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Eugene/Spring/Rose/Alb/Corv News Releases for Wed. May. 22 - 3:41 am
Tue. 05/21/19
Public hearing June 4 for Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant plan
Oregon Health Authority - 05/21/19 4:21 PM

May 21, 2019

What: A hearing to take public comments on Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division’s proposal for the use of funds from the Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant.

Agenda: Review of Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant proposal for October 2019 through September 2020. Public comment will be taken. Draft proposal will be posted at http://www.healthoregon.org/lhd.

When: June 4, 11-11:30 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 915, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland. A call-in option is available for remote attendance. Conference call number is 877-873-8017, participant code 767068#.

Program contact: Danna Drum, 503-957-8869, um@state.or.us">danna.k.drum@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Danna Drum at 971-673-1223, 711 TTY or um@state.or.us">danna.k.drum@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2Hw7XtV


BLM honors outstanding volunteers at 'Making a Difference' awards ceremony
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 05/21/19 1:33 PM

WASHINGTON – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will honor some of their most dedicated volunteers this week at the agency’s 2019 Making a Difference National Volunteer Awards. Volunteers play a critical role in helping the BLM welcome millions of visitors annually to more than 245 million acres of public lands across the American West.

The annual awards, which recognize exceptional volunteer service on BLM-managed lands, will be presented during a special awards ceremony on Wednesday, May 22 at 1:00 p.m. EDT in Washington, D.C., and live via video teleconference on www.blm.gov/live

“It’s important to recognize and celebrate the contributions made by our dedicated volunteers,” said Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt. “I’m continually humbled and inspired by the enthusiasm and hard work of these outstanding individuals as each of you have made a lasting impact on our public lands. Thank you on behalf of the places you safeguard for all Americans, and thank you on behalf of the people whose lives you’ve touched through your generosity.”

In 2018, over 30,000 volunteers contributed nearly one million hours of service, providing the equivalent of more than $24 million in labor and enabling BLM to help more Americans experience their public lands. These hard-working volunteers help monitor trails, manage wild horses, keep campers safe, and provide environmental education, interpretation, and other visitor services.

“The BLM has only about 9,000 employees to sustainably manage hundreds of millions of acres of public lands for a range of multiple uses. While our employees are exceptionally dedicated, the support they receive from our volunteers is essential to helping our agency achieve its mission for the American people,” said Casey Hammond, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Land and Minerals Management, exercising the authority of the BLM Director. “It is a privilege to recognize these incredible people for their tireless efforts.”

The 2019 awardees and their BLM nominating offices are:

  • Tracy Greenwood, Lifetime Achievement, Mother Lode Field Office (CA), for consistent management of the Briceburg Visitor Center at the Merced River Recreation Area since 2000.
  • Walt & Kathy Horsfall, Lifetime Achievement, Safford Field Office (AZ), for their service to the Gila Box Riparian National Conservation Area, collecting data on hundreds of miles of roads around the Gila Box Riparian NCA.
  • Phil & Chriscinda Jamison, Lifetime Achievement, Northeastern States District (ES), for more than 15 years in support of the Wild Horse and Burro Program in the BLM Eastern States Office.
  • Thomas Parkinson & Peter Kearns, Outstanding Achievement, Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument (AZ), for 400 hours of volunteer service in 2018, contributing to multiple programs on the Parashant.
  • Pedal United Chapter of IMBA, Group Excellence, Billings Field Office (MT), for helping to develop more than 28 miles of mountain bike trails and a trailhead facility over the last four years.
  • Blake Ramos-Manz, Sergio Ramos-Manz, & Dylan Brennan, Outstanding Achievement, Wild Rivers Recreation Area (NM), for helping to manage the Wild Rivers Recreation Area, including five campgrounds, 27 campsites, and over 36 miles of trail.
  • Roy Thornton, Outstanding Achievement, Cottonwood Field Office (ID), for his volunteer service at  the BLM's Cottonwood Field Office recreation sites and campgrounds over the last eight years

A national panel of BLM specialists and partner organization representatives selected the winners for their exceptional contributions to conservation and management of public lands. 

For more information, please contact Linda Schnee, BLM National Volunteer Program Lead, at (202) 912-7453 or lschnee@blm.gov

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $96 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2017. These activities supported more than 468,000 jobs.


Early results show fewer youth started smoking since Tobacco 21 took effect
Oregon Health Authority - 05/21/19 11:20 AM

March 21, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7174, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Early results show fewer youth started smoking since Tobacco 21 took effect

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Oregon Health Authority announced promising short-term outcomes of Senate Bill 754, which raised the age of purchase for tobacco and vaping products in Oregon from 18 to 21 years.

OHA found a significant decrease in youth (aged 13-17) and young adults (aged 18–20) who have started using tobacco since the law took effect Jan. 1, 2018. The evaluation also shows a decrease in young adults’ perceived ease of access to tobacco and vaping products.

"Tobacco 21 was enacted to help prevent young people from starting to use tobacco, and it’s working," said Tom Jeanne, MD, deputy state health officer and epidemiologist. "With this and our strong Indoor Clean Air Act, Oregon is a national leader in protecting youth from tobacco use."

In August 2017 Governor Kate Brown signed Senate Bill 754, making Oregon the fifth state to increase the age to purchase tobacco. To ensure compliance with the law, businesses that sell tobacco products and inhalant delivery systems such as e-cigarettes must post signs prohibiting sales of these products to persons under the age of 21.

Ending youth access to tobacco is only a minor cost for retailers but a huge gain for reducing tobacco-related deaths and diseases in Oregon’s next generation, Jeanne says.

Fewer current youth tobacco users reported purchasing tobacco products from convenience stores, grocery stores, or tobacco or vape shops after the legislation went into effect. However, statewide requests for proof of age by retailers did not change significantly, especially outside the Portland metro area. This is, in part, because Oregon is one of only nine states that does not have tobacco retail licensure.

"Nicotine is a poison and tobacco is sweet, cheap and easy to get in Oregon," Jeanne said. "Enforcing Tobacco 21 is vital, and there are other actions we can take to keep our momentum going. For example, we know that raising the price of tobacco keeps kids from starting and encourages people to quit. Our Legislature is considering several bills this session to increase the price of tobacco, e-cigarettes and other flavored tobacco products."

The evaluation of Tobacco 21 assessed short-term outcomes of the law in communities throughout Oregon. OHA contracted with RMC Research, an independent evaluator, to conduct the evaluation through online surveys with youth and young adult tobacco users before and nine months after the law took effect.

The report is available as a PDF at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/PREVENTIONWELLNESS/TOBACCOPREVENTION/Documents/Oregon-Tobacco-21-Impact-Evaluation-Report.pdf.

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https://bit.ly/2WXeGSV


Linda Maddy at DPSST Recognized by Port of Portland Police (Photo)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 05/21/19 10:27 AM
Linda Maddy DPSST and Lt. Scott Creager of Port of Portland Police
Linda Maddy DPSST and Lt. Scott Creager of Port of Portland Police
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1187/124722/thumb_Linda_Maddy_PDX_5-16-2019.jpg

Linda Maddy of the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) was honored recently by the Port of Portland Police Department with a Community Partner Award.

Linda, a Licensed Clinical Social Worker with more than a decade of service, is one of two Coordinators assigned to DPSST's Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) / Mental Health Program which provide training to first responders around the state through Oregon's Crisis Intervention Team Center of Excellence (CITCOE).

The Community Partner Award is given by the Port of Portland Police Department to individuals and organizations who work with the police department to support the safety and security of those who work and travel through Portland International Airport (PDX).   

Over the past year, Linda has spent countless hours, and has delivered dozens of classes at PDX, in the area of mental health first aid, working with people in crisis, and other mental health topics for law enforcement officers and 9-1-1 telecommunicators at the airport.  In addition she has worked with Port of Portland Police to deliver a variety of classes to employees who work at the airport ranging from PDX staff, airline ticket and gate agents, and even rental car company staff who encounter people in crisis on a daily basis as PDX serves more than 19 million travelers each year.

DPSST's Director Eriks Gabliks said "Linda’s commitment to training excellence is appreciated and is one example of the great work done by the men and women at DPSST on a daily basis.  Linda's work with veterans, and public safety professionals, around the state is making a difference in how we respond to incidents involving people in crisis."

 ## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, OLCC regulatory specialists, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 




Attached Media Files: Linda Maddy DPSST and Lt. Scott Creager of Port of Portland Police

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Vacation Rental Scams (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 05/21/19 10:00 AM
TT - Vacation Rentals - GRAPHIC - May 21, 2019
TT - Vacation Rentals - GRAPHIC - May 21, 2019
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/3585/124279/thumb_TT_-_Vacation_rentals_-_GRAPHIC_-_May_20_2019.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against vacation scams. 

The kids are almost out of school, and the weather is warming up… definitely a good time to start planning your next escape out of town. It seems like it has never been easier to find the perfect space in the perfect place to take your family. Want to rent a condo for a few nights in the big city? A cottage in the woods? Or a bungalow by the beach? There are tons of options for every kind of possible vacation, and you can find them all with a few quick clicks on the keyboard. 

Our friends at the Federal Trade Commission, though, have some advice to help make sure that your quest for rest and relaxation doesn’t lead you to a rental scam. 

Here’s how it can work: you find a great house or apartment listed for rent on the internet. The photos look great, and the rates are somewhere between very low and reasonable. You make contact with the person you think is the owner, book a date and pre-pay some or all of your fee. In some cases, a fraudster may have just lifted the info and pictures from a real listing and re-posted them elsewhere. He changes the contact info so you come to him, not the owner, and now he’s making money. 

In other cases, the fraudster posts a phantom listing… the rental doesn’t really exist. He promises all kinds of amenities, and you think you’ve just snagged a great option at a low price. All he has to do is get you to pay up before you figure things out. 

Here’s how to protect yourself: 

  • Be wary if the owner asks you to pay by wire transfer. This is like sending cash – you likely will never get your money back if there’s a problem. Use a credit card. 

  • Watch out if the owner says he is overseas and wants you to send a deposit to a foreign bank. If you are traveling overseas, again, your best bet is to use a credit card. 

  • Consider only using a reputable travel website to book your stay. Look for sites that use secure payment portals and/or those that don’t release the payment to the owner until you’ve checked in. 

  • Use mapping apps – like Google maps or similar – to confirm that the property really exists. 

Remember - if you have been victimized by an online scam, you can report your suspicious contacts to the FBI. You can file an online report at the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office. 

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Attached Media Files: TT - Vacation Rental Scams - AUDIO - May 21, 2019 , TT - Vacation Rentals - GRAPHIC - May 21, 2019

Commissions to meet in June for grant approvals
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/21/19 9:05 AM

The Oregon Heritage Commission will meet via teleconference at 10 a.m. on June 3. A public listening room will be provided in Room 146 of the North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer St. NE, Salem. Its agenda includes approval of Oregon Museum Grants and approval of minutes. Call +1 (646) 749-3122 and use access code 725-625-509.

 

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity. For more information, contact coordinator Beth Dehn at 503-986-0696 or Beth.Dehn@oregon.gov

 

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries will meet via teleconference at 1 p.m. on June 7. Its agenda includes approval of Oregon Historic Cemeteries Grants. A public listening room will be provided in Room 146 of the North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer St. NE, Salem. Call +1 (224) 501-3412 and use access code 549-452-845.

 

State law established the seven-member Commission to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and help obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances. For more information about commission activities, contact coordinator Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail at i.gill@oregon.gov">kuri.gill@oregon.gov.

 

Commission meetings are open to the public and their agendas include opportunities for public comment. The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986?0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.

 

For more information about the commissions, visit www.oregonheritage.org


Mon. 05/20/19
Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services committee holds town hall in Medford
Oregon Department of Human Services - 05/20/19 6:48 PM

Salem, Ore .– The Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (ODHHS) Advisory Committee will hold a town hall in the large meeting room of the Medford Library, 205 S. Central Ave. in Medford, Oregon, from 6 to 8 p.m. on May 21.

The ODHHS Advisory Committee will also hold its full advisory committee meeting prior to the town hall from 2 to 4 p.m., May 21. The executive committee meeting will follow from 9 to 11 a.m., May 22, in the Carpenter Room at the Medford Library, 205 S. Central Ave., Medford, Oregon.

All three meetings are open to the public.

Agenda items for the full advisory committee and executive committee meetings will include: public comment, announcements, an update on the Office of Aging and People with Disabilities, brochures for the Advisory Committee and the ODHHS program, new membership discussion, retreat planning and discussion about bylaws.

Sign language interpreters, FM assistive listening devices and live captioning will be provided for each meeting. Those who are unable to attend in person may view real-time captioning at https://zoom.us/j/416452805 for the Advisory Committee meeting, https://zoom.us/j/795840168 for the Town Hall, and https://zoom.us/j/321918652 for the executive committee meeting.

For questions about these meetings, please contact: Barbara Robertson at 503-509-9550 or the ODHHS program at odhhs.info@state.or.us.

About the Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Advisory Committee

The committee assists the Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (ODHHS) program by providing  issues affecting individuals who are deaf, deaf-blind, hard of hearing and those with additional disabilities.

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Detectives Investigating Shots Fired Call in Green
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/20/19 5:40 PM

ROSEBURG, Ore. - Detectives are following up on leads after a vehicle was struck by gunfire in Green Sunday night. 

At about 10:22 pm, deputies were dispatched to investigate a report of shots fired in the area of Ladd Lane, but were unable to locate any witnesses or the source of the gunfire. 

At approximately 11:00 pm, dispatchers received a report from an individual who stated their vehicle had been struck by gunfire earlier in the evening near Taco Bell. No one was injured in the incident. 

Detectives were notified and are currently investigating the incident. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Investigations Division at 541-440-4458 or the non-emergency dispatch center at 541-440-4471.


TOMORROW: Eugene Rally to Stop Abortion Bans
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon - 05/20/19 4:27 PM

A rally in downtown Eugene will be held at noon Tuesday to support the National Day of Action to Stop the Bans being led by reproductive freedom and justice groups across the country.

This day of action comes at a critical juncture in the fight for reproductive freedom and justice, as anti-abortion politicians push laws infringing on personal decisions that should be left to individuals and their doctors, with the goal of overturning and gutting Roe v. Wade. Former Eugene Mayor Kitty Piercy will join the rally in speaking to what Oregon can do to stand up to these dangerous attacks on reproductive freedom.

WHAT: National Day of Action to Stop the Bans
WHO: NARAL Pro-Choice Oregon, Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon, ACLU of Oregon, Forward Together, Western States Center, Democratic Party of Oregon, Northwest Abortion Access Fund, Family Forward Action, NWGSD PDX, Emerge Oregon, AAUW Oregon
WHERE: Steps of the Wayne Lyman Morse U.S. Federal Courthouse, 405 E Eighth Ave.
WHEN: Noon-1pm Tuesday, May 21st

Sign up to receive more information on the National Day of Action by visiting www.StopAbortionBans.org.

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Campfire safety tips for your summer camping trip (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/20/19 3:30 PM
S'more at The Cove Palisades State Park
S'more at The Cove Palisades State Park
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1303/124694/thumb_SMORE.jpg

Memorial Day is nearly here and for many Oregonians the holiday weekend is the start of their camping season in Oregon’s natural places. However, dry conditions are already present in many areas and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) reminds visitors to enjoy their campfires responsibly.

“Regularly reviewing campfire safety practices, even if you’re a seasoned camper, is a good habit to get in to,” said Chris Havel, OPRD associate director. “It’s especially important if you’re camping with children or folks that are learning about responsible outdoor recreation.”

Follow these tips for a safe and enjoyable campfire:

  • Know before you go: research conditions for the area surrounding your campground. Fire restrictions may be in place at the park, county or state level.
  • Maintain campfire flames at knee height, or roughly two feet high. This helps prevent ash or embers from becoming airborne, especially during the dry summer months. If you see wind stirring up embers from your fire, play it safe and extinguish it.
  • Only build campfires in the existing fire ring in your campsite. Fire ring locations are carefully picked and park rangers clear vegetation around rings to create a safe buffer zone.
  • Always keep plenty of water nearby to extinguish your campfire. To put out your fire, drown the flames with water and stir the embers to make sure everything is wet. The stirring step is important: ash and wood debris often maintain heat and embers unless they are drowned out.
  • Beach campfires should be started on open sand, away from driftwood or vegetation. Use water to extinguish your beach fire, not sand. Covering the fire with sand will insulate the coals, keeping them hot enough to burn unsuspecting beachgoers hours or even days later.
  • For propane fire rings, follow the same safety precautions you would with a log-based campfire. Propane fire rings should be placed in, on or directly next to installed park fire rings.
  • Make sure everyone in your campsite, even children, is familiar with campfire safety. Always keep an eye on your campfire; many accidental fires are started because campers left their fire unattended for “just a minute.”

To reserve your stay at an Oregon state park, head to oregonstateparks.org.

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May is Wildfire Awareness Month. During May, the Oregon Department of Forestry, the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal, the Office of Emergency Management, Keep Oregon Green, the U.S. Forest Service, OPRD and other federal, state and local emergency and response agencies are promoting programs and messages encouraging the public to work together in their local communities to prevent the risk of wildfire.




Attached Media Files: S'more at The Cove Palisades State Park , Family and campfire at L.L. Stub Stewart State Park

Committee to review historic building grant applications
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/20/19 2:45 PM

Two separate committees will meet to score and rank applications for the Preserving Oregon and Diamonds in the Rough Grant programs. The recommendations from the committees will be forwarded to the State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation for final review and approval on June 21 in Cottage Grove. Both meetings will be at the North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer Street, NE, and can also be accessed by phone.

The Diamonds in the Rough Grant committee will meet June 5, 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. in room 124A. Call in information is 1-877-402-9757, access code 4605348.

The Preserving Oregon Grant committee will meet June 10, 9:00 a.m. -12:30 p.m. in room 124A. Call in information is 1-877-402-9757, access code 4605348.

For information about the grants contact Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail: i.Gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov . The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986?0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.


Oregon State Penitentiary reports two in-custody deaths (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 05/20/19 2:41 PM
Nickolas Kasemehas
Nickolas Kasemehas
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1070/124691/thumb_Kasemehas_N.jpg

Two Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adults in custody died recently. Both were incarcerated at the Oregon State Penitentiary (OSP) in Salem and passed away in the infirmary while on hospice care. As with all in-custody deaths, Oregon State Police have been notified.

Ovid John Teixeira died May 18, 2019. He entered DOC custody on January 9, 2018, from Linn County with an earliest release date of October 13, 2020. Teixeira was 55 years old.

Nickolas John Kasemehas died May 20, 2019. He entered DOC custody on November 13, 2014, from Multnomah County with an earliest release date of May 20, 2022. Kasemehas was 78 years old.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,700 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

OSP is a multi-custody prison located in Salem that houses over 2,000 adults in custody. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including death row, disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon’s only prison.

 

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Attached Media Files: Nickolas Kasemehas , Ovid Teixeira

Citizen Alert Test Scheduled for Wednesday (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/20/19 2:39 PM
Citizen Alert image
Citizen Alert image
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/6186/124690/thumb_Citizen_Alert.png

The following release is sent on behalf of Jackson County Emergency Management:

Rogue Valley Citizen Alert Test Scheduled For Wednesday, May 22

If you get a phone call, text message or email from Citizen Alert on May 22, don’t be concerned – it’s an annual test of our Emergency Notification System. The test is scheduled to begin at 10 a.m.

Jackson and Josephine County Emergency Management conduct annual tests of the Citizen Alert Emergency Notification System. Citizen Alert is used to notify residents of important public safety information, such as wildfire evacuations, hazardous materials incidents, or even a fugitive or missing person in your area. Testing the system allows emergency management staff and citizens to practice using the system, as if a real emergency has occurred.

All landline telephones in both Jackson and Josephine Counties will be alerted during this test. Other forms of communication (such as cell phones and email) will be sent to those who have signed up in Citizen Alert.  Landline phone numbers (both published and non-published) are automatically provided to the emergency notification system by the phone company; however, many people don’t have a landline phone anymore. Cellular companies do not provide telephone numbers to the system. If you do not have a landline telephone at your home or business, we do not have your information and therefore, we cannot alert you about potentially dangerous situations.

Signing up for Citizen Alert enables you to receive timely notifications wherever you are.  Jackson and Josephine County Emergency Management will not share your information with anyone. Your information is only used to send you emergency information, and (if you choose) important community alerts.

To sign up for Citizen Alert, visit Rogue Valley Emergency Management at www.RVEM.org.

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Attached Media Files: Citizen Alert image

Deputies Begin "Click It or Ticket" Patrols (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/20/19 2:28 PM
Click It or Ticket image
Click It or Ticket image
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/6186/124688/thumb_click_it_or_ticket.png

JACKSON COUNTY, Ore. – Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) deputies are kicking off two weeks of focused enforcement aimed at saving lives on the road.  JCSO joins law enforcement agencies across the nation for the “Click It or Ticket” enforcement campaign. 

Deputies will be adding patrols from May 20 to June 2, 2019, to ensure that drivers and passengers are wearing their seat belts.  Grant funding allows JCSO to add the enforcement patrols without reducing the number of deputies available for regular calls for service.

“Oregon has a relatively high usage rate for seat belts,” said Sgt. Julie Denney. “But we still see deaths and injuries that could have been prevented if people had buckled up.”

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), there were more than 10,000 unbuckled vehicle occupants killed in crashes in the United States in 2017.  Fifty-one percent of men killed in crashes were not buckled up, compared to 39 percent of women.  Many crash fatalities involving unrestrained passengers also involve impairment or distractions.

The bottom line, according to NHTSA:  wear your seat belt every time—no matter how uncomfortable it feels or how far you're going.  It could save your life.

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Attached Media Files: Click It or Ticket image

Eugene man's first Oregon's Game Megabucks win is $3.2 million (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 05/20/19 1:26 PM
2019-05/4939/124684/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
2019-05/4939/124684/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/4939/124684/thumb_OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg

May 20, 2019 - Salem, Ore. – Mark Bennett of Eugene hadn’t even won so much as free ticket while playing Oregon’s Game Megabucks – until last week when his monthly ticket purchase was worth $3.2 million.
“I like the game, but I had never won anything,” Bennett said. “I always get the 26 draws, then put the ticket away until it is up and get another one.” Players can purchase Oregon’s Game Megabucks tickets for up to 26 draw dates.
Bennett said he purchased a ticket in April from the Jasper’s on Coburg Road in Eugene, and put it away, until recently when he couldn’t sleep. Officials from Jasper’s said it was their first big win at that location.
"To hear one of our guests won the Megabucks jackpot was incredible news!” said Tezra Kong, Director of Operations for Jasper’s. “This will be something our team will be talking about for years to come.  We are very excited for our lucky guest, and his good fortune.  We look forward to sharing some of the seller's bonus with the team that provided the exceptional guest service at Sheldon Jasper's."
For selling the winning ticket Jasper’s will receive a 1-percent selling bonus, $32,000.
Bennett took the opportunity to bring the ticket to the Oregon Lottery for validation before he claimed his prize. A little-used option allows players to bring in a winning jackpot ticket to Lottery headquarters to have the ticket validated. The Oregon Lottery will then hold the winning ticket up to 60 days while the winner determines to the best option for them to claim the jackpot.
A few days later Bennett came back to the Lottery office after talking with his accountant. He took the bulk sum payment of $1.6 million. After taxes he took home $1.08 million.
“I am going to use the money to set up education funds for my grandchildren,” Bennett said.
During the 2015-17 biennium, more than $50 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education and watershed enhancement in Lane County, where Bennett lives and purchased the ticket. Since 1985, Oregon Lottery players have won more than $38 billion in prizes.
The Oregon Lottery reminds players to always sign the back of their Lottery tickets, regardless of the game. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 are advised to contact the Lottery office and schedule an appointment to claim their prize.
Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned nearly $12 billion for economic development, public education, state parks, Veterans services and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org
 




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/4939/124684/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg , 2019-05/4939/124684/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg

Updated: Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce to meet May 23 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 05/20/19 12:59 PM

Updated with call-in information

May 20, 2019

Media contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us">saerom.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce to meet May 23 in Portland

What: Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce

Agenda: Welcome, taskforce purpose and outcomes, agenda review, introductions, background on formation of the Taskforce, principles for guidelines, key components for inclusion in the guidelines, next steps and summary

When: Thursday May 23, 2019 from 1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building (PSOB), 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland Oregon Conference Line: 1-888-278-0296 Public Meeting ID: 843163.

.For more information, please visit the Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Task Force website.

Program contact: Lisa Bui, 971-673-3397, ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Lisa Bui, 971-673-3397, 711 TTY, or ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Keep your family safe from the West Nile Virus this summer
Oregon Health Authority - 05/20/19 12:11 PM

Update for news stations: Raw sound on tape and B-roll https://youtu.be/YRWZfA3iEF4

Spanish / Español

May 20, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7174, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Keep your family safe from the West Nile Virus this summer

As the weather continues to warm up, health officials say it’s important for people to protect themselves from disease-carrying mosquitoes. One of the illnesses to avoid is the potentially deadly West Nile virus.

About one in five infected people may show signs of West Nile virus. People at risk of serious illness include individuals 50 and older, and people with immune-compromising conditions, such as diabetes and high blood pressure.

West Nile symptoms may include fever above 100 degrees and severe headache, stiff neck, mental confusion, muscle weakness, shaking, paralysis or rash. People should contact their health care provider if experiencing any of these symptoms.

Health officials are advising people to take precautions against mosquitoes to avoid the risk of infection, including preventing mosquito bites. West Nile is spread to humans through the bite of an infected mosquito.

"It’s very easy for people to prevent bites from mosquitoes that may carry West Nile virus," said Dr. Emilio DeBess, public health veterinarian at the Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division. "Although the risk of contracting West Nile virus is low, people can take simple precautions to keep these insects at bay if they’re headed outdoors."

To prevent the spread of West Nile virus:

  • Eliminate sources of standing water that are a breeding ground for mosquitoes. This includes watering troughs, bird baths, clogged gutters and old tires.
  • When engaged in outdoor activities at dusk and dawn when mosquitoes are most active, protect yourself by using mosquito repellants containing DEET, oil of lemon eucalyptus or Picardin, and follow the directions on the container.
  • Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants in mosquito-infested areas.
  • Make sure screen doors and windows are in good repair and fit tightly.

In 2018, there were two human cases of West Nile virus in two Oregon counties: Harney and Clackamas. The virus was found in one bird, 58 mosquito pools — samples of about 50 mosquitoes each — and two horses. In 2017, seven humans, 92 mosquito pools, five horses and one bird tested positive for West Nile. The virus also can be found in chickens, squirrels and dogs.

Climate change, particularly effects such as increased temperature and changes in rainfall, have led to longer mosquito seasons and are contributing to the spread of West Nile virus, health officials say. They agree these and other climate change indicators must be considered to help people better prepare for future transmission of the disease.

Additional information about West Nile virus is available on the Oregon Health Authority website, and from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

# # #

https://bit.ly/2wbuwxv

West Nile virus overview from Dr. Emilio DeBess, OHA Public Health Veterinarian


Fatal Crash Highway 126W near Veneta -- Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/20/19 11:58 AM
2019-05/1002/124677/SP19-174466_Fatal_(21).JPG
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1002/124677/thumb_SP19-174466_Fatal_(21).JPG

Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Saturday afternoon’s multi-vehicle fatal crash on 126W near Veneta. 

On May 18, 2019 at about 3:30 PM, OSP and first responders were dispatched to a multi-vehicle crash on Highway 126W near milepost 50.

Preliminary investigation revealed that several eastbound vehicles were stopped on 126W near the intersection of Lake Side Drive waiting for a vehicle to make a turn.  A Chevrolet pickup operated by Thomas HILL, age 39, from Eugene, was eastbound and failed to observe traffic coming to a stop.  The Chevrolet pickup rear ended a Dodge pickup, operated by Christopher STUART, age 29 from Florence.  The impact caused the Dodge pickup to go into the westbound lane where it crashed into a  Ford Focus operated by Jennifer STEPHENSON, age 37, from Noti. 

STEPHENSON suffered fatal injuries from the impact.  STEPHENSON’s passenger, Matthew MARCUERQIAGA, age 39, from Noti, sustained serious injuries and was transported to Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend.  STUART sustained critical injuries and was also transported to Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. 

Highway 126W was closed for about two hours during the investigation.

OSP was assisted by Lane County Sheriff’s Office, ODOT and Veneta Fire. 

Photograph provided by OSP. 

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/1002/124677/SP19-174466_Fatal_(21).JPG

Click It or Ticket Campaign
Roseburg Police Dept. - 05/20/19 11:04 AM

Thanks to a generous grant through Oregon Impact and the Oregon Department of Transportation, the Roseburg Police department will be having Officers work shifts that specifically focus on specific traffic offenses.  From May 20th through June 2nd, 2019 they will be focusing on seat belt and child restraint usage, texting while driving, and speeding.

Enforce Lifesaving Laws

  • Click It or Ticket isn’t about citations; it’s about saving lives. In 2017, there were 10,076 unbuckled passenger vehicle occupants killed in crashes in the United States. To help prevent crash fatalities, we need to step up enforcement and crack down on those who don’t wear their seat belts.
  • Seat belt use is required by law for a reason: In 2017, seat belts saved an estimated 14,955 lives of occupants 5 and older. From 2013 to 2017, seat belts saved nearly 69,000 lives.
  • If all passenger vehicle occupants 5 and older involved in fatal crashes had worn their seat belts, an additional 2,549 lives could have been saved in 2017 alone.

For more information on the Click It or Ticket mobilization, please visit www.nhtsa.gov/ciot.    


DPSST Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 05/20/19 11:02 AM

For Immediate Release                                        

May 16, 2019

Contact:    Staci Yutzie
                 503-378-2426

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel for Phase 3 will hold a regular meeting on June 6, 2019 from 10:00a-2:00p.  The meeting will be held in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Agenda Items:

I.   Welcome- Ryan Keck

II.  Basic Police Revision Overview- Ryan Keck and Staci Yutzie

  1. Phase 1 & 2 Product
  2. Phase 3 Goal
  3. Phase 4 Plan

III.  Metrics- Dr. Stephen James

IV.  Advisory Panel Tasks

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Meth seizure and arrest (Photo)
Douglas Interagency Narcotics Team (DINT) - 05/20/19 10:28 AM
2019-05/6255/124670/House.jpeg
2019-05/6255/124670/House.jpeg
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The Douglas Interagency Narcotics Team (DINT) has been investigating the activities of 58 year old Ron House.  House has been alleged to be using and selling controlled substances from his residence in the 600 block of Parrott Street in Roseburg.  

The ongoing investigation led to the seizure of a substantial amount of methamphetamine in recent weeks.  

On Friday, May 17th, DINT detectives, with help from the Roseburg Police Department, conducted a traffic stop on a vehicle in the 1300 block of NE Stephens Street in Roseburg.  Ron House was an occupant of the vehicle and he was detained without incident.  A search of the vehicle revealed approximately a half pound of methamphetamine.

A search of House's residence in the 600 block of Parrott Street revealed approximately another half pound of methamphetamine, a small amount of cocaine, and other drug paraphernalia such as scales used to weigh drugs, and packaging materials.  

House was lodged at the Douglas County Jail on the following charges:

  • 2 counts of Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine.
  • 2 counts of Unlawful Delivery of Methamphetamine.
  • 1 count of Unlawful Possession of Cocaine.



Attached Media Files: 2019-05/6255/124670/House.jpeg

Fatal Crash Territorial Highway & High Pass Road near Junction City -- Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/20/19 10:11 AM
2019-05/1002/124668/DSC00946.JPG
2019-05/1002/124668/DSC00946.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1002/124668/thumb_DSC00946.JPG

Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Friday morning’s two vehicle fatal crash on Territorial Highway and High Pass Road near Junction City. 

On May 17, 2019 at about 10:20 AM, OSP troopers and first responders were dispatched to a two vehicle fatal crash at the intersection of Territorial Highway and Highway Pass Road. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Chevy Cavalier, operated by Russell Lee NICKERSON, age 81, from Eugene was traveling westbound on High Pass Road when for unknown reasons he failed to stop at the intersection.  NICKERSON’s vehicle was struck by a  Ford Econoline Van, operated by Cary Allen RAMSAY (male), age 55, from Eugene. 

NICKERSON suffered fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.  RAMSAY was transported to Riverbend Hospital with serious injuries. 

Territorial Highway was closed for approximately four hours following the crash. 

OSP was assisted by Lane County Sheriff's Office, ODOT, Junction City Fire and Lane Fire Authority.

Photograph provided by OSP.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ### 
Twitter: @ORStatePolice 
Facebook: @ospsocial




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/1002/124668/DSC00946.JPG

Sun. 05/19/19
Dance Party with Trail Blazers' DJ O.G. One at Sunday Parkways Today! (Photo)
Kaiser Permanente Northwest - 05/19/19 8:30 AM
Kermit rides Southeast Portland Sunday Parkways
Kermit rides Southeast Portland Sunday Parkways
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/5557/124618/thumb_1._kermit.jpg

When: 
Media invited from 11 a.m. to noon on Sunday, May 19

Where:
Laurelhurst Park
Kaiser Permanente "Music Is Medicine" booth at Southeast 37th Avenue and Oak Street

What: 
Kaiser Permanente returns for the 12th year as Presenting Sponsor of Portland Sunday Parkways, kicking off the season in Southeast Portland. Visit Laurelhurst Park from 11 a.m. to noon for highlights including a silent dance party with Trail Blazers’ DJ O.G. One, a flash mob of doctors in white coats on bikes, and “prescriptions” for healthy food, exercise, dance and play at four Kaiser Permanente event booths. Participants visiting all five Kaiser Permanente and Biketown booths will get a prize and a donation to mental health organizations in our community.

Why:
Kaiser Permanente is deeply committed to the total health and wellness of the communities we serve. Being active, eating nutritious food, and playing with friends and neighbors at Sunday Parkways is part of our investment in keeping Portland healthy.

Interviews:

  • Dr. Imelda Dacones, President and CEO for Northwest Permanente (the physician group of Kaiser Permanente)
  • Dan Field, Executive Director of Community Health for Kaiser Permanente’s Northwest region

Visuals: 

  • Opportunities for photos and videos of Portlanders (last year’s attendance 24,000) coming together to bike, walk and run a 7-mile traffic-free route, while enjoying food, live music, fun and games.
  • Doctor Flash Mob ride: Approximately 25 doctors in white lab coats will depart on bikes from the Kaiser Permanente Booth at Laurelhurst Park at 11:30 a.m.
  • Silent Dance Party with Trail Blazers’ DJ O.G. One at Kaiser Permanente's “Music Is Medicine Booth” at Laurelhurst Park.

Background:

  • Kaiser Permanente is the founding and Presenting Sponsor of Portland Sunday Parkways for the 12th year, and is proud to support the City of Portland in contributing to the total health of the city -- where Kaiser Permanente had its beginnings back in World War II.
  • There is a strong link between physical activity and health and mental wellness, so encouraging people to walk, ride and bike Sunday Parkways with friends and family is a great way for everyone to get out, get active and get to know their neighbors, while also allowing us to improve the mental health and resilience of our local communities.
  • Players who complete the Kaiser Permanente Sticker Hunt at Sunday Parkways will earn a collectible neighborhood enamel pin and a donation to mental health organizations in our community.

More Information:

Visit kp.org/sundayparkways for route maps and info.




Attached Media Files: Kermit rides Southeast Portland Sunday Parkways , Southeast Portland Sunday Parkways street scene. , Dancing at Southeast Portland Sunday Parkways , Dance with Trail Blazers' DJ O.G. One in the Kaiser Permanente , Play the Kaiser Permanente Sticker Hunt at SE Portland Sunday Parkways.

Sat. 05/18/19
[PHOTO RELEASE]- 23rd Annual Living History Day at Camp Withycombe (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 05/18/19 4:35 PM
190518-Z-PL933-0129-Visitors to the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019 got to see how military equipment, in this case a boat, is loaded on and off of a truck. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hoste
190518-Z-PL933-0129-Visitors to the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019 got to see how military equipment, in this case a boat, is loaded on and off of a truck. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hoste
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/962/124660/thumb_190518-Z-PL933-0129_rev.jpg

190518-Z-PL933-0008-Visitors, current service members and military Veterans spend time interacting during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. This event is co-sponsored by the Military Vehicle Collectors Club of Oregon and hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, Oregon's official military history repository and an award-winning museum located at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

190518-Z-PL933-0012-Visitors young and old enjoy the interactive displays during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, pays special tribute to those with military service in the U.S. Armed Forces, expanding public knowledge of the military's role in our communities, our nation, and the world. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

190518-Z-PL933-0058-A restored WWI Ford Model-T Ambulance on display from the Vancouver Barracks Military Association is presented to the public at the 23rd annual Living History day at Camp Withycombe in Clackamas, Ore. May 18, 2019. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, pays special tribute to those with military service in the U.S. Armed Forces, expanding public knowledge of the military's role in our communities, our nation, and the world. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

190518-Z-PL933-0070-Visitors young and old enjoy the interactive displays during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, pays special tribute to those with military service in the U.S. Armed Forces, expanding public knowledge of the military's role in our communities, our nation, and the world. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

190518-Z-PL933-0086-Rory Jensen, from Camas, Wash, displays his WWII-era camera again this year during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. His camera from last year has been sold in order to buy this more historically accurate model used by the United States Army throughout WWII. The Oregon Military Museum held the 23rd Annual Living History Day as part of Armed Forces Day celebrations throughout the country. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

190518-Z-PL933-0101-Visitors and military Veterans spend time interacting during Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. The Oregon Military Museum held the 23rd Annual Living History Day as part of Armed Forces Day celebrations throughout the country. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

190518-Z-PL933-0129-Visitors to the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019 got to see how military equipment, in this case a boat, is loaded on and off of a truck. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, pays special tribute to those with military service in the U.S. Armed Forces, expanding public knowledge of the military's role in our communities, our nation, and the world. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

Hi-res photos available on our Flickr account at:

https://www.flickr.com/gp/oregonmildep/1hE1MX

 

 




Attached Media Files: 190518-Z-PL933-0129-Visitors to the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019 got to see how military equipment, in this case a boat, is loaded on and off of a truck. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hoste , 190518-Z-PL933-0101-Visitors and military Veterans spend time interacting during Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. The Oregon Military Museum held the 23rd Annual Living History Day as part of Armed Forces Day , 190518-Z-PL933-0086-Rory Jensen, from Camas, Wash, displays his WWII-era camera again this year during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. His camera from last year has been sold in order to buy , 190518-Z-PL933-0070-Visitors young and old enjoy the interactive displays during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, pays s , 190518-Z-PL933-0058-A restored WWI Ford Model-T Ambulance on display from the Vancouver Barracks Military Association is presented to the public at the 23rd annual Living History day at Camp Withycombe in Clackamas, Ore. May 18, 2019. The Armed Forces Day , 190518-Z-PL933-0012-Visitors young and old enjoy the interactive displays during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, pays s , 190518-Z-PL933-0008-Visitors, current service members and military Veterans spend time interacting during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. This event is co-sponsored by the Military Vehicle Co

Arson Investigation leads to the Arrest of a South Beach man, Lincoln County, Oregon. (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/18/19 9:08 AM
2019-05/5490/124658/Jasper.png
2019-05/5490/124658/Jasper.png
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On May 4, 2019, Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office Deputies were dispatched to an address in South Beach to investigate a suspicious fire at a residence. When Deputies arrived, they observed what appeared to be an incendiary device placed against the residence. Deputies requested resources from the Lincoln County Fire Investigation Team. Investigators developed a suspect based on evidence identified at the crime scene. Detectives from the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office obtained a search warrant for the suspect’s residence; items found during the execution of the search warrant were consistent with the device used at the point of origin in the original complaint.

Derrick Jasper of South Beach was arrested on the following charges:

Attempted Aggravated Murder, two counts Attempted Murder, Arson in the first degree, Arson in the second degree, Unlawful Manufacture of a Destructive Device, and Possession of Destructive Device.

Jasper was lodged at the Lincoln County Jail on $500,000 bail.

See Attached photo

The Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office would like to thank the following agencies for assistance provided in the investigation:

Newport Fire / Lincoln County Fire Investigation Team

City of Newport Police Department

City of Lincoln City Police Department

Oregon State Police

Lincoln County District Attorney’s Office

###

Respectfully submitted by:

Rick Ballentine, Patrol Sergeant

Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office

225 W. Olive Street

Newport, Oregon 97365




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/5490/124658/Jasper.png

French Prairie Area to Receive Focused Traffic Patrols (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/18/19 8:00 AM
2019-05/1294/124654/TST_Lidar.jpg
2019-05/1294/124654/TST_Lidar.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1294/124654/thumb_TST_Lidar.jpg

The Marion County Sheriff’s Office Traffic Safety Team will be focusing their efforts in the French Prairie area of Marion County on May 20th and 21st during the morning and evening commutes.  The French Prairie area of Marion County sees a heavy amount of commuter traffic along multiple roadways such as Highway 219, River Road, French Prairie Road, McKay Road, Yergen Road, and Ehlen Road.  These roadways have also been the site of multiple serious injury and fatal motor vehicle crashes.

Dangerous driving behavior including speeding, cell phone use, and following too close have been identified as contributing factors to serious injury and fatal crashes throughout Marion County.  During this operation our goal will be to educate drivers about these dangerous driving habits and to enforce violations which are known to result in crashes.

This is part of an ongoing collaboration with our community partners to reduce motor vehicles crashes throughout Marion County.  This operation is being funded by grants provided by the Oregon Department of Transportation.




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/1294/124654/TST_Lidar.jpg

Fri. 05/17/19
Find farm stands & u-picks with Oregon's Bounty (Photo)
Oregon Farm Bureau - 05/17/19 2:59 PM
2019-05/5507/124649/oregonsbounty.png
2019-05/5507/124649/oregonsbounty.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/5507/124649/thumb_oregonsbounty.png


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 17, 2019

Find farm stands & u-picks with Oregon’s Bounty

Use a smartphone to easily find farm stands, u-pick fields, on-farm events with Oregon’s Bounty at www.OregonFB.org

Strawberries, asparagus, rhubarb, mushrooms, salad greens — along with bedding plants, flowering baskets, and fresh-cut flowers — are just a few favorites of Oregon’s agricultural bounty in spring.

But outside of the local farmers market, where can you buy these things directly from a farm or ranch?

“Everyone knows where their local farmers market is. But what about roadside farm stands, u-pick fields, and on-farm events out in rural areas? That’s where Oregon’s Bounty comes in,” said Anne Marie Moss, Oregon Farm Bureau communications director.

Oregon’s Bounty at www.OregonFB.org is a searchable directory of nearly 300 family farms and ranches that sell food and foliage directly to the public.

Oregon’s Bounty allows visitors to do keyword searches for specific agriculture products — such as blueberries, cucumbers, honey, or eggs — and/or search for farms within a specific region of the state. Visitors can also do a keyword search for “u-pick” or “events” to find farms that offer those activities.

“Oregonians love farm-fresh food. Thanks to the diversity of agriculture in this great state, we can buy an enormous variety of seasonal fruits, vegetables, flowers, foliage, meat, and nuts directly from the families who grew it,” said Moss.

“Each of the farms listed in Oregon’s Bounty are owned and operated by Farm Bureau members who are proud to share what they’ve raised with the public,” said Moss. “Spring is a great time to take a trip into the beautiful countryside and experience Oregon agriculture firsthand.”

###

Note to Editors: “Farm Bureau” is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit, general farm organization representing the interests of farming and ranching families in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon at the county level in 1919 and the state level in 1932, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties.

Oregon Farm Bureau President Sharon Waterman is an OFB Hall of Fame honoree and operates a Century Ranch raising sheep, cattle, and timber in Bandon. She is OFB’s 16th president.




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/5507/124649/oregonsbounty.png

Cleanup finished on small shipwreck ashore on southern Oregon coast (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/17/19 1:45 PM
Debris from the Ann Kathleen shipwreck being loaded on a flatbed for disposal
Debris from the Ann Kathleen shipwreck being loaded on a flatbed for disposal
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1303/124645/thumb_ann-kathleen-32-loading-debris-after-airlift.jpg

News Release // Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. // FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE // May 17, 2019

Media Contact: Chris Havel, Director’s Office, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department // Cell: 503-931-2590

Cleanup finished on small shipwreck ashore on southern Oregon coast

Bandon, Ore. Friday, May 17, 2019 – Crews finished cleanup of major debris left by the wreck of the Ann Kathleen, a 64-foot fishing vessel. The boat came ashore Thursday, May 2 on a beach south of Bandon, Oregon after catching fire. No one was injured. The vast majority of the wreckage was removed by helicopter over the last week. A portion of the heavy keel was left to sink into the sand.

The cleanup was organized by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department and funded by the boat’s insurer. It involved excavators, helicopters, a salvage crew from Global Dive and Salvage, Inc. out of Seattle, with monitoring and support from the Coquille Indian Tribe, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and U.S. Bureau of Land Management. The wreck site is several miles from a developed beach access and home to sensitive resources like the western snowy plover, a threatened shorebird in the middle of its nesting season.

The initial cleanup response, led by a unified command that included the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and the U.S. Coast Guard, began May 3 and recovered more than 1,000 gallons of diesel fuel. Some residual fuel was recovered during final demolition. No hazardous fluids from the shipwreck were detected on the beach or in the ocean.

Bait fish were removed from the wreck and temporarily buried in containers at the site for later removal from the beach; burying and removing the bait is necessary to avoid attracting predators to the nesting area. After excavating sand from around the boat, a helicopter carried a dozen loads of heavy debris to the Cape Blanco Airport eight miles south. Smaller, lighter debris was removed using ATVs. The keel was deemed too heavy to fly out. The crews excavated around it and allowed it to sink naturally into the sand, where it now rests several feet beneath the surface. The keel does not contain hazardous material. Staff monitoring the cleanup reported plovers were not disturbed by the work.

More information on sharing the beach with plovers is online at http://bit.ly/wsplover.

# # #

Photos are available online at https://drive.google.com/open?id=17nMl8PqSYOvoQ3-6eRuIFRtJabN7igss




Attached Media Files: Debris from the Ann Kathleen shipwreck being loaded on a flatbed for disposal , Excavator demolishing the Ann Kathleen shipwreck

Construction Contractors Board Takes Steps to Stop Data and Security Breach, Inform Contractors
Oregon Construction Contractors Board - 05/17/19 10:47 AM

The Oregon Construction Contractors Board (CCB) has discovered a security breach involving 8,013 online contractor accounts. Unauthorized individuals gained access to some contractors’ usernames and related password information. The incident occurred between October 27, 2018 and October 29, 2018, and was discovered on April 12, 2019, during a routine audit conducted by the Enterprise Security Office of the agency’s information technology databases.

Unfortunately, personally identifying information in 466 of these accounts was accessible, and the CCB determined this constitutes a data breach for that subset of accounts.

Upon detection of the issue, the CCB took immediate steps to determine the scope of the problem and then to remediate the problem. This work included closing the pathways used by the unauthorized individuals to gain access to the contractor accounts. The CCB is also enhancing its password protection security and is requesting that each affected account holder reset his or her password.

The compromised information included the email, name, address, and password hash (the code that protects the password) of the affected individuals. Of those compromised accounts, 466 also included an ID number such as state ID or driver license. At this time, there is no evidence that the information has been misused.

In addition to asking that all affected account holders reset their passwords, the CCB is sending letters to all affected account holders. These letters advise account holders that CCB is offering identity theft protection and fully managed ID theft recovery services to each of them for one year. Information on how to access these free services is included in the letters being mailed.

The Construction Contractors Board is committed to protecting the privacy and security of its licensees, and its systems are frequently reviewed and audited. 

###

About the CCB

The Construction Contractors Board regulates more than 40,000 licensed contractors. The agency also promotes contractor education and protects consumers by preventing and resolving construction contracting problems. Learn more about the CCB at www.oregon.gov/ccb.


Stranger Offers Student a Ride, Deputies Looking For Witnesses
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/17/19 10:08 AM

This morning, the Marion County Sheriff’s Office was notified about a male approaching a student after school yesterday near Mary Eyre Elementary School in the Four Corners area of Salem.  The stranger is reported to have offered the child a ride and continued to follow them after they said no.  The stranger drove away after the child went inside their home.

The child was not able to provide a description of the suspect other than knowing it was a male.  The involved vehicle is described as a black or dark colored, 2 door car with a red sticker on the hood.  The license plate may contain the letters “T” and “Z”.

The Sheriff’s Office encourages parents to ensure they talk to their children about the dangers of talking to strangers.  There will be additional deputies in the area around Mary Eyre Elementary School this afternoon as students are released.  

Deputies are asking anyone who may have witnessed this encounter or with additional information to contact the Marion County Sheriff’s Office at (503) 588-5032.


Celebrate State Parks Day June 1 with free camping, parking and special events (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/17/19 9:30 AM
Wallowa Lake State Park
Wallowa Lake State Park
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1303/124628/thumb_Lake_view_spring.jpg

Saturday June 1 is State Parks Day and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) invites Oregonians outdoors for a day of free camping, free parking and special events at Oregon’s state parks.

Several state parks are holding free events that day, and camping is free at all tent, RV and individual horse campsites. Day-use parking will be free June 1 and 2 at the 25 parks that charge a day-use fee.

“State Parks Day is our way each year of thanking Oregonians for their commitment to our state parks,” said Lisa Sumption, OPRD director. “We invite people to discover a new park or revisit an old favorite.”

State Parks Day is organized by OPRD and has been held annually since 1997.

Oregon Lottery returns as an event sponsor this year and they’re providing support for events at six state parks: Champoeg State Heritage Area, Fort Stevens State Park, Tumalo State Park, The Cove Palisades State Park, Wallowa Lake State Park and Silver Falls State Park.

Oregon Lottery is also sponsoring a new addition to State Parks Day: commemorative State Parks Day pins. The limited-edition pins will be available for free at more than two dozen state parks on June 1. See the full list of parks distributing the pins at the end of this release. Note: parks have a limited supply of pins and they will be given away first come, first served.

In total, 11 state parks will host free events June 1:

Willamette Valley

  • Champoeg State Heritage Area
  • Fort Yamhill State Heritage Area
  • Silver Falls State Park

Coast

  • Fort Stevens State Park
  • Cape Meares State Scenic Viewpoint

Cascade Range and Central Oregon

  • The Cove Palisades State Park
  • Prineville Reservoir State Park
  • Tumalo State Park

Portland Metro Area

  • Tryon Creek State Natural Area

Southern and Eastern Oregon

  • Collier Memorial State Park
  • Wallowa Lake State Park

Events include disc golf, living history, outdoor concerts, ranger-led programs and more. Full details about events at each park are on the official State Parks Day webpage

To guarantee a campsite for State Parks Day, reserve online at oregonstateparks.org or call (800) 452-5687 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday – Friday. While campsite rental is free, an $8 non-refundable transaction fee is required at the time of the reservation. Reservations must be made at least 24 hours in advance of your stay. Approximately half of state park campgrounds accept reservations.

List of state parks giving away State Parks Day pins on June 1

Coast

  • Bullards Beach State Park
  • Cape Arago State Park
  • Cape Lookout State Park
  • Cape Meares State Scenic Viewpoint
  • Crissey Field State Recreation Site
  • Fort Stevens State Park
  • Humbug Mountain State Park
  • Shore Acres State Park
  • Sunset Bay State Park
  • William M. Tugman State Park

Columbia River Gorge

  • Ainsworth State Park
  • Guy W. Talbot State Park

Willamette Valley

  • Champoeg State Heritage Area
  • Dexter State Recreation Area
  • Elijah Bristow State Park
  • Fort Yamhill State Heritage Area
  • Silver Falls State Park
  • Thompson's Mills State Heritage Area

Cascade Range and Central Oregon

  • LaPine State Park
  • Prineville Reservoir State Park
  • The Cove Palisades State Park
  • Tumalo State Park

Southern and Eastern Oregon

  • Clyde Holliday State Park
  • Cottonwood Canyon State Park
  • Emigrant Springs State Heritage Area
  • Farewell Bend State Recreation Area
  • Hat Rock State Park
  • Lake Owyhee State Park
  • Minam State Recreation Area
  • Sumpter Valley Dredge State Heritage Site
  • Wallowa Lake State Park



Attached Media Files: Wallowa Lake State Park , Tryon Creek State Natural Area , Silver Falls State Park , Milo McIver State Park , The Cove Palisades State Park , Peter Iredale wreck at Fort Stevens State Park , State Parks Day pin

Armed Forces Day Event Honors Veterans, History (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 05/17/19 8:30 AM
2019-05/962/124610/180519-Z-CH590-001.jpg
2019-05/962/124610/180519-Z-CH590-001.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/962/124610/thumb_180519-Z-CH590-001.jpg

Armed Forces Day Event Honors Veterans, History  

23rd Annual Living History Day Honors All Service Men and Women

CLACKAMAS, Oregon – The 23rd Annual Living History Day is scheduled for Saturday, May 18th, at Camp Withycombe in Clackamas, Ore., from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm.

The event celebrates Armed Forces Day, a nationally recognized holiday held on the third Saturday each May.  Visitors of all ages can explore military displays, vehicles, and historic buildings.  This free event is co-sponsored by the Oregon Military Museum and the Military Vehicle Collectors Club of Oregon (MVCCO).

The Armed Forces Day celebration pays special tribute to those with military service in the U.S. Armed Forces, expanding public knowledge of the military’s role in our communities, our nation, and the world.  

“This annual event helps us fulfill our mission to inspire and educate visitors about Oregon's military heritage and legacy, to include the National Guard, the early militia, and all branches of the Armed Forces,” explains Tracy Thoennes, curator of the museum. “We showcase military equipment and capabilities throughout the past two hundred years.  Visitors have the opportunity to see, touch, and experience first-hand our military past and learn more about today’s military.” 

Displays include multi-era historical artifacts as well as current operational military equipment.  A few examples include:  U.S. field artillery from 1841 through today, exhibits in two circa 1911 rescued and relocated historic buildings, and many military vehicles from ambulances, trucks, and tanks to amphibious, tactical, and utility vehicles.  Food and beverage for purchase or by donation will be available.

Drivers will be required to show a valid driver’s license to enter Camp Withycombe.  The address is 15300 SE Minuteman Way, just off Interstate 205 and Highway 212, near SE 102nd Avenue.  

For more information about Living History Day, please call the Oregon Military Museum at (503) 683-5359. 

The Military Vehicle Collectors Club of Oregon is dedicated to the preservation and enjoyment of military vehicles and related equipment.  Monthly meetings are held at Camp Withycombe, and members participate in parades and community events throughout each year. 

The Oregon Military Museum is Oregon’s official military history repository and an award-winning museum located at Camp Withycombe.  The museum is currently undergoing major renovations.  

 

Photo Caption:

Rory Jensen from Camas, Washington, dressed in his vintage WWII-era uniform, holds a WWII-era Speed Graphic camera during Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 19, 2018. The Oregon Military Museum will once again host the 23rd Annual Living History Day as part of Armed Forces Day celebrations throughout the country on May 18, 2019. (National Guard photo by John Hughel, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)
 




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/962/124610/180519-Z-CH590-001.jpg

Lincoln City Police Will Conduct Enhanced DUII Enforcement Patrols Over Memorial Day Weekend
Lincoln City Police - 05/17/19 4:06 AM

The Lincoln City Police Department will be joining with other law enforcement agencies across the nation to conduct enhanced DUII enforcement patrols over the Memorial Day weekend time period.

The Lincoln City Police Department plans on putting extra patrol officers on duty during the holiday weekend time period when higher numbers of impaired drivers are likely to be on the roadways. These enhanced enforcement operations will occur in conjunction with the national “High Visibility Enforcement” event, which runs May 24, 2019 through May 27, 2019. The national High Visibility Enforcement events are designed to increase the number of law enforcement officers on the roadways with an emphasis on locating drivers who are impaired by alcohol or drugs. This increased patrol effort is also designed to help deter those impaired persons from driving in the first place.

The Lincoln City Police Department last utilized the DUII Enforcement Grant funds to conduct an enforcement operation in February during the “Newport Seafood and Wine Festival” time period; however no DUII arrests were made during that operation.

The members of the Lincoln City Police Department are committed to the safety of our citizens and visitors. These grant funds are a valuable resource that will assist us in improving the traffic safety in our community. These Grant funds were made possible through the Oregon Department of Transportation and Oregon Impact.

Submitted By:

Sergeant Jeffrey G. Winn


Man Arrested For Burglary After Being Found Inside a Closed Business
Lincoln City Police - 05/17/19 12:46 AM

On Thursday, May 16th, 2019 at about 2:56 AM, Lincoln City Police responded to the Beach Club Restaurant on a report of a burglary in progress at the location. Lincoln City Dispatch received information from the business owners that they were seeing a male subject inside the closed business on their surveillance system.

Lincoln City Police officers as well as an Oregon State Police Trooper and a Lincoln County Sheriff’s Deputy quickly arrived at the business and surrounded the perimeter. A short time later the owners of the business arrived at the location and provided the keys to get in. A team of officers made entry and began searching the interior where they found the male subject and took him into custody without further incident. The male was identified as 31 year-old Jason Daniel McIntyre of Toledo Oregon.

The subsequent investigation determined that McIntyre had been drinking inside the business earlier that morning when it was open and prior to the business closing he hid in one of the unused areas of the building. After the business closed and all the employees left, McIntyre came out from the room he had been hiding in and went to the bar where he began drinking alcohol. The business owners saw him on their surveillance system and alerted the police.

McIntyre was transported to the Lincoln County Jail and lodged on charges of Burglary II and Theft III.      

Submitted By:

Sergeant Jeffrey Winn


Thu. 05/16/19
HERC removes OHP opioid tapering requirement for neck and back pain
Oregon Health Authority - 05/16/19 4:51 PM

May 16, 2019

Commission votes on two proposals regarding chronic pain coverage

The Health Evidence Review Commission (HERC) today voted unanimously to update Oregon Health Plan (OHP) coverage for neck and back pain, by removing requirements for opioid tapering. The change will be effective October 1.

Meanwhile, the HERC unanimously declined to cover treatments for the five chronic pain conditions that had been under consideration since 2017, citing a lack of evidence of clinical effectiveness for both non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic treatments for those conditions.

The five conditions under consideration were: chronic pain due to trauma, post-procedural chronic pain, chronic pain syndrome, other chronic pain, and fibromyalgia.

In 2017 OHA convened the Chronic Pain Task Force to explore whether OHP should cover these five chronic pain conditions. Currently, they are not intended to be covered by OHP. The proposal that was informed by the task force garnered considerable concern and attention from advocates, providers and experts across the country, prompting deeper dives into the evidence and revisions to the proposal. Most recently, OHA commissioned a third-party review by Washington-based Aggregate Analytics Inc. (AAI) to appraise the evidence under consideration for these chronic pain conditions.

"The HERC is often faced with important decisions with limited clinical evidence available," said Dana Hargunani, M.D., chief medical officer at OHA. "We want to thank the members for their thoughtful deliberations. We are committed to reviewing new forthcoming evidence ahead."

Previously in 2016 the HERC expanded OHP coverage for neck and back pain, newly approving non-pharmacological services such as physical and occupational therapy, chiropractic care, cognitive behavioral therapy, acupuncture and yoga. The benefit package had also required opioid tapering neck and back pain patients from long-term opioid therapy.

Today the HERC voted to remove the tapering requirement if not clinically indicated. The neck and back pain coverage will be further revisited this winter, with a focus on opioid coverage.

"Pain is complicated and different for everyone," said Kevin Olson, M.D., HERC chairman. "We heard loud and clear that pain treatment and opioid tapering should be individualized based on the patient-clinician relationship. I am pleased that we were able to align the neck and back coverage with these principles."

About the HERC

The Health Evidence Review Commission reviews medical evidence to prioritize health spending in the Oregon Health Plan and to promote evidence-based medical practice statewide through comparative effectiveness reports, including coverage guidances and multisector interventions, health technology assessments and evidence-based practice guidelines.

The commission consists of 13 governor-appointed and senate-confirmed volunteer members, including five physician representatives (one of whom must be a doctor of osteopathy and another a hospital representative), a dentist, a public health nurse, a behavioral health representative, a provider of complementary and alternative medicine, a retail pharmacist, an insurance industry representative and two consumer representatives.

# # #

http://bit.ly/2w54BY4

 


FBI Profiles Oregon Fugitive as Part of National Police Week Remembrance Events: Reward of up to $10,000 Still Available
FBI - Oregon - 05/16/19 4:01 PM

The FBI has chosen eight cases - including one from Oregon - to highlight during the national Police Week events honoring those officers killed and injured in the line of duty. The Oregon case focuses on fugitive David Anthony Durham who is wanted in connection with the 2011 attempted murder of a Lincoln City Police officer.

On Thursday, May 16th, the FBI highlighted the Durham case on its website (www.fbi.gov) and will showcase Durham across its national social media platforms including www.Facebook.com/FBI and @FBIMostWanted on Twitter.

Background Information 

At approximately 11:00 p.m. on January 23, 2011, a Lincoln City Police officer pulled over an SUV for a traffic violation. During the traffic stop, the driver of the vehicle, later identified as Durham, shot the officer multiple times and critically wounded him. Durham then fled the area. A police chase ensued, and Durham exchanged gunfire with officers before abandoning his vehicle in Waldport, Oregon. Durham disappeared, and there have been no confirmed sightings since. 

"This was a well-known, outstanding, veteran police officer who was ambushed during a traffic stop,” said Lincoln City Police Chief Jerry Palmer of the injured officer. “He will never be the same.” Palmer stressed that it remains a priority of the department to find Durham.

Local authorities obtained an arrest warrant for Durham in Lincoln County on January 27, 2011, charging him with dozens of counts - including four counts of attempted aggravated murder. The FBI obtained a federal arrest warrant on January 29, 2011, charging Durham with unlawful flight to avoid prosecution (a federal fugitive warrant.) Since that time, the FBI has assisted the Lincoln City in the fugtive hunt - providing resources, following up on potential leads and assisting with publicity efforts. 

Durham is known to possess survival skills. He was wearing full green camouflage at the time of his disappearance, as well as tan or dark boots, and a dark-colored beret. In the past, he has expressed a desire to travel or is believed to have traveled to California, the Caribbean, and Thailand. 

The FBI continues to offer a reward of up to $10,000 for information leading to the location and arrest of Durham. Anyone with information is encouraged to contact the FBI at 1-800-CALL-FBI, by submitting a tip online at https://tips.fbi.gov or calling the nearest FBI office.

###

 




Attached Media Files: Durham Wanted Poster

Memorial Day reminds us of our highest ideals -- and the price we must sometimes pay for them (Photo)
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 05/16/19 3:42 PM
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs Director Kelly Fitzpatrick
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs Director Kelly Fitzpatrick
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1082/124620/thumb_KellyFitzpatrick.jpg

The Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs welcomes our news and media partners to consider sharing with your audiences the following Memorial Day message from Director Kelly Fitzpatrick:

Every year, I’m struck by the powerful — and often, opposing — emotions that Memorial Day stirs.

We celebrate our freedoms, and yet, we mourn the cost that they required. We look ahead to a bright future, while we remember the trials and challenges of the past. We honor those who served, but we grieve their loss.

Celebration, and sadness. Gratitude, and remorse. Hope, and helplessness. Memorial Day is unique in evoking such a broad spectrum of feeling, because it is this holiday that speaks most keenly to our highest ideals, as well as the steep price we are willing to pay for them.

Sadly, it is also a day that, for many, has lost its significance. President George W. Bush would often tell the story of asking schoolchildren what the meaning of Memorial Day is, only to have them respond, “That’s the day the pool opens!”

For many Oregonians, Memorial Day is primarily the unofficial start of the summer recreation season, a chance to enjoy our amazing forests and beaches, rivers and lakes and mountain trails.

We should enjoy all that our state has to offer, but we should also keep in mind the words of another president, John F. Kennedy: “A nation reveals itself not only by the citizens it produces but also by the citizens it honors, the citizens it remembers.”

We must remember the fallen because the courage, the strength, the selflessness and the sacrifice of each one of these brave warriors is the ideal to which we all should aspire.

On this Memorial Day, I think of Bob Maxwell, a great American and Oregonian whom we lost earlier this month. Bob was a World War II combat soldier, and until his death, the only Medal of Honor recipient still living in our state. While he did not die fighting for our country he fearlessly faced death in a way few Americans ever have.

He earned that medal — the U.S. military’s highest decoration for valor — for the courage he showed during a battle in September 1944, when a live German hand grenade was tossed in the midst of his squad. Without a second thought, he hurled himself upon it, shielding his comrades from the blast with nothing but a blanket and his unprotected body.

Maxwell cheated death that day, though he carried shrapnel in his body for the rest of his life.  It was a life he dedicated in humble service to the veteran community, and to the memories of his brothers in arms, who never got the chance to come home.

We must never forget the true cost of war. It is a price paid not in dollars and cents, but with the blood of our heroes. They were nothing less than the best America had to offer, those who answered the call when their nation needed them, who paid the ultimate price to protect us and our way of life.

The stories of their sacrifice are forever woven into the fabric of our nation and its history. They gave their lives on the foreign soils of Europe, the black sands of the South Pacific, the frozen reaches of Korea, in the sweltering jungles of Vietnam, the scorching deserts of Afghanistan and Iraq, and in many other places across the globe.

The United States lost more than 400,000 of its sons and daughters in World War II — 2,826 from Oregon. 54,246 American service members gave their lives in Korea (287 Oregonians); 58,209 in Vietnam (791 from our state).

In Iraq and Afghanistan, we lost 6,713 American service members — 142 Oregonians. Each one of their names is etched on slabs of granite that form the heart of the Afghan/Iraqi Freedom Memorial, located just a few steps from the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs office building. Each one of their names is read aloud each year at our Memorial Day ceremony, as we seek to honor and remember their sacrifice.

Each one represents the loss of a bright and shining light in the lives of their families, a pain that they feel each and every day — not just on Memorial Day. We remember and honor their sacrifice as well. They, too, paid a great price for the freedoms we now enjoy.

On behalf of the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs, I urge all Oregonians to take a moment this Memorial Day, to remember our fallen heroes who gave their lives in service to our nation, and say, “Thank you.”

Kelly Fitzpatrick is a U.S. Army veterans and the director of the Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs.




Attached Media Files: Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs Director Kelly Fitzpatrick

We're bringing Trail Blazers' DJ O.G. One to Sunday Parkways! (Photo)
Kaiser Permanente Northwest - 05/16/19 3:08 PM
Southeast Portland Sunday Parkways street scene.
Southeast Portland Sunday Parkways street scene.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/5557/124519/thumb_10._overview.jpg

When: 
Media invited from 11 a.m. to noon on Sunday, May 19

Where:
Laurelhurst Park
Kaiser Permanente "Music Is Medicine" booth at Southeast 37th Avenue and Oak Street

What: 
Kaiser Permanente returns for the 12th year as Presenting Sponsor of Portland Sunday Parkways, kicking off the season in Southeast Portland. Visit Laurelhurst Park from 11 a.m. to noon for highlights including a silent dance party with Trail Blazers’ DJ O.G. One, a flash mob of doctors in white coats on bikes, and “prescriptions” for healthy food, exercise, dance and play at four Kaiser Permanente event booths. Participants visiting all five Kaiser Permanente and Biketown booths will get a prize and a donation to mental health organizations in our community.

Why:
Kaiser Permanente is deeply committed to the total health and wellness of the communities we serve. Being active, eating nutritious food, and playing with friends and neighbors at Sunday Parkways is part of our investment in keeping Portland healthy.

Interviews:

  • Dr. Imelda Dacones, President and CEO for Northwest Permanente (the physician group of Kaiser Permanente)
  • Dan Field, Executive Director of Community Health for Kaiser Permanente’s Northwest region

Visuals: 

  • Opportunities for photos and videos of Portlanders (last year’s attendance 24,000) coming together to bike, walk and run a 7-mile traffic-free route, while enjoying food, live music, fun and games.
  • Doctor Flash Mob ride: Approximately 25 doctors in white lab coats will depart on bikes from the Kaiser Permanente Booth at Laurelhurst Park at 11:30 a.m.
  • Silent Dance Party with Trail Blazers’ DJ O.G. One at Kaiser Permanente's “Music Is Medicine Booth” at Laurelhurst Park.

Background:

  • Kaiser Permanente is the founding and Presenting Sponsor of Portland Sunday Parkways for the 12th year, and is proud to support the City of Portland in contributing to the total health of the city -- where Kaiser Permanente had its beginnings back in World War II.
  • There is a strong link between physical activity and health and mental wellness, so encouraging people to walk, ride and bike Sunday Parkways with friends and family is a great way for everyone to get out, get active and get to know their neighbors, while also allowing us to improve the mental health and resilience of our local communities.
  • Players who complete the Kaiser Permanente Sticker Hunt at Sunday Parkways will earn a collectible neighborhood enamel pin and a donation to mental health organizations in our community.

More Information:

Visit kp.org/sundayparkways for route maps and info.




Attached Media Files: Southeast Portland Sunday Parkways street scene. , Kermit rides Southeast Portland Sunday Parkways , Dancing at Southeast Portland Sunday Parkways , Play the Kaiser Permanente Sticker Hunt at SE Portland Sunday Parkways. , Dance with Trail Blazers' DJ O.G. One in the Kaiser Permanente

Renee Klein Named Lane's Regional Teacher of the Year
Lane ESD - 05/16/19 2:34 PM

NEWS RELEASE

Renee Klein Named Lane’s Regional Teacher of the Year
 
Candidate for 2020 Oregon Teacher of the Year

May 16, 2019

Marcola School District’s Renee Klein was named Lane’s 2020 Regional Teacher of the Year! Klein wins a $500 cash prize and is in the running for Oregon’s 2020 Teacher of the Year – to be announced in September.

"Ms. Klein continues to be an inspiration to her peers, students, and community members as an excellent educator and an exceptional human being" - Bill Watkins, Marcola School District Superintendent

Regional Teachers of the Year are nominated by students, colleagues, administrators, friends or family members to apply for the award, and selected by a diverse panel of regional representatives. In September 2019 one of the Regional Teachers of the Year will be named the 2020 Oregon Teacher of the Year.

Thanks to the Oregon Department of Education’s partnership with the Oregon Lottery, the 2020 Oregon Teacher of the Year receives a $5,000 cash prize (with a matching $5,000 going to their school!) and serves as a spokesperson and representative for all Oregon teachers.


Nurse Staffing Advisory Board meets May 22
Oregon Health Authority - 05/16/19 2:10 PM

May 16, 2019

Nurse Staffing Advisory Board meets May 22

What: The quarterly public meeting of the Nurse Staffing Advisory Board.

Agenda: Review of minutes from Feb. 27 meeting; status updates on surveys, complaints and waivers; committee updates, overtime documentation discussion; nurse staffing complaint discussion; emerging issues in nurse staffing; and public comment. The agenda is available on the OHA’s nurse staffing website.

When: May 22, 1-5 p.m. There will be a public comment period at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building Room 1E, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland. By conference call at 877-336-1829, access code 2075141.

Background: The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board advises the Oregon Health Authority on the administration of Oregon’s nurse staffing laws; identifies trends, opportunities and concerns related to nurse staffing; makes recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the basis of those trends, opportunities and concerns; and reviews the enforcement powers and processes under Oregon’s nurse staffing laws.

For more information, see the agency nurse staffing website at http://www.healthoregon.org/nursestaffing.

Program contact: Matt Gilman, 971-673-2317, matt.s.gilman@state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Matt Gilman at 971-673-2317, 711 TTY or matt.s.gilman@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2EeQUuh


Officer recovering after traffic stop shooting (Photo)
Salem Police Dept. - 05/16/19 1:30 PM
Salem Police Officer Michelle Pratt
Salem Police Officer Michelle Pratt
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1095/124608/thumb_salem-police-officer-michelle-pratt.jpg

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

DATE:     Thursday, May 16, 2019

Salem, Ore. — On the evening of Tuesday, May 14, 2019 a Salem Police officer was shot during the course of a traffic stop.

Officer Michelle Pratt, a seven-year veteran on the force, sustained non-life-threatening injuries, and is now recovering at home.

Although Pratt has been an officer for seven years, she has been part of the Salem Police family since 2005 starting as a volunteer advocate on the Domestic Violence Response Team. In 2011, Pratt was hired as a community service officer, and became a police officer in 2012.

Since that time Pratt has been a stalwart of the Patrol Division primarily working on swing and graveyard shifts. Pratt has received advanced training in crisis intervention techniques and domestic violence investigations. She is also a member of the Salem Police Honor Guard.

Said Chief Moore, “Michelle’s professionalism and courage were demonstrated by her quick reaction to the suspect’s attack. She was calm and composed on the radio, and was able to self-administer her tourniquet until her cover officers arrived.” Adding, “We know that in policing there is no such thing as a routine traffic stop—and, yet, everyday our officers put on their uniform and protect this community no matter the call.”

# # #

Media outlets: Officer Pratt is not available for comment or interview at this time. If she is willing to speak with media in the future, we will make the appropriate notifications. Thank you for your understanding.




Attached Media Files: Salem Police Officer Michelle Pratt

ADDRESS CORRECTION - State Interoperability Executive Council to meet
State of Oregon - 05/16/19 1:22 PM

The original release included an incorrect address for the meeting location. The address is now updated (DPSST - 4190 Aumsville Highway SE).

--------------------

The State Interoperability Executive Council (SIEC) will meet Tuesday, May 21, 1:30 – 3:30 p.m. The meeting will take place in the Hall of Heroes (Room A) at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training, located at 4190 Aumsville Highway SE in Salem. The meeting is open to the public and comments will be taken from those attending in person and via audioconference.

The SIEC was created under the State Chief Information Officer to be the statewide interoperability governing body and serve as the primary steering group for the Oregon Statewide Interoperability Communications Plan (SCIP). The SIEC’s mission is to develop and maintain the SCIP, develop recommendations and guidelines for policy, identify technology and standards, and coordinate intergovernmental resources to facilitate statewide public safety communications interoperability.

The meeting agenda and handouts are posted on the council’s website. Instructions for those who wish to attend over the phone are outlined in the meeting agenda.


Sheriff's Office Announces New Public Information Officer
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/16/19 1:10 PM

Effective today, Sergeant Jeremy Landers will be taking over as the lead Marion County Sheriff's Office Public Information Officer. Sergeant Landers has worked for the Sheriff's Office for 14 years as a Patrol Deputy, K9 Handler, Detective and Patrol Sergeant. Sergeant Landers is currently assigned to the Community Resource Unit, where his team partners with our community to address livability concerns, attends community events and meetings, gives presentations, supports recruitment efforts and provides code enforcement services. In his role as primary PIO, Sergeant Landers will be supported by four back up PIOs: Lt. Warren McDaniel, Lt. Jeff Stutrud, Sgt. Anna Jefferson and Deputy Ethan Griffith to ensure information is made available to the public as soon as possible in critical situations.

We would like to thank Lt. Chris Baldridge for his years of excellent service as our PIO. Chris has done an outstanding job and will continue his work as an Enforcement Division Lieutenant within our Office.

To reach our PIOs you may email MCSOPIO@co.marion.or.us or call 503 584 MCSO (6276).

To reach our PIOs you may email MCSOPIO@co.marion.or.us or call 503 584 MCSO (6276).


Local artists redefine quilting in new Oregon Historical Society exhibit, On the Edge: An Exhibition by SAQA Oregon Artists (Photo)
Oregon Historical Society - 05/16/19 12:09 PM
Just Add Color by Amanda Snavely Credit Sam Garnett
Just Add Color by Amanda Snavely Credit Sam Garnett
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/2861/124602/thumb_snavely_AMANDA_just-add-color_OVERALL_40.jpg

Portland, OR – Quilting has long been at the core of Oregon history. According to the Oregon Encyclopedia, for women who were preparing to embark on the Oregon Trail, “quilt-making was an important part of the preparation for moving west, as women focused on the need for bedding and to make sure they had something to keep them emotionally connected to their past.”

Fast-forward 150 years, and makers continue to create quilts that document the stories of our time. The evolution of the Art Quilt Movement has pushed the boundaries of what one envisions from a quilt, moving these sources of comfort and tradition off beds and onto gallery walls.

The Oregon Historical Society is proud to host an original exhibit of art quilts developed by local Studio Art Quilt Associates (SAQA) artists titled On the Edge. In Oregon, whether staring down from the top of a mountain or standing on a beach, we are all on the edge — be it physically, geographically, emotionally, philosophically, in personality, or in style. SAQA invited members to interpret, either in a representational or abstract way, a response to this theme, and the selected works are part of this two-gallery juried show, open now through August 15, 2019.

“We wanted a theme that would be unique to Oregon, would have wide resonance with the SAQA artists, and allow them to push the limits of their art-making,” said On the Edge curator Karen Sunday Spencer. “Where else do people pride themselves on being “edgy” while living on the edge of a continent and regularly setting foot on the edge of a mountain peak or body of water? The wide array of interpretations of “on the edge” and the stellar quality of the work are a testament to the skill and creativity of the artists involved.”

Visitors to the exhibit, even those unfamiliar with quilting, will appreciate the original interpretations of the theme as well as the technical skill employed to design these works of art. Many SAQA artists incorporated their experiences as painters, photographers, weavers, printmakers, or sculptors into their quilts. This diversity in backgrounds leads to amazing surface design techniques one would not anticipate on fabric. The broad choice of design styles, rich colors, and sumptuous fabrics used by each member of the group redefines quilters as artists versus crafters.

“From 7 ½ foot tall dripping urban landscapes to metal “stitching” layers together to 3D sculptures, portraits, and abstracts, we push the boundaries on what one envisions from the term Art Quilt,” said On the Edge exhibition coordinator Amanda Snavely.

On May 23 at 6pm, the public is invited to meet some of the featured artists at a free lecture and reception. In her talk, Quilts on the Edge, artist Ann Johnston will show her evolution as a quilt maker, and at the same time, illustrate how her quilts express different ways of being on an edge.

On the Edge: An Exhibition by SAQA Oregon Artists is open now through August 15 at the Oregon Historical Society (1200 SW Park Avenue, Portland). The Oregon Historical Society’s museum is open seven days a week, Monday – Saturday from 10am – 5pm and Sunday from 12pm – 5pm. Admission is $10, and discounts are available for students, seniors, teachers, and youth. Admission is free every day for OHS members and Multnomah County residents.


About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.

About the SAQA Oregon

Studio Art Quilt Associates, Inc. (SAQA) is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to promote the art quilt through education, exhibitions, professional development, documentation, and publications. Founded in 1989 by an initial group of 50 artists, SAQA now has over 3,400 members: artists, teachers, collectors, gallery owners, museum curators and corporate sponsors. SAQA Oregon currently has 135 members participating throughout the state.

 




Attached Media Files: Just Add Color by Amanda Snavely Credit Sam Garnett , Amalgam by Judith Quinn Garnett, Credit Pushdot Studio , Equal Value, Different Shades by Sherri Culver, Credit Hoddick Photography , Lava Flow: Waiting for the Big One by Nancy O. Bryant, Credit LuAnn Kessi , Standing Strong by Judith A. Beaver

Tip of the Week for May 20 - Private Timber Lands
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/16/19 8:55 AM

PRIVATE TIMBER LANDS

 

Those who enjoy traveling the back roads of our private timber lands have found locked gates or restricted access.  This leaves some people to believe that private timber companies deny access to their lands simply because they don’t want private citizens on their property.  This is not the case.

 

With the exception of active commercial use such as logging or harvest of other forest products, the closures are in reaction to the ever-increasing incidents of offensive littering, abandonment of vehicles, theft of forest products, and acts of criminal mischief such as destruction of property caused by 4X4’s and ATV’s riding in unapproved areas, destruction of road access gates, and more.

 

Damage and theft detracts from the natural beauty of our forests, incurs costs for cleaning, repairing, and removal of vehicles and garbage.  These costs are borne by private timber companies as well as taxpayers in the county.

 

What can each of us do to stop the current trend of defacing our forests and waterways?  During your visit and when you leave forest lands and waterways:

 

  • Read signs posted at entry points into private & public lands – signs include important information including log truck activity
  • Report criminal acts to law enforcement
  • Report located dump sites or abandoned vehicles
  • Stay informed of possible land use restrictions usually posted at each access.
  • When in doubt about access, contact the landowner or your Lincoln County Sheriff’s office Forest Patrol at (541)265-4277 
  • Do not discard any glass, cans, rubbish, trash, garbage, debris or litter other than in receptacles designed or provided for these items
  • Report anyone observed hauling trash or debris into our forests.  Anyone enjoying nature in our local forests might bring a trash bag or two to pick up any trash you should observe.
  • Do not discard any glass, cans, rubbish, trash, garbage, debris or litter in any waters of the state
  • Do not drain, or cause or permit to be drained, sewage or the drainage from a cesspool, septic tank, recreational or camping vehicle waste holding tank or other contaminated source, upon the land of another without permission of the owner, or upon any public way
  • When target shooting, be sure to pick up brass, targets and anything else used during your visit
  • Do not permit any rubbish, trash, garbage, debris or other refuse to be thrown from a vehicle you are operating

 

Our forestlands, public and private, should be treasured and protected by everyone.  Through our efforts, we can strive to regain the trust of the private timber owners.  The challenge for each of us is to take pride in where we live and work and clean up our county by recycling any and all materials that can be reused rather than simply discarding them.

 

For more information and tips, visit our web site at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.

                            

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

           

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/5490/124592/052019_Private_Timber_Lands.pdf

Winston-Dillard Fire District No. 5 - Public Notice
Douglas Co. Fire Dist. No.2 - 05/16/19 8:10 AM

BOARD MEETING  NOTICE                         

 

The Board of Directors of Winston-Dillard Fire District No. 5 will hold its Regular Board meeting at their fire station, 250 SE Main St., Winston, OR on Monday, May 20, 2019 at 5:30 p.m.

 

The agenda to include but not limited to:

                                                                                 

  1. Monthly Financial Report
  2. Building Payoff Update
  3. Budget Update
  4. SDAO Report Update

Douglas County Fire District No. 2 - Public Notice
Douglas Co. Fire Dist. No.2 - 05/16/19 8:09 AM

BOARD REGULAR MEETING NOTICE

                         

The Board of Directors of Douglas County Fire District No. 2 will hold its Regular Board meeting at DCFD#2 Fire Station 655 at 6000 Garden Valley Rd., Roseburg, OR on Tuesday, May 21, 2019 at 5:30 p.m.
 

The Board agenda to include but not limited to:              

  1. Monthly Financials
  2. Budget Process Update
  3. Executive Session

ORS 192.610 (Definitions for ORS 192.610 to 192.690) to 192.690 (Exceptions to ORS 192.610 to 192.690) do not prevent the governing body of a public body from holding executive session during a regular, special or emergency meeting, after the presiding officer has identified the authorization under ORS 192.610 (Definitions for ORS 192.610 to 192.690) to 192.690 (Exceptions to ORS 192.610 to 192.690) for holding the executive session.

 

(i)To review and evaluate the employment-related performance of the chief executive officer of any public body, a public officer, employee or staff member who does not request an open hearing.

                                                                                               


Sex Offender Notification (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/16/19 7:33 AM
2019-05/1294/124586/Ricketts.jpg
2019-05/1294/124586/Ricketts.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1294/124586/thumb_Ricketts.jpg

Marion County Sheriff’s Office is releasing the following information pursuant to ORS 163A.215, which authorizes Community Corrections to inform the public when the release of information will enhance public safety and protection.

The individual who appears on this notification has been convicted of a sex offense that requires registration with the Sheriff’s Office. Additionally, this person’s criminal history places them in a classification level which reflects the potential to re-offend. This notification is not intended to increase fear; rather, it is our belief that an informed public is a safer public.

NAME: Timothy Wayne Ricketts Jr.

SID#: 16027131

DOB: 5/21/1984

CURRENT AGE: 34

RACE: Caucasian                   SEX: Male

HEIGHT: 5’7”                           WEIGHT: 175 lbs

HAIR: Brown                           EYES: Blue

RESIDENCE: 2252 Hyde St. SE
Salem, OR 97301

Timothy Wayne Ricketts Jr. is on Post Prison Supervision for the crimes of: SEX ABUSE II and BURGLARY I

This person was granted supervision on: 9/5/17

Supervision expiration date is: 12/1/2020

Special restrictions include:
[X] No intimate relationships without prior PO permission
[X] No alcohol
[X] No minors
[X] No places where minors congregate
[X] Sex offender treatment and polygraphs
Other: Mr. Ricketts victim pool includes adult females known to him.




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/1294/124586/Ricketts.jpg