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Eugene/Spring/Rose/Alb/Corv News Releases for Wed. Jul. 18 - 8:58 pm
Wed. 07/18/18
Deputies Investigating Fatal Motorcycle Crash (Independence) ***Names Released*** (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/18/18 4:56 PM
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Deputies have identified the drivers in yesterday’s fatal motor vehicle crash as Juan Ortiz-Hernandez, age 36 of Independence and Thomas Simons, age 62 of Monmouth.  Investigators believe Mr. Ortiz-Hernandez was traveling west on River Road in a small pickup truck when a motorcycle being operated by Mr. Simons failed to negotiate a curve resulting in a collision.  Mr. Ortiz-Hernandez was not injured in the crash but sadly Mr. Simons died at the scene. 

This marks the fourth fatal vehicle crash involving a motorcycle in Marion County within the month of July.  These very tragic events are a reminder of our great responsibility when taking to our roadways.  Attached is a link from our partners at Team Oregon who offer some great safety tips for motorcyclists.  https://team-oregon.org/resources/whatwouldyoudo/  

Deputies Investigating Fatal Motorcycle Crash (Independence) Today, July 17th, at 2:22 p.m., deputies with the Marion county Sheriff’s Office were called to a two vehicle crash that occurred in the 7400 block of River Road South near the Independence Bridge. Deputies believe a west bound motorcycle was negotiating a corner when the rider crossed the center line and struck a west bound pickup truck.

The driver of the pickup truck was not injured, sadly the motorcyclist died on scene. There are no additional details available at this time and no information regarding either involved driver will be released until the proper notifications can be made. River Road South is currently closed to one lane until the crash can be cleared.  Please use caution if you are traveling in the area.  




Attached Media Files: 2018-07/1294/116278/Crash_1.jpg

Garner Complex Prompts Evacuations North of Wimer (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/18/18 4:23 PM
Evacuation map - image
Evacuation map - image
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/6186/116314/thumb_PleasantCreekFireMapjpg071818.jpg

ROGUE RIVER, Ore. – The Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) is issuing evacuation notices to 58 addresses due to a fire in the Garner Complex north of Wimer.  On the afternoon of July 18, 2018, U.S. Forest Service officials notified JCSO that community notifications were advised based on changes in fire behavior. 

JCSO deputies and search and rescue personnel will conduct door-to-door notifications to provide information.  Jackson County Emergency Management will send a notification to affected addresses using the Citizen Alert system.

The following evacuation zones are now in effect:

     Level 2 “BE SET”: Pleasant Creek Road between the addresses of 5047 and 7948. 

Note that a few addresses within that range on Pleasant Creek Road may not receive notifications due to being outside the map sections included in the evacuation advisory.  Officials urge all residents in the area to be vigilant for updates.  Please refer to the map for reference. 

To sign up for Citizen Alert, visit www.jacksoncounty.org/alert.  More information about evacuation levels and preparedness can be found at http://www.rvem.org/.

For more information on the Garner Complex Fire, visit the fire information page at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5935/.  Public information is also available by phone at 541-474-3152.

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Attached Media Files: Evacuation map - detail , Evacuation map - image

Oregon Prosecutor Receives DEA Administrator's Award
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 07/18/18 4:10 PM

WASHINGTON – Scott M. Kerin, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, was one of several prosecutors and investigators recognized today by Acting Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Administrator Uttam Dhillon for their work investigating a transnational opiate trafficking organization.

Kerin and his colleagues were given the prestigious Administrator’s Award for Outstanding Group Achievement in a ceremony today in Washington.

This case came to the attention of law enforcement as part of “Operational Denial,” an Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF) investigation into the international trafficking of fentanyl and other legal drugs, and was significantly aided by the national and international coordination of agencies led by DEA’s Special Operations Division (SOD). The operation started in North Dakota in January 2015 as an overdose investigation. To date, 32 defendants have been charged as a result of the investigation.

This case jointly investigated by DEA; U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations (HSI); U.S. Postal Inspection Service; IRS Criminal Investigations; Grand Forks Narcotics Task Force; Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP); Portland Police Bureau (PPB), Drugs and Vice Division; Portland HIDTA Interdiction Task Force; Oregon State Police (OSP); and the Grand Forks, North Dakota Police Department.

Christopher C. Myers, U.S. Attorney for the District of North Dakota; Assistant U.S. Attorney Kerin; and Trial Attorney Adrienne Rose of the Criminal Division’s Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Section are prosecuting the case.

This case was brought as part of the Justice Department’s Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF) program, the centerpiece of the department’s strategy for reducing the availability of drugs in the U.S. OCDETF was established in 1982 to mount a comprehensive attack on drug trafficking by disrupting and dismantling major drug trafficking and money laundering organizations. Today, OCDETF combines the resources and expertise of its member federal agencies in coordination with state and local law enforcement.

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Attached Media Files: 2018-07/6325/116312/ANNOUNCEMENT-DEA-Administrator-Award-Final.pdf

Silver Creek fire update 6
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/18/18 3:14 PM

SILVERTON, Ore. – Crews working on the Silver Creek fire overnight used an infrared camera to look for hot spots within the fire’s perimeter. Results show crews have made good progress with mop-up operations as they continue to improve lines and extinguish remaining heat. The fire remains at 27 acres and is now 65% contained. Approximately 115 personnel continue to work on the fire. Most of the snags that have posed a threat to firefighter safety are now removed, though some hazard trees remain. Smoke can still be seen from areas of remaining heat, which includes several large standing trees that continue to smolder. Crews will remain focused on mop up for the next couple days.

Visitors to Silver Falls State Park will find pleasant conditions. Light smoke may be visible at times, but heavy smoke is unlikely. Other fires burning in the region may be responsible for increased haze in the area. While some closures remain in the park, there are no interruptions to scheduled events. Waterfall areas remain accessible to visitors during normal park hours.

Supporting media will be available on InciWeb at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5938/.

More details:

—Investigators have officially determined the fire was caused by lightning, most likely from a storm that passed over the area on June 18, 2018. Oregon Department of Forestry fire crews routinely track and investigate lightning strikes, though tracking technology is imperfect. Embers can remain hidden within trees or thick duff for weeks or months – producing no visible smoke – before emerging as weather and fuel conditions change. On Silver Creek, initial reports of smoke first came in late on July 12 and crews located the fire on July 13.

—The Silver Creek Fire demonstrates how changing weather and fuel conditions impact fire behavior. As we move into the hottest and driest part of the year, fire danger increases significantly. Keep informed about current fire restrictions by visiting the Oregon Department of Forestry’s Website:  https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Fire/Pages/Restrictions.aspx.

—A Type II helicopter remains on standby in Salem to support work on the fire. Fire managers have been using this platform to minimize fire activity during the hottest period of the day.

—Park Closures: The 214 Trailhead and several back-country trails, Howard Creek horse camp and Howard Creek day-use area, and the youth camp (Camp Silver Creek) remain closed. The Ranches have been reopened. Conditions can change quickly; watch for updates on https://bit.ly/2meFGMP.

—No injuries or facility damage have been reported.


Fatal vehicle crash Hwy 20 east of Sweet Home - Linn County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/18/18 2:55 PM
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On Tuesday, July 17, 2018 at about 2:00 pm, Oregon State Police Troopers and Sweet Home Fire Department personnel responded to the report of a two vehicle crash on Hwy 20  east of Sweet Home.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a  2001 Pontiac van, operated by Scott A. WARTENA, age 76, of Sweet Home, was traveling west bound on Hwy 20, when for an unknown reason began swerving back and forth in both lanes of travel.  An east bound 2006 Ford Explorer, operated by Linda K. PHILLIPS, age 69, of Boring, saw the white Pontiac van weaving and attempted to avoid a collision.  PHILLIPS was unable to avoid the Pontiac and the vehicles hit head on near the fogline of the east bound lane. 

All involved were transported to area hospitals.  

On Wedmesday,  July 18, 2018 WARTENA died, at the hospital, from injuries sustained in the crash.




Attached Media Files: 2018-07/1002/116307/IMG_20180717_145703.jpg

FOLKLIFE PROGRAM AT Guthrie Park Community Center
Oregon Folklife Network - 07/18/18 1:58 PM

Dallas, Ore.—Join folklorist Amy Howard and Guthrie Park Community Center director and musician, Sally Clark, and selected musicians for a conversation about traditional music and music jams in Polk County. The conversation will take place just before the regular Friday night jam on July 20, 2018, 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm. at the Guthrie Park Community Center, 4320 Kings Valley Hwy, Dallas, OR 97338.

This open, community conversation invites audiences to connect with Sally Clark and local musicians about traditional music and the Friday night jam at Guthrie Park. Howard spent several days in Dallas and the surrounding area speaking to members of the community, documenting their traditions, and learning how their cultural traditions shaped their lives. Please come and chat with Clark and others and learn how they are actively passing their skills and knowledge through the generations.

 

Funding for this program comes from the National Endowment for the Arts to the Oregon Folklife Network, Oregon’s designated Folk & Traditional Arts Program. The project sent trained folklorists to meet and document culture keepers in the Willamette Valley counties of Polk, Benton, Lane, Mario, and Linn as well as with artists from the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. Free public programs are held in each county.

 

Amy Howard received a BA in Anthropology from Brigham Young University and an MA in American Studies and Folklore from Utah State University. Her love of folklore fieldwork began in 2007 on an undergraduate field study in Guatemala. She is currently documenting Oregon traditions and culture keepers in the Willamette Valley.

For more information about public programs in Benton, Lane, Marion, and Linn counties, contact Jennie Flinspach at jflinspa@uoregon.edu or 541-346-3820.

The OFN is administered by the University of Oregon and is supported in part by grants from the Oregon Cultural Trust, Oregon Arts Commission, Oregon Historical Society, and the National Endowment for the Arts.




Attached Media Files: 2018-07/5598/116304/Polk_Presentation_reduced.pdf

Hendrix Fire Prompts Evacuations (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/18/18 1:09 PM
Hendrix fire map - image
Hendrix fire map - image
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RUCH, Ore. – The Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) is issuing evacuation notices to 35 addresses due to the Hendrix Fire near Hells Peak, southeast of Ruch.  On July 18, 2018, JCSO Search and Rescue teams began a door-to-door effort to advise residents of the evacuations and to provide information. 

The following evacuation zones are now in effect:

Level 3 “GO”:  Little Applegate Road to Wagner Creek Road, bordered by USFS roads 2040 on the north and 20 on the south.  This zone affects two addresses: 16001 Wagner Creek Road and 23000 Little Applegate Road (Wrangle Campground).

Level 2 “BE SET”: The Dog Fork community, from Little Applegate Road to west of Yale Creek Road.  This zone contains 31 addresses: 3975 to 4075 Dog Fork Road, and 3812 to 6969 Yale Creek Road.

Level 2 “BE SET”: Wagner Creek Road south of Wagner Gap to USFS road 20.  This zone contains two addresses: 3434 McDonald Creek Road and 16099 Wagner Creek Road.

No addresses in these evacuation zones have phone numbers or email addresses registered with the Jackson County Emergency Management Citizen Alert program, so no alerts will be sent.  To sign up for Citizen Alert, visit www.jacksoncounty.org/alert.  More information about evacuation levels and preparedness can be found at http://www.rvem.org/.

For more information on the Hendrix Fire, visit the fire information page on the US Forest Service Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest website at https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/rogue-siskiyou/home/?cid=fseprd587783.  Public information is also available by phone at (541) 632-3567.

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Attached Media Files: Hendrix fire map - detail , Hendrix fire map - image

Substation Fire declared a conflgration
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 07/18/18 12:44 PM

Governor Kate Brown has declared the Substation Fire, burning near The Dalles, a conflagration. The declaration cleared the way for the state fire marshal to mobilize firefighters and equipment to assist local resources battling the fire.

The Office of State Marshal’s Red Incident Management Team, four structural task forces, and two strike teams from Multnomah, Clackamas, Washington, Central Oregon, Yamhill, and Marion counties arrived early this morning and began working to protect structures.

A Level 3 evacuation was put in place for Eight Mile Road at Emerson Loop Road to Emerson Loop Road and Company Hollow Road, as well as all of Wrentham Market Road and Mason Road.

The following Level 1, 2 and 3 evacuations for Sherman County are as follows:

South of Gordon Ridge Rd from the Deschutes River, east to Hwy 97 and south to King Lane, South along Sayers Rd to Payne Loop is a Level 3. The Towns of Grass Valley and Moro are Level 2.

North of Gordon Ridge Rd to Interstate 84 and HWY 206, east to Hwy 97 and south along Henrichs, Doumand and Lone Rock Rd, and south to Rutledge Lane, as well as the area further south between Finnegan Rd to the Deschutes River is a Level 2. 

The area east of HWY 97 to Hwy 206, and south to Fairview Rd is a Level 1.

Deschutes River from Sheers Bridge to the mouth and Deschutes Park are at Level 3.

Oregon’s conflagration may be invoked only by the Governor and allows the State Fire Marshal to dispatch structural firefighters and equipment.  

More information on evacuations is available at Sherman and Wasco County Sheriffs Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/Sherman-County-Sheriffs-Office-643904422378873/

https://www.facebook.com/WascoCountySheriff/?hc_ref=ARTVrl7XZjg4B1Ea1eVPFIU_hja5N-OGHnbggMctf6KJNRQmvcGcvxVoCJjnXrY5ZWk&fref=nf

 Additional resources may be accessed at:


Attempt to locate female from Lebanon/Sweet Home Area (Photo)/Update
Lebanon Police Dept. - 07/18/18 12:12 PM
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UPDATE: The female was seen at 12:45 pm yesterday Tuesday July 17th, per a witness.  If anyone has camera footage please contact us. Attempt to locate missing female with medical issues from Lebanon/Sweet Home area.  Left the Lebanon Hospital and was last seen on Tangent St near 12th St in Lebanon last night. Missing is Bobi Lynn Wikkala, 53 year old white female, 5'2" and 109 pounds. Shoulder length brown hair and wears glasses.  Last seen wearing denim blue shorts and long short sleeve top.  Last seen wearing a hospital bracelet on her wrist as well. Subject may have difficulty communicating as she may be suffereing from medical issues.  If you have seen this person please contact Lebanon Police Department at (541) 451-1751 or (541-367-5181

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-07/4582/116293/20180718_091708.jpg

Thirty New Girl Scout Badges Now Available to Power Girl Leadership in Key 21st Century Issues
Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington - 07/18/18 12:04 PM

Thirty New Girl Scout Badges Now Available to Power Girl Leadership in Key 21st Century Issues

The all-girl organization proven to equip girls to create positive change has released new badges in environmental advocacy, space science, robotics, and more.

Portland, OR (July 18, 2018)— Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) revealed 30 new badges yesterday that are now available exclusively for girls ages 5–18 that not only enhance the one-of-a-kind Girl Scout experience, but also address some of society’s most pressing needs, such as cybersecurity, environmental advocacy, mechanical engineering, robotics, computer science, and space exploration. In a safe all-girl space, Girl Scouts develop important soft skills, including confidence and perseverance, as well as hard skills, setting them up for success and preparing them to take action for a better world. Today’s youth are more vocal than ever about the change they want to see, and Girl Scouts are the most equipped with the skills needed to make a real impact. The results are proven: girls who participate in Girl Scouts are more than twice as likely to exhibit community problem-solving skills than girls who don’t (57 percent versus 28 percent).

The unique Girl Scout environment provides fun, exciting, and essential experiences that carry into girls’ future careers and life success; the KPMG Women's Leadership Study of more than 3,000 professional and college women shows that early exposure to leadership has a significant impact on a woman’s perceptions of her ability to lead. Additionally, 76 percent of women today wish they had learned more about leadership and had more leadership opportunities while growing up, demonstrating how imperative it is for girls and volunteers to join Girl Scouts.  

The new programming for girls in grades 6–12 includes:

  • Environmental Stewardship badges, GSUSA’s first-ever badge series focused on environmental advocacy. Girls in grades 6–12 prepare for outdoor experiences and take action on environmental issues. Although Girl Scouts have been advocating for the environment since the organization’s founding 106 years ago, these badges are the first to specifically prepare girls to be environmental advocates who address problems, find solutions, and protect the natural world (funded by the Elliott Wildlife Values Project).
  • Badges that teach girls how to program, design, and showcase robots, completing the suite of Robotics badges GSUSA first introduced for grades K–5 last year.
  • The College Knowledge badge for Girl Scouts in grades 11 and 12, the first badge completely dedicated to college exploration. By showing girls how to research the admissions process, financial aid, and other factors, the badge fills a specific need that girls asked for—and that many do not have support for outside Girl Scouts.
  • Two Girl Scout Leadership Journeys: Think Like a Programmer (funded by Raytheon) provides a strong foundation in computational thinking and the framework for Girl Scouts’ first ever national Cyber Challenge, coming in 2019. The Think Like an Engineer Journey exposes girls to design thinking to understand how engineers solve problems. As with all Leadership Journeys, girls complete hands-on activities and use their newly honed skills to take action on a problem in their community. The programming aims to prepare girls to pursue careers in fields such as cybersecurity, computer science, and robotics.

Girls in grades K–5 can now earn badges in:

  • Environmental Stewardship, through which girls learn how to respect the outdoors and take action to protect the natural world (funded by the Elliott Wildlife Values Project).
  • Cybersecurity, introducing girls to age-appropriate online safety and privacy principles, information on how the internet works, and how to spot and investigate cybercrime (funded by Palo Alto Networks).
  • Space Science, enabling girls to channel their inner NASA scientist as they learn about objects in space and how astronomers conduct investigations (funded by NASA’s Science Mission Directorate and led by the SETI Institute).
  • Mechanical Engineering for Girl Scout Juniors, through which girls in grades 4 and 5 design paddle boats, cranes, and balloon-powered cars, learning about buoyancy, potential and kinetic energy, machines, and jet propulsion. Following last year’s introduction of Mechanical Engineering badges for girls in grades K–3, the addition of these badges for Girl Scout Juniors means that all Girl Scouts in elementary school can now have hands-on engineering experiences.

“Across the country, people are having powerful conversations about the increasingly strong voice of young people who want to change the world and the lack of women in leadership positions in the United States—two topics Girl Scouts is uniquely positioned to address,” said GSUSA CEO Sylvia Acevedo. “Whether they are fighting cybercrime, exploring how engineers solve problems, or advocating for issues affecting their community, Girl Scouts are learning how to proactively address some of the foremost challenges of today while also building skills that will set them up for a lifetime of leadership. I am so proud that our new programming continues to push girls to be forward-thinking and equips them with the skills they need to make the world a better place. We believe in the power of all girls, and we invite them to strengthen their unique abilities by joining Girl Scouts.”

GSUSA works with top organizations in fields that interest today’s girls. Combined with Girl Scouts’ expertise in girl leadership, these organizations and specialists advise and inform on content to provide the most cutting-edge programming available to girls. Content collaborators include Code.org, the Cyber Innovation Center, robotics educator and author Kathy Ceceri, the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics, the Museum of Science, Boston, and WGBH’s Design Squad Global. Girl Scouts themselves also rigorously tested some of the new offerings, including the Think Like a Programmer activities and the Space Science and Cybersecurity badges, which were announced last year and are now available for girls around the country to earn.

ABOUT GIRL SCOUTS OF OREGON AND SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON | GSOSW

Our council serves 13,955 girls in 38 counties with the help of over 10,000 volunteers. The Girl Scout mission is to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. Every opportunity in Girl Scouting develops these essential skills in an all-girl, inclusive, safe environment. For more information, please visit girlscoutsosw.org.

GSOSW STEM PROGRAMMING

About GSOSW STEM program opportunities, http://www.girlscoutsosw.org/en/our-council/news/2018/to_the_moon_and_back.html http://www.girlscoutsosw.org/en/our-council/news/2018/april_is_stem_month_.html

About Girl Scouts of the USA
We're 2.6 million strong—1.8 million girls and 800,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Georgia, she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. And with programs from coast to coast and across the globe, Girl Scouts offers every girl a chance to practice a lifetime of leadership, adventure, and success. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscouts.org.

“Reaching for the Stars: NASA Science for Girl Scouts” is based upon work supported by NASA Science under cooperative agreement No. NNX16AB90A. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

About the GSUSA STEM Pledge, https://www.girlscouts.org/en/press-room/press-room/newsreleases/2017/girl-scouts-announces-STEM-pledge.html

About GSUSA STEM Programming, https://www.girlscouts.org/en/about-girl-scouts/girl-scouts-andstem.html


Town Hall to Discuss Modernization of the Columbia River Treaty Regime
Bonneville Power Administration - 07/18/18 11:40 AM

U.S. Columbia River Treaty Negotiator Jill Smail will lead a Town Hall on September 6, 2018, in Portland, Oregon on the modernization of the Columbia River Treaty regime. The Town Hall is free of charge, open to the public, and will take place at the Bonneville Power Administration’s Rates Hearing Room from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. This Town Hall will follow the August 15–16 round of negotiations on the Treaty regime in British Columbia and take place in advance of the October 17–18 round of negotiations in Portland, Oregon. At the Town Hall, U.S. government representatives will provide a general overview of the negotiations and take questions from the public; feel free to send questions in advance to iaRiverTreaty@state.gov">ColumbiaRiverTreaty@state.gov. For more information on the Town Hall, including call-in details, please see the Federal Register Notice.

The Columbia River Treaty is an international model for transboundary water cooperation. The 1964 Treaty’s flood risk and hydropower operations have provided substantial benefits to millions of people on both sides of the border. The Treaty also has facilitated additional benefits such as supporting the river’s ecosystem, irrigation, municipal water use, industrial use, navigation, and recreation. More information can be found on the Department’s Treaty website.

As the United States continues bilateral negotiations with Canada, our key objectives are guided by the U.S. Entity Regional Recommendation for the Future of the Columbia River Treaty after 2024, a consensus document published in 2013 after five years of consultations among the Tribes, states, stakeholders, public, and federal agencies. The U.S. negotiating team is led by the U.S. Department of State and comprises the Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Northwestern Division, the Department of the Interior, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

 


Photo_I-5 MP 7 NB overturned truck hauling grapes (Photo)
ODOT: SW Oregon - 07/18/18 10:50 AM
Salvage crews remove pallets of grapes from an overturned semi on I-5, south of Ashland
Salvage crews remove pallets of grapes from an overturned semi on I-5, south of Ashland
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/1202/116296/thumb_I_5_NBMP7_SemiGrapes_July182018.jpg

ASHLAND - I-5 NB MP 7, south of Ashland: Salvage crews continue to off-load cargo from the semi that rolled earlier this morning while coming down the Siskiyou Summit grade at MP 7. Contrary to earlier reports, the cargo is pallets of fresh green and purple grapes.
Slow lane is open to traffic. Cargo recovery is occurring in the fast lane. Use caution through the crash zone and expect short delays. 

Gary Leaming, ODOT PIO, 541-774-6388




Attached Media Files: Salvage crews remove pallets of grapes from an overturned semi on I-5, south of Ashland

Detectives Seek Tips on Peninger Fire (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/18/18 10:04 AM
Wednesday morning scene photo
Wednesday morning scene photo
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CENTRAL POINT, Ore. – Jackson County Sheriff’s Office detectives are working with Fire District 3 investigators to determine the cause of the Peninger Fire.  Detectives would like to talk to anyone who may have information that will assist in the investigation.

The fire was first reported on Tuesday, July 17, 2018, at 4:01 p.m.  Witnesses described a column of smoke originating from the area of the Bear Creek Greenway, behind the Jackson County Expo and the Family Fun Center.  The fire quickly spread to the east, damaging outbuildings and homes.  Nobody was injured.

Detectives would like to talk to anyone who was on or near the Bear Creek Greenway between the Expo and Pine Street during the hours of 3:00 p.m. to 4:15 p.m.  They say some people may not realize they have information that could help in the investigation.  The number for the Jackson County Sheriff’s Office tip line is (541) 774-8333.

Case #18-14794

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Attached Media Files: Wednesday morning scene photo

Recreational use health advisory issued July 18 for water contact at Sunset Bay State Park Beach
Oregon Health Authority - 07/18/18 9:30 AM

July 18, 2018

Recreational use health advisory issued July 18 for water contact at Sunset Bay State Park Beach

The Oregon Health Authority issued a recreational use health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Sunset Bay State Park Beach, located in Coos County.

Water samples indicate higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria, which can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted. This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at Sunset Bay State Park Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory. Neighboring beaches are not affected by this advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Since 2003 state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state organizations participating in this program are the Oregon Health Authority, Department of Environmental Quality, and Parks and Recreation Department.

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Recreational use health advisory issued July 18 for water contact at Nye Beach
Oregon Health Authority - 07/18/18 9:24 AM

July 18, 2018

Recreational use health advisory issued July 18 for water contact at Nye Beach

The Oregon Health Authority issued a recreational use health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Nye Beach, located in Lincoln County.

Water samples indicate higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria, which can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted. This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at Nye Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory. Neighboring beaches are not affected by this advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Since 2003 state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state organizations participating in this program are the Oregon Health Authority, Department of Environmental Quality, and Parks and Recreation Department.

# # #


Pedestrian Safety Event Results
Roseburg Police Dept. - 07/18/18 8:47 AM

Thanks to a grant obtained through Oregon Impact, the Roseburg Police Department participated in the 3rd and final pedestrian safety crosswalk event for 2018.  The last event was held on Monday, July 16th, 2018.  These events are designed to raise awareness regarding pedestrian safety at crosswalks, and to enforce traffic laws related to crosswalk areas.

During this last event there were 29 citations issued for crosswalk violations, 3 for driving uninsured, 1 for unlawful use of a cell phone, and 2 for driving with a suspended license.  There were also 19 warnings issued for crosswalk violations and 30 informational pamphlets were handed out.

During all three events there were 116 citations issued for crosswalk violations, 13 for safety belt violations, 27 for driving uninsured, 10 for driving while suspended or without a license,  and 3 arrests were made.  There were 17 other citations issued for other traffic violations. 

 

When turning at a traffic signal, drivers must:
Stop and remain stopped for pedestrians until they have cleared the lane into which your vehicle is turning and at least 6 feet of the next lane.

At any other crosswalks - whether marked with paint or unmarked - drivers must:
Stop and remain stopped for pedestrians until they have cleared the lane in which you are traveling (or into which you are turning) and the next lane.
Stop and remain stopped for students as you are directed by a crossing guard.
Stop and remain stopped for a blind pedestrian using a white cane or a guide dog until the pedestrian is completely across the roadway.

Safety Tips

Remember, under Oregon law there is a crosswalk at every intersection.
Do not pass a vehicle stopped at a crosswalk. A stopped car may be a clue that a pedestrian is crossing. When stopping for a crosswalk on a multi-lane road, you should stop about 30 feet before the crosswalk so you don't block visibility to a driver in a second lane.
When stopping at an intersection, do not block the crosswalk. This forces pedestrians to go around your vehicle and puts them in a dangerous situation.
Watch for pedestrians, especially children, when exiting driveways or when backing out of parking spaces in parking lots.
Pedestrians move at different speeds. Be alert for children who may suddenly dart into the street. Be patient with older adults who take extra time to cross the street.
Around taverns and bars, be alert for people with slowed reaction times or impaired judgment.
Be alert for people or animals during low-light conditions, especially in areas where they are likely to cross the road, or you might not see them until it is too late to stop.

 


Tue. 07/17/18
FOLKLIFE PROGRAM AT Guthrie Park Community Center (Photo)
Oregon Folklife Network - 07/17/18 2:03 PM
2018-07/5598/116269/IMG_0544.JPG
2018-07/5598/116269/IMG_0544.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/5598/116269/thumb_IMG_0544.JPG

Dallas, Ore.—Join folklorist Amy Howard and Guthrie Park Community Center director and musician, Sally Clark, and selected musicians for a conversation about traditional music and music jams in Polk County. The conversation will take place just before the regular Friday night jam on July 20, 2018, 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm. at the Guthrie Park Community Center, 4320 Kings Valley Hwy, Dallas, OR 97338.

 

This open, community conversation invites audiences to connect with Sally Clark and local musicians about traditional music and the Friday night jam at Guthrie Park. Howard spent several days in Dallas and the surrounding area speaking to members of the community, documenting their traditions, and learning how their cultural traditions shaped their lives. Please come and chat with Clark and others and learn how they are actively passing their skills and knowledge through the generations.

 

Funding for this program comes from the National Endowment for the Arts to the Oregon Folklife Network, Oregon’s designated Folk & Traditional Arts Program. The project sent trained folklorists to meet and document culture keepers in the Willamette Valley counties of Polk, Benton, Lane, Mario, and Linn as well as with artists from the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. Free public programs are held in each county.

 

Amy Howard received a BA in Anthropology from Brigham Young University and an MA in American Studies and Folklore from Utah State University. Her love of folklore fieldwork began in 2007 on an undergraduate field study in Guatemala. Since then, she has interned at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, coordinated public programs, and worked on multiple documentation projects in Utah and Idaho. In 2013, she collaborated with other fieldworkers documenting and producing a book on quilting traditions in the Bear River Heritage Area. In 2015, she and two of her students documented artistic, occupational, and recreational traditions in the Southeast Idaho Snake River Plain for the Idaho Commission on the Arts. Together they created an exhibit and organized public performances at the Idaho Museum of Natural History. She is currently documenting Oregon traditions and culture keepers in the Willamette Valley.

 

For more information about public programs in Benton, Lane, Marion, and Linn counties, contact Jennie Flinspach at jflinspa@uoregon.edu or 541-346-3820.

 

Please contact Oregon Folklife Network Director, Riki Saltzman, at riki@uoregon.edu or 541-346-3820 with questions about the Oregon Folklife Network or recommendations for traditions, groups, or individual folk & traditional artists to be documented in the Willamette Valley. OFN always appreciates contact information for traditional musicians and dancers, quilters, storytellers, cooks, leatherworkers, fly-tiers, wood carvers, silversmiths, taxidermists, basket makers, and more.

 

The OFN is administered by the University of Oregon and is supported in part by grants from the Oregon Cultural Trust, Oregon Arts Commission, Oregon Historical Society, and the National Endowment for the Arts.




Attached Media Files: 2018-07/5598/116269/IMG_0544.JPG

Motorcyclist killed in single vehicle crash - Hwy 202 (Nehalem Hwy) - Clatsop County
Oregon State Police - 07/17/18 1:57 PM

On July 16, 2018 at approximately 7:07 PM Oregon State Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a single vehicle (motorcycle) crash on Hwy 202 near milepost 6.

Investigation revealed that a Triumph Motorcycle operated by Damian BURRELL, age 30 of Warrenton, was westbound on Hwy 202, traveling at a high rate of speed while passing, when he lost control of the motorcycle and traveled off the roadway and crashed into the water.  Passing motorists stopped to assist and pulled BURRELL from the water.   

BURRELL suffered fatal injuries in the crash and was pronounced deceased at the scene. 

Oregon State Police were assisted on scene by Olney-Walluski Fire & Rescue, Medix Ambulance,  ODOT, Clatsop County Sheriff's Office, and the Clatsop County Medical Examiner.  


Silver Creek fire update 5
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/17/18 11:55 AM

SILVERTON, Ore. – Firefighters continue to make good progress mopping up the Silver Creek fire, located in a remote southeast corner of Silver Falls State Park. The fire has been mapped at approximately 27 acres and no further growth is expected; it is 100% lined and 55% contained. Around 125 personnel remain on the fire, and will continue mopping up the fire’s perimeter, as well as removing dangerous snags.

Investigators have officially determined the fire was caused by lightning, most likely from a storm that passed over the area on June 18, 2018. Known as a lightning holdover, the fire smoldered for several weeks before emerging during a windy period with high temperatures, low relative humidity and drier fuels on the ground.

While some closures remain in the park, there are no interruptions to scheduled events. Waterfall areas remain accessible to visitors during normal park hours. Visitors may notice light smoke at times, but the fire is not anticipated to produce heavy smoke.

More details:

—A June 18, 2018 lightning event initially caused the fire. The ignition went undetected for several weeks as the fire smoldered until fuel and weather conditions allowed it to grow. Initial reports of smoke first came in late on July 12 and crews located the fire on July 13. Air resources dropped water and retardant to help stop the fire’s spread as crews worked to gain access on the ground.

—Crews will continue heavy mop-up around the fire perimeter for the next several days. Mop-up includes working from the perimeter into the fire’s interior, ensuring all heat has been extinguished. Mop-up is especially challenging on this fire because of thick brush, a heavy layer of duff and dangerous snags. Firefighters have been carefully removing large snags around the fire’s perimeter. Night crews have used infrared cameras to help identify hot spots. Fire managers anticipate maintaining current staffing levels for the next several days to continue this work and secure the fire area.

—A Type II helicopter remains on standby in Salem to support work on the fire.

—Park closures: The 214 Trailhead and several back-country trails, Howard Creek horse camp and Howard Creek day-use area, and the youth camp (Camp Silver Creek) remain closed. The Ranches have been reopened. Conditions can change quickly; watch for updates on https://bit.ly/2meFGMP.

Photos and videos from Saturday and Sunday, July 14-15 remain available online at https://drive.google.com/open?id=19RlLpHp3XPlNq0d-H8ZBz7SqEvDUG3Yy.

No injuries or facility damage have been reported.


Nurse Staffing Advisory Board SurveyMonkey Committee meets July 30 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 07/17/18 11:40 AM

July 17, 2018

Program contact: Anna Davis, 971-673-2950, anna.l.davis@state.or.us

Nurse Staffing Advisory Board SurveyMonkey Committee meets July 30 in Portland

What: A public meeting of the Nurse Staffing Advisory Board SurveyMonkey Committee

Agenda: Committee members' discussion of SurveyMonkey questions and SurveyMonkey in the Nurse Staffing FAQ. The agenda is available on the OHA's nurse staffing website at http://www.healthoregon.org/nursestaffing.

When: July 30, 3-5 p.m. No public comment period is offered.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 612, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland. Conference call line: 877-336-1829, access code 2075141.

Background: The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board has established a committee to advise the Oregon Health Authority on the SurveyMonkey tool used in nurse staffing surveys. Board members on the committee will review the use of the SurveyMonkey tool, the questions asked in it, and whether to include information about it in the Nurse Staffing FAQ.

For more information, see the agency nurse staffing website at http://www.healthoregon.org/nursestaffing.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

•         Sign language and spoken language interpreters

•         Written materials in other languages

•         Braille

•         Large print

•         Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Anna Davis at 971-673-2950, 711 TTY or anna.l.davis@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


Be Prepared For A Natural Disaster
Better Business Bureau Northwest + Pacific - 07/17/18 11:18 AM

                                             BBB, OEM Offers Tips for Keeping Your Home and Business Safe

Portland, Oregon —July 17, 2018 It is wildfire season in Oregon, and the U.S. Forest Service warns this year could be especially significant for wildfires.  Better Business Bureau Northwest + Pacific and the Oregon Office of Emergency Management are reminding consumers and businesses owners to do their part to be prepared in the event of a natural disaster. 

“A major disaster can pose significant challenges for individuals and families, as well as for local businesses” says Andrew Phelps, director at OEM. “Even a minor emergency can interfere with your ability to operate or require funding for repairs. There are steps you and your organization can take to be prepared, the most significant of which is to be 2 Weeks Ready.

While strangers will reach out to help others during a natural disaster, scammers make situations worse by trying to take advantage of victims. BBB reminds those affected by natural disasters to beware of out-of-town contractors soliciting businesses with ill intentions. While they may not all be frauds, they may lack the proper licensing for your area, offer quick fixes or make big promises they can’t deliver. The con artists typically show up after a natural disaster offering to help with cleanup for a low cost. Be sure to research any company before doing business with them and never be pressured into making quick decisions when solicited by a contractor.

Remember, it's just as important to be prepared before disaster strikes. Here are some steps you can take to get your home and business ready:

For consumers:

  • Keep documents secure. Store your documents in a safe place that is easy to access such as a safe deposit box. This includes your Social Security card, birth certificate, passport and any other official, hard-to-replace documents. Documents not kept in a safe can land in the wrong hands.
  • Have a plan. Familiarize yourself with your town’s emergency plans for shelter and evacuation. Have a list of emergency contacts, the locations frequented by family members and know the specific needs of household members, including animals.

For additional consumer preparedness information, visit the Individual Preparedness page on OEM’s website.

For businesses:

  • Practice emergency drills. Businesses should practice drills with employees and have processes in place to account for employees in the event of a disaster.
  • Lock up customers' information. Remember to safeguard your customers’ privacy by protecting their data.  Lock up important papers or transfer them to the cloud to keep them safe and intact.

For additional business preparedness information, check out the Business Preparedness section on OEM’s website and complete a Preparedness Scorecard for Businesses. Get more scam tips at bbb.org/scamtips.

###       

ABOUT BBB: For more than 100 years, Better Business Bureau has been helping people find businesses, brands, and charities they can trust. In 2016, people turned to BBB more than 167 million times for BBB Business Profiles on more than 5.2 million businesses and Charity Reports on 11,000 charities, all available for free at bbb.org. There are local, independent BBBs across the United States, Canada, and Mexico, including BBB Northwest & Pacific which serves more than 15 million consumers in Alaska, Washington, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Hawaii and Western Wyoming.    

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*UPDATE* Trailer Fire Death Deemed a Homicide (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/17/18 10:24 AM
Scene photo
Scene photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-06/6186/115790/thumb_18-13354_Fire.jpg

Update 7/17/18:

JACKSON COUNTY, Ore. - The Jackson County Medical Examiner's Office has completed its investigation into the death of Tammy Rae Hicks.  Deputy State Medical Examiner Dr. James Olson, MD, has ruled Hicks' death as a homicide.  The cause of death was determined to be strangulation.  Evidence at autopsy showed Hicks died before her body was burned in a trailer fire on June 30, 2018.  

Kevin Dean Hicks, Sr. remains lodged in the Jackson County jail on charges related to this case.  Any further updates will be released by the Jackson County District Attorney's Office.

Update 7/1/18:

SAMS VALLEY, Ore. – Jackson County Sheriff’s Office detectives say the death at the scene of Saturday’s trailer fire was a homicide. The suspect is in jail, accused of murdering his estranged wife and burning her body.

On June 30, 2018, at 3:17 p.m, deputies responded with Fire District #3 personnel to a trailer fire in the 3100-block of McMartin Lane. The caller indicated a woman was in the trailer, which was fully engulfed before first responders arrived.

Deputies arrested Kevin Dean Hicks, Sr., 52, shortly after arriving at the scene, which was also Kevin Hicks’s residence. Hicks is lodged in the Jackson County jail on charges of murder and second degree abuse of a corpse.

Detectives have presumptively identified the victim as Tammy Raye Hicks, 49, of the 12200-block of Table Rock Road. Investigators with the Jackson County medical examiner’s office say the official identity of the deceased is tentative; they will likely need to rely on dental records or DNA comparisons to make a conclusive identification. An autopsy will take place later this week.

The couple separated after deputies arrested Kevin Hicks on October 15, 2017, for assaulting Tammy Hicks in the presence of their four minor children. Kevin Hicks was arrested again the following day when he contacted Tammy Hicks, in violation of the jail release agreement. The children were not present during Saturday’s incident.

Detectives with the multi-agency Major Assault and Death Investigation Unit (MADIU), as well as fire investigators, are assisting with the case. The District Attorney’s Office will review the evidence and refer the case to a grand jury.  Additional details regarding the incident will not be released at this time.

Case #18-13354

###

Original release 6/30/18:

SAMS VALLEY, Ore. -- Jackson County Sheriff's Office deputies are investigating an apparent death at the scene of a trailer fire. Few details are available for release at this early stage in the investigation.

On June 30, 2018, at 3:17 p.m., dispatch received a 911 call reporting a fire in a trailer in the 3100-block of McMartin Lane. The caller reported a woman was inside the trailer.

Fire District #3 personnel responded to fight the fire, which was fully engulfed. Jackson County Sheriff's Office detectives and an investigator from the medical examiner's office responded to assist with the investigation.

Further information, including the identity of the deceased, will be released at a later time.

Case #18-13354

###




Attached Media Files: Scene photo , Kevin Hicks booking photo - 6/30/18

FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Online Auction Fraud (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 07/17/18 10:00 AM
TT - Online Auction Fraud slide
TT - Online Auction Fraud slide
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/3585/116179/thumb_TT_-_Online_Auction_Fraud_-_slide.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against online auction frauds.

We are now fully into summer. With vacations already planned and paid for, many are short on the cash needed to buy those odds and ends for around the house. Instead of paying top dollar at the store, many are turning to online auctions as a way to save money. Such auctions are a great option – if you know how to use them safely.

Most auction sites have rules for both the buyer and the seller. Take time to familiarize yourself to the auction site and all its policies before you bid on anything. Pay special attention to details about payment information, privacy policies, and insurance. Also, before using, make sure that the sites where you register, sign in and bid are secure. Chances are that if the site URL starts with “https,” the page is secure. However, to be safe, try to pay with a credit card that comes with fraud protection. Additionally, take your time to research what other people have to say about the website. Look for reviews or complaints that indicate that a buyer either got a faulty product or never received what they bid on.

These scam artists have been doing it for a while and know exactly what to say and do to steal your money. Here are some warning signs:

  • The seller only has a generic photo of the item. You cannot be sure that the seller actually has the item if there isn't a current picture.
  • A “brand name” product is marked down or on sale for a price much lower than normal. This product could be counterfeit.
  • If you see words such as “used”, “old”, or “vintage”, the item may not be in the best condition.
  • Do not use the “Friends and Family” money transfer method to pay for items, as buyers are not eligible for fraud protection through this method.
  • Do not pay for items using gift cards. These requests almost always indicate a scam since the “seller” can cash out the cards immediately and the auction site has no way to verify that payment.  
  • The seller insists on communicating or paying outside of the auction site’s payment system. The seller might insinuate that the system is too slow and that he needs the money right away to send you your product. No matter what story he tells you, don’t send money outside the established payment system!
  • You get an email stating that you need to verify your account or reply to confirm your purchase of a product. If this happens, go to the auction site itself to log in. There you will be able to see if the site really sent you an email. If so, you can respond there and avoid clicking on any potentially compromising links.

If you have been victimized by an online overpayment scam or any other cyber fraud, be sure to report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.




Attached Media Files: TT - Online Auction Fraud - AUDIO , TT - Online Auction Fraud slide

Marine Patrols Jet Off to the Rogue for On-Water Training (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 07/17/18 10:00 AM
Sheriff's Office Jet Boat Image
Sheriff's Office Jet Boat Image
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/4139/116242/thumb_JetSheriffBoat.JPG

The Oregon State Marine Board will conduct its week-long law enforcement jet boat course on the Rogue River between Gold Beach and Foster Bar during the week of July 23 – July 26.  This intensive course focuses on boat operation, marine law, swift water rescue, and boat trailering.

The training focuses on honing boat operating skills.  “This is critical training for law enforcement and we’re excited to be returning to Gold Beach,” says Ed Persichetti, Law Enforcement Training Coordinator for the Marine Board.  “We’ve selected this week to hopefully minimize disruption to recreational boaters, but we still request the public’s patience.  The students will need room to work because they will be very focused on reading the river, avoiding other boaters, and navigating whitewater, wind and chop.”  Students who attend the Marine Board’s Whitewater Jet Boat Training bring a range of skills from the novice operator to advanced operator. 

“Boating is an apprenticeship where we’re learning every day.  One of the goals of the training is to pair up an experienced marine deputy with a new jet boat operator.  Incorporating expertise with students new to jet boating is why our Law Enforcement training is such a rewarding experience for everyone,” says Persichetti.  “This is a unique course in that it is the only one in the nation that offers this type of specialized training.”

Signs will be posted at local access sites about the training operations and notices have also been sent to all the registered fishing guides in the area.  In addition to boat handling exercises in whitewater conditions, marine deputies will also learn how to dis-assemble service and reassemble jet pumps, learn anchoring and chocking techniques, and how to navigate all stages of whitewater rapids.  “Fast action and skill are required by marine officers, and this kind of training can mean the difference between a saved life or not,” Persichetti says.

The Marine Board contracts with 32 Sheriff’s Offices and the Oregon State Police for marine law enforcement services, including search and rescue operations, and boating safety education.  Contracts with the County Sheriff’s Offices are paid for through motorboat registrations and titling fees.

For more information about the Marine Board and law enforcement services, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/info/Pages/AboutUs.aspx.

###

The Marine Board is funded by registration, title fees and marine fuel taxes paid by motorized boaters.  No lottery, general fund tax dollars or local facility parking fees are used to support the agency or its programs.  Boater-paid fees go back to boaters in the form of boating safety services (on-the-water enforcement, training and equipment), education/outreach materials and boating access facility grants (boat ramps, docks, parking, construction and maintenance).  The Aquatic Invasive Species Prevention Permit program is dedicated funding to pay for border inspection stations, decontamination equipment, inspectors, and signage/outreach materials.  The Mandatory Education Program is self-supporting and revenue helps pay for education materials and boater education cards.  For more information about the Marine Board and its programs, visit www.boatoregon.com.

 




Attached Media Files: Sheriff's Office Jet Boat Image

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Employment in Oregon June 2018 New Release
Oregon Employment Department - 07/17/18 10:00 AM

Oregon Unemployment Rate at New Record Low of 4.0 Percent in June

Oregon’s unemployment rate was 4.0 percent in June, which was Oregon’s lowest unemployment rate since comparable records began in 1976. Oregon’s May unemployment rate was 4.1 percent. The U.S. unemployment rate was also 4.0 percent in June.

In June, Oregon’s nonfarm payroll employment rose by 1,900 jobs, following a revised gain of 3,200 jobs in May. Job gains were led by leisure and hospitality (+1,800 jobs) and private educational services (+1,000). Three major industries each added close to 600 jobs: health care and social assistance (+700); manufacturing (+600); and construction (+500). Several industries shed jobs in June, including retail trade (-1,000 jobs); information (-800); financial activities (-600); and transportation, warehousing and utilities (-500).

Although Oregon’s payroll employment continued to expand, the rate of growth has moderated in recent months. Job gains averaged 1,500 per month over the past three months. Over the past 12 months, 31,400 jobs were added, good for a growth rate of 1.6 percent. This growth matched that of the U.S. where over-the-year job growth was also 1.6 percent through June. Oregon’s job gains were much faster in 2013 through 2017, averaging 2.8 percent per year and reaching a peak growth rate of 3.7 percent in mid-2015.

Part of the reason for the slowdown in the rate of job growth is likely due to an unusually tight labor market. Many employers are facing increasing difficulty hiring workers. The degree of Oregon’s labor market tightness is reflected in these indicators:
• The number of people working part time for economic reasons is at the lowest since at least 2002, when comparable records began.
• The broadest measure of labor underutilization, U-6, dropped to 7.8 percent in June, which was its lowest reading since at least 2002.
• The number of Oregonians unemployed for 27 weeks or more dropped below 7,000, the lowest level since at least 2002, and far below the more than 100,000 long-term unemployed in 2010 during the aftermath of the recession.
• The number of people entering the labor market without a job was at its lowest level since at least 2000, when comparable records began.

Next Press Releases
The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the June county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, July 24th, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for July on Tuesday, August 14th. 


Notes:
All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted.

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources.

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this Official Oregon Series data unless noted otherwise. This month’s release incorporates the October, November and December 2017 tax records data. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS.

Effective with the January 2018 data, employment of Oregon’s approximately 17,000 home care workers are counted in private health care and social assistance instead of state government. The change was due to legislative action clarifying that for purposes of workforce and labor market information, home care workers are not employees of state government. The reclassification affects private sector and government monthly change figures for January 2018 and will affect over-the-year change figures through December 2018. It does not affect total payroll employment levels.

 

The pdf version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For the Deaf and Hard of Hearing population, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: Employment In Oregon June 2018 News Release

Oregon CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to hold meeting and webinar July 20
Oregon Health Authority - 07/17/18 9:58 AM

July 17, 2018

Contact: Pete Edlund, 503-559-2216, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Oregon CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to hold meeting and webinar July 20

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority's CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee

When: Friday, July 20, 9 a.m. to noon

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Room 111/112, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E., Wilsonville

Attendees can also join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/7438627555801803523 and listen-only conference line at 888-204-5984, participant code 1277166

Agenda: Welcome, consent agenda, and updates; public testimony; extended CCO 2.0 update; 2018 incentive measure program changes; 2019 measure set: information for consideration; break; finalize 2019 measure set; adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Scoring-Committee.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-559-2216, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Cultural Trust geographic reach "remarkable," says impact report; Per capita funding for culture peaks in rural Oregon (Photo)
Oregon Cultural Trust - 07/17/18 9:43 AM
2018-07/1171/116260/Trust_impact_plan_graphic.png
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/1171/116260/thumb_Trust_impact_plan_graphic.png

Salem, Ore. – A new impact study of the Oregon Cultural Trust calls its geographic reach “remarkable” and reinforces its unique role as a stable and accessible funding source for arts, heritage and humanities statewide. Produced by ECONorthwest, the report concludes that the Cultural Trust has a wide-reaching influence on people’s experience of culture in Oregon, supporting cultural activities and organizations in every county with higher per capita funding, up to $15 per capita, in rural counties where grant funding can be scarce.

“The Trust effectively allocates resources to rural areas of the state by harnessing contributions from urban areas,” said Terry Moore, ECONorthwest’s senior project director. “It serves as a nexus for the entire cultural community in Oregon and can use this position to amplify the effects of its grantmaking activities.”

The impact study focused on Cultural Trust performance between 2006 and 2016, or 10 of the 17 years since the Trust was founded. During that time donations to the Cultural Trust increased an average of 4.3 percent annually, adjusted for inflation. The non-corporate donor base grew by 7.6 percent.

Between 2006 and 2016 the Cultural Trust distributed $17.5 million in grant funds through its 45 Cultural County and Tribal Coalitions, directly to cultural nonprofits through Cultural Development grants and via its five Statewide Partners – the Oregon Arts Commission, Oregon Heritage, Oregon Historical Society, Oregon Humanities and the Oregon State Office of Historic Preservation. The funding provided $11.2 million to support 4,958 statewide projects and an additional $6.3 million in partner and collaborative grants.

“This longitudinal view of the Cultural Trust’s impact for cultural projects and programs all across Oregon is truly extraordinary,” said Cultural Trust Board Chair Chuck Sams. “The uniqueness of the Cultural Trust in the nation is testament to how highly valued culture is in our state.”

In addition, the impact of the grants was maximized by producing goods and services, generating an additional 70 percent of the grant amounts in economic value and leveraging new funding sources for required matching grants.

Report findings also indicate that the Cultural Trust has tremendous potential to continue to grow contributions and expand its impact. As one donor said, “The Cultural Trust funds culture through a diverse statewide network that ensures its grant dollars are shared wisely. It’s a great funding model – if more donors would participate it could have a transformational impact on the cultural life of our state.”

The Oregon Cultural Trust was created by the Oregon State Legislature in 2001 to lead Oregon in cultivating, growing and valuing culture. The Legislature established an innovative funding mechanism to support that mission: the Cultural Tax Credit. Oregonians who donate to an Oregon-based cultural nonprofit qualifies for the state tax credit by donating the same amount to the Cultural Trust. The program allows Oregon taxpayers who value and support culture to redirect that portion of their taxes to Cultural Trust grant programs.

The Cultural Tax Credit now generates close to $5 million per year for the Cultural Trust. Up to 60 percent of that amount is distributed to nonprofit organizations working on cultural activities in Oregon; the remainder is invested in a permanent fund for Oregon culture.

View the full impact report and/or the executive summary.

The impact report was commissioned by the Cultural Trust’s Statewide Cultural Partners:

The more than 100 projects supported by Cultural Development Grants in FY2018 include:

  • the “Racing to Change: Oregon’s Civil Rights Years” interactive exhibit at Oregon Historical Society and community programming by the Oregon Black Pioneers in Salem;
  • theater lighting and sound equipment upgrades for the Florence Events Center;
  • the renovation of the historic Baker Orpheum Theatre to become a community performing arts center in Baker City; 
  • exhibits and programs that highlight the LBGTQ community and Native youth as part of a Cultural Diversity Initiative by the High Desert Museum in Bend; and
  • transforming a major gallery at Portland Children’s Museum into The Studio - a clay, maker and multi-purpose art space for families.

For a full list of Cultural Trust grant projects, including links to Cultural County Coalitions and several hundred county projects they fund, visit www.culturaltrust.org.

Total grant funds distributed since the Cultural Trust was founded: $23 million.

# # #

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-07/1171/116260/Trust_impact_plan_graphic.png , “Los Angeles Cowboys,” one of the many photographs taken by Blake Little of the gay rodeo circuit and its participants during the late 1980s and early 1990s that were featured in a Cultural Trust-funded exhibition at Bend’s High Desert Museum in spring 20

Newly Restored Oregon Constitution on View for the First Time Outside of the State Archives in Salem (Photo)
Oregon Historical Society - 07/17/18 9:37 AM
2018-07/2861/116259/Constitution_at_OHS_1.jpg
2018-07/2861/116259/Constitution_at_OHS_1.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/2861/116259/thumb_Constitution_at_OHS_1.jpg

Portland, OR – Following a massive statewide crowdfunding campaign, the newly restored Oregon Constitution is now on view at the Oregon Historical Society through September 3, 2018. What started as a penny drive targeted at Oregon students to raise funds to preserve and exhibit the original 1857 Oregon Constitution turned into over $100,000 raised to restore this historic document. The Oregon Historical Society is proud to have joined many Oregonians in contributing to this effort, and is the first location outside of the Oregon State Archives in Salem to host the document.

Oregon Secretary of State Dennis Richardson arranged special TSA clearance as the constitution traveled from Portland to the Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC) in Andover, Massachusetts. The detailed conservation effort included digital imaging to create a record of the document prior to restoration, and some of the “before and after” photos of the constitution are on view in the Oregon Historical Society display.

Mary Beth Herkert, Director of the State Archives Division, shares an overview of the restoration in a video, and the NEDCC further details the complex conservation process in this video. Steps included repairing pages that were loose from the binding (while preserving the original binding), as well as essentially giving the pages a “bath” in order to clean the pages that were starting to discolor due to the type of ink that was used in writing the document. The full effort took a single conservationist four months to complete.

While the constitution is on view, the Oregon Historical Society will host two free public programs in the month of August to invite conversation around this important founding document:

Objects in Mirror Are Closer Than They Appear: Conversations on Citizenship and the Oregon Constitution

Presented by Manuel Padilla on Wednesday, August 8 at 7pm

Join Manuel Padilla for a dialogue on the foundations of citizenship in the Oregon constitution. The discussion will explore the local people that shaped this concept of citizenship and will then situate the conversations of the past in the current socio-political climate of the present. Have we progressed beyond the considerations and limitations of 1857? Have we transcended past Oregonians’ debates over belonging? Or, is there something of us in them, and something of them in us today?

A White Man’s Democracy: The Drafting of the Oregon State Constitution in the Era of Dred Scott

Presented by Kenneth Coleman on Wednesday, August 15 at 12pm

Kenneth Coleman will discuss the national and regional historical context of the Oregon Constitutional Convention and the ultimate outcome of debates surrounding slavery, racial exclusion, and woman suffrage. He will also consider the meaning of representational democracy in antebellum Oregon, focusing on those Oregonians who had no access to the convention or the right to vote on its final draft.

To learn more about Oregon’s road to statehood and the constructing of Oregon’s Constitution, visit www.ohs.org/constitution. Explore OHS digital history projects for more background on Oregon’s road to statehood and to view the draft copy of the Oregon State Constitution’s preamble and bill of rights that is part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library collection.

View this historic document now through September 3, 2018 at the Oregon Historical Society (1200 SW Park Avenue, Portland). The museum is open seven days a week, Monday – Saturday from 10am – 5pm and Sunday from 12pm – 5pm. Admission to the museum is currently discounted to $5 as we renovate our permanent exhibition on the third floor. Admission is free every day for OHS members and Multnomah County residents.

 

About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.




Attached Media Files: 2018-07/2861/116259/Constitution_at_OHS_1.jpg , 2018-07/2861/116259/Constitution_at_OHS_3.jpg , 2018-07/2861/116259/Constitution_at_OHS_5.jpg , 2018-07/2861/116259/Constitution_at_OHS_6.jpg

Media advisory: Silver Creek fire communications change (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/17/18 6:21 AM
Bobbi Doan, Oregon Dept of Forestry
Bobbi Doan, Oregon Dept of Forestry
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/1303/116257/thumb_Screen_Shot_2018-07-17_at_6.15.14_AM.png

Assignment editors and reports: there's been a change to the Public Information Officer operating at the Silver Creek fire inside Silver Falls State Park. Ryan Gordon with the Oregon Department of Forestry will take over as the sole PIO starting today. He will work with Oregon Parks and Recreation Department staff from the Salem headquarters to issue a daily release updating acreage, containment, and any other important changes. We expect that release will normally be published around 11 a.m. for as long as is needed, but daily circumstances may require us to shift that schedule periodically.

To make a site visit, please contact Ryan in advance. His cell phone number is 503-779-5278 and email is ryan.p.gordon@oregon.gov. Use both methods to reach him before visiting the site. Cell phone coverage at the park is very limited, but the incident command area has temporary phone and wifi service, and even if you have to leave a message, he should eventually get it and respond.

Thanks for your support so far helping us get the word out about this event.

# # #

Signing off: Bobbi Doan, Oregon Department of Forestry // Chris Havel, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department




Attached Media Files: Bobbi Doan, Oregon Dept of Forestry

Mon. 07/16/18
Oregon Acute Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Workgroup meets July 30
Oregon Health Authority - 07/16/18 4:50 PM

July 16, 2018

Oregon Acute Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Workgroup meets July 30

What: The Oregon Acute Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Workgroup is holding a public meeting to develop detailed recommendations for acute opioid prescribing that will be included as an amendment to Oregon’s existing Statewide Opioid Prescribing Guidelines.

Agenda:

  • Agenda overview and introductions.
  • Presentation: background and Oregon opioid overview.
  • Presentation: Acute Opioid Prescribing Guideline overview.
  • Discussion of draft.
  • Meeting summary and next steps.

When: Monday, July 30, 1-3 p.m. The meeting is open to the public.

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Room 1B, Portland. No conference call option is available for the public.

Background: The purpose of Oregon Acute Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Workgroup is to set a standard of care in Oregon around safe opioid prescribing for acute pain. The workgroup will develop detailed recommendations for acute opioid prescribing that will be included as an amendment to Oregon’s existing Statewide Opioid Prescribing Guidelines, and will address acute opioid prescribing in primary care, emergency departments, dentistry, and after surgical procedures.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Drew Simpson at 971-673-1033, 711 TTY or ew.r.simpson@state.or.us">drew.r.simpson@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


Man Assaults 7-11 Employee, Steals Candy (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/16/18 3:50 PM
Shepard booking photo 071418
Shepard booking photo 071418
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/6186/116244/thumb_18-14326_Shepard.jpg

WHITE CITY, Ore. – A White City man was jailed this weekend on several charges including robbery. Deputies say Mark Eugene Shepard, 44, assaulted a 7-Eleven employee who confronted him about shoplifting candy, and then fled the scene with the merchandise.

On Thursday, July 12, 2018, at 5:08 p.m. deputies responded to a report of a shoplifting and assault at the 7-Eleven store located at 2410 Antelope Road.  Employees reported a customer tried to “haggle” over the price of a package of gummy bears.  When he wasn’t satisfied with the employee's refusal to lower the price, the customer opened the package and began eating the candy. 

The employee told the customer to either pay for the candy or leave the store without it.  The customer began shouting profanities at the employee.  He “head-butted” the employee in the face and left the store on foot.  

Store managers provided surveillance video of the incident.  Deputies were able to identify the suspect in the video as Shepard, a White City-area transient. 

On Saturday, July 14, at 12:49 a.m., deputies contacted Shepard at a residence in the 2600-block of Falcon Street.  Shepard admitted to being involved in the incident at 7-Eleven.  When deputies took Shephard into custody, they located a pipe with methamphetamine residue on his person. 

Shepard was lodged in the Jackson County Jail on the following charges:  third degree robbery, fourth degree assault, harassment, third degree theft, second degree disorderly conduct, and unlawful possession of methamphetamine.  Shepard was released from jail on July 15 due to capacity restrictions.

Shepard is due to appear in Jackson County Circuit Court on August 15, 2018.  The case will be referred to the district attorney’s office for prosecution.

Case #18-14326 

###




Attached Media Files: Shepard booking photo 071418 , Surveillance image

Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee meets July 26 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 07/16/18 3:46 PM

July 16, 2018

Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee meets July 26 in Portland

What: The regular public meeting of the Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee

When: Thursday, July 26, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building Room 1C, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Please note that space is limited.

Who: The Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee is appointed by the Governor and comprised of private organizations and state agencies dedicated to the reduction of the harmful impact of Oregonians’ tobacco use.

Agenda: Tobacco Prevention and Education Program (TPEP) budget; implementation update; legislative efforts check-in; Place Matters Conference update; communications update: Central Oregon Prevention Campaign; youth survey update.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Barnard at 971-673-1347, 711 TTY or ah.barnard@state.or.us">sarah.barnard@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


Man damages the Bend Police Department and threatens to burn down the community (Photo)
Bend Police Dept. - 07/16/18 2:02 PM
2018-07/5593/116239/BPD_8725.JPG
2018-07/5593/116239/BPD_8725.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/5593/116239/thumb_BPD_8725.JPG

Date: Monday, July 16, 2018                                                                         

Case # 2018-213264                            

Date & Time of Incident: July 16, 2018 at 2:15am                                          

Type of Incident:  Criminal Mischief                                                               

Location of Incident: 555 NE 15th Street; Bend Police Department

 

Arrestee:

Samuel Wyatt Dennis                    21 year old                             Bend resident

Narrative:

 

On July 16th, 2018 a Bend Police Officer leaving their shift at 2:15 am heard a commotion near the gate of the secured parking lot of the Bend Police Department. The officer interrupted a male striking the security key pad and damaging it beyond being able to use it.

Officers made attempts to contact the suspect, but the suspect sped away in his 1998 Dodge Pickup to avoid contact. Further inspection of the police department and security video footage showed the suspect throwing an object into the secured lot, damaging a police vehicle. The suspect also placed a board through the front door handles inside the Bend Police Department lobby and leaned a heavy metal object against the door. The suspect etched letters into the front glass door and on the concrete in front of the front entry doors.

Bend Police Officers and Detectives started to investigate the case and quickly identified the suspect as Samuel Dennis. Dennis made calls to Bend Fire and Rescue mentioning burning the community to the ground. From the statements and actions by Dennis, and by essentially barricading the police department earlier in the morning, Dennis’ intentions to cause harm to public safety employees seemed legitimate.

Detectives located Dennis’ vehicle at his residence in the 62000 Bunchgrass Loop. Detectives observed Dennis’ vehicle leave for a short time, before returning to his residence. Detectives and officers attempted to contact Dennis in his driveway.

At 10:18 am, as officers attempted to arrest Dennis from his vehicle, but he refused and drove through landscaping before leading Bend Police on a pursuit. As the pursuit continued, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, the Oregon State Police and Bureau of Land Management assisted with the pursuit.

The pursuit continued at a low speeds. At 10:41, a Deputy with the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office deployed spike strips to disable the truck driven by Dennis. The pursuit took place through the east end of Bend and Deschutes County before stopping in Crook County.  

At 10:46, Dennis’ vehicle stopped on Geo Millican Road just south of Four Corners. Dennis was contained in his vehicle while Crisis Negotiators from the Central Oregon Emergency Response Team (CERT) were on scene working on a successful solution with Dennis. Other members from the CERT Team and the Oregon State Police SWAT Team responded to assist in resolving the situation.

Crook County Sherriff’s Office, Oregon Department of Transportation, Bend Fire and Rescue and BLM Fire responded to assist with this incident.

At 12:17pm, Dennis was taken into custody. Dennis was not cooperating with officers on scene and refused to exit his vehicle. Members of the CERT team deployed chemical agents to safely apprehend Dennis. He was evaluated by Bend Fire and Rescue and transported to St. Charles Bend. Dennis did suffer minor injuries while being taken into custody, as he was not complying with officer’s directions.  

Dennis is facing charges of Criminal Mischief I, Reckless Driving, Attempt to Elude and Disorderly Conduct. This investigation is still on going and will be continued by the Bend Police Detective Division.  

 

### End of Release###




Attached Media Files: 2018-07/5593/116239/BPD_8725.JPG , Damage to rear security pad 2 , Damage to rear security pad 1

Roseburg Woman Dies in House Fire
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/16/18 12:16 PM

ROSEBURG, Ore. - An early morning house fire has claimed the life of a Roseburg woman.

9-1-1 dispatchers received a call of a house fire in the 700-block of Happy Valley Road. It was reported that that there may have been a subject still in the structure at the time of the call. 

Firefighters from Douglas County Fire District #2 and Winston Dillard Fire Department responded along with a deputy. 

It was later confirmed by firefighters that one person, 66 year-old Georgia Fullerton, was located deceased in the residence. Her husband, 79 year-old Jerry Fullerton, was able to exit the residence safely.

The Douglas County Medical Examiner's Office is working in conjunction with firefighters and fire investigators. At this time, nothing appears to be suspicious.  


Deputies Make Nine Weekend DUII Arrests (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/16/18 12:08 PM
18-14567 Peninger Rd crash
18-14567 Peninger Rd crash
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/6186/116236/thumb_18-14522_both.png

JACKSON COUNTY, Ore. – Jackson County Sheriff’s Office deputies made nine arrests for impaired driving over the weekend.  Nearly half of the cases involved intoxicated drivers leaving the Jackson County Fair. 

On the night of Friday, July 13, 2018, deputies arrested two men for driving under the influence of intoxicants (DUII).  In one case, 23-year-old man was reported by a citizen as a possible impaired driver leaving the area of the fairgrounds.  Deputies caught up to him in Eagle Point, where he was arrested for DUII.  He was found to have a blood alcohol concentration of 0.24%. 

JCSO deputies arrested seven people for DUII on Saturday.  Those arrested included five men and two women, ranging in age from 21 to 58 years.  

Of the seven drivers arrested Saturday, three were leaving the fair at night.  Deputies arrested a 21-year-old man after a crash on Peninger Road.  He rear-ended another vehicle carrying two women, one of whom was pregnant.  Both women were transported by ambulance to Rogue Regional Medical Center for evaluation.  No one else was injured.

In a case unrelated to the fair, a 31-year-old woman rolled her car in the 6000-block of Griffin Lane at about 4:30 p.m. Saturday.  Her two-year-old child was also in the vehicle.  Both were transported to Rogue Regional Medical Center for evaluation.  The driver was cited and released at the hospital for DUII, reckless driving, and recklessly endangering another person. 

Notably, deputies were alerted to two of this weekend’s cases by citizens who called 911 after suspecting an impaired driver.  In each case, the caller provided identifying information and remained on the line with dispatch to help a deputy locate the suspect vehicle.

Deputies remind people to make transportation plans before they begin drinking, whether at home or attending an event. Designate a sober driver, call a cab or ride share service, or call a friend.  If you suspect an impaired driver on the roadway, call 911 immediately.

###




Attached Media Files: 18-14567 Peninger Rd crash

Silver Creek Fire Update 4 (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/16/18 12:06 PM
Silver Creek fire showing retardant coating vegetation
Silver Creek fire showing retardant coating vegetation
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/1303/116235/thumb_silver-falls-fire-and-youthcamp-05.jpg

News Release // Oregon Department of Forestry + Oregon Parks and Recreation Department
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE // July 16, 2018 // 11:50 a.m.

 

Contacts:

Chris Havel, Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept, 503-931-2590, is.havel@oregon.gov">chris.havel@oregon.gov

Bobbi Doan, Oregon Department of Forestry, 503-507-4481, obbi.j.doan@oregon.gov">bobbi.j.doan@oregon.gov

 

Silver Creek Fire Update 4

Silverton OR – This is an update on the small fire burning in a remote southeast corner of Silver Falls State Park. Smoke was first reported late in the evening on Thursday, July 12, and after confirming the location, attack began early on Friday, July 13. The cause of the fire is still under investigation.

Main points:

  • Containment is currently estimated at 35% with 75% of the perimeter lined. The area is especially challenging for firefighters due to steep slopes, thick undergrowth and numerous large snags posing safety hazards.  
  • Burning in the Howard Creek drainage, a remote, steep, timbered area over a mile from the park boundary. Improved mapping and information from firefighters on the ground, rather than fire growth, has allowed for a more accurate measurement of 27 acres. Initial acreage estimates were hampered by the dense canopy, extensive understory, and limited visibility due to smoke.
  • The number of personnel engaged remains at approximately 125.
  • Today’s aerial support includes a Type 1 helicopter, with Heavy Airtankers and Single Engine Airtankers (SEATs) available if needed.
  • Park facilities remain unchanged from earlier reports: the 214 Trailhead and several back-country trails, Howard Creek horse camp and Howard Creek day-use area, youth camp (Camp Silver Creek), and the Ranches are all closed. Howard Creek and the Ranches are closed to serve as incident command posts.
  • Other areas of the park are currently operating normally, with no interruptions to scheduled events.
  • Conditions can change quickly; watch for updates on https://bit.ly/2meFGMP.

Photos and videos from Saturday and Sunday, July 14-15 are online at https://drive.google.com/open?id=19RlLpHp3XPlNq0d-H8ZBz7SqEvDUG3Yy . Aerial video from Sunday, July 15 is included.

No injuries or facility damage have been reported.

 

###




Attached Media Files: Silver Creek fire showing retardant coating vegetation , Silver Creek fire on JUly 15, showing Camp Silver Creek youth camp in foreground

***Update-Names Released***Josephine County man Kills ex-girlfriend and then takes his own life - Josephine County
Oregon State Police - 07/16/18 11:55 AM

UPDATE NAMES RELEASED

The names are being released after the families were notified. The victim, 27 year old, Kristina L. Mehaffey was from the Josephine County area. The suspect, 28 year old, Jeremy L Sweet, also from Josephine County.

 

END UPDATE

 

On July 11, 2018 at approximately 11:00PM, Oregon State Troopers responded to a domestic disturbance at an address in the Merlin area. When Troopers arrived they located a passenger van in the driveway and the female operator was deceased. Approximately 1 mile from this scene a second vehicle was located and the male driver was pronounced deceased from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot. The investigation has determined that the male had confronted the female, killing her and then took his own life.  

The names will be released at a later time once the families have been notified. No other information is available at this time.


Oregon Man Sentenced to 70 Months in Federal Prison for Detonating Explosive Device in Fred Meyer Store
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 07/16/18 11:22 AM

PORTLAND, Ore. – Monte Robin Kaija, Jr., 47, of Portland, was sentenced today to 70 months in federal prison for detonating a small explosive device at a Fred Meyer store in Southeast Portland, and later possessing a homemade metal pipe bomb.

According to court documents, on May 21, 2016, the Portland Police Bureau (PPB) received a report of an individual placing a small pipe bomb made of PVC in an aisle of a Fred Meyer store on SE 82nd Avenue in Portland. Portland Fire & Rescue were dispatched to assist PPB with their response. Kaija detonated the device shortly before police arrived on scene, causing damage to a single aisle. Nobody was injured in the explosion, and Kaija fled. While processing the scene, PPB officers identified several fragments of white plastic PVC pipe, pieces of white plastic PVC end caps, electrical tape, and a granular, power-like substance.

After analyzing the materials collected on scene, the Oregon State Police Lab notified PPB that a DNA profile had been collected from a small piece of electrical tape. The DNA profile was matched to Kaija. On August 31, 2016, PPB officers arrested Kaija in a motorhome on SE 96th Avenue in Portland, and discovered a homemade metal pipe bomb in his motorhome.  A certified bomb technician assigned to the Portland Metropolitan Explosive Disposal Unit responded to the scene and rendered the device safe. As a convicted felon, he was not allowed to possess the destructive devices.

Kaija previously pleaded guilty to two counts of possession of an unregistered destructive device in violation of 26 U.S.C. §§ 5841, 5861(d), and 5871 on December 12, 2016. Upon completion of his prison sentence, Kaija will be on supervised release for three years.

The PPB and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) investigated this case. It was prosecuted by Hannah Horsley and Paul T. Maloney, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2018-07/6325/116234/SENTENCING-Kaija-Final.pdf

$1.1 million in Powerball prizes are still unclaimed
Oregon Lottery - 07/16/18 9:26 AM

July 16, 2018 - Salem, Ore. – While the $150 million winning Powerball ticket was claimed last week, there are several other Powerball prizes that have gone unclaimed.

More than $1.1 million in Powerball prizes are scheduled to expire this November if players with the winning tickets don’t come forward. Prizes are good for one year from the draw date of the game. Two of the unclaimed prizes were purchased in Portland and one in Troutdale. Prizes that are not claimed are transferred to the state Economic Development Fund.

The largest of the unclaimed prizes is a $1 million Powerball prize that was won last November 25. The ticket was sold in Portland and the winning numbers are 08-13-27-53-54 with a Powerball of 04. The player matched five numbers but missed the Powerball number.

There are also two $50,000 Powerball prizes from the Nov. 15 drawing that are also still unclaimed. Players matched four numbers and the Powerball. The numbers for that draw are 23-32-44-48-50 with a Powerball of 25.

“I don’t know anyone who would turn down a $50,000 prize,” said Patrick Johnson, public information specialist with the Oregon Lottery. “Anyone who purchased Powerball tickets in the Portland area back in November make sure you check your tickets. If you have a winning ticket, sign the back immediately and claim it at the Oregon Lottery.”

All unclaimed prizes go into the state’s Economic Development Fund. Each year approximately $5 million goes into the fund. In fiscal year 2016, more than $5.3 million in unclaimed prizes were transferred to the fund. In fiscal year 2017, more than $5.4 million.

There is also an unclaimed $50,000 Win for Life prize which was sold in Portland on Sept. 30 of 2017.

Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. The Oregon Lottery reminds players to always sign the back of their Lottery tickets, regardless of the game. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org


UPDATE - Double fatality crash Hwy 211 - Clackamas County
Oregon State Police - 07/16/18 8:38 AM

Preliminary investigation reveals a 2005 Mini Cooper operated by Jesus David Jay THARP, age 33 of Colton, was westbound on Oswalt Rd. when he failed to stop for a stop sign at the intersection of Oswalt and Hwy 211. The Mini Cooper collided with a 2000 Holr motor home operated by Steven Gary DAVIS, age 67 of Estacada. 

THARP and the passenger in the Mini Cooper Dylan James TAYLOR, age 28 of Burns, sustained fatal injuries in the crash and were pronounced deceased at the scene.

Steven DAVIS and the passenger in the motor home Jeanette Sue DAVIS, age 54 of Estacada, sustained non-life threatening injuries and were transported to the hospital.  

 

On July 15, 2018 at approximately 9;15 AM Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to the report of a two vehicle crash on Hwy 211 near mp 20. 

Two people are confirm deceased and two people have been transported to the hospital for injuries.

A detour is in place, however expect delays for several hours while the troopers investigate.

No more information to be released at this time.


Sun. 07/15/18
Silver Creek Fire Update 3
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/15/18 10:56 AM

News Release // Oregon Parks and Recreation Department + Oregon Department of Forestry

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE // July 15, 2018 // 11 a.m.

 

Contacts:

Chris Havel, Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept, 503-931-2590, is.havel@oregon.gov">chris.havel@oregon.gov

Bobbi Doan, Oregon Department of Forestry, 503-507-4481, obbi.j.doan@oregon.gov">bobbi.j.doan@oregon.gov

 

Silver Creek Fire Update 3

Silverton OR – This is an update on the small fire burning in a remote southeast corner of Silver Falls State Park. Smoke was first reported late in the evening on Thursday, July 12, and after confirming the location, attack began early on Friday, July 13.

Main points:

  • It’s burning in the Howard Creek drainage, a remote, steep, timbered area over a mile from the park boundary. The fire is currently estimated at 27 acres (see attached rough map). A good portion of the change in acreage over the last day is due to improved mapping and information from firefighters on the ground rather than fire growth. Initial acreage estimates were hampered by the dense canopy, extensive understory, and limited visibility due to smoke.
  • Containment is currently estimated at 25%. The area is especially challenging for firefighters due to steep slopes and the nature of a mature forest; thick undergrowth slows progress and snags pose a falling hazard. Firefighter and public safety remains priority for all involved.
  • The number of personnel engaged is approximately 125.
  • The current aerial support includes two Type 2 helicopters and a Type 1 helicopter. Heavy Airtankers and Single Engine Airtankers (SEATs) are on standby if needed.
  • Park facilities remain unchanged from earlier reports: the 214 Trailhead and several back-country trails, Howard Creek horse camp and Howard Creek day-use area, youth camp (Camp Silver Creek), and the Ranches are all closed. Howard Creek and the Ranches are closed to serve as incident command posts.
  • All other areas of the park are currently operating normally, with no interruptions to scheduled events. Visitors are enjoying the Historic Silver Falls Day event (https://silverfallsstatepark.wordpress.com/category/historic-silver-falls-days/), and the Silver Falls Lodge and Conference Center (http://silverfallslodge.com/) continues to serve customers, including a wedding reception.
  • Conditions can change quickly; watch for updates on https://bit.ly/2meFGMP.

Photos and videos from Saturday, July 14 are online at https://drive.google.com/open?id=19RlLpHp3XPlNq0d-H8ZBz7SqEvDUG3Yy

No injuries or facility damage have been reported.

 

###




Attached Media Files: Map showing location and approximate size of fire

"Scoop It Forward" Promotes Random Acts of Ice Cream (Photo)
Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council - 07/15/18 6:21 AM
Special ice cream delivery to police
Special ice cream delivery to police
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/4131/116217/thumb_6_Special_ice_cream_delivery_to_Tigard_Police.JPG

Today is National Ice Cream Day, which also kicks off a celebration of appreciation called “Scoop It Forward.” Supported by Oregon’s dairy farmers and processors, the weeklong campaign, from July 15 to 22, encourages people to show appreciation for one another through random acts of ice cream.

Ice cream is one of those things that just makes everything better, and we saw this as a simple way to bring positivity and joy to people’s lives in surprising and unexpected ways,” said Josh Thomas, Senior Director of Communications for the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council. “Random acts of kindness can be contagious, and our call to action is simply for people to spread the good and pay it forward.”

Leading up to this week, there have already been surprise ice cream deliveries to a playground, a skate park, a police station and Pioneer Courthouse Square in downtown Portland. And that’s just the beginning. Each person who receives ice cream is encouraged to recognize at least two others with a special delivery of their own.

Suggestions include recognizing family, friends, neighbors, a favorite teacher, local police or fire departments or even complete strangers. Photos and video from these moments will be shared on social media using the hashtag #ScoopItForward. Those who aren’t able to give ice cream are encouraged to send ice cream emojis with a message of appreciation. Organizers hope the positivity will spread far and wide.

“This is such a simple gesture that anybody can do,” said Thomas. “You can’t buy happiness, but you can buy ice cream, and that’s pretty close”

# # #

NOTE: We can arrange surprise deliveries for photos or videos this week. Call us to make arrangements.

Oregon ice cream brands include:

  • Alden’s Organic
  • Alpenrose
  • Cascade Glacier
  • Eberhards
  • Julie’s Organic
  • Lochmead
  • Ruby Jewel
  • Salt and Straw
  • Sunshine
  • Tillamook
  • Upstar
  • Umpqua
  • YoCream



Attached Media Files: Special ice cream delivery to police , Dairy Princess Ambassadors free ice cream coupons , Playground with kids , Playground ice cream delivery for kids , Playground free ice cream , A Scoop It Forward logo

Silver Creek Fire Update 2 (Photo) REVISED
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/15/18 4:57 AM
Firefighter on the line at the Silver Creek Fire, Courtesy Oregon Dept of Forestry
Firefighter on the line at the Silver Creek Fire, Courtesy Oregon Dept of Forestry
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/1303/116214/thumb_20180714_152931.jpg

[This news release was revised to add a link to photos and videos: https://drive.google.com/open?id=19RlLpHp3XPlNq0d-H8ZBz7SqEvDUG3Yy]

 

News Release // Oregon Department of Forestry + Oregon Parks and Recreation Department

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE // July 14, 2018 // 5:20 p.m.

 

Contacts:

Chris Havel, Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept, 503-931-2590, is.havel@oregon.gov">chris.havel@oregon.gov

Bobbi Doan, Oregon Department of Forestry, 503-507-4481, obbi.j.doan@oregon.gov">bobbi.j.doan@oregon.gov

 

Silver Creek Fire Update 2

Silverton OR – This is an update on the small fire burning in a remote southeast corner of Silver Falls State Park. Smoke was first reported late in the evening on Thursday, July 12.

Main points:

  • After successfully forging trails to reach the fire, ground and air attacks made headway and containment is currently at 10%.
  • The fire is currently estimated at 12-15 acres and is burning in the Howard Creek drainage, a remote, steep, timbered area over a mile from the park boundary.
  • Approximately 110 personnel from Oregon Department of Forestry and partner organizations are involved, with most directly engaged in firefighting on the ground.
  • The aerial component involves Heavy Airtankers, Single Engine Airtankers (SEATs), helicopter, and ground support.
  • Park facilities remain unchanged from earlier reports: the 214 Trailhead and several back-country trails, Howard Creek horse camp and day-use area, youth camp (Camp Silver Creek), and the Ranches are all closed. Howard Creek and the Ranches are closed to serve as command posts. Other areas of the park are currently operating normally, with no interruptions to scheduled events.
  • Conditions can change quickly; watch for updates on https://bit.ly/2meFGMP.

The Oregon Department of Forestry and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department expect to issue one update daily starting Sunday, July 15 unless conditions change dramatically. Photographs and video from the active area of the fire will be posted later this evening. REVISED: Photos and videos frlom July 14 are available for download at https://drive.google.com/open?id=19RlLpHp3XPlNq0d-H8ZBz7SqEvDUG3Yy .

No injuries or facility damage have been reported.

###




Attached Media Files: Firefighter on the line at the Silver Creek Fire, Courtesy Oregon Dept of Forestry

Sat. 07/14/18
Both drivers killed in crash on Hwy 99W (Lane County)
Oregon State Police - 07/14/18 4:46 PM

On Friday July 13, 2018 at approximately 4:35 PM, Oregon State Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on SR-99W near milepost 111, south of Junction City.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a black 1995 Chevrolet Tahoe SUV, operated by Aleeshaeseana Gordon-Germain, age 40, of Junction City was traveling north on SR-99W when for an unknown reason crossed over into the southbound lanes of travel and crashed head on into a southbound blue 2004 Chevrolet Silverado Pickup, operated by William Galt IV, age 22, of Eugene.

Both drivers suffered fatal injuries and were pronounced deceased on scene. 

OSP Troopers were assisted by Junction City Fire, Junction City PD, Lane County Sheriff’s Office, ODOT, and T&M Towing.

The southbound lane of SR-99W was shut down for approximately 4 hours.


Over 100 firefighters are now engaged on the Silver Creek Fire in Marion County (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/14/18 10:57 AM
ODF Aviation Manager Neal Laugle discusses with ODF and local fire teams the agency's air attack strategy on the Silver Creek Fire.
ODF Aviation Manager Neal Laugle discusses with ODF and local fire teams the agency's air attack strategy on the Silver Creek Fire.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/1072/116208/thumb_IMG_2557.JPG

SILVER FALLS STATE PARK, Ore. – The number of firefighting personnel engaged on the Silver Creek Fire at Silver Falls State Park has grown to about 110. The Oregon Department of Forestry and Drakes Crossing Rural Fire Protection District both are engaged on the fire along with hand crews from Coffee Creek Correctional Facility. The fire’s size is estimated at 12 acres. The cause is under investigation.

The Howard Creek Horse Camp within the park has been closed to the public so it can be used as a staging area for firefighting operations. Camp Silver Creek (also known as the Y Camp) about a mile from the fire’s location in the southeast part of the park was evacuated yesterday and remains closed. Oregon State Parks is reporting that also closed are all back-country trails on the east side of the park, The Ranches, and 214 Trailhead.  The rest of the park and events there are unaffected and remain open but visitors are cautioned to be alert to firefighting activity and traffic. For the latest on park and trail closures, check Oregon State Park’s fire closures web page

The fire’s Incident Commander Brent O’Nion with ODF said this morning that, “Because the fire is in steep, heavily timbered terrain in a section of the park away from roads and trails, getting ground crews up to the fire has been challenging. Firefighter safety is a concern and our number one priority right now as we battle this blaze.”

O’Nion said ODF and Drakes Crossing firefighters responded to the initial report of fire Thursday night and searched until 1 a.m. trying to locate the fire. The search resumed at daybreak Friday morning, when the fire – estimated at less than an acre – was finally located beneath thick timber.

“We had solid initial attack on the fire from the air yesterday, with response from a helicopter, single-engine airtankers and large airtankers,” said O’Nion. “That gave our firefighters time to work their way toward the fire so they could begin engaging on it.”

O’Nion lauded the continuing close collaboration with local firefighters and parks personnel on the fire.

# # #




Attached Media Files: ODF Aviation Manager Neal Laugle discusses with ODF and local fire teams the agency's air attack strategy on the Silver Creek Fire.

Media Advisory: Silver Creek Fire
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/14/18 7:40 AM

Silverton OR -- For assignment editors: Firefighters will be working the Silver Creek Fire inside Silver Falls State Park today. A media area has been set up at the park office. The media area on Friday, July 13 was in the F Loop parking lot, but that lot is in use by visitors today and is not available for media today. Any media who wish to be on site to cover the fire should come to the main state park office near the campground check-in booth.

The fire is not visible from public areas of the park, and that includes the park office. Cell phone reception is very limited; AT&T functions inside the park, but other carriers do not. Past news crews have also noted it is difficult to get a satellite signal out. To the extent possible, Public Information Officers will present on-site briefings from fire crew leaders and publish periodic news releases with photos as new information becomes available.

 

 


Fri. 07/13/18
Silver Creek Fire Update 1 (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/13/18 11:07 PM
2018-07/1303/116201/silver-creek-fire-aerial-01.jpg
2018-07/1303/116201/silver-creek-fire-aerial-01.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/1303/116201/thumb_silver-creek-fire-aerial-01.jpg

News Release // Oregon Parks and Recreation Department + Oregon Department of Forestry

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE // July 13, 2018 11 p.m.

 

Contacts:

Chris Havel, Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept, 503-931-2590, is.havel@oregon.gov">chris.havel@oregon.gov

Bobbi Doan, Oregon Department of Forestry, 503-507-4481, bobbi.j.doan@oregon.gov

 

Silver Creek Fire Update 1

Silverton OR – This is an update on a small fire burning in a remote southeast corner of Silver Falls State Park. Smoke was first reported late in the evening on Thursday, July 12. Crews from Drakes Crossing Fire District responded quickly, but the small size of the fire and thick undergrowth made it difficult to pinpoint the source before darkness made further work impossible. Crews from the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) joined Drakes Friday, July 13 to cut a trail toward the fire while aviation resources dropped water and retardant through the day.

Main points:

  • The fire is currently estimated at 10 acres and is burning in remote, steep, timbered terrain.
  • ODF crews are still actively engaged on the fire. Additional resources will join the effort and engage the fire early in the morning Saturday, July 14.
  • Oregon Department of Forestry and local fire crews are engaging with Heavy Airtankers, Single Engine Airtankers (SEATs), helicopter and ground support.
  • A YMCA summer camp at Camp Silver Creek, a facility inside the park about a mile from the fire, ended a day early as a precaution, with 142 youth and several dozen staff leaving between 4-5 p.m.
  • While other areas of the park are currently scheduled to open on Saturday, July 14, there will be abundant firefighter equipment and aircraft in the area. Any visitors who plan to visit the park this weekend are advised to wait until more information is available about the status of this small fire.
  • Conditions can change quickly; watch for updates on https://bit.ly/2meFGMP.

 

No injuries or facility damage have been reported.

###




Attached Media Files: 2018-07/1303/116201/silver-creek-fire-aerial-01.jpg

Small fire closes back-country trails at Silver Falls
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/13/18 6:08 PM

News Release //  Oregon Parks and Recreation Department + Oregon Department of Forestry

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE // July 13, 2018 + 6 p.m.

 

Contacts:

Chris Havel, Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept, 503-931-2590, is.havel@oregon.gov">chris.havel@oregon.gov

Bobbi Doan, Oregon Department of Forestry, 503-507-4481, bobbi.j.doan@oregon.gov

 

Small fire closes back-country trails at Silver Falls

Silverton OR – A fire, currently less than 6 acres, in the southeastern corner of Silver Falls State Park has forced the closure of several back-country trails. Drakes Crossing Fire District and the Oregon Department of Forestry have responded with  aircraft and 30 personnel.

Main points:

  • There is a small fire -- less than 6 acres -- near the eastern boundary of Silver Falls State Park.
  • Back country trails in the area are closed. See attached map. Camp Silver Creek, a YMCA youth camp, is in the affected area and was in use, but all children and staff, totalling about 185 people, have left the site.
  • Oregon Department of Forestry and local fire crews are engaged with Heavy Airtanker, Single Engine Airtankers (SEATs), helicopter  and ground support.
  • While other areas of the park remain open, there will be equipment and aircraft in the area. Any visitors who planned to visit the park are advised to wait until more information is available about the status of this small fire.
  • Conditions can change quickly; watch for updates on https://bit.ly/2meFGMP.

 

No injuries or facility damage have been reported.

###




Attached Media Files: 2018-07/1303/116199/sf-fire-trail-closure-20180713b.pdf

Junction City Traffic Crash Claims Two Lives
Junction City Police - 07/13/18 5:27 PM

At approximately 4:34 PM on Friday, July 13, 2018 the Junction City Police Department received a report of a two-vehicle traffic crash at the intersection of Hwy 99S and Prairie Rd., in Junction City, Oregon.  Junction City Police arrived on scene at approximately 4:38 PM and Junction City Fire arrived at about 4:40 PM.  Shortly after their arrival, responding units determined the drivers of both vehicles were deceased.  The identity of the involved parties will be withheld until notification of family has been made.

Both south-bound lanes of traffic are completely closed, while one north-bound lane remains open. The Oregon State Police Crash Reconstruction Team will be investigating.  The Oregon Department Of Transportation Incident Response Team is on site and handling traffic control.  The traffic patterns around the crash scene are subject to change as the investigation evolves.

Further information will be released when possible.


Fire Station to Temporarily Relocate (Photo)
Roseburg Fire Department - 07/13/18 4:54 PM
Image 1
Image 1
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/5568/116197/thumb_Image_1_-_St._2_Relocation.jpg

The City of Roseburg Fire Department will be temporarily relocating Station 2, currently located at 2177 W. Harvard on Sunday, July 15, 2018 at 8 a.m., while seismic rehabilitation construction is occurring.   The temporary location for Station 2 will be located at Stewart Park.

The seismic rehabilitation construction is an effort to strengthen the structural integrity of the fire stations in case of a catastrophic earthquake.  The fire stations will then be able to serve as an emergency operations center in case of a community wide disaster.

During the relocation, department incident response will remain the same and personnel will continue to provide a high level of service to the citizens of Roseburg.  The relocation of the station is expected to last until late summer or early fall. 

For the latest information regarding the City of Roseburg Fire Department, please visit our website at www.cityofroseburg.org or like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/roseburgfire.




Attached Media Files: Image 1

Notice of Emergency Closure of Public Lands in Jackson County (Photo)
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 07/13/18 4:25 PM
CSNM Road and Area Closure
CSNM Road and Area Closure
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/5514/116194/thumb_07_13_CSNM__Road_and_Area_closures_Fire_2018.jpg

Medford, Ore. –  The Bureau of Land Management, Medford District in cooperation with the Jackson County Sheriff's Department and the Oregon Department of Forestry Southwest Oregon District, is giving notice that public lands southeast of Ashland, Oregon, as described below are closed to all unauthorized entry, effective immediately and remaining in effect until the Klamathon Fire is declared controlled, or until such time as the BLM Medford District Manager determines public entry is safe.

This closure impacts the following areas: Emigrant Creek Road, Baldy Creek Road, Soda Mountain Road, Pilot Rock Road, the Lone Pilot Trail, and the Pacific Crest Trail from Highway 66 west to the boundary of Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument. Additionally, all BLM lands and roads within Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument within the closure area marked on the map are closed.  Please see attached map.

This emergency closure is necessary to ensure public safety, land health, and resource integrity during firefighting activities. Potential fire activity and suppression activities preclude public access. The areas affected by this closure order will be posted with appropriate regulatory signs at main access and entry points.

BLM will post closure signs at main entry points to the area. You may obtain maps of the closure area and information from the Medford District Office.

BLM Medford District Office

3040 Biddle Road

Medford, OR 97504

Phone: 541-618-2200

E-mail: LM_OR_MD_Mail@blm.gov">BLM_OR_MD_Mail@blm.gov

Additional information about the current status of fires in Oregon/Washington is available at the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center:  https://gacc.nifc.gov/nwcc/

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska.  The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation.  The agency's mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America's public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.  Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $75 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2016 - more than any other agency in the Department of the Interior.  These activities supported more than 372,000 jobs.




Attached Media Files: CSNM Road and Area Closure

Child Welfare Advisory Committee meets Wednesday, July 18 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 07/13/18 3:59 PM

July 13, 2018

Contact: Christine Stone, 503-602-8027; istine.l.stone@state.or.us">christine.l.stone@state.or.us.

Child Welfare Advisory Committee meets Wednesday, July 18 in Salem

The Child Welfare Advisory Committee meets Wednesday, July 18, 9 a.m. to noon at the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, Room 166, 500 Summer St. NE, Salem. The meeting is open to the public.

Agenda will be added when available.

About the Child Welfare Advisory Committee: The legislative-mandated 21-member Child Welfare Advisory Committee counsels the agency on the development and administration of the policies, programs and practices.

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities.

For questions about this meeting, please contact: Cheloya.D.Chase@state.or.us; 503-945-6731.

                                                             # # #


Girl Scouts Reach for the Stars, Envision STEM Future at Pine Mountain Observatory in Central Oregon (Public Viewing Friday Evening) (Photo)
Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington - 07/13/18 3:26 PM
Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington Astronomy Adventure
Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington Astronomy Adventure
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-06/6250/115629/thumb_27908150_10154928262475882_3676806621651358207_o.jpg

Girl Scouts Reach for the Stars, Envision STEM Future at Pine Mountain Observatory in Central Oregon

Public Viewing TONIGHT, Friday, 7/13/18

Girls from around the nation (including girls from Oregon and Washington) to experience hands-on astronomy exploration, real-world skills thanks to NASA, the SETI Institute and the University of Oregon

PORTLAND, Ore. – July 13, 2018 – Girl Scouts from throughout the United States have stellar STEM opportunities this summer, thanks to the "Reaching for the Stars: NASA Science for Girl Scouts," SETI Institute’s cooperative agreement with NASA.

“Girls will have a chance to make friends from throughout the country while sleeping out under the stars in a National Forest,” says Shannon Joseph, STEM Specialist for Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington. “The girls will learn to operate telescopes, engage in solar and dark sky observations, collect and analyze data and flex their leadership muscles. And, while they’re having a great time, they're also getting a chance to see a future for themselves in the STEM fields.”

“This is an exceptional opportunity to embrace the Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington and Pine Mountain Observatory into our scope of work,” says Pamela Harman, Acting Director of Education at the SETI Institute. “The local Girl Scout council will deliver an excellent camping experience, the Observatory will deliver dark skies and observing opportunities and the SETI Institute will lead the girls through activities they can take home to their local troops and councils.”

“Pine Mountain Observatory (PMO) and UO Physics are excited to support this new program! We especially look forward to having Girl Scouts visit the observatory for an extended stay,” says Scott Fisher, Director of PMO. “The four-day excursion will give the girls a chance to fully engage with PMO and the STEM experience. It is my hope that all of our visitors leave the summit with a new appreciation for the universe we inhabit, as well as a genuine positive experience with the environment, the observatory, and most importantly, science itself. I hope to see these Girl Scouts pursue studies in Physics or Astronomy in the near future.”

WHO

Ten (10) Girl Scouts from throughout the United States, including Girl Scouts from Oregon (Portland and Milwaukie) and Washington, will participate in an Astronomy Adventure.

The girls will join University of Oregon undergraduate women, the Observatory Director, and other professional instructors for solar observing by day, deep sky observing by night, and camping in the beautiful Deschutes National Forest of Central Oregon.

WHAT THE PARTICIPANTS WILL DO

  • Operate telescopes and engage in solar observation
  • Collect data, learn how to manipulate data into an image
  • Explore fun astronomy activities
  • Flex leadership muscles
  • Develop new astronomy expertise
  • Meet new friends from across the USA
  • Sleep out under the stars in a National Forest
  • Geocaching
  • Camp, build campfires (weather dependent) and develop outdoor skills

Photography by Justin Hartney http://www.justinhartney.com/

WHEN

Girls Scouts will participate in the Astronomy Adventure from July 10-14, 2018

Public Viewing Friday Evening (7/13/18)

The public is welcome for viewing on the evening of Friday, July 13, 2018. Programs commence at approximately 8:30 p.m., around sunset. Groups of 8 or more are requited to provide advance notification. For information, scheduling and questions, please contact:

Alton Lukem Operations Manager, Pine Mountain Observatory

541-382-8331 | aluken@uoregon.edu

GSOSW staff on-site at Pine Mountain Observatory:

Jen Akins,  Travel Pathway Program Specialist
541-499-1446, Mobile | jakins@girlscoutsosw.org

Shannon Joseph, STEM Program Specialist, sjoseph@girlscoutsosw.org

WHERE

Pine Mountain Observatory in the Deschutes National Forest of Central Oregon

Pine Mountain Observatory, in the Deschutes National Forest of Central Oregon, offers a unique opportunity to observe the skies from mountaintop telescopes and learn about astronomy.

For more information, please visit: https://pmo.uoregon.edu/.

Live camera at Pine Mountain Observatory:

http://128.223.164.214/view/view.shtml?id=83&imagepath=%2Fmjpg%2Fvideo.mjpg&size=1

WHY

Research shows women are still vastly under-represented in STEM fields and exposing girls to these subjects at a young age is vital to ignite their curiosity and close this gap. Girl Scouts, the SETI Institute and the University of Oregon support helping young women succeed in working in these impact fields.

HOW

The SETI Institute is leading a five-year program called “Reaching for the Stars: NASA Science for Girl Scouts,” which NASA’s Science Mission Directorate will fund through 2020.

To learn more, please visit: https://www.girlscouts.org/en/about-girl-scouts/our-partners/SETI-institute.html

“Girl Scouts, the SETI Institute and the University of Oregon share a passion for inspiring and empowering the next generation of female leaders through science, technology, engineering, and math programs,” says Karen Hill, Chief Executive Officer for Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington. “This exciting collaboration gives girls rare hands-on experiences that broaden their view of our world, our solar system, and most importantly of their own future potential in STEM and beyond.”

ABOUT THE GIRLS

Ten Girl Scouts – hailing from Arizona, Oklahoma, Oregon (Portland and Milwaukie), Maine, Massachusetts, Utah, Vermont, Virginia and Washington – will participate in the program. While they come from different places and have a variety of interests, from speech and debate to mountain biking, film club to violin, the girls all share a strong interest in astronomy, engineering and physics. In their own words:

“When I was little, I wanted to be an astronaut so I could explore outer space and perhaps even travel to another planet. I’ve visited two observatories and each time I get to glimpse through the lens, I fall in love with our world a little bit more.”

“This trip will give me the chance to explore the topic of astronomy and to ask specific questions about studying science in college and what to expect as a woman in the STEM fields.”

“In the future, I’d like to be an engineer and work with satellites and robots/rovers of NASA to gather scientific data to learn more about the universe we live in. This program will allow me to learn more about operating telescopes, and exploring the many scientific and engineering endeavors astronomy has to offer.”

MAKING AN IMPACT: GIRL SCOUT ALUMNA SECURES NASA INTERNSHIP
Programming such as this Astronomy Adventure make an impact. Participation in a Girl Scout Destinations trip to Space Camp in Huntsville, Alabama in summer 2017 inspired Rosemary Williams, Girl Scout alumna from GSOSW Troop 20022, to reach for her dreams and seek a future in space science. Rosemary has attained a paid 10-week internship with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) this summer, and she is currently a mechanical engineering major at Oregon State University.

"Going to work at NASA has been my dream for a very long time," says Rosemary Williams, engineering student at Oregon State University and Girl Scout alumna from Troop 20022 in Oregon. "When I found out I would be an intern at NASA Ames Research Center this summer I was absolutely over the moon. I am incredibly excited for this opportunity and I'm so ready to be surrounded by people who share my love for math and science and, most importantly, for space."

Rosemary Williams is available for media interviews by phone, or on-site at NASA in Florida. Interested media should contact communications@girlscoutsosw.org.

INTERESTED MEDIA

Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington’s

ABOUT GIRL SCOUTS OF OREGON AND SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON | GSOSW

Our council serves 13,955 girls in 38 counties with the help of over 10,000 volunteers. The Girl Scout mission is to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. Every opportunity in Girl Scouting develops these essential skills in an all-girl, inclusive, safe environment. For more information, please visit girlscoutsosw.org.

OTHER GSOSW STEM PROGRAMMING

Girl Scout Astronomy Club Training At Goddard Space Flight Center—This week, teams from ten selected Girl Scout councils, including Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington, are taking part in an intensive weeklong space science training at NASA’s premier research facility in Greenbelt, Maryland. Teams are made up of two high school Girl Scouts (entering grades 9, 10 OR 11 in Fall 2018), one Girl Scout volunteer, and one amateur astronomer. Participants will learn how to start their own astronomy club back home and have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to connect directly with NASA scientists.

To learn more about other GSOSW STEM program opportunities, please visit:

http://www.girlscoutsosw.org/en/our-council/news/2018/to_the_moon_and_back.html

http://www.girlscoutsosw.org/en/our-council/news/2018/april_is_stem_month_.html

ABOUT GIRL SCOUTS OF THE U.S.A. (GSUSA)

The Girl Scout mission is to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. The impact of Girl Scouts in the United States is reflected in the fact that 90 percent of female astronauts, 80 percent of female technology leaders and 75 percent of female senators are Girl Scout alumnae. To learn more about Girl Scouts of the U.S.A., visit girlscouts.org.

About the GSUSA STEM Pledge, https://www.girlscouts.org/en/press-room/press-room/news-releases/2017/girl-scouts-announces-STEM-pledge.html

About GSUSA STEM Programming, https://www.girlscouts.org/en/about-girl-scouts/girl-scouts-and-stem.html

ABOUT THE SETI INSTITUTE

Founded in 1984, the SETI Institute is a non-profit, multi-disciplinary research and education organization whose mission is to explore, understand, and explain the origin and nature of life in the universe. Our research encompasses the physical and biological sciences and leverages expertise in data analytics, machine learning and advanced signal detection technologies. The Institute is a distinguished research partner for industry, academia and government agencies, including NASA and NSF. To connect with the SETI Institute, visit www.seti.org.

ABOUT NASA

NASA leads the nation on a great journey of discovery, seeking new knowledge and understanding of our Sun, Earth, solar system, and the universe. The NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) searches for answers across three overarching themes: Safeguarding and improving life on Earth, searching for life elsewhere, and discovering the secrets of the Universe. SMD’s STEM Science Activation program advances STEM to improve U.S. scientific literacy through the leveraging of partners such as Girl Scouts of the USA and the SETI Institute. 

“Reaching for the Stars: NASA Science for Girl Scouts” is based upon work supported by NASA Science under cooperative agreement No. NNX16AB90A. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.




Attached Media Files: Girl Scouts SETI NASA Astronomy Adventure Press Release , Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington Astronomy Adventure , From Pine Mtn Observatory w/ robotic telescope June 2018 , Pine Mtn Observatory by Justin Hartney , Rosemary Williams Girl Scout and NASA Intern , Rosemary Williams NASA Intern and Girl Scout , Girl Scouts Pine Mountain Observatory , Girl Scouts Pine Mountain Observatory

Three Gypsy Joker Motorcycle Club Members and Associates Indicted for Murder and Kidnapping in Aid of Racketeering
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 07/13/18 2:45 PM

Club members accused of kidnapping, torturing and murdering a former club member and resident of southeast Portland

PORTLAND. Ore. – A federal grand jury has returned a four-count indictment charging three members and associates of the Gypsy Joker Outlaw Motorcycle Club (GJOMC) for racketeering, kidnapping and murder. The indictment was returned on June 28, 2018 and unsealed today.

The indictment was announced by Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General John P. Cronan of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division; Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon; Darek Pleasants, Special Agent in Charge of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosive’s (ATF) Seattle Field Division; and Danielle Outlaw, Chief of Police of the Portland Police Bureau (PPB).

“The defendants allegedly violently kidnapped and murdered Robert Huggins to maintain and advance their positions in the Gypsy Joker Outlaw Motorcycle gang,” said Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Cronan. “This indictment is an important step toward dismantling this violent gang, and should send a clear message that the Department of Justice will bring to justice those who commit such heinous criminals mes on our streets.”

“Pursuing organized criminal organizations and individual members that commit violent crimes and threaten public safety is a top priority for the Department of Justice and the U.S. Attorney’s Office in the District of Oregon,” said U.S. Attorney Williams. “We will use every law enforcement tool available to hold members of criminal organizations accountable for their violent and lawless criminal gang activity.”

“ATF remains committed to combatting violent crime organizations that endanger our communities,” said SAC Pleasants. “ATF will always stand shoulder to shoulder with our law enforcement partners to protect the public.”

“The Portland Police Bureau is proud to be a part of this collaborative effort that resulted in the indictment of people engaged in violent activity,” said Chief Outlaw. “Violent crime deeply affects our community and by working in partnership, we can use effective strategies to locate those individuals who are responsible for violence and hold them accountable.”

Mark Leroy Dencklau, 58, of Woodburn, Oregon; Earl Deverle Fisher, 48, of Gresham, Oregon; and Tiler Evan Pribbernow, 37, of Portland are charged with:

  • Murder in aid of racketeering in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 1959(a)(1);
  • kidnapping in aid of racketeering, resulting in death in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 1959(a)(1) and 18 U.S.C. § 2;
  • kidnapping resulting in death in violation of 18 U.S.C. §§ 1201(a)(1) and (2);
  • and conspiracy to commit kidnapping, resulting in death in violation of 18 U.S.C. §§ 1201(a)(1) and 1201(c)

in a case stemming from the June 30-July 1, 2015 kidnapping and murder of Robert Huggins, a former GJOMC member and resident of southeast Portland.

According to the indictment, GJOMC oversees several “support clubs” in Oregon and Washington, including the Road Brothers Northwest Motorcycle Club, Solutions Motorcycle Club, Northwest Veterans Motorcycle Club, High-Side Riders, and the Freedom Fellowship Motorcycle Club. The indictment alleges that the three men engaged in the violent actions leading to Huggins’ death for the purpose of maintaining and increasing their positions in the GJOMC criminal enterprise.

Dencklau, Fisher and Pribbernow made their initial appearances before a U.S. Magistrate Judge in Portland on July 9, 10, and 13, 2018, respectively.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

This case was investigated by the PPB and ATF, with assistance from the Clark County, Washington Sheriff’s Office, the Oregon State Police, and the Oregon and Washington State Crime Labs. Leah K. Bolstad, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, is prosecuting the case with Rebecca A. Staton, Trial Attorney for the Criminal Division’s Organized Crime and Gang Section.

This case is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), a program bringing together all levels of law enforcement and the communities they serve to reduce violent crime and make our neighborhoods safer for everyone. Attorney General Jeff Sessions reinvigorated PSN in 2017 as part of the Department’s renewed focus on targeting violent criminals, directing all U.S. Attorney’s Offices to work in partnership with federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement and the local community to develop effective, locally-based strategies to reduce violent crime.

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Deputies Investigating Fatal Motor Vehicle Crash (Brooks) (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/13/18 10:50 AM
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Investigators have identified both drivers in yestedays fatal traffic crash.  Deputies belive Michael Bashaw, age 18, of Salem was making a delivery when he turned in front of a motrcycle causing a collision.  The motorcyclist Robert Grove, age 69, of Newberg died at the scene.  This is still an active investigation and there are no additional details to release at this time.   

Today at 8:57 a.m., deputies with the Marion County Sheriff’s Office were called to a motor vehicle crash on River Rd NE south of Waconda Rd NE. Preliminary information is that a motorcycle was traveling south on River Road when a northbound SUV turned west in front of the motorcycle.

The driver of the vehicle was not injured in the collision. Tragically the motorcyclist was pronounced dead at the scene. River Road is closed between Waconda and Brooklake RD NE but expected to reopen within the hour. The Sheriff’s Office is not prepared to release any further details or the names of either driver until the proper notifications can be made.   




Attached Media Files: 2018-07/1294/116132/IMG_0114.JPG , 2018-07/1294/116132/IMG_0109.JPG

Nickell Wins Powerball Millions
Oregon Lottery - 07/13/18 10:45 AM

July 13, 2018 - Salem, Ore. – Steven Nickell of Salem still can’t believe the ticket he had in his wallet for two weeks was the $150.4 million Powerball jackpot winner.

Nickell purchased the ticket at the Circle K on Liberty Street in Salem, and said that he usually picks up tickets, then checks them when he goes to lunch. After he had a burger, he scanned his tickets and realized he needed to go to the Lottery headquarters – he thought he had won at least $600.

“When the clerk told me that wins over $600 have to go to the Lottery office, I thought I could buy my wife something nice for the 4th of July,” he said. “I had no idea that ticket was worth $150 million!”

Nickell took the ticket home, and about an hour before his wife got home, checked the numbers.

“I looked at ticket and couldn’t stop shaking!” he said.

When Nickell told his wife, they went into action, hiring a financial planner and lawyer. They also said they are going to be very careful with the $61 million lump sum they will receive after taxes.

“At first I felt guilty I won,” he said. “Then I realized that I’m the guy that gets to stand up and say BINGO! We all play the game, it just so happens I’m the guy who got to win this time.”

Nickell said he is happy to know his family will be taken care of in the future because of his win – and how he is being careful with the money.

Nickell’s win is the third largest Lottery win since the Oregon Lottery started in 1984. This is the fifth time a ticket sold in Oregon has won the Powerball jackpot prize. Previous winners include Dan Gannon of Milwaukie who won $182.7 million in 2006; The West and Chaney families of Medford who won $340 million in 2005; Robin Powell of Beaverton who won $33.8 million in 1999; and the Givens family of Eugene who won $38.4 million in 1992.

Powerball is a multi-state jackpot operated by 44 states, plus the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. By pooling a portion of each lottery’s Powerball sales, this game is able to offer players jackpots of far greater value than any lottery could offer alone.

On Jan. 11, Reggie Pearne of Jacksonville, won $1 million playing Powerball. And on Jan. 4, Ronald Ceci of Grants Pass won $2 million playing Powerball. He selected the Power Play option for an additional $1, which doubled his prize to a total of $2 million.

During the 2015-17 biennium in Marion County, where the Salem winner and Lottery retailer are located, more than $55.2 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education and watershed enhancement.

Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org


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Deputies Investigating Serious Injury Crash (Salem) (Photo) ***Update***
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/13/18 10:40 AM
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The Marion County Sheriff's Office has learned that Mr. Bolen died from the injuries he sustained in yesterdays motorvehicle crash.  This is the third death involving a motorcycle in Marion County in a time span of less than 12 hours.  The summer months brings extra traffic on our roadways including motorcycles, bicycles and pedesterians.  We encourage all of our resdients and vistors to practice being an attentative driver and please watch for others.  

Today at 9:13 a.m., deputies with the Marion County Sheriff’s Office were called to a motor vehicle crash on Cordon Road NE near State Street.  Investigators have determined that a motorcycle being ridden by Virgil Bolen, age 90 of Salem, was traveling north on Cordon Road. A southbound passenger car driven by Kaye Yocles, age 52 of Salem turned east in front of the motorcycle causing both vehicles to collide head on.   

Ms. Young was not injured in the collision and has been issued a citation for making a dangerous left hand turn.  Mr. Bolen was transported to Salem Hospital where he is being treated and expected to survive his injuries. 

There is no further information available at this time.   

Today at 9:13 a.m., deputies with the Marion County Sheriff’s Office were called to a motor vehicle crash on Cordon Road NE near State Street.  Preliminary information is that a motorcycle was traveling north on Cordon Road when a southbound passenger car turned east in front of the motorcycle. 

The driver of the vehicle was not injured in the collision, the motorcyclist was transported to Salem Hospital with life threatening injuries.  Cordon Road is closed between State Street and Auburn Road NE.  This closure is to allow specialized investigators with our CRASH Team to investigate.  It is believed the road will remain for the next hour. 

There is no further information available at this time.   




Attached Media Files: 2018-07/1294/116125/IMG_20180712_094134_16.jpg , 2018-07/1294/116125/20180712_100857.jpg

Motorcyclist killed in vehicle crash on Hwy 219 - Marion County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/13/18 10:28 AM
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On Thursday July 12, 2018 at about 5:38 PM hours, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a two vehicle crash on Highway 219 and Mahony Rd NE.

Investigation revealed that a 2000 Harley Davidson, operated by John STEWART age 75, of Port Angeles, Washington, was traveling northbound on Highway 219 when for unknown reasons the motorcycle veered into the oncoming lane hitting a 2015 International truck, operated by Finet Navan Carlos FALIG age 27, of Gresham, OR. 

Stewart suffered fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.

Falig was not injured.

Highway 219  was closed for five and half hours following the crash.  OSP was assisted by Marion County Sheriff’s Office, St. Paul Fire and ODOT.

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-07/1002/116183/fatal2.jpg

Oregon Cannabis Commission meets July 23 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 07/13/18 10:09 AM

July 13, 2018

Oregon Cannabis Commission meets July 23 in Portland

What: The bi-monthly public meeting of the Oregon Cannabis Commission

Agenda: Smoke free environment; assessment; GovSpace documents; report and legislative concepts from subcommittees; next steps to finalizing legislative concepts for September 24 meeting; listening tour; future meeting dates for commission; OMMP governance; public comment

When: Monday, July 23, 1-4 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Conference Room 1B (first floor), 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Conference call line: 877-848-7030, access code 753428.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight-member panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. Along with this, it advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission with respect to the statutes governing medical and retail cannabis.

More information on the commission's webpage at http://www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


Oregon silverspot butterfly reintroduced to Saddle Mountain (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/13/18 10:06 AM
Oregon silverspot catterpillar - attribute Mike Patterson
Oregon silverspot catterpillar - attribute Mike Patterson
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Five hundred Oregon silverspot butterfly caterpillars have been released on the slopes of Saddle Mountain, part of a continuing effort to stabilize the declining species population in the state.

The reintroduction was led by a team from Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Oregon Zoo and Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle.

The Oregon silverspot butterfly (Speyeria zerene hippolyta) was federally listed as threatened in 1980, and population numbers have declined continuously over the last three decades. Today, just four isolated populations remain: three in Oregon and one in California.   

Saddle Mountain was chosen as the reintroduction site because a rare flower—the early blue violet—blooms in abundance there. Early blue violets are the main food source for the caterpillars as they mature into adult butterflies. The mountain is one of the few remaining areas where early blue violets grow in large enough quantities to sustain a butterfly population. Elsewhere, the delicate violets have been choked out by invasive weeds and forest succession.

“Saddle Mountain is prime real estate for Oregon silverspots,” said Trevor Taylor, manager for the reintroduction project at OPRD. “Our hope is the caterpillars will be the start of a vibrant and lasting butterfly population on the mountain.”

The caterpillars began their journey to the mountain as part of the imperiled species programs at Oregon Zoo and Woodland Park Zoo. Each year, a small number of female Oregon silverspots are collected from wild populations and brought to zoo conservation labs to lay eggs. The hatched larvae are raised over the winter and released into the wild when they’ve matured into caterpillars.

Funding for the reintroduction project was provided by the USFWS Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund.




Attached Media Files: Oregon silverspot catterpillar - attribute Mike Patterson , Oregon silverspot caterpillar - attribute Richard Szlemp , Early blue violet - attribute Oregon State Parks , Caterpillar reintroduction 4 - attribute Mike Patterson , Caterpillar reintroduction 3 - attribute Mike Patterson , Caterpillar reintroduction 2 - attribute Mike Patterson , Caterpillar reintroduction - attribute Mike Patterson , Saddle Mountain - attribute Oregon State Parks

Winston-Dillard Fire District - Public Notice
Douglas Co. Fire Dist. No.2 - 07/13/18 9:55 AM

The Board of Directors of Winston-Dillard Fire District will hold its Regular Board meeting at 5:30 pm on Monday, July 16, 2018.  The meeting will be held at the Winston-Dillard Fire Station, located at 250 SE Main St, Winston OR.

Anyone desiring additional information regarding the meeting should contact WDFD at 541.679.8721.


Douglas County Fire District No. 2 - Public Notice
Douglas Co. Fire Dist. No.2 - 07/13/18 9:47 AM

The Board of Directors of Douglas County Fire District No 2 will hold its Regular Board meeting at 5:30 pm on Tuesday, July 17, 2018.  The meeting will be held at DCFD#2 Fire Station 655, located at 6000 Garden Valley Rd., Roseburg OR.

Anyone desiring additional information regarding the meeting should contact DCFD #2 at 541.673.5503.


MedCom - Public Notice
Douglas Co. Fire Dist. No.2 - 07/13/18 9:45 AM

The MedCom Ambulance Authority Board of Directors will hold its Regular Board meeting at 12:00 pm on Thursday, July 19, 2018. The meeting will be held in the Bay Cities' Ambulance conference room at 1290 NE Cedar St, Roseburg OR.

Anyone desiring additional information regarding the meeting should contact the MedCom Administrator at 541.673.5503.


Answerland Advisory Committee (AAC) Meeting July 30, 2018
State Library of Oregon - 07/13/18 9:07 AM

The Answerland Advisory Committee (AAC) will meet on Monday, July 30th from 1pm to 3pm Pacific Time at the Oregon Institute of Technology Library in Klamath Falls. There is a virtual option for those who are unable to attend in person.

AGENDA

1:00        Welcome new members, thanks to members leaving

1:15        Review agenda, approve minutes, and review previous action items

1:20        Coordinator’s report

1:40        Outstanding Service to Answerland award

1:50        Grant funds

2:00        Open Forum

2:10        Subgroup reports

2:55        Action item review

3:00        Adjourn

 

This is a public meeting; those who would like to attend virtually or who require special accommodations should contact Tamara Ottum, 503-378-6506 or tamara.ottum@state.or.us, so that appropriate arrangements may be made.

The AAC advises the State Library and the Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) Advisory Council on Answerland, and its membership is drawn from all areas of the state and representing the public, school, academic, and special libraries that use or provide service for Answerland.

Questions or concerns can be addressed to Tamara Ottum, 503-378-6506 or tamara.ottum@state.or.us.


Marine Board Approves Ford's Pond Rules, Facilities Grant, Opens Rulemaking
Oregon Marine Board - 07/13/18 8:25 AM

The Oregon State Marine Board met in Central Point on July 11, and approved a new rule for Ford’s Pond in Douglas County, approved a boating facility grant for Columbia County, and approved opening rulemaking on several items.

The Board approved a 5 mph speed limit and electric motor only regulation on Ford’s Pond in Douglas County.  The operating rules will be effective upon filing.  Ford’s Pond is a 95 acre pond owned by the City of Sutherlin.

The Board also approved a boating facility grant for Columbia County.  The county manages the Gilbert River boat ramp off the Multnomah Channel which is approximately seven miles from the confluence of the Gilbert and Columbia Rivers.  The short term tie-up dock has eight piling, with four that are broken, creating a serious safety hazard to boaters.  The best approach is to install pile sleeves that can be reused for future replacement by welding together additional lengths of piling and then vibrating the piles into the submerged ground.  This approach will extend the useful life of the structure by another 10-15 years while the county plans for future improvements to the dock to improve boater safety.  The county plans on refurbishing the docks by obtaining materials to replace hinge assemblies, rub strips, pile hoops, rollers and bull rails on the concrete docks.  The Board approved $19,000 in federal Boating Infrastructure Grant funds to match $21,613.50 of applicant match (from the county and numerous boating clubs).  The project total is $40,613.50. 

The Board also approved opening rulemaking for the following items:

  • Outfitter and Guides, OAR 250 Division 016
  • Personal Flotation Devices, OAR 250-010-0154
  • Insurance and Duplication of Fees, OAR 250-010-0315

Additionally, the Board elected to keep the existing roles for Board Chair and Vice Chair appointments. 

For more details about the grant applications and meeting materials, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/info/Pages/Board-and-Public-Meetings.aspx.

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The Marine Board is funded by registration, title fees and marine fuel taxes paid by motorized boaters.  No lottery, general fund tax dollars or local facility parking fees are used to support the agency or its programs.  Boater-paid fees go back to boaters in the form of boating safety services (on-the-water enforcement, training and equipment), education/outreach materials and boating access facility grants (boat ramps, docks, parking, construction and maintenance).  The Aquatic Invasive Species Prevention Permit program is dedicated funding to pay for border inspection stations, decontamination equipment, inspectors, and signage/outreach materials.  The Mandatory Education Program is self-supporting and revenue helps pay for education materials and boater education cards.  For more information about the Marine Board and its programs, visit www.boatoregon.com.

 


Public invited to ADA Anniversary Celebration on July 26 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 07/13/18 7:51 AM

(Salem, Ore.) — This year marks the 28th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and it is being celebrated with a day-long event in Salem on Thursday, July 26.

Presented by the Oregon Disabilities Commission, the event will feature presentations, panel discussions and other learning opportunities from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursday, July 26, at the Human Services Building, 500 Summer St. N.E., Salem.

Event speeches will be from noon to 1 p.m. Featured speakers include Ted Wenk from Disability Rights Oregon and the Oregon Disabilities Commission; Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) Director Fariborz Pakseresht; Rosa Klein, Human Services Policy Advisor for Gov. Kate Brown; and many other advocates and representatives.

Leadership from DHS and the Oregon Disabilities Commission will give opening remarks at 9 a.m.

At 10:30 a.m., there is a showing of the 2011 film “Lives Worth Living.” This 60-minute documentary chronicles the disability rights movement and covers the successful efforts by people with disabilities to make changes to legislation to improve access and eventually achieve passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990.

There will be panels and sessions throughout the day, including:

  • Employment of People with Disabilities panel with representatives from Employment First, Vocational Rehabilitation, Disability Rights Oregon, Employed People with Disabilities program, and Work Incentives Planning and Assistance.
  • Oregon ABLE Savings with Oregon 529 Savings Network.
  • Day-to-Day Challenges Individuals Face Living with Disabilities, which features a number of speakers from organizations such as the Alzheimer’s Association, Salem’s Parkinson’s Support Group, Oregon Deaf & Hard of Hearing Services Advisory Council, and much more.
  • My Employment Journey session with members of the Oregon Self-Advocacy Coalition.
  • Veteran’s Employee Resource Group & Oregon Disabled Veterans Association.
  • ADA History and Advocacy.

Cake and refreshments will also be served.

More information about the Oregon Disabilities Commission is online at: https://www.oregon.gov/DHS/SENIORS-DISABILITIES/ADVISORY/ODC/Pages/index.aspx

If you have questions about the celebration and program, contact: egonDisabilities.Commission@state.or.us">OregonDisabilities.Commission@state.or.us.


Governor Brown to welcome Kim Stafford, thank Elizabeth Woody at Oregon Poets Laureate Celebration July 17
Oregon Cultural Trust - 07/13/18 7:09 AM

Salem, Ore. – Governor Kate Brown will welcome newly appointed Oregon Poet Laureate Kim Stafford and thank outgoing Poet Laureate Elizabeth Woody at the Oregon Poets Laureate Celebration from 6 to 8 p.m. on Tuesday, July 17, at the Rockwood Boys & Girls Club in East Portland (454 SE 165th Ave). The reception will celebrate Oregon’s Poet Laureate program, which is funded by the Oregon Cultural Trust and administered by Oregon Humanities. The event is free but registration is required by Friday, July 13.

The Oregon Poet Laureate fosters the art of poetry, encourages literacy and learning, addresses central issues relating to humanities and heritage, and reflects on public life in Oregon. The Poet Laureate provides at least six and up to 20 public readings per year in settings across the state to educate community, business and state leaders about the value and importance of poetry and creative expression. 

Stafford began a two-year term as Poet Laureate in May, succeeding Woody, who had served as Poet Laureate since April 2016. Both are committed to connecting communities through poetry. Each will read from their personal collections at the event and invite youth from the center to share their original works of spoken word. Oregon’s 2018 Poetry Out Loud champion, Sarah Calvin-Stupfel, also will be featured.

“There are many ways to serve this state and among them is clarity of language and passion of purpose, which may travel from one soul to another through poetry,” said Governor Kate Brown, who appoints the Poet Laureate. “Kim Stafford is one of our state’s most generous literary teachers and I am proud to appoint him as our next Poet Laureate.”

Stafford was born and grew up in Oregon. He is the author of a dozen books of poetry and prose, and edited half a dozen others. His book, “Having Everything Right: Essays of Place,” won a citation for excellence from the Western States Book Awards in 1986. Stafford has received creative writing fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, a Governor’s Arts Award, and the Steward Holbrook Award from Literary Arts for his contributions to Oregon’s literary culture. His work also has been featured on National Public Radio.

“Elizabeth Woody's words bring to life the landscapes, creatures and people who make Oregon special," Governor Brown added. "As Poet Laureate, the energy of her vivid storytelling helped us understand who we are as a larger community."

Woody was born on the Navajo Nation reservation in Ganado, Arizona, but has made her home in Oregon for most of her life. An enrolled member of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, she has published poetry, short fiction and essays, and also is a visual artist. “Hand Into Stone,” her first book of poetry, received a 1990 American Book Award. In 1994 she published “Luminaries of the Humble (University of Arizona Press)” and “Seven Hands, Seven Hearts (The Eighth Mountain Press).”

Past Oregon Poets Laureate were Edwin Charles Markham (1921–1940), Ben Hur Lampman (1951–1954), Ethel Romig Fuller (1957–1965), William Stafford (1974–1989), Lawson Inada (2006–2010), Paulann Petersen (2010-2014) and Peter Sears (2014-2016).

To learn more about the Oregon Poet Laureate program, or to schedule an event with Kim Stafford, visit the Poet Laureate website.

Register here by Friday, July 13, to attend the Oregon Poets Laureate Celebration.

The Cultural Trust extends its gratitude to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Portland Metro, the City of Gresham and Sokol Blosser Winery for their generous support of this event.

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About the Oregon Cultural Trust

The Oregon Cultural Trust is an innovative, statewide private-public program raising significant new funds to support and protect Oregon’s arts, humanities and heritage. In addition to the creation of a permanent endowment, funds are distributed annually through three multifaceted, wide-ranging grant programs. No other state in the nation has a program like the Oregon Cultural Trust, which has been ranked with the bottle bill and the vote-by-mail bill as among Oregon’s most forward-thinking public policy measures. More information at culturaltrust.org.

 

About Oregon Humanities

Oregon Humanities is an independent, nonprofit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities and a statewide partner of the Oregon Cultural Trust. Each year through programs and publications—the Conversation Project, Think & Drink, Humanity in Perspective, Bridging Oregon, Public Program Grants, and Oregon Humanities magazine—Oregon Humanities connects Oregonians to ideas that change lives and transform communities. More information at oregonhumanities.org.

 

 


$150 million Powerball jackpot winner to be announced
Oregon Lottery - 07/13/18 4:30 AM

Lottery to hold press conference regarding claimed $150 million Powerball prize

WHO: Oregon Lottery officials

WHEN: 10 a.m., Friday, July 13, 2018

WHERE: Oregon Lottery Headquarters, 500 Airport Road SE, Salem, OR

WHAT: Oregon Lottery officials will announce the winner of the $150.4 million Powerball jackpot. An Oregon Lottery player matched all numbers drawn in the June 20th Powerball jackpot draw. The winning ticket was sold at the Circle K on Liberty St. in Salem. A Circle K representative will also be at the Friday morning event. The winner claimed the prize on Thursday and will not be at the event Friday morning.

BACKGROUND: On June 20, an Oregon Lottery player won the $150.4 million Powerball jackpot prize by matching the numbers 4-14-23-27-56 and a power ball of 13. The winning ticket, sold in Salem, was the only ticket sold to have all the winning numbers. More than 6,800 winning tickets, with smaller prizes, were sold in Oregon during the June 20 drawing.

This is the fifth time a ticket sold in Oregon has won the Powerball jackpot prize. Previous winners include Dan Gannon of Milwaukie who won $182.7 million in 2006; The West and Chaney families of Medford who won $340 million in 2005; Robin Powell of Beaverton who won $33.8 million in 1999; and the Givens family of Eugene who won $38.4 million in 1992.

Powerball is a multi-state jackpot operated by 44 states, plus the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. By pooling a portion of each lottery’s Powerball sales, this game is able to offer players jackpots of far greater value than any lottery could offer alone.

VISUALS: Oregon Lottery officials will announce the winner of the $150 million Powerball jackpot.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned over $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

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Red Cross Responds to a Single Family Home Explosion Affecting Two People in Eugene
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 07/13/18 4:27 AM

Disaster responders with the local American Red Cross responded to a home explosion disaster on July 13, 2018, at approximately 1:00 a.m. in the 4000 block of Goodpasture Loop in Eugene. This single-family explosion affected 2 adults.

The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/GetAnAlarm to schedule an appointment.


Serious injury crash in construction zone on Highway 97 south of Madras - Jefferson County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/13/18 4:11 AM
2018-07/1002/116164/20180712_225845[1].jpg
2018-07/1002/116164/20180712_225845[1].jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/1002/116164/thumb_20180712_225845[1].jpg

On July 12, 2018 at about 9:00 p.m., Troopers from the Bend Area Command responded to a three vehicle injury crash occuring on Highway 97 near milepost 101, south of Madras.  Knife River Construction is repaving this section of Highway 97 and was active in the zone when the crash occured. 

The preliminary investigation revealed that a 2006 Silver Saturn ION, operated by 23 year old Portland resident Casandra Monsivais, was traveling southbound on Highway 97 near milepost 101, and for unknown reasons, was unable to stop in time before crashing into stopped vehicles waiting for the construction zone to open to southbound traffic.  The Saturn rear ended a silver 2013 Dodge Ram truck, operated by 27 year old Spokane resident, Kelty Godby.  The impact to the Dodge then pushed it into a 2014 Subara Crosstrack, operated by 57 year old Chiloquin resident Timothy Parrish. 

The passengers of the Saturn, were identified as 20 year old Portland resident Rachel Reed and 18 year old Gresham resident Hailee Owen, and were both injured in the crash.  Reed was transported to a Bend area hospital by air ambulance for life threatening injuries and Owen was transported via ground ambulance for non-lifethreatening injuries.  The other involved occupants of the involved vehicles were all treated for minor injuries and later released.

OSP was assisted at the scene by Jefferson County Sheriff's Office, ODOT, Jefferson County Fire District #1 and the Knife River Construction Flagging Crew.




Attached Media Files: 2018-07/1002/116164/20180712_225845[1].jpg , 2018-07/1002/116164/20180712_225913[1].jpg

Thu. 07/12/18
ODF declares high fire danger for rural Lane County, southern Linn County and parts of northern Douglas County
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/12/18 4:57 PM

VENETA, Ore. – Due to extreme heat and dry conditions, the Oregon Department of Forestry has raised the fire danger level to high (yellow) in all of rural Lane County, southern Linn County and parts of northern Douglas County.

At this level the public is only allowed to use gas-powered equipment until 10 a.m. and then again after 8 p.m.  No gas-powered equipment may be used during this ten-hour shutdown period, with the exception of mowing well-irrigated green grass lawns. 

The use of off road recreational vehicles in rural portions of the district is prohibited and campfires are only allowed in incorporated campgrounds with built in, metal-ringed fire pits.

“While temperature does affect fire behavior, it is not as much a danger to the fire as it is a danger to firefighters” said District Forester Link Smith with ODF’s Western Lane District. “Fighting fires in cooler conditions is always difficult, but fighting fires in extreme heat is especially taxing on those who are trained to protect our lands from fire.  We are asking that our public remain mindful of this as they conduct activities during the coming days.”

For updates on fire danger levels in the Western Lane District, the public may call the district’s Veneta office at 541-935-2222 or check the district’s Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/ODFWesternLane/.

Residents in eastern Lane County can contact ODF’s Springfield office at 541-726-3588.

                                                                                      # # #


OHA report: OMMP needs fixes in reporting, tracking, inspections to protect patients
Oregon Health Authority - 07/12/18 3:56 PM

July 12, 2018

OHA report: OMMP needs fixes in reporting, tracking, inspections to protect patients

State medical marijuana program taking action to improve regulation

SALEM, Ore.—An internal review of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program (OMMP) has identified administrative shortcomings that enabled growers, dispensaries and laboratories to operate without effective oversight. It also found that statutory restrictions have limited OMMP's ability to answer information requests from local law enforcement officials, even as the program protects patient confidentiality.

The issues have heightened the risk for medical marijuana to be diverted from patients, who rely on cannabis to treat medical conditions, into the black market. The report can be viewed on the OHA website at http://healthoregon.org/ommp.

Oregon Health Authority Director Patrick Allen requested the study in response to changing demands on OMMP in the wake of voter approval of legalized recreational marijuana sales. The agency also has heard concerns from local officials who have been frustrated as they sought information about grow operations in their communities. The report will be presented to the Oregon Cannabis Commission July 23.

"More than 40,000 Oregonians depend on medical marijuana to treat their qualifying medical conditions," Allen said. "We are taking steps to maintain the integrity of Oregon's medical marijuana program and make sure medical products reach the patients who need them. The actions we're taking include better tracking of growers, better enforcement, and making sure product that fails testing has been destroyed."

The study identifies several challenges OMMP has encountered since it was established in 1999. Some of these administrative problems existed before voters approved recreational sales in 2014. Other issues were compounded by a changing market and regulatory landscape for OMMP and medical marijuana patients once marijuana was legalized. These issues include:

  • Reporting and tracking: OMMP's reporting and tracking of growers and cannabis have been inadequate and inaccurate, and monthly compliance has been historically low, ranging between 26 percent and 42 percent during 2017.
  • Grow site validation: OMMP lacks reliable, independent tools to validate grow site addresses and relies on inconsistent county databases.
  • Grow site inspections: As of January 2018 there were more than 20,000 grow sites across the state. However, in 2017 OMMP completed only 58 inspections. OMMP does not have sufficient staff to conduct the number of inspections that would deter grower non-compliance with program requirements.
  • Laboratory testing and product destruction: While OMMP has protocols that require the destruction of products for the medical market that fail laboratory tests for pesticides and other chemicals, the program had difficulties with ensuring the appropriate and verified destruction of those products.

OMMP is taking action to improve its regulation of medical marijuana. The program is requiring dispensaries, processors and certain growers to use the Oregon Liquor Control Commission's Cannabis Tracking System (CTS). The program is ensuring that applicable growers meet new tracking requirements. In addition, OMMP will require patients to provide proof of address when processing applications, which will help validate grow site locations. As part of implementing SB 1057 (2017), OMMP will take enforcement action against participants who don't comply with reporting requirements by July 1, 2018, whether reporting in CTS or in OMMP's internal monthly reporting system. Finally, the OMMP's compliance program has finalized and started using a viable destruction protocol.

OMMP currently verifies grow site locations for local authorities and has a hotline to field grow site address inquiries. The confidentiality of grow site addresses is protected in statute and these limitations can pose a barrier to the program's ability to respond to some local law enforcement requests. In addition, the program is exploring ways to more closely work with local law enforcement to ensure compliance at medical marijuana grow sites.

The study acknowledges that OMMP successfully established and administered a program that provides more than 40,000 patients dependable access to medical cannabis and regulates more than 20,000 grow sites. In addition, frequent legislative changes have affected OMMP's ability to consistently regulate and monitor the medical marijuana market. Chronic underfunding and understaffing has affected OMMP's ability to meet the demands of robust regulation, particularly in the years immediately following the legalization of recreational sales in Oregon.

Information about the Oregon Cannabis Commission meeting is on the commission's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/DISEASESCONDITIONS/CHRONICDISEASE/MEDICALMARIJUANAPROGRAM/Pages/Cannabis-Commission.aspx.

# # #


Heritage Commission to meet July 29-30 in Astoria
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/12/18 2:31 PM

The Oregon Heritage Commission will meet in Astoria July 29-30. 

On July 29, Commissioners will gather at 12:30 p.m. to tour heritage efforts at the Astoria Column, Liberty Theatre, and Lewis & Clark National Park. 

On July 30, a public business meeting will begin at 9 a.m. at the Columbia River Maritime Museum conference room located at 1792 Marine Dr., Astoria 97103. The agenda includes proposals for designating Oregon Heritage Traditions, reports on commission programs, a report on the Cultural Trust Impact Study, and a proposal for FY19 Cultural Trust Funds.

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity.

Commission meetings are open to the public and their agendas include opportunities for public comment. The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986?0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.

For more information and accessibility needs, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Oregon Heritage Commission Coordinator Beth Dehn at 503-986-0696 or eth.Dehn@oregon.gov">Beth.Dehn@oregon.gov.

###


Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meets July 19 in Junction City
Oregon Health Authority - 07/12/18 2:19 PM

July 12, 2018

Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meets July 19 in Junction City

What: Public meeting of the Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board

When: Thursday, July 19, 1-5 p.m.

Where: Oregon State Hospital Junction City Campus, Room A1012, 29398 Recovery Way, Junction City. The public can also attend via toll-free conference line at 888-278-0296, participant code 4294893.

Agenda: After the public comment period, topics will include patient engagement, staff training on Trauma Informed Care, Intimate Interactions Charter, veterans update, family feedback and orientation, gambling addiction, medication and discharge, medical evaluation/forensic assessment, a diversity/cultural affairs update, update from the Patient Advisory Council, access to the electronic hospital policy/procedure manual and Pow Wows.

Details: The Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board advises the superintendent, Oregon Health Authority Director and legislators on issues related to the safety, security and care of patients. Members include consumers, providers, advocates, legislators, community members, consumer families and OSH union members.

For more information, see the board’s website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/osh/Pages/advisory-board.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jacee Vangestel at 503-945-2852, 711 TTY or jacee.m.vangestel@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Cannabis Commission Training Subcommittee meets July 20 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 07/12/18 1:29 PM

July 12, 2018

Cannabis Commission Training Subcommittee meets July 20 in Portland

What: The monthly public meeting of the Oregon Cannabis Commission Training Subcommittee

Agenda: The agenda will include discussion of the following topics: review minutes from May 18, 2018; Review legislative fixes; review legislative report draft 2.

When: Friday, July 20, 9-11 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Conference Room 1B (first floor), 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. The public also may attend by conference call line at 877-848-7030, access code 753428.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight-member panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. Along with this, it advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission with respect to the statutes governing medical and retail cannabis.

More information on the commission's webpage at http://www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


Subject has been located Attempt to locate missing person from Lebanon (Photo)
Lebanon Police Dept. - 07/12/18 11:59 AM
2018-07/4582/116115/Julianne_Flagg.jpg
2018-07/4582/116115/Julianne_Flagg.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/4582/116115/thumb_Julianne_Flagg.jpg

Subject has been located and is of no further interest  Attempt to locate missing adult from Lebanon.  Julianne Flagg 38 year old female.  5' 5" and 135 lbs. Brown eyes and long brown hair.  Last seen in 900 block of E St. in Lebanon around 2 am this monring.  She left on foot to an unknown location and has not returned.  

Last seen wearing a purple top, black pants, a hatr and rainbow colored nike shoes.  Female is of Korean descent.

If you seen this person or know the whereabouts of her please call the Lebanon Police Departmet at (541) 451-1751.




Attached Media Files: 2018-07/4582/116115/Julianne_Flagg.jpg

Reproductive Rights Leaders Condemn Knute Buehler's Misleading Campaign Ad
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon - 07/12/18 11:09 AM

Yesterday Knute Buehler released a new television ad attempting to cover up his record of voting against expanding access to reproductive health care; protecting a woman’s right to safe, legal abortion; and expanding healthcare access for low-income families.

Leaders from Planned Parenthood PAC of Oregon and NARAL Pro-Choice Oregon PAC strongly condemn the ad, titled “Our Bodies,” as misleading and irresponsible.

Emily McLain, Executive Director of Planned Parenthood PAC of Oregon, said: “Knute Buehler voted against the Reproductive Health Equity Act, which enshrines Roe v. Wade into Oregon law. This was the single most important vote in Buehler’s legislative career to protect access to reproductive health care, and Buehler voted no. There is absolutely no room for uncertainty when it comes to protecting reproductive health care in Oregon and in our country at this time.”

Grayson Dempsey, Executive Director of NARAL Pro-Choice Oregon PAC, said: “It’s irresponsible for Knute Buehler to be on television and online telling women and girls that birth control is available over the counter in Oregon. It is not. As a physician, Buehler knows the difference between a prescription and over-the-counter medication and is offering misleading information in this ad.”

Oregonians deserve to know the truth. Here are 10 questions that Knute Buehler still hasn’t answered:

  1. Why did he vote against codifying Roe v. Wade into Oregon law?

  2. Why has he been silent about Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee who is committed to overturning Roe v. Wade?

  3. Why did he say abortion is “the wrong option” if he’s indeed “pro-choice”?

  4. Why did he promise to restrict abortion, while claiming he “doesn't see access to abortion under threat”?

  5. Why did he seek the recommendation of Oregon Right to Life, a radical organization that wants to ban all abortion and the most popular forms of birth control?

  6. Why does he oppose state funding for low-income women to access to safe, legal abortion through their insurance plan?

  7. Why has he refused to defend the Planned Parenthood health center that serves his own constituents, in the face of relentless attacks at the federal level from his own political party?

  8. Why did he brag on right-wing radio about his “record in the Legislature of voting against Governor Brown’s efforts to expand access to abortion”?

  9. Why does he continue to misrepresent the existence of “over the counter” birth control in Oregon?

  10. Why did he vote against the Oregon Health Plan, which covers reproductive health services for thousands of women throughout the state?

Planned Parenthood PAC of Oregon and NARAL Pro-Choice Oregon PAC have endorsed Governor Kate Brown for re-election because she has provided clear answers to these questions in her endorsement interviews and in her longtime voting record and leadership. Voters should visit TheTruthAboutKnute.com for more information about why Buehler cannot be trusted to protect women’s health and rights.


DPSST Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/12/18 10:31 AM

For Immediate Release      
July 11, 2018
Contact: Staci Yutzie
503-378-2426
 
 Notice of Regular Meeting
 
The Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel for Phase 2 will hold a regular meeting on July 27, 2018 from
11:00a-2:00p.  The meeting will be held in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety
Academy in Salem, Oregon. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an
interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be
made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above.   
 
Agenda Items:
 
I. Welcome
 
II. Content Draft Review-
a. Legal Series
b. Mental Health Series
c. Use of Force Series
d. Defensive Tactics  
e. Firearms
f. Building Searches  

III. Development Tasks for August
IV. Conclusion

 
Administrative Announcement
This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


Twelve Mile City Ruck Tour Comes to Salem - Supports Wounded Veterans
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/12/18 9:58 AM

About the Salem City Ruck Tour:

25 AUG 2018; 1PM

Full Distance: 12 Miles / Second distance option: 4 Miles

START:  Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training / 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, OR 97317

FINISH: Capitol Building in Salem.

DAY OF EVENT: 1PM - Kick off Ceremony (20-30 minutes at the MOST) @ DPSST

The City Ruck Tour 2018 (CRT18) is a series of 60 friendly Ruck Marches hosted by Operation Enduring Warrior (OEW) and led by select volunteers from OEW’s Masked Athlete Team and OEW’s Community Ambassador population. The purpose is to perform outdoor fitness in a group setting, while learning more about OEW’s mission, which is to Honor, Empower, and Motivate our nation’s wounded military veterans.

The pace for the 12 mile route will be moderate (approx. 18-20 minutes per mile), and the group will move together as one team. Short breaks will occur as needed. The amount of weight participants carry in their rucksack is up to them. However, each participant is required to have two (2) quarts of water, a reflective band or belt on the outside of your ruck, and a headlamp or flashlight. Kid friendly. Dog friendly.

There will be a Rally Point (RP) 3-4 miles from the End-Point, for any late comers to join in for the final miles.

Upon conclusion of the ruck march, there will be a “Circle of Trust” closing ceremony where you will hear a testimony directly from one of our Adaptive Athlete honorees, or participating military veteran. Prepare to be inspired. Everyone in the circle will receive a CRT patch, and probably a hug!

More info about the CRT- https://www.enduringwarrior.org/blog/city-ruck-tour-to-raise-awareness-and-funds-for-operation-enduring-warrior

Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/city-ruck-tour-2018-salem-or-tickets-44786299026 

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/2090873344502839/ 

Very special thanks to: DPSST, Marion County Veteran Service Officers, J-One-9, Team RWB, Dignity Memorial, ARCHES Veteran Housing, Staff Gym, Team Rubicon, Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office, Salem Poiice Department, City of Salem,  Portland Police Highland Guard, SOVAH, Oregon City Police Departnent, MSG Mark Browning, Concordia University Veteran Services, Jourdan Smith, and MANY MORE!

# # #

Oregon Ruck Contact: Crystal Mai Purdy

Pacific Northwest Regional Coordinator, Operation Enduring Warrior

Crystal.Purdy@Dignitymemorial.com

 




Attached Media Files: 2018 City Ruck

On-Line Video Illustrates New Communication Tool for Deaf or Hard of Hearing and Law Enforcement
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/12/18 9:26 AM

Thanks to the assistance of the City of Corvallis Police Department, Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (ODHHS), and the great team at Orange Media at Oregon State University, a short on-line video was created that illustrates the new visor and wallet cards that have been made available on a statewide basis to assist with communications between individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing and law enforcement officers.

The video can be found at https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/13rQRfNx1AKUAbHIKYljKzLxSFftXFTIq?usp=sharing

The wallet and visor cards were created through a partnership between the Oregon Association for the Deaf (OAD), the Public Safety Subcommittee of the Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Advisory Committee (ODHHS), and the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) . 

The cards, released two months ago, are being distributed by the Oregon Association for the Deaf, and their local and regional partners; the Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Program; local law enforcement agencies; and other organizations that work with deaf and hard of hearing Oregonians.

The on-going partnership between the three organizations, OAD, ODHHS and DPSST, has resulted in an update to the basic police curriculum used to train new law enforcement officers, and also deaf and hard of hearing role players who participate in scenario-based training at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem.

DPSST’s Director Eriks Gabliks said “we are very proud of the partnership we have with the Oregon Association for the Deaf, the Public Safety Subcommittee of the Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (ODHHS), and ODHHS.  Sadly, we know there have been some tragic interactions around the nation involving law enforcement officers and individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing.  The visor and wallet cards were designed to serve as a tool to assist with communications between individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing and city, county, state, tribal and university law enforcement officers around Oregon.”

Past President of OAD and current state employee with ODHHS, Chad A. Ludwig said “it take a village’s effort to promote public safety, awareness, and communication. The goal for two-sided visor and wallet communication card to minimize the barrier in the field and allow each member involved in any type of legal related incidents to build rapport. The communication card is not intended to replace trained, certified and qualified sign language interpreters in the legal system. This move is a positive step that improves safety for individuals who are Deaf, Deaf-Blind, Hard of Hearing and those with additional disability as well as law enforcement partners across Oregon.”

DPSST's Director Eriks Gabliks said "the video produced by the Corvallis Police Department, Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (ODHHS), and the team at Orange Media at Oregon State University gives a realist view of how communications between those who are deaf or hard of hearing and law enforcement are improved by the new wallet and visor cards. We are very appreciative of the work that was done to create this video and are glad to be a partner in the creation of this important communications tool."

Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services

http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/BUSINESS-SERVICES/ODHHS/Pages/index.aspx

Oregon Association for the Deaf

http://www.OAD1921.org

Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training

http://www.oregon.gov/dpsst/Pages/index.aspx

 

## Background Information on the BPSST and DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.




Attached Media Files: Visor Card , Visor Card

State fire marshal urges vigilance and extreme care against wildfires
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 07/12/18 9:22 AM

Oregon State Fire Marshal Jim Walker is encouraging Oregonians to use extreme caution as intense heat and dry thunderstorms are predicted for areas around the state for the next few days. 

If your summer plans include camping, Chief Walker reminds you to check for any campfire restrictions in the area you will be visiting, as campfires may be prohibited outside maintained campgrounds with fire pits. Build your campfire only where authorized and never leave your campfire unattended. When putting out your campfire be sure you drown the coals with water, stir with a shovel and drown again until it is cool to the touch.

Fire season requires residents to be at a heightened awareness for the dangers of wildfire. Be prepared to act to keep you, your family, and pets safe.  Follow these Ready, Set Go! tips:

  • Be Ready - Plan escape routes, and make sure all the residents within the home know the plan of action.  Be ready to evacuate any pets as well as family members.
  • Get Set – Pack your emergency items such as a battery powered radio, spare batteries, emergency contact numbers, and ample drinking water. Stay aware of the latest news and information on the fire in your area from local media, your local fire department and public safety.
  • Go! – If a fire impacts your community and you are asked to leave, follow your personal wildland fire action plan. Doing so will not only support your safety, but will allow firefighters to best maneuver resources to combat the fire.

“It’s everyone’s responsibility to help prevent human-caused wildfires,” said Chief Walker. “Please be aware of weather conditions and fire restrictions in your area.”  

Residents are strongly encouraged to contact their local fire protection agencies for additional burning information and regulations.

For more information, visit the websites for OSFM Wildland Urban Interface, Keep Oregon Green, or Oregon Department of Forestry


Trusted Tester Program Comes To Coffee Creek Correctional Facility
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 07/12/18 8:59 AM

In May, Oregon Correctional Enterprises (OCE) announced the successful startup of a new work program for incarcerated women at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility (CCCF). Five women completed months of rigorous training and testing to become Trusted Testers certified by the Office of Accessibility Systems and Technology under the Department of Homeland Security. The graduation ceremony is July 26 at 10:30 a.m. at CCCF.

Through OCE’s partnership with Access2online, the company which operates the work and training program inside CCCF, these five women are now qualified to test websites (in an offline environment) for accessibility to the visually impaired. Their expertise joins the national effort to allow the visually impaired to benefit from the internet that has become an essential part of life in most of the world.

While the Access2online program is relatively new to the prison environment, it is already supporting successful transition from incarceration into Oregon communities. Upon release from prison, the first two participants in the program had jobs waiting for them with the Access2online corporate office. Ninety-five percent of the men and women incarcerated in Oregon’s prisons will ultimately release from Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) custody; plans to grow the Access2online program include training and employing additional women at CCCF as well as the addition of satellite programs at other Oregon institutions.

Those releasing from incarceration are discovering how essential the internet is for everyday life in the United States. Most job applications, information about public services, and even grocery orders can be processed online; but many adults in custody have never touched a computer, let alone surfed the web. While American prisons do not allow those in our care to have unfettered access to the internet, most states, including Oregon, have developed offline environments or secure, direct portals to specific sites which allow for education, training, and production. Industry-recognized certifications are difficult for those in custody to obtain because most testing is done online, but the recent partnership with DOC, OCE, Access2online, and the Department of Homeland Security is evidence that difficult does not mean impossible.

Oregon Corrections Enterprises (OCE) is a semi-independent, self-funded state agency which operates under the Director of Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC). Created by statute in 1999 to help DOC meet its constitutional mandate to engage adults in custody (AICs) in meaningful work and training opportunities, OCE currently operates various production and service programs in 10 DOC facilities. While primarily teaching work skills to prepare over 1300 AICs for successful re-entry into Oregon communities, OCE’s programs also keep the AICs engaged in activity, thus reducing idleness that can lead to types of behavior which affect the safety and security of the institutions.


Tip of the Week-July 16, 2018-Traffic Congestion
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/12/18 7:57 AM

Traffic congestion is a part of life on the Oregon Coast this time of year. With an increase in visitors on our roads comes a corresponding increase in traffic incidents to generate more congestion. There are a few measures citizens can take to assist emergency responders and help keep delays minimal.

If you find yourself in a congested area, consider the following:

  • When stopped in traffic, make sure your vehicle isn’t blocking any intersecting roads or driveways.
  • If you decide to turn your vehicle off, make sure you will be able to get it started again. If the delay occurs at night, your headlights could run your vehicle’s battery down.
  • Make sure your headlights are on and leave your foot on the brake, even in the daytime. Drivers behind you may not realize that traffic is stopped ahead. The more visible you are the better.
  • Stay in your vehicle. Even though traffic is stopped, exiting your vehicle on the roadway is hazardous; traffic may begin moving suddenly or emergency responders could be approaching the scene.
  • Stay focused when passing the cause of the congestion. Additional incidents sometimes happen due to drivers paying too much attention to crashes and paying too little attention to the road.
  • Use extreme caution when turning around or changing lanes. You could end up blocking traffic yourself. Emergency personnel may use the oncoming lane to get to the scene.
  • Find a place to wait it out. If you’re in Lincoln County, there is a good chance a park, natural area, or business is nearby. It may not be a planned excursion, but it’s probably better than waiting in your car.
  • Be courteous! Being stuck in traffic is frustrating for everyone involved.

The best way to deal with traffic congestion is to not be a part of it. Adjust your travels to times when congestion is unlikely or plan alternate routes. When congestion is forecasted, take care of household and other errands well beforehand.

For more information and tips, visit our website at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-07/5490/116114/071618-Traffic_Congestion.pdf

OAICU Selects New President (Photo)
Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges & Universities - 07/12/18 7:00 AM
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-07/4829/116108/thumb_bauer800.jpeg

PORTLAND, ORE – The Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges and Universities (the Alliance) today announced the appointment of Jim Bauer as its new president, effective July 16, 2018. Bauer succeeds Kristen Grainger, who announced she will step down on July 13.

“Jim brings to the Alliance nearly 25 years of experience as a strategic thinker and leader for private, independent higher education in Oregon,” said Carolyn Walker, chair of the Alliance Board of Trustees. “With a deep understanding of the important contributions nonprofit colleges and universities make to the state’s workforce, economy, and higher education attainment goals, he is well-suited to engage with employers and policy makers in service of the public good.”

Bauer has served since 1995 as vice president for planning and external affairs at Willamette University in Salem, a position with wide-ranging responsibilities that support campus development and operations. His leadership and advocacy have substantially impacted the Salem community, most recently serving as board president of the Salem Area Chamber of Commerce. 

Prior to Willamette, Bauer held administrative leadership positions at the University of Idaho from 1980-1995.

He earned an MBA from Willamette University and master’s and bachelor’s degrees from the University of Idaho.

About the Alliance:

The Alliance represents 18 of Oregon’s regionally accredited, nonprofit private institutions of higher education. Together, Alliance colleges and universities enroll more than 35,000 students, conferring approximately one in four baccalaureate degrees and about half of the master’s and doctoral degrees awarded in Oregon. 

  • One in five students at an Alliance member institution is the first in their family to attend college; one in three is from demographic groups historically underrepresented on the nation’s college campuses; and one in three has sufficient financial need to be eligible for federal Pell grants.  
  • Twenty-eight percent of the graduates from Alliance-member colleges complete their degrees with zero debt; average debt for those students who graduate with debt is about the same as graduates of public universities. 
  • Three out of five students at an Oregon private nonprofit college will finish their bachelor’s degrees in four years, compared to public university students, three out of five of whom take six years to finish, according to the Oregon Higher Education Coordinating Commission. 

The Alliance works to intersect the needs of business and industry with private nonprofit colleges and the public good to create real solutions to build a more educated and skilled workforce for Oregon. 

For more information visit www.oaicu.org.




Attached Media Files: 2018-07/4829/116108/bauer800.jpeg