celebrate 2015 Session: Cite Transparency Initiatives and Collaborative Efforts as Greatest Successes
Oregon Assn. of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS) - 07/09/15
The 2015 Legislative Session was one of the most proactive and productive in recent memory for hospitals and health care, as well as the patients hospitals serve, announced the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS) today. From partnering for the fifth consecutive biennium to fund a significant portion of the state's Medicaid program, to passing landmark price transparency legislation and collaborating to update Oregon's nurse staffing law, hospitals' priorities were front and center in the legislature.

Hospitals also announced several voluntary initiatives while the legislature was in session--all designed to help Oregon patients and their communities. One of those initiatives was the announcement that Oregon hospitals will maintain their community benefit spending levels even as charity care, a significant portion of that total, drops in the wake of the Affordable Care Act. Hospitals across the state also agreed to offer free care to those earning up to 200% of the federal poverty level.

In keeping with their commitment to quality and transparency, hospitals also launched a new website, OregonHospitalGuide.org, which currently displays the quality ratings for every hospital in the state. This user-friendly platform will incorporate further data on hospitals in future months, giving patients an ability to compare all Oregon hospitals.

"The first six months of 2015 have seen some of the most proactive initiatives by Oregon hospitals in a decade," said Andy Davidson, President and CEO of OAHHS. "Hospitals have proven their deep commitment to their communities, their patients, and the state in many ways. Our hospitals and health systems are working hand-in-hand with state and local leaders to continuously improve the health of Oregonians, and to ensure that patients can understand both the price and quality of the care they receive. Oregon is leapfrogging ahead of many states with these initiatives, and we are proud to say we are leading the way for the rest of the country."

Below are details on each of the various areas on which Oregon hospitals found partnership and success during the legislative session.

Medicaid Funding (HB 2395, signed by Gov. Brown on March 23; and HB 5526, passed July 2):

Oregon hospitals again agreed to partner with the state on a hospital tax program which, when leveraged with federal funding, will pay for a significant portion of the state's Medicaid program. The four-year agreement is estimated to generate more than $1.2 billion, which will pay for Medicaid services of all types for low income Oregonians.

Price Transparency (SB 900, passed July 6, 2015):

Oregon hospitals and many other stakeholder partners rallied to pass a bipartisan price transparency bill, SB 900, which directs the state to create a user-friendly website that displays average prices for the most common inpatient and outpatient hospital procedures, as paid by commercial insurers, giving Oregonians a better sense of the cost of care.

The price transparency bill is an integral piece of a three-pronged approach put forward by OAHHS, which would allow Oregonians to understand health care prices in advance of receiving care. Beyond the passage of the bill, OAHHS is working with members of the Oregon Health Leadership Council to build a plan that would provide insured Oregonians with cost estimates directly from their insurer, and pledging to provide good-faith estimates to uninsured and out-of-network patients in advance of care.

Nurse Staffing (SB 469, passed June 25):

Oregon hospitals worked with a variety of stakeholders to pass a SB 469, which outlined updates to Oregon's nurse staffing law. The legislation focused on ensuring patient safety and enhanced the audit and complaint investigation process by the Oregon Health Authority so that both nurses and hospitals could address deficiencies in a timely manner.

Quality Transparency:

In May, Oregon hospitals launched Oregon Hospital Guide (www.OregonHospitalGuide.org), a new website that displays hospital data on a user-friendly platform. This website is the first phase of a larger hospital transparency effort.

OregonHospitalGuide.org is the new home of data that tracks the quality of care in Oregon's hospitals--which patients can use to learn about their local community hospital. The site is designed to make complex information understandable and accessible to all Oregonians.

Community Benefit:

Earlier this year, Oregon hospitals announced a new, two-part community benefit policy package. The first initiative will provide free care for families who are not Medicaid eligible and whose income is below 200% of the federal poverty level. This program will help ensure that even as Medicaid expands, those who do not qualify and are unable to attain insurance will receive the hospital care they need. It is estimated that 87,000 Oregonians fall into this category.

The second initiative involves hospitals keeping overall community benefit spending at or above levels from prior years. During a time when charity care - free care for patients who do not have the ability to pay - is dropping statewide as a result of the Affordable Care Act, hospitals have committed to maintain their 2015 community benefit spending based on an average of prior years, as reported to the Oregon Health Authority. This commitment will allow hospitals to reinvest those dollars in other community benefit activities which support local health needs, in addition to fulfilling their charitable obligations to their communities as tax-exempt organizations.

Economic Impact:

Oregon community hospitals accounted for $18.9 billion in economic output in Oregon in 2013, according to a study by ECONorthwest released by OAHHS in June.

Executive Summary: http://www.oahhs.org/sites/default/files/2015-Economic-Impact-Executive-Summary.pdf
Full Report: http://www.oahhs.org/sites/default/files/2015-OAHHS-Final-Economic-Report.pdf

Nearly 60,000 Oregonians are directly employed by Oregon's community hospitals and another 52,000 jobs are directly associated with hospitals, showing that community hospitals are one of Oregon's key economic engines. Those 112,000 hospital-related jobs account for 4.9 percent of the state's total employment. On a county-by-county basis, hospital jobs and associated employment generally range between 3 and 6 percent of job totals--often trailing only government-supported jobs.
Sheriff's Office PIO Schedule for July
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/09/15
Lt. Chris Baldridge will be off for vacation starting tomorrow and returning 07/20. In his absence Sergeants Parise and Stutrud will be assuming the PIO duties. To reach a PIO in my absence please call our PIO line at 503-584-6276. Thank you.
Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Update - Thursday, July 9, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/09/15
This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Fire Update for Thursday, July 9, 2015.

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS

No fires 10 acres or larger were reported during the last 24 hours on forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

North Cascade District - Santiam Unit: The Niagara Fire, reported on July 4 burning on state forestlands adjacent to Highway 22 near Big Cliff Dam, is 80 percent contained and approximately 79 acres. The fire is in full mop-up and, with continuing improved containment, firefighters have been released for rest or to other fire assignments. The cause of the fire remains under investigation. More information: http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/.

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015 through July 9, 2015:
Lightning-caused fires: 122 fires burned 1,012 acres
Human-caused fires: 325 fires burned 672 acres
Total: 447 fires burned 1,684 acres

10-year average (January 1 through July 9):
Lightning-caused fires: 51 fires burned 501 acres
Human-caused fires: 218 fires burned 1,428 acres
Total: 269 fires burned 1,929 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.

When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

NEWS MEDIA
News media may contact the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Jeri Chase, 503-945-7201 (office), 503-931-2721 (mobile), or Jeri.Chase@Oregon.gov, any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System (Inciweb) website.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF proves fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting effort on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.

OTHER LINKS
Fire weather
Wildfire smoke forecasts
Wildfire smoke and air quality
Keep Oregon Green

Follow the Oregon Department of Forestry on Twitter and Facebook.

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Jeri Chase | Public Information Officer/
Agency Web Coordinator
Oregon Department of Forestry
2600 State Street, Salem, OR 97310
Office: 503-945-7201
Cell: 503-931-2721
Jeri.Chase@oregon.gov
Finances Top of Mind for LGBT Americans, New Wells Fargo Survey Reveals
Wells Fargo - 07/09/15
PORTLAND, July 9, 2015 -A new survey from Wells Fargo & Company of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Americans sheds light on how marriage equality is shaping the attitudes, behaviors, and conversations of same-sex couples related to money and planning for their future. The majority of LGBT Americans surveyed (86%) say that marriage-equality will improve the financial lives of same-sex couples, with 50% citing financial security and benefits as a top reason for wanting to get married ( love and commitment tops the list at 86%).

Marriage Changes How Couples Think About Finances
The survey included an oversample of LGBT Americans currently in same-sex marriages (living in states that recognized same-sex marriage before the federal ruling) to explore the impacts so far of legalized marriage. Seven in ten (70%) say they feel better off financially. Moreover, legalized marriage has changed how many think, feel, and talk about their lives:
Seventy-three percent say that same-sex marriage becoming legal has changed how they plan for their future.
Sixty-eight percent say that being married has changed how they think about their financial future, specifically.
Sixty percent say that being married has changed how they are planning for their financial future.

"The decision to marry seems to bring with it a level of financial security for same-sex couples," said John Lake, Wells Fargo LGBT Segment Manager. "While LGBT Americans recognize that access to marriage provides certain financial benefits and obligations, there is still a significant knowledge gap around specific issues."

The survey showed that 81% of LGBT Americans see getting married as a big financial decision, and almost nine in 10 (89%) say it's important to evaluate the financial implications of getting married before doing so. However, just one in three (32%) say they fully understand the financial implications of doing so, and even fewer (29%) fully understand how Federal and state laws apply to same-sex marriages in their states. Likewise, most survey respondents do not fully understand all the legal implications of being married versus living together in several specific areas related to money and planning. For example:
Seventy-five percent do not fully understand how legal marriage affects access and rights to workplace pension benefits.
Seventy-two percent do not fully understand how legal marriage affects rights to inherit money from a spouse.

There remains a strong need for financial planning work and increased education. While almost half (48%) of LGBT Americans in same-sex marriages have a financial advisor (compared to 23% of U.S. married couples), less than one in five (18%) consulted with a financial or legal professional before getting married. Now that they are married, 56% say they have lot of financial planning work to do. Most LGBT Americans in same-sex marriages (54%) say that being married makes talking about money easier. Still, almost one in five (19%) have disagreements about money at least monthly, and 30% admit that discussions about finances have caused tension in their relationships.

Before Saying "I Do"
Among same-sex couples considering marriage, the need for advice is strong. Forty-seven percent feel unsure whether legal marriage would be financially beneficial for them or not, and 52% do not feel fully-prepared to make an informed financial decision about whether or not to marry. Only one in four (25%) have fully discussed with their partners whether marriage would be a good financial decision or a bad one.

The need for more conversations about money also resonated throughout the survey on a variety of issues LGBT Americans consider important to discuss before marriage. Fewer than one-third, for example, have fully discussed:
Whether to merge all of their accounts and assets (30%)
Their personal feelings and views about money (28%)
Personal debts and how marriage brings joint obligations (27%)
What they want to save or invest for (24%)
How much each partner can, will, and wants to earn (23%)
Their mutual risk tolerance with savings and investments (18%)

"Having conversations about financial issues like saving, investing, and preparing for retirement is critically important for same-sex couples. There are many unanswered questions out there, and as an industry we must keep working hard to provide useful information same-sex couples need in order to achieve their financial goals," Lake added.

Wells Fargo Advisors - Accredited Domestic Partnership Advisor (ADPA) Program
The Accredited Domestic Partnership Advisor (ADPA) program was created, through a partnership with the College for Financial Planning, to educate advisors about the unique needs and financial considerations of same-sex couples and domestic partners. Financial advisors who earn this designation are well equipped to work with domestic partners and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) clients to develop a thoughtful approach to help identify and work toward their financial goals. Wells Fargo Advisors created ADPA in conjunction with the College for Financial Planning. Today, Wells Fargo Advisors has more than 100 ADPA-certified financial advisors nationwide, more than any other firm in the country. For more information on financial services offered to LGBT individuals and couples, please visit: WellsFargo.com/lgbt.

About the Survey
Versta Research conducted an online national survey for Wells Fargo among 1,152 LGBT
(Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, or Transgender) Americans between April 8 and April 25, 2015.
Qualified respondents were non-students, ages 25-75, who are the primary or joint financial
decision-maker in the household. The sample included 207 who are in same-sex marriages and
301 who are in same-sex civil unions or domestic partnerships or who live with a same-sex
partner. Data were weighted to reflect the overall LGBT population in the U.S. based on LGBT
and same-sex relationship status. The survey also included a similar national comparison sample of 360 Americans, weighted to reflect current Census data for gender, age, race, ethnicity, household income, and region. Assuming no sample bias, the maximum margin of error is 3% for the LGBT sample and 5% for the full U.S. sample.

About Versta Research
Versta Research is a full-service market research firm, headquartered in Chicago, IL, specializing in customized strategic market research and public opinion polling. For more information, visit www.VerstaResearch.com.

About Wells Fargo
Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE: WFC) is a nationwide, diversified, community-based financial services company with $1.7 trillion in assets. Founded in 1852 and headquartered in San Francisco, Wells Fargo provides banking, insurance, investments, mortgage, and consumer and commercial finance through more than 8,700 locations, 12,500 ATMs, and the internet (wellsfargo.com), and mobile banking, and has offices in 36 countries to support customers who conduct business in the global economy. With approximately 266,000 team members, Wells Fargo serves one in three households in the United States. Wells Fargo & Company was ranked No. 30 on Fortune's 2015 rankings of America's largest corporations. Wells Fargo's vision is to satisfy all our customers' financial needs and help them succeed financially. Wells Fargo perspectives are also available at Wells Fargo Blogs and Wells Fargo Stories.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1188/86068/Wells_Fargo_LGBT_Survey_News_Release_or.docx
Employers Report More Than 50,000 Job Vacancies in Spring
Oregon Employment Dept. - 07/09/15
Oregon businesses reported 53,300 vacancies in spring 2015. That's the largest number of
vacancies ever captured by the Oregon Job Vacancy Survey, and an increase of 6,400 vacancies from the prior year. The growing number of vacancies reflects continued strength in Oregon's labor market.

The ratio of unemployed Oregonians to vacancies dropped to 2-to-1 in the spring, after spending a year at 3-to-1. The national unemployed-to-vacancy ratio was also 2-to- 1. The 2-to-1 ratio is consistent with a strong economy: Oregon's Job Vacancy Survey last showed a ratio this low in the spring of 2008.

Amid solid economic growth and with many available job openings, employers are having a harder time finding the workers they need. Statewide, businesses reported that 61 percent of job vacancies were difficult to fill in the spring. That's the highest percentage in the two and a half years of the quarterly Job Vacancy Survey.

"Many businesses are finding it's getting more and more difficult to find skilled and qualified staff," said Ken Madden, owner of Madden Industrial Craftsmen, Inc. and Chair of the Oregon Workforce Investment Board. "That's going to be a major challenge in Oregon, with increasing job openings and the retirement of a whole generation of workers."

Businesses most commonly report a lack of applicants or a lack of qualified candidates as the primary reason for difficulty filling vacancies. In the spring, the occupations
with the largest number of difficult-to-fill vacancies in Oregon included personal care aides, several leisure and hospitality occupations such as cooks and maids, and various computer and production occupations.

Central Oregon businesses reported 6,300 vacancies in the spring. That's 2,600 more vacancies compared with last spring. Central Oregon's total was boosted by vacancies for wildland firefighters and leisure and hospitality workers. Central Oregon also reported the highest share of difficult-to-fill vacancies, at 71 percent.

About the Survey
The Oregon Employment Department's Job Vacancy Survey started in May 2008 and became quarterly in 2013. This survey serves as a current indicator of hiring demand and focuses specifically on characteristics of vacancies for anyone seeking a job in Oregon. In addition to developing the estimate of total vacancies in the state, the survey also provides insights on the industries hiring, wages offered, and education required. In recent years, the survey has also asked businesses whether their vacancies are difficult to fill.

The Employment Department publishes a quarterly summary of vacancy survey results, as well as annual, more detailed reports on wages, education requirements, and the reasons why businesses have difficulty filling openings.

Survey results are based on responses from private-sector businesses with at least two employees. Estimates for summer 2015 will be released in October.

For more details on recent Oregon job vacancies, visit the "publications" tab on QualityInfo.org and scroll down to the "Job Vacancy Survey" section.

Equal Opportunity program -- auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For the Deaf and Hard of Hearing population, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.


Attached Media Files: Audio Cut 4 , Audio Cut 3 , Audio Cut 2 , Audio Cut 1 , Audio Story , Press Release
Forest Practice Committees to discuss Riparian Rules
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/09/15
The Northwest and Southwest Oregon Regional Forest Practice Committees are meeting from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 15, 2015 to discuss recommendations they will present to the Board of Forestry on July 23.

The committees will be discussing final staff reports and riparian (streamside) rules. Although the meeting is being held via conference call, members of the public are invited to attend at the SunPass room located on ODF's Salem campus, 2600 State Street in Salem.

Regional Forest Practice Committees are citizen panels created to advise the Oregon Board of Forestry on current forestry issues and forest management approaches. Three Regional Forest Practice Committees, serving the Northwest, Southwest, and Eastern regions of the state, were created by the 1971 Oregon Forest Practices Act. Under Oregon law, a majority of Regional Forest Practice Committees members must be private forest landowners and logging or forest operations companies.

Anyone may attend the meeting. The meeting is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting.

For questions about accessibility or special accommodations please call 503-945-7502.

Oregon's forests are among one of the state's most valued resources, providing a balanced mix of environmental, economic and social benefits.

Additional information about ODF's Regional Forest Practice Committees is available on the Oregon Department of Forestry's web site: www.oregon.gov/ODF/pages/board/rfpc/rfpc.aspx
***Name Correction*** Idaho Man Loses Life On HWY 26 East Of Government Camp- Wasco County
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 07/09/15
Correct spelling on victim's last name is FAWCETT.

Previous Release:
On July 6, 2015 at about 5:11PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to milepost 68 on HWY 26 for the report of a motorcycle crash. This is east of Government Camp and the HWY 35 junction. Initial information was the rider was lying on the roadway and not responding.

According to Lieutenant Pat Shortt, a 2009 Yamaha motorcycle, operated by Wilbur F FAWCELL, age 63, of McCall, Idaho was traveling eastbound on HWY 26 when he struck a guardrail. FAWCELL was ejected and came to rest on the roadway. His motorcycle came to rest 500 feet from the where he struck the guardrail.

FAWCELL was declared deceased on scene by emergency personnel. The highway was partially closed for several hours while the investigation was conducted.

The investigation is continuing and excessive speed appears to be the contributing factor to the crash. OSP was assisted on scene by the Oregon Department of Transportation Welches Fire Department.
Pacific Power names Regional Advisory Board members
Pacific Power - 07/09/15
Contact: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tom Gauntt, Pacific Power, July 9, 2015
503-813-7291

Pacific Power names Regional Advisory Board members
Teri Cline of Klamath Falls and Willis Van Dusen of Astoria join board that helps utility stay current with local customer concerns

PORTLAND, Ore. - The former long-time mayor of Astoria and a communications professional from Klamath Falls are joining Pacific Power's Regional Advisory Board, a select group of well-respected local community leaders who work with both their communities and Pacific Power to foster effective communication both ways.

Willis Van Dusen will represent the Northern Oregon coast. He served as mayor of Astoria from 1990 to 2014 and is president of Van Dusen Beverages, Inc., a long-time north coast bottling company. The Van Dusen family enterprises, which date to 1849 in Astoria, have made them Oregon's oldest family owned business.

"We have worked closely with Willis in Astoria for decades," said Stefan Bird, Pacific Power president and chief executive officer. "It will be extremely valuable to be able to seek his insights on business and community matters. And I know he will give us the unvarnished counsel for which he is well known."

Teri Cline operates her own communications firm in Klamath Falls where she has lived for 20 years. She formerly was corporate communications manager at JELD-WEN Windows & Doors. She is deeply involved in the community in everything from the Babe Ruth World Series organization to the Ross Ragland Theatre to the Circle of Hearts Endowment Fund.

"Teri will bring a lot of energy and heart to the board," said Bird. "The RAB helps us gather ideas from our customers and to communicate important issues to the communities we serve. We are counting on Teri to provide her expertise and wisdom in these areas."

Van Dusen and Cline join three other distinguished Northwest community leaders on the Regional Advisory Board. Angela Boothroyd, of Redmond, Ore., is a financial advisor with Edward Jones; Leigh Johnson is a consultant based in Medford; and Dr. Steve VanAusdle is the president of Walla Walla Community College.

###

Pacific Power
Pacific Power provides electric service to more than 730,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. Our goal is to provide our customers with value for their energy dollar, and safe, reliable electricity. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with almost 1.8 million customers in six western states. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net.
Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board to meet July 16 in Junction City
Oregon Health Authority - 07/09/15
July 9, 2015

What: Public meeting of the Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board

When: Thursday, July 16, 1:30 to 3 p.m.

Where: Oregon State Hospital, 29398 Recovery Way, Junction City

Details: Board members include consumers, providers, advocates, legislators, community members, consumer families and OSH union members.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Individuals requiring accommodation may request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations by calling the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

For more information, see the board's website at www.oregon.gov/oha/amh/osh/pages/advisory-board.aspx.

# # #
07/08/15
Media availability: Family of Mason Young
Salem Health - 07/08/15
The family of Mason Young plans to meet with the news media at Salem Hospital at 4 p.m. today. Young is recovering from injuries he sustained in a fall Tuesday at Three Pools Recreation Area, east of Salem on the Santiam River.

NEWS AVAILABILITY DETAILS:

WHERE: Salem Hospital, 890 Oak St. SE, Salem, OR

WHEN: 4 p.m.

Reporters and photographers should meet Salem Health media relations staff in the Building A lobby, near the grand piano. Staff will escort crews to the news conference location.

PARKING INFO: Please park news vans along Capitol St. SE--just north of Mission St. SE, in the turnout/shuttle terminal on the east side of the parking garage.


Media interested in attending are asked to call the Media Pager (503-441-6397) to R.S.V.P.

NOTE TO EDITORS: Mason Young is listed in fair condition at Salem Hospital. He is not available for interviews at this time.
Governor Kate Brown appoints Mike Marsh to Oregon Travel Information Council (Photo)
Oregon Travel Experience - 07/08/15
Mike Marsh
Mike Marsh
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/4010/86050/thumb_marsh_1.jpeg
Oregon Travel Experience (OTE) is pleased to welcome Mike Marsh to the Oregon Travel Information Council (OTIC). Marsh was appointed to OTE's governing board by Governor Kate Brown.

Marsh brings 30 years of experience in Oregon government policy analysis and leadership including serving as administrator of the DAS Budget and Management Division, administrator of the DAS Facilities Division, and a decade as Deputy Director of the Oregon Department of Transportation. Marsh previously served in the US Marines Corps active duty and reserves for 20 years, retiring as a Lt. Colonel.

"Mike brings a wealth of expertise in public administration, finance, transportation, and facilities operations ," said OTIC Chair Gwenn Baldwin. "We congratulate Mike on his appointment to the Council and are excited to work with him in service to travelers exploring Oregon."

A native Oregonian, Marsh cited his love for our state's history as a factor in seeking this position with the Council. Marsh notes that as a child he asked his parents to stop at every historical marker they passed, writing: "I am connected at my core to Oregon."

"I have a life-long affinity for our state," said Marsh, "and welcome the opportunity to work with OTE's programs, applying my experience in finance and government and contributing as much as possible to the Council's mission."

Marsh earned a bachelor's degree in History and Political Science at the University of Oregon and his MBA from the Willamette University Atkinson Graduate School of Management. Marsh served as an executive/adjunct professor for the Atkinson school, where he continues to teach and serves on the Board of the Institute for Modern Government. Marsh also chaired the board for Co-Serve International, a non-profit leadership-training organization.

Oregon Travel Experience (OTE) is a semi-independent state agency located in Salem, whose public programs focus on transportation information. The agency's (and its governing body--the Oregon Travel Information Council) mission is to ensure a safe and convenient motoring experience. OTE oversees highway safety rest area management, helps motorists find essential services through blue highway logo signs, and connects the first-time Oregon visitor to businesses and attractions through its travel information centers. OTE also administers two of the state's official heritage programs: historical markers and heritage trees. Visit us on the web at www.ortravelexperience.com.


Attached Media Files: Mike Marsh
Community's Police Ask for Community's Assistance in Identification of Burglar (Photo)
Corvallis Police - 07/08/15
2015-07/1393/86049/Key_Bank_sus_(2).jpg
2015-07/1393/86049/Key_Bank_sus_(2).jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/1393/86049/thumb_Key_Bank_sus_(2).jpg
On July 7, 2015, between 2:30am and 3:00am, an unknown suspect forced entry to Key Bank, 1817 NW 9th St. Once inside the individual broke into locked drawers and obtained a large quantity in change.

Surveillance photos show the suspect is wearing a navy blue hat, navy blue jacket, black gloves, dark jeans with tears, and is seen carrying a grey bucket as well as an orange 5 gallon bucket, likely from Home Depot.

The Corvallis Police Department would like assistance in identification of this individual. If someone has information about this incident, or observed a person or vehicle in the area of the bank during the time of the burglary, please call Detective Greg Kantola at 541-766-6781.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1393/86049/Key_Bank_sus_(2).jpg
Corvallis Police Arrest Violent Suspect who Attempted to Assault Multiple Officers
Corvallis Police - 07/08/15
On July 7, 2015, at about 11:55pm, Corvallis Police responded to a prowler/burglary in progress in the 3900 block of NW Circle Blvd. A female caller, who was home with her child, reported hearing someone banging on a wall of the residence, and then hearing glass breaking from a downstairs window. When she called out downstairs, a male voice answered her, prompting her to retreat and call 911.

When officers arrived, they searched the area surrounding the residence. A single officer located a male subject laying in the yard of the residence; he had two pit bulls with him. The male subject, later identified as 37 year old Michael Christopher Douglas of Corvallis, responded by releasing his two pit bulls when the officer identified himself. Initially, the dogs aggressively approached the officer, growling at him, but did not attack. Douglas ignored numerous warnings, and got up from the ground and assumed a fighting stance as he directly approached the officer. As Douglas advanced on the officer, the officer deployed a taser, which was not effective. Douglas removed the probes and continued to advance on the officer.

Additional officers came to the assistance of the initial officer and attempted to control Douglas. Officers deployed a taser a second time, deployed pepper spray, and delivered focused baton blows to Douglas without effect. Douglas fought through all the officers' attempts to control him. He punched officers and eventually tackled one of the responding officers to the ground, landing on top of him.

After a continued struggle, and officers delivering additional focused blows, officers were able to take Douglas into custody. Once in custody, Douglas was transported to Good Samaritan Hospital for evaluation, exposure to pepper spray and injuries sustained during the incident. At the hospital he continued to be non-compliant; spitting in the face of one of the transport officers.

Two Corvallis Police Officers were also treated for exposure to pepper spray and injuries they sustained from the assault by Douglas.

Douglas was transported to the Benton County Jail and lodged.

Douglas was charged with the following:

Assault on a Public Safety Officer- 3 counts
Aggravated Harassment- 1count
Resisting Arrest- 1 count
Interfering with a Peace Officer 1 count
Criminal Mischief in the Second Degree- 1 count
Disorderly Conduct in the Second Degree- 1 count

Bail for Douglas is currently set at $345,000. At this time no mug-shot photo is available from the Benton County Jail.

Douglas' two pitbulls were unable to be located after the incident. If someone discovers these animals they are encouraged to call Corvallis Police at 541-766-6911.
Oregon Board of Optometry hires new Executive Director (Photo)
Oregon Travel Experience - 07/08/15
Shelley Sneed
Shelley Sneed
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Shelley Sneed, a native Oregonian and Grand Ronde Tribal member, has been hired by the Oregon Board of Optometry as their new Executive Director.

Sneed was employed by the Oregon Landscape Contractors Board as Administrator for the last four years. Sneed's work with the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde culminated in her position as Director of the Spirit Mountain Community Fund. For over 20 years, Sneed's expertise in accounting, business management and real estate development has advanced and supported the goals and mission of her Tribe.

Sneed is a graduate of the Atkinson Graduate School of Management's MBA program, as well as a proud Oregon State University alumni. Her current public service includes volunteer work on the CASA of Marion County Board, helping local children and youth in the foster care system. Sneed also served the local community as an elected member of the Salem Area Mass Transit District.

"I believe my two decades in business development and management combined with my prior experience in state licensing will benefit the Oregon Board of Optometry," Sneed said. "I look forward to serving patients and licensees, as well as our Board members. I am committed to ensuring that our agency is using resources wisely and that we employ technology to improve our services."

"The Board of Optometry is excited to have Shelley join the team and looks forward to her leadership over the coming years," said the Oregon Board of Optometry Board Chair Dr. Jeff Pelson, OD.

Sneed's focus over the next few months will be to streamline and identify efficiencies, improve communication, and ensure a delivery of high quality services. She will oversee both short and long range plans to ensure that legislative and industry regulations adequately protect Oregonians.

The Oregon Board of Optometry's mission is to protect Oregonians from the dangers of unqualified and improper practice of optometry. The Board operates from shared office space with Oregon Travel Experience at 1500 Liberty St. SE in Salem. For more information about the Board of Optometry, contact Shelley Sneed at 503-399-0662 or email to Shelley.g.sneed@oregon.gov.


Attached Media Files: Shelley Sneed
Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Update for Wednesday, July 8, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/08/15
This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Fire Update for Wednesday, July 8, 2015.

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS

No fires 10 acres or larger were reported during the last 24 hours on forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

North Cascade District - Santiam Unit: The Niagara Fire, reported on July 4 burning on state forestlands adjacent to Highway 22 near Big Cliff Dam, is 55 percent contained. There has been no increase in actual fire size in the past 24 hours, but due to more accurate mapping the size is now estimated at approximately 79 acres. The fire is in mop-up, moving towards being fully extinguished, and, with improved containment, firefighters will begin to be released for rest or to other fire assignments. The cause of the fire remains under investigation. More information: http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/.

Note: The following fire was reported on Monday, July 6, but mistakenly not included in the July 7 morning fire update:
Central Oregon District - John Day Unit: The Baker Gardens Fire was reported at approximately 10:43 a.m. on Monday, July 6, 2015, burning on ODF-protected forestlands 11 miles east of Lonerock in grass and light timber. The fire was 100 percent dozer-lined by the morning on Tuesday, July 7. The cause of the fire is under investigation. This will be the only report on this fire.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS
Corner Creek Fire - The lightning-caused Corner Creek Fire, burning approximately 11 miles south of Dayville, is now approximately 28,766 acres and 40 percent contained. Private lands in the fire area are protected by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) through an offset agreement with ODF, which has jurisdictional responsibility. ODF's Incident Management Team 1 transitioned management of this fire over to the Oregon Interagency Incident Management Team 2 (IC: Brett Fillis), this morning, July 8. With the release of the ODF incident management team, and information available from the interagency team, there will be no further reports on this fire in these updates unless warranted. More information: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4349.

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015 through July 8, 2015:
Lightning-caused fires: 110 fires burned 1,011 acres
Human-caused fires: 317 fires burned 661 acres
Total: 427 fires burned 1,682 acres

10-year average (January 1 through July 8):
Lightning-caused fires: 48 fires burned 419 acres
Human-caused fires: 213 fires burned 1,426 acres
Total: 261 fires burned 1,845 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.

When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

NEWS MEDIA
News media may contact the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Jeri Chase, 503-945-7201 (office), 503-931-2721 (mobile), or Jeri.Chase@Oregon.gov, any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System (Inciweb) website.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF proves fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting effort on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.

OTHER LINKS
Fire weather
Wildfire smoke forecasts
Wildfire smoke and air quality
Keep Oregon Green

Follow the Oregon Department of Forestry on Twitter and Facebook.

###

Jeri Chase | Public Information Officer/
Agency Web Coordinator
Oregon Department of Forestry
2600 State Street, Salem, OR 97310
Office: 503-945-7201
Cell: 503-931-2721
Jeri.Chase@oregon.gov
Niagara Fire Update, Wednesday, July 8, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/08/15
July 8, 2015 8:00 a.m.
Niagara Fire Update
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
This will be the last release unless there are significant changes

Oregon Department of Forestry
North Cascades District, Santiam Unit

Blake Ellis, Incident Commander
Fire Information: Note change to (503) 859-2151, Santiam Unit Office http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/

Fire at a glance:
Size: 79 acres, 55% contained
Location: Adjacent to Big Cliff Dam on Highway 22
Personnel: 180
Aircraft: One helicopter
Weather: warm and dry today

The goal now is to keep the Niagara Fire within its established containment line and work towards control. Containment is currently 55%. There has been no increase in the fire size in the last 24 hours but due to more accurate mapping with GPS its size is now 79 acres.

Mop up, the final extinguishment of the fire, is now in full swing. Infrared (heat seeing) cameras were used Tuesday night to check the perimeter and few areas with remaining heat were found within 35 feet of the fireline. Fire hose has been laid on about 85% of the fireline that will supply firefighters with water to speed their work. Higher relative humidities will also help put out the smaller embers as they are dug up and exposed to the slightly cooler, moist air. Ensuring that this fire will not re-ignite was explained this way by Blake Ellis, Incident Commander "I don't want anything popping up after the crews are sent home".

With improved containment, crews will be released to rest or to other fire assignments. The number of personnel assigned to the Niagara Fire is expected to be about 160 tomorrow, July 9, 2015.

There are no road or recreational closures associated with the fire at this time.

The Niagara Fire was first reported July 4, 2015 and is located adjacent to the Big Cliff Dam along Highway 22. The cause of the fire is under investigation. Fire restrictions are in effect on the Willamette National Forest and state and private forests, http://www.oregon.gov/odf/pages/fire/precautionlevelmap.aspx.

Cooperators include: Willamette National Forest, Marion County Sheriff's Office, Oregon Department of Transportation, Bonneville Power Administration, Detroit-Idahna Fire District, Gates Fire Department, Lyons Fire Department, and Oregon Department of Corrections
###
LaPine State Park hosts free summer mountain biking tours
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/08/15
LaPine, OR -- Experience the thrill of the ride on one of three free guided mountain biking tours at LaPine State Park this summer. The rides are hosted by Oregon State Parks and Bend bike tour and rental company Cog Wild.

Rides are from 4 to 6 p.m. on July 16 and Sept. 12, with an additional ride to be scheduled in August. The rides are intended for beginners and will be led by a mountain bike tour guide from Cog Wild. They will cover basic information including equipment, safety, off-road biking skills and drills. The route takes off through the trees and follows the Deschutes River.

Advance registration is required. Call the LaPine State Park office at 541-536-2428.
Participants can use their own bikes, or the park has 10 bikes that can be reserved at the time of registration. Children must wear a bike helmet and be at least 12 years old to participate.

The program is part of the Let's Go series of guided recreational activities offered at parks throughout the state by Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). Go to oregonstateparks.org and search the event calendar for a list of activities statewide.
OSP Enterprise/La Grande Fish and Wildlife Division Receives Award (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 07/08/15
2015-07/1002/86021/F_W_team.jpg
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The Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division recently recognized the outstanding work of troopers from the Enterprise / La Grande Team when Captain Jeff Samuels announced that the team was the recipient of the Division's "Team of the Year" award for 2014. The team was presented the award at a special gathering held at the La Grande Area Command Office. This is the ninth presentation of the award since the Division implemented a program to celebrate and recognize the outstanding teamwork by OSP Fish and Wildlife troopers in protecting Oregon's citizens and natural resources.

The six member Enterprise / La Grande Team, supervised by Sergeant Chris Hawkins, works out of the La Grande Area Command Office and Enterprise Worksite. Team members are:

Sergeant Chris Hawkins
Senior Trooper Kreg Coggins
Senior Trooper Kris Davis
Senior Trooper Mark Knapp
Senior Trooper Marcus McDowell
Senior Trooper Brian Miller

The Enterprise/La Grande Team is a very tight knit and cohesive team assigned to cover a vast landscape of Northeast Oregon. The Team patrols their area by truck, raft, powerboat, ATV, aircraft, horseback and on foot to cover a multitude of different terrain from valley to deep river canyons (including the Grande Ronde and Snake Rivers), not to mention the forests and wilderness areas within their patrol area.

During 2014, the Team apprehended 60 individuals for criminally violating fish and wildlife laws, seized 30 unlawfully taken wildlife, served four search warrants, and issued countless citations to those involved in fish and wildlife violations. This team is known for their commitment to protecting Oregon's natural resources and rural law enforcement services. During the presentation, Captain Samuels praised the team for their efforts and dedication; along with their devotion to working with sport groups and other constituents to address natural resource issues and concerns.

Some of the 2014 case highlights for the Enterprise/La Grande Team include:

A three month investigation into two individuals for the unlawful take of bobcats using traps and dogs in the Enterprise area. One individual was charged with 28 wildlife offenses and the second individual with 8 wildlife offenses.

A four month investigation regarding the unlawful take of a Rocky Mountain Bull Elk scoring over 319 Boone and Crocket points from the Chesnimnus Unit without a valid elk tag and while trespassing. DNA analysis was used in this case. The individual was charged with unlawful take of elk without a valid tag and criminal trespass II.

An investigation near La Grande into the unlawful take of two cow elk with a centerfire rifle during muzzleloader season. The investigation revealed that one individual did not have a tag and had borrowed a tag from someone else and provided false information to the Trooper. One individual was charged with unlawful take of antlerless elk and borrowing an elk tag, as well as, giving false information to a police officer; the second individual was charged with unlawful take of antlerless elk.

An investigation of two individuals for unlawfully shooting a buck deer in a La Grande cemetery. The cemetery had security cameras and caught the whole incident on camera, including the two individuals returning the scene afterwards with cleaner in an attempt to conceal their crime. A search warrant was used in this case. One individual was charged with hunting game mammal in prohibited area - cemetery, fail to validate big game tag and tampering with evidence; the second individual was charged with conspiracy and aiding in a wildlife offense.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1002/86021/F_W_team.jpg
07/07/15
Man Rescued After 26 Foot Fall at Local Park ***Update Video Added*** (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/07/15
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2015-07/1294/86019/Helo_6.jpg
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The three links contain video footage shot today during the patient transfer from the Air National Guard to the Life Flight Team.

http://youtu.be/cSdZ7O8hNn4
https://youtu.be/0uMw2l0uZQ4
https://youtu.be/Lcghm-tjW0U



Rescuers worked for nearly two hours to recover Mason Young, age 26 of Salem after he attempted a back flip off of the rocks, fell some 26 feet and missed the water at Three Pools Recreation Area. Mason was originally assisted by bystanders and then later by Fire and Law Enforcement personnel from seven different jurisdictions.

Due to the complex terrain the Salem Fire Technical Rescue Team and the Army Air National Guard were used to recover and air lift Mr. Mason to a waiting Life Flight Helicopter. Mr. Mason was taken to the Salem Hospital with serious injuries.
The Sheriff's Office would like to thank the following agencies for their response to today's incident:

Stayton Fire Department
Gates Fire Department
Lyons Fire Department
Jefferson Fire Department
Scio Fire Department
Salem Fire Department
United States Forrest Service
Army Air National Guard
Life Flight


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1294/86019/Helo_6.jpg , 2015-07/1294/86019/Helo_5.jpg , 2015-07/1294/86019/Helo_4.JPG , 2015-07/1294/86019/Helo_3.JPG , 2015-07/1294/86019/Helo_2.JPG , 2015-07/1294/86019/Helo_1.JPG
Salem Police Looking For Missing, Possibly Endangered Woman (Photo)
Salem Police Dept. - 07/07/15
2015-07/1095/86018/Virgie_Henry.jpg
2015-07/1095/86018/Virgie_Henry.jpg
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Salem Police Detectives are asking for assistance from the public as we search for 66-year old Virgie Mae Henry.

Virgie does not have a permanent address, but she was most recently staying with an acquaintance in southeast Salem. She was frequently seen in the neighborhood where she had been staying, but she has not been seen since January 8 as she was leaving her residence. It is unusual for her to go for this long without any contact with friends or relatives.

Virgie is a Black female with grey hair. She is approximately 5'07" tall and weighs about 100 lbs. It is unknown what she was last wearing.

Anyone with any information about Virgie or her whereabouts is asked to call Salem Police Detective Corporal Jake Burke at 503-540-2463


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1095/86018/Virgie_Henry.jpg
Josephine County DA Concludes Troopers' Use Of Force In May Incident As Justified - Josephine County
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 07/07/15
The Josephine County District Attorney's Office announced Monday that the two troopers involved in an officer involved shooting on May 29, 2015 were justified in their use of deadly physical force.

The following is information from the Josephine District Attorney's Office press release,

"Ryan Mulkins, the Josephine County District Attorney, announced today that he had concluded his review of the officer-involved shooting which occurred in the late night hours of May 29, 2015 at 108 Fir Canyon Road, Grants Pass and resulted in the death of Robert Box (DOB: 6/27/1959).

A full investigation of the incident was conducted by the Josephine County Major Crime Response Team, an interagency team comprised of detectives and personnel from the Grants Pass Department of Public Safety, Oregon State Police, and the Josephine County Sheriff's Office. The Oregon State Police Crime Lab assisted in the scene investigation and forensic analysis.

At approximately 10:21 PM on Friday, May 29, 2015, Kelsey Box, the adult daughter of Robert Box called 911 to report she had been assaulted by Robert Box at their home located 108 Fir Canyon Road, Grants Pass. Kelsey Box requested law enforcement response. Kelsey reported to the Oregon State Police Dispatch that she and her father engaged in an argument. Kelsey reported that her father had knocked her out of her wheel chair to the ground, choked her, punched her in the nose, and broke her nose. Kelsey additionally reported that she had left the residence to seek treatment at Three Rivers Community Hospital.

Kelsey Box in a subsequent interview reported that Robert Box had been drinking. A sample of Robert Box's blood was subsequently tested for alcohol content. Testing showed Robert Box had a blood alcohol content of .09 at the time of the incident.

At approximately 10:28 PM on Friday, May 29, 2015, Oregon State Police Troopers Gregor Smyth and Heather West are advised of Kelsey Box's reported assault. At approximately 10:32 PM, Trooper West placed a telephone call to Robert Box. Robert Box confirms with Trooper West that he had punched his daughter Kelsey Box. Robert Box claimed he punched Kelsey Box after Kelsey Box had punched him. After Trooper West identified herself to Robert Box as a member of the Oregon State Police, Robert Box terminated the telephone call. Troopers Smyth and West responded to 108 Fir Canyon Road, Grants Pass at approximately 10:55 PM.

As Troopers Smyth and West approached the residence they were encountered by multiple barking dogs. Robert Box was alone at his residence. At approximately
11:00 PM, Trooper Smyth observed Robert Box near the rear of his residence talking on the telephone. Trooper Smyth called out to Robert Box and requested that he come out and speak to the Troopers. Robert Box stated into the telephone "hang on a minute somebody's here." As Robert Box approached the Officers, Trooper Smyth stated "Trooper Smyth and Trooper West with the State Police you are being recorded ."

At this time Robert Box was armed with a .44 magnum revolver. Robert Box was carrying the revolver in his right front pocket. Robert Box walked to approximately 15 feet from Troopers Smyth and West. Trooper Smyth ordered Robert Box not to touch the gun in his pocket.
Regardless of Trooper Smyth's order to Robert Box not to touch the gun, Robert Box removed the gun from his pocket and raised it in the direction of the Troopers.

In response to the actions of Robert Box Troopers Smyth and West discharged their duty firearms. Trooper Smyth discharged 7 rounds. Trooper West discharged 4 rounds. Robert Box was struck 7 times. Subsequently Robert Box dropped his gun into the bed of nearby truck. Upon subsequent inspection Robert Box's .44 magnum revolver was found fully loaded with six live rounds, 3 of which were hollow point bullets.

At approximately 11:01 PM, Trooper West radioed into dispatch that shots had been fired and the suspect was down. At approximately 11:01 PM, Trooper Smyth radioed into dispatch requesting medical units be sent to the scene. Trooper Smyth renders first aid to Robert Box while waiting for medical personnel to arrive. Fire personnel arrived on scene at approximately 11:14 PM . American Medical Response arrived on scene at approximately 11:17 PM. Robert Box was transported to Three Rivers Community Hospital. Robert Box was pronounced deceased at approximately 11:45 PM.

The District Attorney is charged with the duty of reviewing incidents where deadly physical force is used by the police to determine if the use of force was consistent with Oregon law.

During this incident both officers were justified in using deadly physical force under the circumstances they encountered. No further action in this matter is anticipated or merited.

District Attorney Mulkins would like to thank the Josephine County Major Crime Response Team for a thorough and detailed investigation of this event."
End Release

Previous Release:
On May 29, 2015 at approximately 10:27 p.m., two Oregon State Police Troopers responded to a 911 call at 108 Fir Canyon Road in rural Josephine County near Wilderville on the report of a domestic disturbance.

Initial information is that Kelsie BOX, age 23, called 911 to report her father, Robert BOX, age 55, was physically assaultive and causing her injury.

Oregon State Police Trooper Heather West and Trooper Gregor Smyth responded to the address. When the Troopers arrived at the location they made contact with Robert BOX in the driveway. Robert BOX was armed with a handgun. Shortly after making contact, the Troopers reported via radio to dispatch that shots had been fired and the subject was down. A handgun was recovered during the investigation.

The Troopers provided emergency medical care to Robert BOX on scene. Robert BOX was then transported to Three Rivers Medical Center in Grants Pass for emergency medical treatment. Robert BOX was pronounced deceased a short time after arrival.

Troopers West and Smyth were not injured. As is standard protocol in officer-involved shooting investigations, they were placed on paid administrative leave pending the ongoing investigation and review by the Josephine County District Attorney's Office. West, age 41, joined OSP in 2007 and is currently assigned in the Patrol Services Division at the Grants Pass Worksite. Smyth, age 46, also joined OSP in 2007 and currently assigned in the Patrol Services Division at the Central Point Area Command.

Pursuant to Senate Bill 111 - Use of Deadly Force investigations - a multi-agency investigation coordinated by the Josephine County District Attorney is ongoing. This includes agencies from the Grants Pass Department of Public Safety, Josephine County District Attorney's Office, the OSP Criminal Investigations Division and the OSP Forensic Services Division.

All above information was approved for release by the Josephine County District Attorney's Office. No other information is anticipated for release unless approved Josephine County District Attorney's Office.
Corner Creek Fire Update, Tuesday, July 7, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/07/15
July 7, 2015
12:30 p.m.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CENTRAL OREGON NEWS MEDIA

Oregon Department of Forestry
Incident Management Team 1
John Buckman, Incident Commander

Fire Information: (541) 987-2348

The Corner Creek Fire grew slightly to 27,166 acres on Monday due to fire line relocation and burnout operations along the fire's western flank. Despite some gusty winds to 30 mph late Monday afternoon, the Corner Creek Fire stayed within containment lines.

The fire is 15 percent contained and 1,100 people are assigned to the suppression effort. The majority of the work today is focused on securing the fire's perimeter and mopping up hot spots inside the fire line.

The fire is burning on public lands managed by the Ochoco National Forest and the Bureau of Land Management - Prineville District, with some private lands within or near to the burned area. The fire started June 29 from a lightning strike in the Black Canyon Wilderness.

Tomorrow at 6:00 a.m., a new incident management team will take control of the Corner Creek Fire. The fire has been managed since July 2 by the Oregon Department of Forestry's Incident Management Team 1, led by Incident Commander John Buckman. The incoming team is the Oregon Interagency Incident Management Team 2, headed by Incident Commander Brett Fillis.

ODF's incident management team originally had suppression responsibility for the Sugarloaf Fire, located 8 miles north of Dayville, before the team was also assigned suppression responsibility for the Corner Creek Fire. Now that the Sugarloaf Fire is 98 percent contained, and the southern three-fourths of the Corner Creek Fire, which is near some private lands, has been significantly stabilized, ODF's incident management team is being released to be available for new fire suppression assignments.

Oregon Interagency Incident Management Team 2 will continue to work with administrators from the Ochoco National Forest, the Bureau of Land Management - Prineville District, and the Oregon Department of Forestry on a full-suppression strategy for the Corner Creek Fire, which includes fire suppression operations in the Black Canyon Wilderness.

A few of the helicopters assigned to the Corner Creek Fire were used yesterday to help cool down the West Fork Fire, located 10 miles southeast of Dayville, on the Malheur National Forest.

Information about the Corner Creek Fire is posted online at www.centralorfireinfo.blogspot.com.

###


Brian Ballou
Fire Prevention Specialist
ODF Southwest Oregon District
Office: (541) 665-0662
Cell: (541) 621-4156
brian.ballou@oregon.gov
FBI Seeking Information to Identify Victims in International Sextortion Case
FBI - Oregon - 07/07/15
This press release is being sent on behalf of the FBI's Office of Public Affairs as part of a national effort to educate the public, particularly parents, about the issue of "sextortion" as well as to identify other potential victims of Lucas Michael Chansler. As of now, the FBI has not identified any of Chansler's victims as having come from Oregon, but approximately 240 victims remain unidentified.



The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is seeking the public's assistance to identify additional victims of convicted online predator Lucas Michael Chansler. Chansler, 31, formerly of St. Johns, Florida, was sentenced to 105 years in federal prison for engaging in an extortion scheme to produce child pornography. On August 13, 2014, Chansler pleaded guilty to nine counts of producing child pornography.

According to court testimony, Chansler targeted 350 minor victims in 26 different states throughout the United States, three Canadian provinces, and the United Kingdom. One hundred and nine victims have been positively identified.

The FBI is actively working to identify Chansler's remaining victims. A list of 135 known screen names, including Myspace, Stickam, and AIM, he used while sexually extorting victims is attached to this release.

Court documents, from 2007 and continuing through January 8, 2010, show that Chansler transmitted threatening communications to hundreds of teen girls over the Internet. He transmitted these threats with the intent to extort photographs and webcam videos showing the victims exposing themselves and engaging in sexually explicit conduct. Chansler pretended to be a friend, acquaintance, or admirer of the victims on various social networking websites.

After gaining some measure of trust from a particular victim, Chansler would invite her to engage in a live video chat, and later would ask her to expose herself. Unbeknownst to the victim, he was recording the video session. Chansler often enticed his victims to expose themselves by showing a streaming video of a minor male exposing himself or engaging in sexually explicit behavior. If a victim did expose herself, he recorded it, and then demanded additional and more graphic images or webcam videos. He would inform the victim that if she did not comply, he would distribute the images and videos online, or send them to her family and friends.

Using information received from the parents of one victim and working with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC), agents were able to identify Chansler and locate his residence. A federal search warrant was executed at the residence on January 8, 2010.

During an interview, Chansler stated that he used social networking sites to meet girls who ranged in age from 13 to 18. He stated that he targeted underage girls because adult women were "too smart" to fall for his scheme.

Forensic analysis of Chansler's computer media revealed hundreds of folders labeled with the name of each victim. These folders contained personal information specific to the victims, as well as related chat logs and videos or digital photos. Many of the chat logs contained the threats Chansler had made to the victims. In several of the videos, the victims are seen crying and pleading with Chansler. In total, he had approximately 80,000 images and videos in his possession.

Assistant Director Joseph S. Campbell explains, "Sextortion is a growing threat both domestically and internationally. The devastating impact of these crimes on the victims, their families, and friends cannot be ignored. The FBI is committed to using our resources and leveraging law enforcement partnerships around the world to identify and arrest these criminals."

"This case serves as an example that children anywhere can be targeted for sextortion and that the FBI remains committed to stopping this cycle of victimization and holding the criminals accountable," said Campbell.

"I'm proud of the young girl and her parents for taking a stand against sexual exploitation by submitting the information to NCMEC's CyberTipline," said Linda Krieg, NCMEC's acting CEO. "That one CyberTipline report, through the FBI's investigation, turned out to be the tip of the iceberg involving a sophisticated child predator who allegedly victimized hundreds of children."

If you have information that may help identify victims of Lucas Michael Chansler or believe you have been victimized by him, please learn more and complete our confidential questionnaire at FBI.gov/sextortion. You can also send a confidential e-mail to FBI.VICTIMASSISTANCE@IC.FBI.GOV, contact your local FBI Field Office, or call toll-free at 1-800-CALL-FBI (225-5324).

###

Note to media: There are a number of resources, including downloadable interviews with FBI agents and a sextortion victim, available at https://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/2015/july/sextortion.

Other resources, including Chansler's most common user ID's, a fact sheet for parents, radio podcasts and a related article in Glamour Magazine are attached.


Attached Media Files: Glamour - Sextortion Article , Sextortion - Fact Sheet from National Center for Missing & Exploited Children , Sextortion - FBI Fact Sheet , Sextortion - Audio Podcast , Chansler - Audio Podcast , Chansler - Most Commonly Seen ID's used
Niagara Fire Update, Tuesday, July 7, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/07/15
July 7, 2015 8:00 a.m.
Niagara Fire Update
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Oregon Department of Forestry
North Cascades District, Santiam Unit

Russ Lane, Incident Commander
Fire Information: (503) 801-8468. http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/

Fire at a glance:
Size: 70 acres, 35% contained
Location: Adjacent to Big Cliff Dam on Highway 22
Personnel: 180
Aircraft: Two Type 2 helicopters
Weather: warm and dry today

A fire containment line has been established around the Niagara Fire and additional growth is not anticipated. The fire is mapped at 70 acres and containment is 35%.

The goal for July 7, 2015 is to secure the fire containment line by extinguishing all fire adjacent to it and working inward. Firefighting hose has been positioned along a portion of the line providing firefighters with a ready source of water. Tuesday night, 6,000 gallons of water were used in this effort. Where the ground is just too steep for a person to walk helicopters will drop water to cool the fire. At the morning briefing Blake Ellis, Operations Chief, established the importance of the work saying "there are challenges out there but I don't want you to go quickly over it, make sure it is 100% out".

Depending on the firefighters work today, containment is expected to steadily increase. Infrared (heat seeing) cameras were used last night to check for remaining fire along Highway 22 where the fire began. Very little fire was found in the area, and that will be put out today. Even though the fire is located on very rugged and rocky ground progress has been good. Russ Lane, Incident Commander, commented that he was "super impressed with the efforts of the firefighters".

There are no road or recreational closures associated with the fire at this time.
The Niagara Fire was first reported July 4, 2015 and is located adjacent to the Big Cliff Dam along Highway 22. The cause of the fire is under investigation. Fire restrictions are in effect on the Willamette National Forest and state and private forests, http://www.oregon.gov/odf/pages/fire/precautionlevelmap.aspx.

Cooperators include: Willamette National Forest, Marion County Sheriff's Office, Oregon Department of Transportation, Bonneville Power Administration, Detroit-Idahna Fire District, Gates Fire Department, and Lyons Fire Department
###
Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Update for Tuesday, July 7, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/07/15
This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) fire update for Tuesday, July 7, 2015.


FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
Niagara Fire - This morning, the 70-acre Niagara Fire is 35 percent contained. It is burning mostly on state forest lands in the Santiam Unit of the North Cascade District along Highway 22 adjacent to the Big Cliff Dam. Approximately 180 personnel are currently assigned to the fire, and ODF will continue to work today to secure containment lines, with two helicopters dropping water on the fire which is burning in steep terrain. ODF continues to receive valuable assistance from the Willamette National Forest and several local fire departments, as well as Oregon Department of Transportation helping ensure that traffic remains moving on Highway 22. The Niagara Fire was first reported July 4, 2015, and the cause of the fire is under investigation. More information: http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS
Corner Creek Fire - The lightning-caused Corner Creek Fire is 26,517 acres and 15 percent contained. Private lands in the fire area are protected by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) through an offset agreement with ODF, which has jurisdictional responsibility. ODF's Incident Management Team 1 is working today to transition management of this fire over to the Oregon Interagency Incident Management Team 2 (IC: Brett Fillis), who will assume command on Wednesday, July 8. More information: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4349/ .


ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.


The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.


FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.


January 1, 2015, through July 7, 2015:
Lightning-caused fires: 103 fires burned 1,009 acres
Human-caused fires: 308 fires burned 646 acres
Total: 411 fires burned 1,655 acres


10-year average (January 1 through July 2):
Lightning-caused fires: 35 fires burned 40 acres
Human-caused fires: 173 fires burned 1,360 acres
Total: 208 fires burned 1,400 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.
When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Jeri Chase, 503-945-7201 office, 503-931-2721 mobile, Jeri.Chase@Oregon.gov, any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.


###
Oregon landslide research honored with geology award
Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries - 07/07/15
NEWPORT, Ore. - Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) scientists have been nationally honored for a paper detailing a multi-year study of a large landslide on the Oregon coast.

The Geological Society of America (GSA) has announced that DOGAMI's George R. Priest and Jonathan C. Allan and co-authors are recipients of the 2015 E.B. Burwell Jr. Award for their paper on physical processes affecting the Johnson Creek landslide north of Newport.

"This is well-deserved recognition of a study that advances Oregon's understanding of coastal landslide hazards," says Ian Madin, interim State Geologist. "Congratulations to George, Jonathan and all the authors."

Priest, a geologist, and Allan, a coastal geomorphologist, work in DOGAMI's Newport field office. The two, along with co-authors William H. Schulz and William L. Ellis of the U.S. Geological Survey and Alan R. Niem and Wendy A. Niem of Pacific Geology Northwest, studied the Johnson Creek landslide as part of an ODOT-funded research project on the landslide, which has a long history of impacting Highway 101.

The paper, titled "Landslide stability: Role of rainfall-induced, laterally propagating, pore-pressure waves," appeared in Environmental & Engineering Geoscience.

The Burwell Award is the top honor of the GSA's Engineering Geology Division. The award recognizes a published paper of distinction that advances knowledge of principles or practice of engineering geology, or of related fields of applied soil or rock mechanics where the role of geology is emphasized. Established in 1968, the award honors the memory of Edward Burwell Jr., a founding member of the Engineering Geology Division and the first chief geologist of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

The honorees will be recognized during the GSA Annual Meeting November 1-4 in Baltimore.
Red Cross Responds to Eugene Home Fire
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 07/07/15
American Red Cross disaster action team volunteers this morning responded to a single-family fire in the 500 block of Nottingham Avenue in Eugene. The fire affected two adults and multiple pets. Red Cross provided lodging, food, clothing, shoes, comfort kits, disaster mental health, and recovery information.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in communities across Oregon and southwest Washington. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 to schedule an appointment.

Know what to do before, during and after a home fire. Take a few moments to review your family's exit plan should there be a fire in your home. This information, and more, is available at www.redcross.org or in a free Prepare! Resource Guide published by the American Red Cross Cascades Region. The guide can be downloaded at http://rdcrss.org/1zq8XW6.
Oregon's Hospitals, Legislators Celebrate Landmark Price Transparency Bill
Oregon Assn. of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS) - 07/07/15
Lake Oswego - July 7, 2015 - The Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS), which represents all of Oregon's 62 community hospitals, today celebrated the passage of a bill that will set up a groundbreaking hospital price transparency website. The bipartisan bill, SB 900, supported by OAHHS and other stakeholders, passed the legislature on July 6 and is expected to be signed by Governor Kate Brown in coming days.
The bill directs the state to set up a user-friendly website that displays median prices for the most common inpatient and outpatient hospital procedures, as paid by commercial insurers, giving Oregonians a clearer view of the cost of care.

"Senate Bill 900 gives Oregonians a new resource for patient-friendly price transparency," said Andy Davidson, president and CEO of OAHHS. "With a broad, bipartisan coalition of legislators and stakeholders behind the bill, Oregon should be proud that it will be leading the way in bringing price transparency to patients. Oregon hospitals applaud the efforts of all those involved, from legislators, to hospitals, to health care partners and beyond. This bill, in combination with hospitals' other price transparency initiatives, will make a difference in our state.

"SB 900 will allow me to better serve my patients in my practice as a physician," said Senator Alan Bates (D-Ashland). "I will be able to get a sense of what my referrals will mean financially to my patients. Price transparency in the health care sector is long overdue, and today Oregon took a big step forward. I applaud the hospitals for championing this approach and look forward to working with them on implementation."
"The health care system in Oregon is a national leader in many ways, and today we have taken a step toward leading on price transparency," said Senator Jeff Kruse, (R-Roseburg). "Like other industries, health care needs to compete on price and seek to deliver the best value to its customers. SB 900 will move our state and its system in that direction and I commend all those involved in this effort."

"Price transparency in Oregon got a huge boost when we passed SB 900," said Representative John Lively, (D-Springfield). "Our constituents asked for tools to manage health care expenses and we heard them loud and clear. In passing this bill, we have set in motion a process that will lead to a valuable source of information for Oregonians, which will allows them to make informed choices about health care."

Currently, Oregon receives an "F" on the influential Catalyst for Payment Reform Price Transparency scorecard, and SB 900 was designed with the intention of moving Oregon toward an "A." According to the group, one of the most important steps to receive an "A" is to pass legislation mandating price data be shown on a website in a consumer-friendly manner. SB 900 will accomplish that goal and will help move Oregon significantly up the ranks on the scorecard.

"We've worked hard to understand how to provide patients meaningful price information," added Davidson. "This measure will serve as a starting point to ensure our state becomes a national leader in providing price information patients can use. Oregonians will now be able to see the prices paid for common procedures at hospitals, which is an important step forward."

The price transparency bill is an integral piece of a three-pronged approach put forward by hospitals, which would allow Oregonians to understand health care prices in advance of care. Beyond the passage of the bill, OAHHS is:

Working with members of the Oregon Health Leadership Council to build a plan that would provide insured Oregonians with cost estimates directly from their insurer and;
Pledging to provide good-faith estimates to out-of-network patients in advance of care.

"Our three-pronged approach means that whether an Oregonian has insurance or not, whether they are in-network or out, they are able find out what a procedure will cost them ahead of time," concluded Davidson. "We needed SB 900 to ensure that all the pieces are there to serve Oregonians."

OAHHS' push for price transparency follows the recent launch of a transparency website, to provide patients with user-friendly government data about the quality of care in Oregon hospitals. The website can be found at www.orhospitalguide.org.

###


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1635/85997/FINAL_--_price_transparency_900.pdf
Salem Police Request Assistance In Locating Suspect In Child Pornography Case (Photo)
Salem Police Dept. - 07/07/15
2015-07/1095/85980/david_brown_so_image.jpg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/1095/85980/thumb_david_brown_so_image.jpg
UPDATE: 07-07-15/9:45 AM

Suspect David Michael Brown was taken into custody at approximately 8:15 pm last night in a downtown Portland hotel. A viewer of a local news station saw the media coverage of the suspect and recognized the suspect, then called the Portland Police Bureau. Brown was alone when he was taken into custody.

The Salem Police Department appreciates the media coverage that was provided in this case and the response from the public in taking this offender into custody so quickly.

###


UPDATE: 07-06-15/10:25 pm


David Michael Brown has been located and taken into custody in Multnomah County. Details of his arrest are unknown at this time.



Salem Police Detectives are requesting assistance from the public in locating a suspect in a child pornography case.

David Michael Brown, 27 years old, is a white male adult, 5'09", 210 lbs with black hair and brown eyes. There are no known vehicles associated with Brown.

Brown has valid warrants for his arrest for twenty counts of Encouraging Child Sexual Abuse and is a registered sex offender. He has also been placed on the Salem Police Department Ten Most Wanted Listing. It is believed that Brown may be in the company of a young child and attempting to leave the state.

Anyone with information as to the whereabouts of David Michael Brown is asked to immediately call 911. A photo is attached.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1095/85980/david_brown_so_image.jpg
World-renowned pianist to lead workshop at Western Oregon University (Photo)
Western Oregon University - 07/07/15
2015-07/1107/85995/paul_roberts.jpg
2015-07/1107/85995/paul_roberts.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/1107/85995/thumb_paul_roberts.jpg
MONMOUTH, Ore. - Western Oregon University's Music Department will host residential masterclasses and lectures for pianists on campus, led by Paul Roberts from July 14 through 17. The program opens with a performance and a lecture on Claude Debussy and Maurice Ravel by Roberts at 7:30 p.m. on July 14 in Smith Hall, room 121. A reception will follow the event.

Dr. Diane Baxter, professor of music at WOU, has organized the event. "Paul Roberts is brilliant and entertaining. When he talks about music and plays the piano, it is as if the composers are present in the room. He reaches audiences of all ages and all musical persuasions," she said. "Mr. Roberts possesses a degree of skill and recognition substantially above that ordinarily encountered in the field. To hear him perform live is to be transported through sound."

Roberts is a British pianist, scholar and author. He's published three books on Debussy and Ravel, and is currently working on a book about literary influences on Franz Liszt. He is a Fellow at the Guildhall School of Music and Dance in London and is the artistic director of the international summer school for pianists Music at Albignac in France. In addition to Roberts' masterclasses held around the world, he has been a guest of esteemed United States institutions such as the Juilliard School in New York, the Peabody Institute and the Golandsky Institute.

Baxter has been a student of Roberts' workshops and knows first-hand how skilled he is. "In terms of teaching, Paul Roberts is the most brilliant teacher I know. He has an uncanny ability to assess a student's capabilities in a blazing streak of insight, then knows exactly how to proceed to help the student unlock the access to the music," she said.

This program includes masterclasses led by Roberts and lectures by he and Baxter. Both performing participants (by audition) and auditors are welcome. Attendees also have the option to receive college credit through WOU. For registration and tuition information, visit bit.ly/1J2sc8J. To learn more about Roberts, visit paulrobertspiano.com. This workshop has received support from the Oregon Community Foundation and the City of Monmouth.


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1107/85995/paul_roberts.jpg
Neighborhood Park Watch Meeting
Lebanon Police Dept. - 07/07/15
Press Release



Contact: Dala Johnson,Community Policing Officer
Phone: 541.258.4339
Email: djohnson@ci.lebanon.or.us


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday, July 7, 2015

LEBANON POLICE DEPARTMENT



Meeting Notice: Neighborhood Park Watch Meeting
Wednesday, July 15, 2015 - 5:30 pm
Lebanon Justice Center - 40 N. 2nd Street, Lebanon Oregon

Lebanon Police Department is introducing a new crime prevention program, NEIGHBORHOOD PARK WATCH. Much like Neighborhood Watch, this program is made up of citizens interested in taking a proactive approach to ensure safety within city parks. You are part of the solution: your eyes and ears are a valuable crime prevention tool and we need your help.

The Lebanon Police Department will teach citizens how to recognize suspicious activities and the means to report them. Our goal is to create a cohesive body of concerned citizens to help address issues that are important to the entire community. Through NEIGHBORHOOD PARK WATCH, citizens will be equipped with information to help reduce crime, drug activity, and negative incidents in our parks, thus creating safer parks for our children and community.

NEIGHBORHOOD PARK WATCH is one of the most effective and least costly ways to prevent crime. It also forges bonds among neighbors and park users, helps reduce graffiti, burglaries and vandalism, and improves and strengthens the relationships between residents and the Lebanon Police Department.

Questions: Contact Dala Johnson at 541-258-4339 or via email djohnson@ci.lebanon.or.us
Lebanon Fire District Responds To Motor Home Fire (Photo)
Lebanon Fire Dist. - 07/07/15
2015-07/1191/85992/5.jpg
2015-07/1191/85992/5.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/1191/85992/thumb_5.jpg
Just before midnight LFD was dispatched to the report of a motor home on fire at the intersection of Santiam Highway and Honeysign Drive.

Upon arrival fire crews found an approximate 30-foot RV fully involved in the east bound lane of Santiam Highway. Fire was approximately 4-6ft above the roof of the RV and had started to spread to the trees by the time Brush 31 arrived with Battalion Chief Tim Moore. Spot fires began lighting areas of the ditch on the other side of Santiam Highway, where a large field of standing grain sat unharvested.

Fire crews quickly extinguished the spot fires and began work on the RV, which took about an hour and a half to fully extinguish and overhaul.

There were no injuries to the responding crews and an investigation is ongoing by OSP.

LFD crews:
Brush 31: Battalion Chief Tim Moore
Engine 31: Engineer/Medics Russell Duerr and Blaine Suing
Medic 30: Engineer/Medics Stacy Porchia and Kyle Robertson
Reserve Engine 31: Volunteer Lt Al Herrera and volunteer firefighter Zach Parker
Water Tender 32: Engineer/Medic Mark Fitzwater

Photos courtesy Firefighter/Intermediate Randy Whitfield


Attached Media Files: 2015-07/1191/85992/5.jpg , 2015-07/1191/85992/4.jpg , 2015-07/1191/85992/3.jpg , 2015-07/1191/85992/2.jpg , 2015-07/1191/85992/1.jpg
07/06/15
Drowning victim located on Willamette River downstream from Albany
Benton Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/06/15
Monday, July 6, 2015, BENTON COUNTY, OR - Benton Co

Drowning victim located on Willamette River downstream from Albany.

On July 5, at about 6:00 p.m., the Benton County Sheriff's Office Marine Patrol Program recovered the drowning victim named Brian Rogers (39 year old male) who was listed as a missing person and possible drowning victim on July 3, 2015. Mr. Rogers was located near river mile 115, which is about three miles downstream from where he was last seen on the Willamette River.

Mr. Rogers was found with the assistance of a local citizen. Notifications have been made to family members. The Albany Police Department assisted in the recovery and identification of Mr. Rogers on July 5. The Albany Police Department, Linn County Sheriff's Office, Albany Fire Department, and Benton County Sheriff's Office responded to the initial call, but were unsuccessful in rescue and recovery attempts. Mr. Rogers had been swimming near Bowman Park in Albany when he went under water and did not resurface.

This was the second drowning in the last week in waters the Benton County Sheriff's Office Marine Patrol Program patrols. There was also a near miss just downstream of Harrisburg on the Willamette River where a boat is currently hung up in a logjam. Efforts are in the works to get the boat removed, and no one was injured during the incident. The Benton County Marine Patrol Program patrols on the Willamette River from Harrisburg to Buena Vista and up the Santiam River to Jefferson where the North and South Santiam Rivers meet.

We would like to remind people to be cautious when recreating on the water and if you are in a boat or vessel wear an approved life jacket or have it accessible. If you are not in a vessel, it is still a good idea to have an approved personal flotation device with you or accessible, especially if you cannot swim or are not a good swimmer. Also use caution when in or around the water if you are using alcohol and or drugs. Many drownings each year are found to have alcohol or controlled substances (legal or not legal) as a contributing factor. For more information on safe boating practices, see the Oregon State Marine Board website at www.oregon.gov/OSMB.

End
Contact: Sergeant Toby Bottorff (Office Phone #: 541-766-6099)
Board on Public Safety Standards and Training to Meet in Salem
Oregon Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/06/15
Board on Public Safety Standards and Training / Notice of Regular Meeting

The Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 9:00 a.m. on Thursday, July 23, 2015, in the Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem.

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired must be made to Tammera Hinshaw at least 48 hours before the meeting at (503)373-1553 or tammera.hinshaw@state.or.us.

1. CONSENT AGENDA (The following items to be ratified by one vote)
A. Minutes
Approve minutes from the April 23, 2015 meeting.
B. OAR 259-060-0010 et al - Proposed Rule Change
Crowd Management
C. OAR 259-008-0010 - Proposed Rule Change
Physical Standards Review, For F2, and Physical Standard Waivers Process Changes
D. OAR 259-008-0011 - Proposed Rule Change
Physical Standards Review, Form F2-T and Physical Standard Waivers Process Changes
E. Jarred Morgan - Request for Medical Waiver - Possible Executive Session
F. Marcus Krieg DPSST#54792 - Not Deny Application for Training
Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by CPC on May 12, 2015.
G. Jason Terkelson DPSST#55126 - Deny Application for Training
Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by CPC on May 12, 2015.
H. Joseph Murdock DPSST#54905 - Not Deny Application for Training
Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by CPC on May 12, 2015.
I. Derrick Diebel DPSST#49646 - Not Revoke
Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by CPC on May 12, 2015.
J. Brent Peterson DPSST#49647 - Revocation
Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by CPC on May 12, 2015.
K. James Escobar DPSST#51843 - Revocation
Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by PPC on May 21, 2015.
L. Brian Cunningham DPSST#54866 - Not Deny
Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by TPC on May 6, 2015.
M. Joseph Hernandez PSID#51239 - Approve Civil Penalty
Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by PS/IPC on May 19, 2015.
N. 2015 Police Job Task Analysis - Approve
Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by PPC on May 21, 2015.
O. OAR 250-008-0250 - Proposed Rule Change - Information Only
Certification of Oregon Liquor Enforcement Inspectors
P. Committee Appointments
Polygraph Licensing Advisory Committee
. Rebecca Martin - Reappointment

2. OLCC Curriculum Approval - Sara Tribbey/ DPSST Staff

3. Director's Report - Director Eriks Gabliks

4. Policy Committee Updates

5. Next Meeting Date: October 22, 2015


## Background Information on the DPSST and BPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Chief Kent Barker of the City of Tualatin Police Department serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.
Two early Forest Service sites in Oregon listed in National Register of Historic Places (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/06/15
Hoodoo Ridge Lookout
Hoodoo Ridge Lookout
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/1303/85983/thumb_OR_WallowaCounty_HoodooRidgeLookout_WEB.jpg
Two early sites of U.S. Forest Service efforts in Oregon, one in Marion County and the other in Wallowa County, are among Oregon's latest entries in the National Register of Historic Places.

The two places are the Hoodoo Ridge Lookout Historic District near Troy and the Olallie Meadows Guard Station near Estacada. Both indicate the types of facilities and activities undertaken by the Forest Service from its foundings a century ago through the Great Depression.

The U.S. Forest Service was launched with limited resources, yet with millions of acres of land to manage; These two places show the ingenuity and resourcefulness of early forest rangers in carrying out their myriad of duties. They are unique in their development.

The Hoodoo Ridge Lookout was constructed in 1925 to support fire detection and suppression. Initially a six-foot wide crow's nest platform in the top of a 110-foot-tall ponderosa pine, the site was supplemented in 1933 by a 101-foot-tall steel tower built by members of the Civilian Conservation Corps. These and several other supplemental buildings are included in the district designation.

The Olallie Meadows Guard Station was hastily and inexpensively constructed in 1910 by Forest Service personnel from site-sourced materials, including a rough-hewn peeled log foundation and walls, lodgepole pine roof and structure, hand-split cedar shake roof, and field stone steps.

The cabin served as a guard station until 1932, allowing rangers to stay overnight and to conduct forest patrols. Field rangers did a variety of tasks including managing small timber sales, fighting fires, and building roads and trails.

"We applaud the U.S. Forest Service's efforts to preserve and develop cultural heritage resources," said Chrissy Curran, the acting deputy state historic preservation officer. "These two sites help us understand how the Forest Service managed the state's forests during the first century of its existence."

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon lists is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on "National Register" at left of page).


Attached Media Files: Hoodoo Ridge Lookout National Register nomination , Press Release , Olallie Meadows Cabin National Register nomination , Hoodoo Ridge Lookout , Olallie Meadows Cabin
349th Basic Police Class to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy
Oregon Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/06/15
The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 349th Basic Police Class.

The Basic Police Class is 16-weeks in length and includes dozens of training areas including survival skills, firearms, emergency vehicle operations, ethics, cultural diversity, problem solving, community policing, elder abuse, drug recognition, and dozens of other subjects.

Basic Police Class 349 will graduate at the Oregon Public Safety Academy at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE in Salem, Oregon on Friday July 17,2015 at 11:00 a.m. There will be a reception immediately following the graduation.

Class spokesperson for graduation will be Deputy Joel Ives from the Hood River County Sheriff's Office. The Guest speaker is Chief Janie Schutz from the City of Forest Grove Police Department.

Members of Basic Police #349

Deputy Sheriff Tyler Alexander
Clackamas County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Michael Boliek
Beaverton Police Department

Director Michael Brace
Curry County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Ricky Branin
Nyssa Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Collin Brehm
Columbia County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Christian Briggs
Newberg-Dundee Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Matthew Brown
Clackamas County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Jonathan Buck
Gresham Police Department

Police Officer Andrew Colasurdo
Forest Grove Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Steven Frambes
Linn County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Daniel Graybill
Linn County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Anthony Hadeed
Warm Springs Police Department

Police Officer Christopher Hartenstein
Beaverton Police Department

Police Officer Taylor Herbst
Klamath Falls Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Chelsey Hill
Washington County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Jordan Houser
Dallas Police Department

Police Officer Mark Inman
Milwaukie Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Joel Ives
Hood River County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer David King
Dallas Police Department

Police Officer Jonah Kopp
Grants Pass Dept of Public Safety

Police Officer Loren Larsen
Oakridge Police Department

Deputy Sheriff James Majetich
Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Robert Manuel
Sutherlin Police Department

Police Officer Raymond Marrington
Brookings Police Department

Police Officer Josiah Meyer
Gresham Police Department

Police Officer Christopher Miner
Lebanon Police Department

Police Officer Jamie Neal
Bend Police Department

Police Officer Joseph Nomako
Beaverton Police Department

Police Officer Russell Palmeri
Lake Oswego Police Department

Police Officer Thomas Poulton
Beaverton Police Department

Police Officer Joshua Price
Lake Oswego Police Department

Police Officer Thomas Reif
Klamath Falls Police Department

Police Officer Joshua Robertson
Corvallis Police Department

Police Officer Garrett Shannon
Gold Beach Police Department

Police Officer Tyler Smith
John Day Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Christopher Taylor
Douglas County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Robert Teague
Clackamas County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Christopher Waggoner
Linn County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Zachary Weitzel
Klamath Falls Police Department

Police Officer Dale Willcox
Sandy Police Department


## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Chief Kent Barker of the City of Tualatin Police Department serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.
Salem Police On Scene of Fatal Plane Crash-UPDATE-Victim Identification
Salem Police Dept. - 07/06/15
UPDATE: 07-06-15/2:40 PM


The victim in this incident has now been identified as 60-year old John Douglas Layton of Salem. Mr. Layton was the pilot and sole occupant of the airplane.

The investigation will continue with the National Transportation and Safety Board (NTSB) as the primary investigating agency.

###



UPDATE: 07-04-15/11:40 AM


Lt Okada will be available for contact in the northeast corner of the parking lot at 25th St SE and Mission St SE at 11:45 am



The Police Department is on the scene of a fatal plane crash on the grounds of the Salem Airport.

Salem Police and Fire Departments received calls at approximately 8:26 am of a plane crash north of the runway on the Salem airport grounds. Witnesses reported that a small plane was attempting to takeoff northbound when it crashed north of the runway and burst into flames. The flames were extinguished quickly by fire units and it was determined that there is at least one deceased victim in the plane.

The identity of the victim is unknown at this time, and we are currently awaiting the arrival of the NTSB for further investigation.
New State Report Highlights Non-motorized Trail Use (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/06/15
Walkers and hikers enjoy the Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail. A new report conducted by Oregon State University and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department shows non-motorized trail use trends in Oregon.
Walkers and hikers enjoy the Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail. A new report conducted by Oregon State University and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department shows non-motorized trail use trends in Oregon.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/1303/85976/thumb_Hikers_n_bikers_on_HCRST.jpg
A new state report on non-motorized trail use summarizes survey results of approximately 1,400 trail users across the state, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) announces.

The survey included questions about use patterns, user experiences and preferences, as well as the economic contribution of trail recreation. Non-motorized trail use includes walking, hiking, running, backpacking, bicycling on hard surface trails, mountain biking, horseback riding, cross-country skiing and snowshoeing.

"Trails continue to be the one of the main ways Oregonians from any background enjoy the outdoors," says Lisa Sumption, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department director. "We're hearing that people want their smaller, local trails connected to the longer, regional ones so they can enjoy a more natural experience. We agencies can get there by cooperating on planning, maintenance, and grants."

Results showed that non-motorized trail activities generated an estimated $2.1 billion in expenditure across the state in 2014. In turn, this expenditure contributed 21,730 jobs, $1 billion in value added, and $672 million in labor income. When out-of-state visitors are included, the estimated amounts increase to 24,340 jobs, $1.2 billion in value added, and $753 million in labor income.

Other highlights of the report include:
Walking and hiking are the most popular trail activities.
Walking or running with a dog off-leash was the second-most frequent activity on trails.
Two-thirds of respondents walked or ran specifically on an ocean beach at least once during the past 12 months.
Older Oregonians are less likely to participate in trail activities overall. Most popular trail activities for this demographic include walking on local trails or paths and cross-country skiing.
Eleven percent of statewide respondents use recreation-oriented trails to walk or bike to work, with the highest percentage in Lane County (36 percent).
Respondents most commonly prefer dirt surface trails for all activities other than biking on hard surface trails.
Respondents prefer creating new trails to reduce crowding, rather than letting existing trails remain crowded. This is especially true for mountain bikers.
Respondents' top priority for new trails was adding walking/ hiking trails both inside and outside one's community. Trails for hard surface bicycling were the next highest priority for within one's community, while trails for backpacking were the next highest priority for outside one's community.
Repair of major trail damage was identified as the highest funding priority over the next 10 years, followed by protection of natural features and routine trail maintenance.
The top trail concern was an inability to experience the natural environment while using trails. Respondents also indicated that they would like to see more trail information on the internet and more trail signs and markers.
Word of mouth is the most frequent source for seeking information about trails, followed by agency websites and printed maps.

OPRD contracted with Oregon State University in 2014 to conduct the survey, a component of the 2015-2024 Statewide Trails Plan. Results provide state planners with up-to-date information on trails recreation for use in local and regional planning. OPRD will also use the information in distributing grants to federal, state, and local government agencies that maintain and develop non-motorized trail opportunities.

To view the entire report, visit http://tinyurl.com/qydclea.


Attached Media Files: Walkers and hikers enjoy the Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail. A new report conducted by Oregon State University and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department shows non-motorized trail use trends in Oregon.
Baseball Unites Rural and Urban Communities (Photo)
Oregon Cattlemen's Association - 07/06/15
Mack with a Volcanoes baseball
Mack with a Volcanoes baseball
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-07/4839/85971/thumb_DSC_1944.JPG
SALEM,Ore., (07/06/2015) - Baseball fans gathered Tuesday night, June 30, in the stadium of the Salem-Keizer Volcanoes to celebrate Oregon Cattle Night. Cowboy hats and a hay-bale photo booth added a ranching flare to the stadium's Volcanoes merchandise and ballpark food.

Jerry Howard, the Volcanoes' senior marketing executive, invited the Oregon Cattlemen's Association (OCA) to join this final night of the Volcanoes' first 5-game series honoring Oregon agriculture.

To prepare to highlight this key Oregon industry, Howard did his homework. Over the course of four months, he visited 54 ranches, farms, associations, and food processors in Oregon. "I'm 74 and I didn't know there are 225 different varieties of Oregon Ag," Howard said. "We sat down and chose five areas to do the first year and do a very good job of it." The last of these nights focused on Oregon cattle and food banks.

Kayli Hanley, OCA's communications director, jumped at the opportunity for OCA to participate. "What's more American than cowboys and a good old fashion baseball game?" she said.

OCA asked a couple of young cowboys to help start off the evening. Mack traveled all the way from Echo, Oregon to throw the ceremonial first pitch. The eight-year-old said his favorite part of helping start the Volcanoes' game cowboy-style was "being on the actual baseball field."

Carter, a cowboy in the first grade, represented OCA, ranchers, and kids across the state, by sprinting around the four plates in the ceremonial first run. He said he liked "running the bases."

The fun continued after the opening ceremony. OCA and Oregon Cattle Women shared a spot behind home plate to offer raffle tickets, stickers, and fun ranching facts to the fans. OCA's Administrative Assistant, Brittany Steele said she was excited to reach out to people. "I love baseball and cows, and this is a combination of both!"

Howard, known as "Howie" around the stadium, was excited to see the interaction between urban audiences and the Ag community. "Baseball is sort of a common thread amongst everyone. Urban or rural, old or young, male or female, obviously everyone has heard of it, if not played it. Baseball has the ability to draw everyone together."

One of the mid-game diversions included a race between three cardboard cows hoofing it behind the outfield fence. The evening rounded out with a sample of Oregon beef provided at the gates by Oregon Cattlewomen.

Hanley was excited for this chance to meet urban Oregonians on common ground to show them the presence of ranchers in their community. "Ranching isn't a thing of the past," Hanley said. "It is alive and well in today's community and a huge part of Oregon agriculture. There are all kinds of ranchers, young and old, who work hard to raise healthy animals and provide for their families. It is exciting seeing youth like Mack and Carter excited about ranching!"

The Oregon Cattlemen's Association was founded in 1913 and works to promote environmentally and socially sound industry practices, improve and strengthen the economics of the industry, and protect its industry communities and private property rights.

###


Attached Media Files: Mack with a Volcanoes baseball , Jerry Howard with cowboy Carter
Oregon Dept. of Forestry (ODF) fire update - July 6, 2015.
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/06/15
FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
Niagara Fire - The 70-acre Niagara Fire is 15 percent contained. It is burning mostly on state forest lands in the Santiam Unit of the North Cascade District along Highway 22 adjacent to the Big Cliff Dam. ODF will continue to work today to secure containment lines. Fire conditions continue to challenge firefighters, with any spot fires beyond the fire lines spreading rapidly. Slightly cooler temperatures forecast for today are expected to aid the firefighting effort. ODF has been receiving valuable assistance from the Willamette National Forest and several local fire departments. More info: http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS
Corner Creek Fire - The lightning-caused Corner Creek Fire is 26,414 acres and 15 percent contained. The fire continues to burn actively on the west side of the South Fork John Day River. Private lands in the fire area are protected by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) through an offset agreement with ODF, which has jurisdictional responsibility. ODF's Team 1 is managing the firefighting operation.

Bunker Hill Complex - The lightning-caused Bunker Hill Complex 30 miles SE of Oakridge is 388 acres and 90 percent contained. It is burning on National Forest lands.

Dennis Creek Fire - The lightning-caused Dennis Creek Fire 15 miles east of Union is 192 acres and uncontained. The fire is burning on National Forest lands.

Jones Canyon Fire - The lightning-caused Jones Canyon Fire 12.5 miles NE of Monument is 840 acres and 75 percent contained. The fire is burning on BLM lands.

Radar Fire - The human-caused Radar Fire four miles west of Burns is 400 acres and uncontained. The fire is burning on BLM lands.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015, through July 6, 2015:
Lightning-caused fires: 101 fires burned 1,009 acres
Human-caused fires: 300 fires burned 645 acres
Total: 401 fires burned 1,654 acres

10-year average (January 1 through July 2):
Lightning-caused fires: 35 fires burned 40 acres
Human-caused fires: 173 fires burned 1,360 acres
Total: 208 fires burned 1,400 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website, Oregon.gov/odf

When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.


NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Rod Nichols, 503-945-7425 office, 503-508-0574 mobile, any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.


OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

For information on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands view:
the department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
the Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.


ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.
Niagara Fire update - July 6 morning
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/06/15
Niagara Fire Update

Oregon Department of Forestry North Cascades District, Santiam Unit
Russ Lane, Incident Commander
Fire Information: (503) 801-8468. http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/

FIRE AT A GLANCE:
Size: 70 acres, 15% contained
Location: Adjacent to Big Cliff Dam on Highway 22
Personnel: 120
Aircraft: 3 helicopters, 1 Type 1, 2 Type 2
Weather: warm and dry today, compared to hot and dry yesterday
Fire control efforts continue on the Niagara Fire located adjacent to the Big Cliff Dam along Highway 22. Fire size has not changed from its size of 70 acres and is now is 15 percent contained. The fire was first reported on July 4, 2015.

Today, July 6, 2015, the goal will be to "continue to build a fire containment line to secure the fire," said Blake Ellis, Operations Chief, adding that "night [firefighting forces] set us up for success today." Staffing has increased to 120 personnel and is divided into two shifts providing 24-hour coverage on the fire.

Primary threat to reaching containment is the explosive growth whenever any fire is able to get across the fire line. These "slopovers" have shown that they can grow rapidly, but water-dropping helicopters have been used effectively to stop their spread.

There are no road or recreational closures associated with the fire at this time. Visitors to the Detroit Lake Recreation Area should be aware that boating on the west end of the lake and recreational activities on Detroit dam may be limited due to fire activity. For those traveling Highway 22, visit the Oregon Department of Transportation Trip Check site, http://tripcheck.com for the most current information. Fire traffic is heavy in the vicinity of the Big Cliff Dam, and the public is advised to use caution when traveling in this area.

The cause of the fire is under investigation. Fire restrictions are in effect on the Willamette National Forest and state and private forests, http://www.oregon.gov/odf/pages/fire/precautionlevelmap.aspx.

Cooperators include: Willamette National Forest, Marion County Sheriff's Office, Oregon Department of Transportation, Bonneville Power Administration, Detroit-Idahna Fire District, Gates Fire Department, and Lyons Fire Department.
Media Advisory: Portland Air National Guard offers Media Tour
Oregon Military Department - 07/06/15
PORTLAND AIR NATIONAL GUARD BASE, Ore. - The 142nd Fighter Wing Office of Public Affairs, Portland Air National Guard (ANG) Base, Oregon, is pleased to offer a tour to media on July 15, 9:15a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Please note all media representatives who plan to attend the event must have credentials verified prior to July 10.

To attend the tour, please email shelly.l.davison.mil@mail.mil with the following information: full name, date of birth, and driver's license number.

Attendees will receive a mission briefing from Col. Paul T. Fitzgerald, 142nd Fighter Wing Commander. Other highlights include being able to view F-15 take-offs from the flightline and opportunities for a close-up view of the jet. As this will be a walking tour, only still cameras will be authorized.


About the 142nd Fighter Wing
With more than 1,000 Airmen, the 142nd Fighter Wing guards the Pacific Northwest skies from northern California to the Canadian border, on 24-hour Aerospace Control Alert as part of Air Combat Command and the North American Aerospace Defense (NORAD) Command. Our mission is to provide unequalled, mission-ready units to sustain combat aerospace superiority and peacetime tasking any time, any place in service to our nation, state and community. The fighting "Redhawks" are proud to serve as a vital part of the Total Force team, defending our nation with the F-15 Eagle. The wing also stands ready to participate in state and federal contingency missions as required.
07/05/15
Niagara Fire update - July 5, 2015 morning
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/05/15
Oregon Department of Forestry North Cascades District, Santiam Unit
Russ Lane, Incident Commander
FIRE AT A GLANCE
Size: 70 acres
Location: Adjacent to Big Cliff Dam on Highway 22
Personnel: 100
Aircraft: 5 helicopters, 3 Type 1, 2 Type 2
Weather: hot dry conditions expected to continue
The Niagara Fire was reported on July 4, 2015 burning above Big Cliff Dam along Highway 22. The fire grew rapidly with some spotting burning through heavy timber to a size now estimated at 70 acres. Helicopters and air tankers were used to slow its growth, and little additional growth was observed overnight.

Today, July 5, 2015, the goal explained by Russ Lane, Incident Commander "is to knock the fire down by air and get a containment line around it on the ground." Weather in the fire area continues to be hot and dry, with historically dry fuels. About 100 personnel are assigned to the fire. Five helicopters, three heavy lift and two medium lift, are available to provide support for fire line construction.

There are no road or recreational closures associated with the fire at this time. Visitors to the Detroit Lake Recreation Area should be aware that boating on the west end of the lake and recreational activities on Detroit dam may be limited due to fire activity. For those traveling Highway 22, visit the Oregon Department of Transportation Trip Check site http://tripcheck.com for the most current information. Fire traffic is heavy in the vicinity of the Big Cliff Dam and the public is advised to use caution when traveling in this area.
The cause of the fire is under investigation. Fire restrictions are in effect on the Willamette National Forest and state and private forests, http://www.oregon.gov/odf/pages/fire/precautionlevelmap.aspx.

Cooperators include: Willamette National Forest, Marion County Sheriff's Office, Oregon Department of Transportation, Bonneville Power Administration, Detroit-Idahna Fire District, Gates Fire Department, and Lyons Fire Department
Niagara Fire update - July 5, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/05/15
Firefighters continue to battle the 70-acre Niagara Fire in the Santiam Unit of Oregon Department of Forestry's North Cascade District. Reported July 4 about noon, the fire is burning near Highway 22, milepost 39, in the vicinity of the Big Cliff Dam. ODF is being assisted by the U.S. Forest Service as well as local rural fire departments.

Approx. 100 personnel are fighting the fire today. ODF has increased the air attack and will have five helicopters dropping water today, along with large and small air tankers delivering fire retardant. Several private contract hand crews are on scene, for a total of 100 personnel fighting the fire.

The Niagara Fire is uncontained at present. The fire is burning on steep terrain in heavy timber. Hot, dry conditions persist in the area, which will challenge firefighters as they work to contain the blaze. Cause is under investigation.

Highway 22 remains open. Traffic is expected to be heavy today, with travelers returning from the Fourth of July holiday weekend, and firefighting equipment also moving along the major travel route.
Salem Man Dies After Boat Capsizes Near Newport
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 07/05/15
On July 4, 2015 at 10:40am the Oregon State Police-Newport Office was dispatched to a capsized boat in the Pacific Ocean just south of South Beach State Park.

The 21 foot Hewes boat was being operated by Robert BAKER, age 58, of Salem. BAKER and his three passengers had been crabbing in Yaquina Bay and left the bay to fish in the ocean. Not far into the ocean, the boat was struck by a "sneaker wave" and it capsized. Two passengers were able to put life jackets on after it capsized.

Upon the US Coast Guard arriving on scene, Lowell LEATHER, age 81, of Salem, was pronounced deceased. The US Coast Guard rescued Robert BAKER, Allen BAKER, age 55, of Salem, and Donita FREE, age 50, of Salem. The three survivors were transported to Samaritan Pacific Communities Hospital in Newport with minor injuries.

The OSP Newport Office was assisted by US Coast Guard, Newport Fire and Rescue, Pac-West Ambulance, Lincoln County District Attorney's Office, Lincoln County Medical Examiner, and Lincoln County Sheriff's Office, and OSP-Salem.
Red Cross Assisting After Residential Fires in Salem, Roseburg
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 07/05/15
The American Red Cross Cascades Region is providing immediate emergency assistance after two residential fires in Marion and Douglas County.

A July 3 single-family fire in the 2000 block of Pratum Avenue in Salem affected one adult and one chi1d. The Red Cross provided lodging, food, clothing, comfort kits, and information about recovery services.

A July 5 single-family fire in the 2000 block of Old Highway 99 in Roseburg affected two adults and a dog. The Red Cross provided lodging, food, clothing, shoes, comfort kits, and recovery information.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in communities across Oregon and southwest Washington. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 to schedule an appointment.

Know what to do before, during and after a home fire. Take a few moments to review your family's exit plan should there be a fire in your home. This information, and more, is available at www.redcross.org or in a free Prepare! Resource Guide published by the American Red Cross Cascades Region. The guide can be downloaded at http://rdcrss.org/1zq8XW6.