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Eugene/Spring/Rose/Alb/Corv News Releases for Tue. May. 21 - 6:57 pm
Tue. 05/21/24
Oregon Housing and Community Services' Annual Report highlights significant statewide housing outcomes (Photo)
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 05/21/24 3:54 PM
Willet Apartments, Tillamook
Willet Apartments, Tillamook
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-05/1810/172488/thumb_20230629_153253.jpg

SALEM, Ore. — Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) releases the 2023 Annual Report, “Building Oregon’s Future,” to show and highlight outcomes achieved throughout the state to meet the housing needs of Oregonians with low to moderate incomes.  

“Building Oregon’s Future describes the progress that OHCS has made in delivering results on the strategic goals and challenges facing our housing system,” said OHCS Executive Director Andrea Bell. “The public has placed great trust in OHCS, and we are honoring that trust by delivering results that aim to make everyday life better for the people of Oregon.”  

As the state’s housing agency, OHCS works across the housing continuum to help reduce poverty among Oregonians and increase access to safe, stable, and affordable housing. Some highlights from 2023 include: 

  • Over $436 million was allocated to create more than 4,000 affordable rental and homeownership opportunities across the state.  
  • OHCS surpassed all three housing goals helping more than 10,000 households and creating over 1,000 shelter beds. 
  • OHCS launched seven new data dashboards and reports to show the continued progress. 

“Even as we celebrate the many milestones highlighted in this report, we continue to work tirelessly to create new programs and policies and get funding out to communities as swiftly and efficiently as possible. Working together with our partners across Oregon, we remain relentless, through the lens of humanity, to deliver effective housing solutions for all,” said Bell. 

The report features stories from Oregonians who have received housing assistance through OHCS and its housing partners, like Howard. Howard is an older adult who was able to receive a new manufactured home through the Manufactured Home Replacement Program. His new home is more energy efficient and structurally sound, ensuring he has a safe place to enjoy and live for many years to come.  

The 2023 Annual Report includes many other key data points, stories, program and policy updates, photos, and more. You can read the full report on the OHCS website. 

El comunicado de prensa en español




Attached Media Files: Willet Apartments, Tillamook , Lincoln City Habitat for Humanity, single-family home

5/19/24 - LCSO Case #24-2599 - Deputies arrest armed felon after shooting outside Junction City (Photo)
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/21/24 3:18 PM
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On May 19th at about 1:30 p.m., Lane County Sheriff's deputies responded to a report of a dispute with shots fired in the 28700 block of Bailey Lane, south of Junction City. Investigation determined David Lynn Parker, 69, drove to the location while intoxicated to confront several Hispanic workers about a perceived theft.  

Parker pointed a rifle at a worker and fired several times, injuring him. The worker then struck Parker, knocking him unconscious, and secured the firearm. Parker also made racially derogatory comments about the victims.  

Parker was evaluated for his injury then lodged at the Lane County Jail on charges of Assault in the Second Degree, Bias Crime in the First Degree x3, Menacing x4, Felon in Possession of a Firearm, Unlawful Use of a Weapon x3, Reckless Endangering x4, Coercion, and DUII. Parker was still in custody as of May 21st.  




Attached Media Files: 2024-05/6111/172487/Junction_City_Arrest.png

Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee meets May 24
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/21/24 11:08 AM

SALEM, Ore. — The Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee meets May 24 at 10 a.m. at ODF headquarters in Salem, with a virtual option.

The public meeting will be held in the Tillamook Room, Building C, at the Oregon Department of Forestry’s Salem headquarters, 2600 State St., Salem, OR 97310. To join virtually, please use the Zoom video conference information found on the agenda.

The committee’s agenda includes:

  • Forest Management Plan (FMP) performance measures
  • Prepare testimony for June Board of Forestry meeting

Public comment is scheduled at the beginning of the meeting. To submit written comment, email ftlac.comment@odf.oregon.gov. Written comments sent at least 48 hours before the meeting will give the FTLAC time to review and consider information. Comments submitted after that window of time will be sent to the FTLAC after the meeting, entered into the record and posted online. Comments are not accepted after the meeting concludes.

The Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee is comprised of seven county commissioners representing 15 Oregon counties where state forestlands are located. The FTLAC is a statutorily established committee that advises the Board of Forestry on matters related to forestland managed by ODF. View more information on the FTLAC webpage.

Questions about accessibility or special accommodations can be directed to the Oregon Department of Forestry at least 24 hours prior to the meeting at 503-945-7200.


BLM office moves to Port of Tillamook Bay
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 05/21/24 10:51 AM

Tillamook, Ore. — Bureau of Land Management leaders announced that the Tillamook Field Office will be moving, June 3. The BLM’s lease at the current facility will expire in June, and the Field Office will relocate to the Port of Tillamook Bay

“Moving an office—just like moving a home—is always a transition,” said Janet Satter, BLM Tillamook Field Manager. “And I want to reassure everyone that we will continue to be available to our customers—to the American public.”

The new location at the Port of Tillamook Bay is just five miles, or a ten-minute drive, from the current BLM office.

Until construction of the new permanent facility at the Port of Tillamook is complete, the Field Office will temporarily relocate to 4000 Blimp Blvd, Suite 380.

“We look forward to welcoming you to our new home,” Satter added.

For the latest information on the upcoming move, call or email the Tillamook Field Office at 503-815-1100 or blm_or_no_mail@blm.gov. The phone number and email address will remain the same throughout the transition.

Information will also be available at the Northwest Oregon District website: https://www.blm.gov/office/northwest-oregon-district-office

GoogleMap of new location at the Port of Tillamook Bay: https://maps.app.goo.gl/aYGNG2ET7XQ2d8x38
 

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 western states, including Alaska, on behalf of the American people. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. Our mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.


5/18/24 - Six rafters rescued from hazardous dam on the Willamette River (Photo)
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/21/24 10:44 AM
Still from low head dam rescue
Still from low head dam rescue
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On Saturday, May 18th at about 3:15 p.m., Lane County Sheriff’s Marine Patrol and Search & Rescue Deputies responded to a water rescue along with Eugene Springfield Fire. The rescue took place on and around the low head dam, a concrete structure in the Willamette River east of I-5 that has formed an enormous log jam. 

A total of six people were rescued, including two in shallow water below the dam and one on the dam. None had life jackets, and were floating on inner tubes. Five had gone over the dam into the strainer, while one managed to grab onto a log. Had they gone under the log jam, they likely would not have survived.  

Lane County has miles of beautiful water ways and warm spring weather. Please enjoy safely. Wear a life jacket. Scout the river ahead. Check river obstructions before you go. For those floating the Willamette River in the Eugene / Springfield area, be very cautious passing low head dam, to include taking out well before the obstruction to go around it.  

View an interactive map of obstructions from the Oregon State Marine Board at oregon-boating-obstructions-geo.hub.arcgis.com.




Attached Media Files: Still from low head dam rescue

5/18/24 - Six rafters rescued from hazardous dam on the Willamette River (Photo)
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/21/24 10:44 AM
Still from low head dam rescue
Still from low head dam rescue
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On Saturday, May 18th at about 3:15 p.m., Lane County Sheriff’s Marine Patrol and Search & Rescue Deputies responded to a water rescue along with Eugene Springfield Fire. The rescue took place on and around the low head dam, a concrete structure in the Willamette River east of I-5 that has formed an enormous log jam. 

A total of six people were rescued, including two in shallow water below the dam and one on the dam. None had life jackets, and were floating on inner tubes. Five had gone over the dam into the strainer, while one managed to grab onto a log. Had they gone under the log jam, they likely would not have survived.  

Lane County has miles of beautiful water ways and warm spring weather. Please enjoy safely. Wear a life jacket. Scout the river ahead. Check river obstructions before you go. For those floating the Willamette River in the Eugene / Springfield area, be very cautious passing low head dam, to include taking out well before the obstruction to go around it.  

View an interactive map of obstructions from the Oregon State Marine Board at oregon-boating-obstructions-geo.hub.arcgis.com.




Attached Media Files: Still from low head dam rescue

05-21-24 Meeting Notice - Douglas County Parks Advisory Board
Douglas Co. Government - 05/21/24 9:59 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

May 21, 2024

 

Meeting Notice

Douglas County Parks Advisory Board

Thursday, May 23, 2024

 

(Douglas County, Ore.) Douglas County Commissioners Chris Boice, Tim Freeman, and Tom Kress are pleased to inform the public that the next Douglas County Parks Advisory Board (PAB) meeting will be held on Thursday, May 23, 2024, at 10:00 am, in Room 216 of the Douglas County Courthouse located at 1036 SE Douglas Avenue in Roseburg, Oregon.

 

In compliance with ORS 192.610 to 192.690, we will accommodate any member of the public who wishes to submit or provide public comment on agenda items.  Members of the public who wish to comment can do so: (1) in-person, (2) by submitting via email to k.wall@douglascountyor.gov">mark.wall@douglascountyor.gov or (3) by virtual format via Zoom Meeting at https://us06web.zoom.us/j/88529564705?pwd=e3AZfeVcaakcaaI8lKIt9LoZfqgCJA.1 Meeting ID: 885 2956 4705 and Passcode: 033148. To view the live stream of the meeting, please visit: https://video.ibm.com/channel/douglascountyoregon.

 

For additional information about this meeting, please contact the Douglas County Parks Department at (541) 957-7001.  The meeting agenda can be found on the Douglas County government website at www.douglascountyor.gov

 

Douglas County attempts to provide public accessibility to its services, programs and activities.  Please contact the Parks Department Office located in Room 116 of the Justice Building at the Douglas County Courthouse, 1036 SE Douglas Ave. Roseburg, OR 97470 or call (541) 957-7001, prior to the scheduled meeting time if you need an accommodation.  TDD users please call Oregon Telecommunications Relay Service at 1-800-735-2900.

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Media Contact:     Tamara Howell, Douglas County Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist | Douglas County Public Affairs Office | Office: (541) 957-4896 | Cell: (541) 670-2804 | Email: a.howell@douglascountyor.gov">tamara.howell@douglascountyor.gov

Meeting Contact: Jennifer Monroe, Division Business Manager | Douglas County Parks Department | Office: (541) 440-6040 | Email: .monroe@douglascountyor.gov">jennifer.monroe@douglascountyor.gov


05-21-24 Notice of Holiday Closure - Memorial Day (Photo)
Douglas Co. Government - 05/21/24 9:56 AM
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

May 21, 2024

 

NOTICE OF HOLIDAY CLOSURE

Memorial Day

Monday, May 27, 2024

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.) Douglas County Commissioners Chris Boice, Tim Freeman, and Tom Kress would like to remind citizens that government offices in the Douglas County Courthouse, located at 1036 SE Douglas Avenue in Roseburg, as well as the Douglas County Justice Building, Douglas County Courthouse Annex in Reedsport, Douglas County Landfill and Transfer Stations, Douglas County Fairgrounds and All External Douglas County Government Offices will be closed to the public on Monday, May 27, 2024, in observance of the Memorial Day holiday.

 

Even when Douglas County government offices are closed, many officials and public employees are still working on special, routine or emergency projects such as our Douglas County Commissioners, Juvenile Department, Public Works Department, Emergency Management Department, Parks Department and Salmon Harbor Marina. Please note the following:

 

  • The Douglas County Museum of History and Natural History and the Umpqua River Lighthouse Museum will be open on Monday, May 27, 2024, for normal business hours. 
  • All Douglas County operated parks, campgrounds and boat ramps will continue to be open and accessible to the public.      For reservation information at Douglas County operated campgrounds, please call (541) 957-7001 or go online to https://douglascountyor.gov/802/Parks.  As a reminder, the Douglas County Parks Office will be closed on Monday, May 27, 2024. 
  • Salmon Harbor Marina and the Winchester Bay RV Park will continue to be open and accessible to the public.  For harbor or reservation information at Salmon Harbor, please call (541) 271-3407 or go online to https://douglascountyor.gov/448/Salmon-Harbor-Marina.  As a reminder, the Salmon Harbor Marina Office will be closed on Monday, May 27, 2024. 
  • Even though the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office lobby entrance will be closed on Monday, May 27, 2024, our Sheriff’s Deputies, 911 communications and DCSO staff will continue to provide law enforcement protection and emergency assistance for our residents.  If you have an emergency, call 9-1-1.  If you need to reach dispatch for a non-emergency, call the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office non-emergency number at (541) 440-4471. 

 

            Commissioners Boice, Freeman, and Kress encourage citizens to participate in memorials on this day that honor the men and women that gave their lives in service to this country in our U.S. Armed Forces.  Honor, remember and never forget the sacrifices made on our behalf for our freedom, liberty, and justice.   

 

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Media Contact:     Tamara Howell, Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist | Douglas County Public Affairs Office | Office: (541) 957-4896 | Cell: (541) 670-2804 cell | a.howell@douglascountyor.gov">tamara.howell@douglascountyor.gov




Attached Media Files: 2024-05/6789/172470/2024_Memorial_Day_-_DC_Gov_Closed.jpg

Mon. 05/20/24
5/11/24 - Suspect arrested for multiple thefts, including communication line, timber gates, and burglary (Photo)
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/20/24 10:42 PM
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Branden Paul Sherrill, 41, is facing multiple criminal charges from cases spanning across Lane County.  

During the 2024 ice storm, Sherrill took advantage of the power outage to break into the Shotgun Park maintenance headquarters near Marcola. Sherrill stole a dump trailer, various tools, and power equipment. He then returned for a second burglary, stealing more tools from a storage shed and yard (LCSO Case #24-1680). 

On April 17th, an area resident of Richardson Upriver Road near Linslaw discovered three wooden utility poles had been cut down and a half-mile of telecommunications line stolen. A tow strap was used to pull down the line, and a remnant of the tow strap was still attached. The following week on April 24th, a deputy patrolling the area observed a vehicle with tow straps tied to the hitch and conducted a traffic stop. One of the tow straps matched the segment of strap found on scene (LCSO Case #24-1978). Sherrill was identified as the suspect.  

During that stop, evidence regarding the theft of two yellow BLM gates and one white Weyerhaeuser gate was also discovered (LCSO Case #24-2084). These gates had been cut up and stolen April 21st and scrapped at a local metal recycler on April 22nd.

Sherrill was located near Whittaker Creek Campground on May 11th. He was arrested and lodged at the Lane County Jail on a warrant for a probation violation. He has been charged with Aggravated Theft in the First Degree, Theft in the First Degree x2, Criminal Mischief in the First Degree x3, Burglary in the Second Degree, and Unlawful Use of a Vehicle.  Sherrill is still in custody as of May 20th




Attached Media Files: 2024-05/6111/172464/Arrested.png

5/15/24 - LCSO Case #24-2527 - Deputies arrest male destroying Glenwood convenience store (Photo)
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/20/24 10:32 PM
Glenwood Arrest
Glenwood Arrest
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On May 15th at about 7 a.m., deputies responded to a report of a burglary and assault in progress in the 1400 block of S. Brooklyn Street, Glenwood. Deputies contacted a male suspect, Jason Michael Grimm, 40, shortly after arriving on scene. 

As they attempted to detain him, Grimm ran into a nearby convenience store. Deputies chased him inside, where Grimm used a slingshot to shoot rocks at deputies and store clerks. Grimm then began throwing items from the shelves, some hard enough to break exterior windows. Deputies were able to detain Grimm without further incident. The initial caller declined contact by deputies. 

Grimm was arrested and lodged at the Lane County Jail for Unlawful Use of a Weapon, Menacing x2, Recklessly Endangering x5, Criminal Mischief in the First Degree, and Disorderly Conduct in the Second Degree.  Grimm is still in custody as of May 20th.  




Attached Media Files: Glenwood Arrest

Firefighters Contain West Eugene Fire (Photo)
Eugene Springfield Fire - 05/20/24 6:42 PM
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Eugene, OR.  Eugene Springfield Fire responded to a structure fire at Sponsors 338 Hey 99 N in West Eugene Monday evening.  Crews were alerted to the fire at 5:34 PM on May 20th with callers reporting smoke and popping sounds from a storage building.  Firefighters arrived 4 minutes later to find a working fire in the storage building.  Crews made entry and extinguished the fire containing it to the building of origin.  The cause is under investigation. 




Attached Media Files: 2024-05/4466/172462/IMG_6617.jpeg , 2024-05/4466/172462/IMG_6615.jpeg

Fire Crews utilize transitional attack to combat blaze (Photo)
Marion County Fire District No. 1 - 05/20/24 6:19 PM
2024-05/6602/172461/IMG_7047.jpeg
2024-05/6602/172461/IMG_7047.jpeg
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See attachment for release




Attached Media Files: Press Release , 2024-05/6602/172461/IMG_7047.jpeg , 2024-05/6602/172461/IMG_7043.jpeg , 2024-05/6602/172461/IMG_7042.jpeg

OHA Director's Visit to Hood River, The Dalles Provides Insight into Local Health Priorities
Oregon Health Authority - 05/20/24 4:47 PM

May 20, 2024

Media Contact: Amy Bacher, acher2@oha.oregon.gov">amy.bacher2@oha.oregon.gov

OHA Director’s Visit to Hood River, The Dalles Provides Insight into Local Health Priorities

Hood River, Ore. – Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Director Sejal Hathi, MD, MBA, met with health leaders and partners on Thursday in Hood River and The Dalles as part of a series of visits around the state to hear about community health needs.

Key themes heard in meetings with local public health and mental health authorities, a federally qualified health center and the local coordinated care organization (CCO), included difficulties surrounding health workforce shortages, the need for comprehensive behavioral health supports, and concerns about the loss of COVID-19 pandemic federal funding.

“From this visit, I heard loud and clear that we need creative solutions to bring more people into the health care workforce - especially in areas where the cost of living is high,” said Dr. Hathi. “In speaking with health leaders, advocates, and providers in this region, it was evident that there is a true collaborative spirit and a lot of care for people in our communities. I look forward to working on solutions to all the challenges we discussed.”

OHA is using feedback received during the regional visits to inform current and future policy initiatives. Later this year, OHA will share a summary of themes heard across all regional visits and examples of specific partner recommendations that agency staff plan to pursue.

The visit to Hood River and The Dalles marks the sixth in a series across the state for the new director to learn about the challenges, needs and priorities of individual communities.

A video recap of Dr. Hathi’s visit is available here. A full schedule of all of Dr. Hathi’s regional listening visits are posted on her web page.


Passenger dies in single-vehicle collision
Salem Police Department - 05/20/24 4:14 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                  

DATE: May 20, 2024

 

Passenger dies in single-vehicle collision

Salem, Ore. — At approximately 8:30 a.m. today, callers reported a vehicle collision near the intersection of Croisan Creek RD and Roberta AV S. The Salem Police Traffic Team and other emergency responders arrived at the scene to find a car crashed into a power pole and tree leaving downed electrical line across Croisan Creek RD. 

The preliminary investigation by the Traffic Team revealed the driver of the car, Richard Gary Brunkal of Salem, was traveling southbound on Croisan Creek RD when he was unable to maintain control of the vehicle. The compact crossover car he was driving left the right shoulder of the roadway and sheared off a utility pole and struck two trees before stopping.

Officers performed lifesaving measures for the passenger before paramedics arrived; however, the passenger, Judith Ann Brunkal, age 84 of Salem, was pronounced deceased.

The 82-year-old driver is cooperating with the investigation. No arrest or citations have been issued at this time.

Croisan Creek RD between Heath ST and Mockingbird DR was closed for the crash investigation and to allow for repairs by Portland General Electric (PGE) crews.

As of 4:00 p.m. this afternoon, Croisan Creek RD remains closed with street access available to those residences in the area.

Today’s early morning traffic fatality is the twelfth in Salem for 2024.

# # #


OSP seeking public assistance regarding wolf shot and killed in Grant County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/20/24 3:22 PM
Google map of location
Google map of location
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Wolf shot and killed in Grant County
OSP Fish & Wildlife seeking public assistance to identify the person(s) responsible

GRANT COUNTY, Ore. 20 May 2024 – The Oregon State Police Fish & Wildlife Division is seeking the public’s help in identifying the person(s) responsible for shooting and killing a wolf in Grant County. 

On Monday, May 19, 2024, the Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife (ODFW) notified OSP’s Fish & Wildlife Division a mortality signal had been received from a collared wolf from the Logan Valley Pack. 

OSP Fish & Wildlife troopers responded to the scene with ODFW personnel and found a deceased yearling male wolf which died from an apparent gunshot wound. The deceased wolf was found on private property adjacent to County Road 62 near milepost 11, approximately 11 miles southeast of Prairie City. 

The preliminary investigation indicated the wolf was likely shot from the roadway between the late evening on May 18, 2024, and the early morning hours of May 19, 2024. 

Anyone with information regarding this case is urged to contact OSP Fish and Wildlife Senior Trooper Khris Brandon through the Turn in Poachers (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888 or dial OSP (mobile). TIPs can remain anonymous.

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

The Turn In Poachers (TIP) program is a collaboration between the Oregon State Police, Oregon Hunters Association, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Oregon Wildlife Coalition, Oregon Outfitter and Guides Association, and the Oregon State Marine Board. 

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.  

Preference Point Rewards
5 Points: Bighorn Sheep
5 Points: Rocky Mountain Goat
5 Points: Moose
5 Points: Wolf
4 Points: Elk
4 Points: Deer
4 Points: Pronghorn Antelope
4 Points: Bear
4 Points: Cougar

The TIP program also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of the following fish and wildlife species. Cash rewards can also be awarded for habitat destruction, illegally obtaining hunting or angling licenses or tags, lending or borrowing big game tags, spotlighting, or snagging.

Cash Rewards

Oregon Hunters Association (OHA) cash rewards:
$2,000 Bighorn Sheep, Mountain Goat, or Moose 
$1,000 Elk, Deer, or Antelope 
$600 Bear, Cougar, or Wolf
$300 Habitat destruction 
$200 Illegally obtaining Oregon hunting or angling license or tags
$200 Unlawful lending/borrowing big game tag(s)
$200 Game Fish & Shellfish
$200 Game Birds or Furbearers
$200 Spotlighting
$200 Snagging/Attempt to Snag

Oregon Wildlife Coalition (OWC) Cash Rewards:
$500 Hawk, Falcon, Eagle, Owl, Osprey
$500 Cougar, Bobcat, Beaver (public lands only), Black bears, Bighorn Sheep, Marten, Fisher, Sierra Nevada Red Fox
$1,000 Species listed as “threatened" or “endangered" under state or federal Endangered Species Act (excludes fish)

Oregon Outfitters & Guides Association (OOGA) Cash Rewards:
$200 Acting as an Outfitter Guide for the Illegal Killing of Wildlife, Illegally Obtaining Oregon Hunting or Angling Licenses or Tags, or Illegally Offering to Act as an Outfitter Guide as defined in ORS 704.010 and 704.020.

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 
TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP (677)
TIP email: TIP@osp.oregon.gov (monitored Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.)
For more information, visit: www.oregon.gov/osp/programs/fw/Pages/tip.aspx

# # #

 

About the Oregon State Police 
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.




Attached Media Files: Google map of location , Location where wolf was found

Near Miss on the Willamette River in Eugene (Photo)
Eugene Springfield Fire - 05/20/24 12:47 PM
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Eugne, OR.  Eugene Springfield Fire responded to swimmers in distress near the low head dam on the Willamette River in Glenwood Saturday afternoon.  Crews were alerted to the water rescue call at 3:19 PMand the first land based fire crews arrived 5 minutes later to guide the water rescue boats.  In all, 7 college age males were assisted following a near drowning incident involving the defunct dam and debris in it.  The individuals were floating the river in non-rated floatation devices without wearing life jackets.  Some of all of the swimmers were forced under the water due to currents and obstacles called strainers.  Most were washed down stream from the dam while one was able to escape the churning current by grabbing a branch to pull himself up concrete wall.  The low head dam is a dangerous obstacle in the waterway on a good day.  With cold water, changing flows and debris caught on the dam, it is much more dangerous.  We recommend recreating on the river with approved and rated water craft while wearing an approved personal floatation device (life jacket). Eugene Springfield Fire was supported by Lane County Sherriff’s Office.  




Attached Media Files: 2024-05/4466/172445/IMG_6021.jpeg , 2024-05/4466/172445/IMG_4449.jpeg

National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center reopening May 24, BLM announces (Photo)
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 05/20/24 12:22 PM
National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center, BLM Photo.
National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center, BLM Photo.
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Renovated interpretive center now represents a best-in-class example of a net-zero emissions building

BAKER CITY, Ore. — Pioneers of all ages and backgrounds are invited to celebrate the May 24 reopening of the National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center in Baker City, Ore. After a three-year closure for renovations, the center will reopen to the public at 1 p.m. Friday, May 24, and offer free admission through Sunday, May 26. 
Beginning Saturday, May 25, summer hours of operation will be 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, including holidays. 
 

Admission is $8 for ages 16 and up, $6 for seniors. The center also accepts America the Beautiful National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands passes.


Since opening in 1992, the center has drawn an estimated 2.5 million visitors to the area. In order to maintain some services during the closure, the BLM partnered with Baker County to install and staff an Oregon Trail exhibit at the Baker Heritage Museum, and with the City of Baker City to launch a new event — Oregon Trail Days at Geiser-Pollman Park — which will take place June 7-8 this year.


“It was very important to us to continue offering Oregon Trail experiences to visitors during the renovations,” said BLM Vale District Manager Shane DeForest, whose office oversees the center. “Additionally, this partnership has strengthened our bond with the museum and the community, and we look forward to continuing to work together.”
 

The renovation, which included $1 million from the Great American Outdoors Act, represents a best-in-class example of a net-zero emissions building: it is all-electric, it meets the Biden-Harris Administration’s Federal Building Performance Standard by eliminating the on-site use of fossil fuels, and it is highly efficient, having reduced the facility’s energy consumption by 73 percent thanks to new windows, doors, siding, insulation, roofing, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems. 


The Biden-Harris Administration is leading by example to tackle the climate crisis through President Biden’s Federal Sustainability Plan, which establishes an ambitious path to achieve net-zero emissions from federal buildings by 2045.
“President Biden set bold goals for Federal sustainability, and this project helps us achieve those goals,” said Andrew Mayock, Federal Chief Sustainability Officer in the White House Council on Environmental Quality. “Upgrading our federal buildings to be more efficient and sustainable also means healthier communities.” 
For more information about the center, visit www.oregontrail.blm.gov or call 541-523-1843.


-BLM-


The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 western states, including Alaska, on behalf of the American people. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. Our mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.
 




Attached Media Files: National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center, BLM Photo.

OSFM Community Wildfire Risk Reduction Grant application period opens May 20
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 05/20/24 10:28 AM

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon State Fire Marshal is pleased to announce the opening of its Community Wildfire Risk Reduction Grant. This funding is designed to enhance wildfire defensible space across the state, supporting wildfire mitigation projects led by structural fire protection agencies, counties, and cities. 

The $3-million grant will significantly reduce wildfire risks by funding projects to create and maintain defensible space around buildings and critical infrastructure. Grant awards will range between $50,000 and $75,000. 

The grant focuses on two project types: 

Defensible Space Projects: The goal is to protect the first 100 feet around buildings, constituting approximately 70% of grant funds. 

Community Protection Projects: These projects extend beyond 100 feet to create fire breaks or lessen wildfire risks community wide.  

Applications will be prioritized based on fire risk, social vulnerability, and project clarity. 

“By supporting local projects that lessen wildfire risks, we are working together to create a prepared and resilient Oregon,” Oregon State Fire Marshal, Mariana Ruiz-Temple said. “This grant works in concert with our other wildfire programs to move us closer to our goal of keeping fires small and away from communities.” 

More information, including the application and a grant manual, can be found on the OSFM’s grants webpage 

About the Oregon State Fire Marshal: The Oregon State Fire Marshal’s mission is to protecting people, property, and the environment from fire and hazardous materials. Through its programs, the OSFM enhances public safety and promotes community resilience across Oregon. 


New Research Reveals Uneven Treatment Landscape for People with Co-Occurring Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders
Oregon Health Authority - 05/20/24 10:10 AM

May 20, 2024

Media contact: Timothy Heider, 971-599-0459,

timothy.heider@oha.oregon.gov

New Research Reveals Uneven Treatment Landscape for People with Co-Occurring Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders

SALEM, Ore. — A study from the OHSU-PSU School of Public Health, commissioned by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA), shows that people living with co-occurring disorder (COD) experience a complex and uneven treatment landscape in Oregon.

The study—based on self-reported provider data— found that overall, 82 percent of mental health providers and 40 percent of substance use providers in Oregon offer treatment for co-occurring disorder, defined as treatment for co-occurring substance use plus either serious mental health illness in adults or serious emotional disturbance in children.

However, the study showed that availability and types of COD treatment can vary substantially:

  • Only half of mental health providers offer integrated treatment (combined treatment for mental illness and substance abuse from the same clinician or treatment team) and special groups for clients with COD.
  • COD treatment is least likely to be offered in hospital and substance use residential settings.
  • Only half of the treatment providers treat gambling disorders.
  • Only about a third of providers offer programs for young adults or LGBTQ+ clients. Just over one third of the programs offer services in Spanish, and half offer services in sign language.

The study found that acceptance of public insurance—especially Medicare—is low in some settings, which may be a barrier to access.

The study noted that workforce shortages remain a key barrier to spreading and scaling co-occurring disorder treatment across the state.

Oregon has made concerted efforts over the years to support the uptake and availability of holistic behavioral health care, including treatment for those living with co-occurring disorders.

In 2021, the Legislature directed OHA to develop payment models for increasing access to integrated treatment, which led to the establishment of the Integrated Co-Occurring Disorder Treatment program.

Oregon was also one of the first states to open Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinics as part of a federal demonstration program that began in 2017.

Participating providers receive a single payment model for treating COD (including co-occurring intellectual and developmental disabilities and problem gambling), and receive training, technical assistance, and other resources to support provision of COD treatment.

They are required to provide nine core services, ranging from crisis services to peer support and counseling. They must also provide 20 hours of primary services per site.

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Oregon Community Foundation Awards $5.3M to 281 Nonprofits Making an Impact in Every Corner Oregon (Photo)
Oregon Community Foundation - 05/20/24 10:08 AM
Constructing Hope Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation
Constructing Hope Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-05/6858/172437/thumb_Constructing_Hope_Courtesy_of_Oregon_Community_Foundation.png

May 20, 2024 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Contact: Colin Fogarty, Director of Communications, Oregon Community Foundationty@oregoncf.org">cfogarty@oregoncf.org 

 

COMMUNITY GRANTS STRENGTHEN LOCAL SOLUTIONS, OPPORTUNITIES WITH FLEXIBLE OPERATIONS FUNDING

Oregon Community Foundation Awards $5.3M to 281 Nonprofits Making an Impact in Every Corner Oregon

PORTLAND, Ore. – Nonprofit and community leaders throughout Oregon are seeing their work strengthened through new grants that provide important operational support. The funding is flexible, allowing organizations to direct it to where it is needed most. The 2024 Spring Cycle of Community Grants from Oregon Community Foundation has awarded $5,266,908 to 281 nonprofits making an impact across the state. 

For 27 years, OCF’s Community Grants program has supported nonprofits, tribal organizations and government agencies in all 36 counties of Oregon. Grants in this cycle support responses to community needs in the areas of food insecurity, housing, health, environmental stewardship, arts and culture, community development and more. This year’s grants prioritized small rural nonprofits and organizations that are culturally specific and responsive. 

"As a statewide foundation, we rely on the wealth of local expertise our communities show in finding solutions and opportunities,” said Marcy Bradley, Chief Community Engagement and Equity Officer, Oregon Community Foundation. 

“We know our nonprofit partners find flexible operating funding increasingly useful. These grants support Oregon’s smallest communities – such as Tygh Valley, with a population of 54 – to our largest in the Portland metropolitan area and everywhere in between. This is what responsive grantmaking looks like.” 

Fun Fact: OCF Community Grants are distributed so widely that if you were to travel to all four corners of the grants map for this cycle – east, west, north and south - it would take 25 hours to drive 1,432 miles. 

A full list of grantees can be found on the OCF website. The list below of representative grants from each region of Oregon demonstrates the breadth of impact these grants have on nearly every aspect of life for Oregonians. The funding is possible because of donors to Oregon Community Foundation. 

The 2024 Fall Cycle of Community Grants will focus on capacity building, small capital and new or expanding projects. Program applications will open June 24, 2024. Grants will be awarded in November.

 

Madras Community Food Pantry: $20,000 Community Grant

MCFP is a USDA/Oregon Food Bank that manages a shopping style pantry at their primary location, three school pantries in Jefferson County. They are piloting a home delivery program for individuals with limited mobility. Services are provided in both Spanish and English, and they are intentional about requesting culturally specific foods when they place orders and when necessary, they use grant funding to shop for culturally specific staples at local stores. 

 

Black United Fund of Oregon: $20,000 Community Grant

The mission of the Black United Fund of Oregon (BUF-OR) is to assist in the social and economic development of Oregon's underserved communities and to contribute to a broader understanding of ethnic and culturally diverse groups. Primary activities include culturally congruent one-on-one postsecondary mentorship; culturally specific workshops and professional development for BIPOC youth and young professionals; postsecondary scholarships for students of color; and support for small businesses and grassroots and BIPOC-led nonprofits via sponsorship, fiscal sponsorship, and workplace giving.

 

Condon Arts Council: $20,000 Community Grant

The Condon Arts Council plays a critical role in the community and has gained a reputation for providing unexpected and unique activities. Whether it is a haunted house built by youth, a music concert at the historic Liberty Theatre, or a ceramics class for seniors - the Condon Arts Council is helping to improve livability and cultural enrichment to local people. In addition, the Condon Arts Council has been working with the Oregon Arts Commission on a project to create an Arts and Culture District through the Oregon Legislature. Condon was selected as one of six cities for the pilot project. Their work in advocacy helped bring this issue to the Oregon Legislature and to educate elected officials on the power of arts and culture in underserved communities. 

From the Condon Arts Council Board of Directors: "With the support of Oregon Community Foundation's Community Grant, the Condon Arts Council will continue to bring creative and cultural engagement opportunities to our frontier community. Condon is a town of 716 people, but our programming and activities stack up with larger towns and cities. We have big goals for 2024, and this grant puts us one step closer to making them a reality."

 

Siletz Tribal Arts and Heritage Society$20,000 Community Grant

The mission of the Siletz Tribal Arts and Heritage Society is to support and promote the practice, conservation, and restoration of the tribal cultures of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians. The Siletz Tribe possesses a rich and vibrant culture, woven from 38 bands of Tribes. Yet, decades of displacement and assimilation have threatened the vitality of these traditions. The Crooked River Coffee Shop & Boutique project aims to bridge this gap through community outreach providing a space that will enrich the lives of the community by providing a platform to teach and learn history, language and cultural practices of the Siletz Tribe. 

 

Compass House: $20,000 Community Grant

Compass House offers adults living with mental illness purposeful opportunities to rebuild lives, hope and self-respect. Through the Clubhouse International Recovery Through Work model, Compass House fosters a sense of community among members and staff, while providing insight to offer appropriate member support. The Clubhouse model encourages teamwork and cooperation, exposing each other to a wide variety of attitudes, beliefs and life choices, thereby promoting a culture of acceptance and inclusion for everyone.

“Members of the Compass House courageously walk through our doors because they belong,” said Compass House Executive Director, Anna Wayman. “As they pursue recovery, they set foot on a path of self-discovery, dignity and connection. Every engagement in the clubhouse leads to the achievement and purpose needed to pursue personal and professional goals for an empowered life.” 

 

Constructing Hope$40,000 Community Grant

Constructing Hope’s mission is to rebuild the lives of community members by encouraging self-sufficiency through skills training and education in the construction industry. Constructing Hope helps people of color, returning citizens (formerly incarcerated), and low-income adults enter careers with middle-class wages and defined benefits to support themselves and their families through quarterly, no-cost, ten-week construction skills and life skills pre-apprenticeship training programs, placement services and career advancement support. The youth summer program provides skills, motivation, awareness and access for construction career pathways.

 

Safe Shelter for Siuslaw Students: $20,000 Community Grant

Safe Shelter for Siuslaw Students works to mitigate the effects of homelessness and poverty, by supporting school success through the provision of temporary shelter, support services and community awareness. The organization aids student households facing housing crises with prevention/diversion programs: rent/mortgage assistance, crisis lodging and diversion support.

"This grant is essential for our organization's mission as it provides crucial flexible funding and continues our client/community-led approach in addressing housing crises in the Siuslaw region,” said Jennifer Ledbetter, Associate Director of Safe Shelter for Siuslaw Students. “With this support, we can expand our efforts of creating temporary housing solutions and continue serving families with students and youth within the Mapleton and Siuslaw School District boundaries."

 

Gold Beach Main Street$15,000 Community Grant

Gold Beach Main Street’s mission is to enhance the livability and safety of the community while restoring and preserving the town of Gold Beach. The team partners with citizens and partner organizations to promote economic development, enhance quality of life and achieve shared community goals.

"We are excited that OCF’s grant support will help us continue the transformation of our small town’s main street to a thriving and inviting tree-lined street, with benches, banners, and someday underground power,” said Linda Pinkham, Business Coordinator, Gold Beach Main Street. “This grant will help our growing organization expand into a larger office space to accommodate new staff for many of the larger projects currently underway, such as daycare, facade improvements, way finding signs and development of community gathering places." 

 

Fortaleza Atravez Barreras: $30,000 Community Grant

A first-time OCF grant recipient, Fortaleza Atravez Barreras provides peer support, trainings, support groups, community activities, and advocacy to underserved and underrepresented populations in Marion and Polk Counties, with a focus on Hispanic, Chicano, Latino and Indigenous people of all ages who identify or experience emotional, behavioral, physical and/or risk behaviors or have lived experience.

 

About OCF’s Community Grants Program 

For 27 years, OCF’s Community Grants program has invested in community livability and vitality by listening and responding to people closest to innovating opportunities they want to advance. As Oregon has grown, so too has the complexity of issues facing so many Oregonians. Compounding these challenges is a history of systems that have not benefited everyone equitably. OCF recognizes this reality. The Community Grants program continues to provide flexible funding for nonprofits addressing the pressing needs of communities across Oregon, informed by the voices of people who know their communities the best.

 

About Oregon Community Foundation

Since 1973, Oregon Community Foundation has worked to improve the lives of all Oregonians through the power of philanthropy. In partnership with donors and volunteers, OCF strengthens communities in every county in Oregon through grantmaking, scholarships and research. In 2023, OCF distributed $225 million in grants and scholarships. Individuals, families, businesses and organizations can work with OCF to create charitable funds to support causes important to them. To learn more, please visit oregoncf.org. 

 

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Attached Media Files: OCF Community Grants Spring 2024 Grants List , Oregon Community Foundation Awards $5.3M to 281 Nonprofits Making an Impact in Every Corner Oregon Press Release , Constructing Hope Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation , Safe Shelter for Siuslaw Students Bike Giveaway Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation , Madras Community Food Pantry Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation , Madras Community Food Pantry 3 Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation , Gold Beach Main Street Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation , Constructing Hope 2 Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation , Condon Arts Council Haunted House Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation , Condon Arts Council Childrens Theatre Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation , Compass-House-Courtesy-of-Oregon-Community-Foundation

Lane County Firewise Grant Program open for applications
Lane Co. Government - 05/20/24 8:30 AM

Lane County’s Firewise Grant Incentive Program is accepting applications from residents in unincorporated Lane County beginning May 31 through 4:00 p.m. on June 27, 2024.

 

Firewise grants provide rural property owners with funding to help complete projects that reduce the risk of wildfire, such as clearing vegetation, replacing wood shake roofing, fire-resistant landscaping materials, noncombustible exterior siding, chimney spark arrestors, and more. Up to $15,500 in grant funding is available for each qualifying property. 

 

Apply online at www.LaneCountyOR.gov/firewise. Paper applications are also available at the Lane County Public Works Customer Service Center (3050 North Delta Highway, Eugene). 

 

Firewise grants are funded through Title III of the Federal Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Program - Section 601 of the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008. 

 

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Lane County celebrates Public Works Week with tours
Lane Co. Government - 05/20/24 8:09 AM

This week is National Public Works week. In celebration, Lane County Public Works is hosting free tours at multiple parks and at Short Mountain Landfill. 

 

Parks Tours

 

Monday, May 20, 12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m. at Howard Buford Recreation Area

Led by Natural Areas Coordinator Ed Alverson this tour will explore areas "touched by fire" and delve into the ecological benefits of prescribed burns.

Location: 34901 Frank Parrish Road, Eugene

RSVP: http://bit.ly/PWW_HBRA

 

Tuesday, May 21, 12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m. at Camp Lane

A behind-the-scenes tour of the 15-acre camp that serves as a venue for weddings, family reunions, summer camps and retreats. It has a commercial kitchen, a spacious dining hall accommodating up to 160 guests, a grand fireplace, Adirondack shelter, cozy yurt, and unique treehouses.

Location: 15767 Highway 126W (milepost 23)

RSVP: http://bit.ly/PWW_CampLane

 

Wednesday, May 22, 12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m. at Armitage Park

This popular park offers a diverse range of attractions, including scenic trails, a boat launch, rentable picnic shelters, campgrounds, and dog parks. Located conveniently close to town, Armitage Park is undergoing several improvements to ensure it remains a favorite with people.

Location: 90064 Coburg Road, Eugene

RSVP: http://bit.ly/PWW_Armitage

 

Thursday, May 23, 12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m. at Harbor Vista & North Jetty

Located where the Siuslaw River meets the Pacific, Harbor Vista offers camping, cabins and a day-use playground. The tour will cover upcoming, levy-funded projects to improve both locations.

Location: 87658 Harbor Vista Road, Florence

RSVP: http://bit.ly/PWW_HVNJ

 

Friday, May 24, 12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m. at McKenzie River Discovery Center

Delve into the history and resilience of the McKenzie River at the McKenzie River Discovery Center. Owned by Lane County Parks and operated by the McKenzie River Discovery Center, this unique and historic property offers a glimpse into the impact of the 2020 Holiday Farm Fire and the vision for an extraordinary visitor and education center.

Location: 44645 McKenzie Highway, Leaburg

RSVP: http://bit.ly/PWW_MRDC

 

 

Short Mountain Landfill Tours

 

Two tours are being offered of Short Mountain Landfill. Interested residents must sign up by Wednesday, May 22. The tours will begin at Short Mountain Landfill, south of Goshen. People who sign up will be provided clear driving directions.

 

Tour 1

Wednesday, May 22, 9:00 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Sign up at: https://www.signupgenius.com/go/10C0E48A4A62BA1FCCE9-49752356-lane#/

 

Tour 2

Thursday, May 23, 9:00 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Sign up at: https://www.signupgenius.com/go/10C0E48A4A62BA1FCCE9-49752356-lane#/

 

Tour participants will be provided parking for their personal vehicles. The tour will be conducted from a large passenger van.

 

 

National Public Works Week is an opportunity to celebrate the importance of public works on the daily life of a community: planning, building, managing, maintaining and operating infrastructure and programs that improve quality of life. Learn more at www.apwa.org

 

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Election results available starting at 8:00 p.m. on Election Day
Lane Co. Government - 05/20/24 8:00 AM

Election results will be made available to the public starting at 8:00 p.m. on Election Day, Tuesday, May 21, and updated throughout the evening. Elections results can be obtained at:

 

 www.LaneCountyOR.gov/Elections

 

Ballots returned by mail and postmarked by May 21 must be received by May 28 in order to be counted. Ballots returned via mail and postmarked by May 21 may take several days to arrive at Lane County Elections, which means that the outcome of some races or ballot measures may not be known as quickly as in past elections. The Lane County Elections Office will continue to periodically update election results after May 21 until all ballots have been counted. The full results reporting schedule is available online at www.LaneCountyOR.gov/Elections.

 

Election results will be certified on June 17, 2024.

 

Voters with questions can email elections@lanecountyor.gov or call 541-682-4234.

 

About the Lane County Elections Office:

The Elections Office, located at 275 W. 10th Avenue in Eugene, is responsible for conducting elections in Lane County.  The Elections Office manages voter registration, the processing of mail ballots, recruitment and training of election workers, and certification of elections.

 

 

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ROAD CLOSURE: Beacon Drive West
Lane Co. Government - 05/20/24 7:30 AM

 

Road Name:Beacon Drive West
Location:Beacon Drive West between River Road and Prairie Road
Begin Closure:MP .30
End Closure:MP .30
Dates and times:Monday, June 3, at 7:00 a.m. through Friday, June 7, at 4:30 p.m. 

Alternate routes:

 

Prairie Road or River Road

Reason for closure:

 

 

Culvert replacement

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Public invited to comment on a federal grant award in Coos Bay
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/20/24 7:02 AM

The City of Coos Bay has received a grant through the federal Historic Preservation Fund, administered by Oregon State Historic Preservation Office to fund the following local preservation project. 

Coos County

City of Coos Bay
750 S 7th Street
Marshfield Pioneer Cemetery

$16,500 grant funds
Complete marker repair and leveling.

This notice serves to make the public aware of the projects and solicit comments pursuant to Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act and the National Environmental Policy Act. The comment period is open for 30 days from the date of this announcement. To provide comments or learn more information about this project visit the federal grant public comment section of our website or contact Kuri Gill at i.Gill@oprd.oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oprd.oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.

The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 authorizes a program of federal matching grants, known as the Historic Preservation Fund, to assist the various states in carrying out historic preservation activities. The Program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, and in Oregon, is administered through the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office. For information about the grants contact Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail: i.Gill@oprd.oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oprd.oregon.gov.


Fire crews Respond To West Eugene Commercial Fire (Photo)
Eugene Springfield Fire - 05/20/24 5:48 AM
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Eugene, OR.  Eugene Springfield Fire (ESF) responded to a commercial structure fire in West Eugene on Sunday night. At  11:02  PM on May 19th, ESF Engine 8 responded to a fire alarm at a large commercial structure with multiple businesses located at 4216 W 7th Ave. The call was quickly turned into a full commercial structure fire assignment, as witnesses reported flames and smoke from one unit. Residents evacuated as ESF arrived.  Crews forced entry, and stretched hose lines for fire attack. Multiple engines and ladder trucks worked to locate and extinguish the fire, search adjacent occupancies, and check for fire extension. A large van was discovered to be on fire inside the occupancy, with fuel leaking and catching fire.  Thanks to quick response times, the fire was contained to the business of origin. The fire was placed under control, all units with smoke were ventilated and searched. There were no reported injuries and the Fire Marshal’s Office is conducting an investigation.



 




Attached Media Files: 2024-05/4466/172432/Attach0.jpeg , 2024-05/4466/172432/Attach0_21.jpeg , 2024-05/4466/172432/Attach1.jpeg , 2024-05/4466/172432/Attach0_87.jpeg

Sun. 05/19/24
2nd alrm fire destroy Adult Foster Care Home. (Photo)
Lebanon Fire District - 05/19/24 7:00 AM
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At Approximately 1:21AM Lebanon Fire District was dispatched to the report of a structure fire at an adult foster care home. BC31 arrived on scene to a two-story home that was well involved in fire. The owners of the adult foster home stated that there was still someone inside the structure. BC31 upgraded the fire to a second alarm fire, requesting additional resources from across the county. The first arriving engine and medic unit forced their way through a locked door to search the room for the missing victim. The victim was located and removed from the burning building and then emergently transported to Lebanon Community Hospital. Hot embers from the fire were being blown across the street and started another structure on fire. A single engine was able to quickly extinguish the second fire and return to the original fire. The crews remained on scene for several hours extinguishing the fire. The fire is currently under investigation.

Lebanon Fire District received assistance From Albany Fire Department, Sweet Home Fire District, Tangent Fire District, Harrisburg Fire Department, and Corvallis Fire Department

The owners of the adult foster care home were awakened by working smoke detectors and able evacuate majority of the residents until the the LFD was able to arrive on scene.




Attached Media Files: 2024-05/1191/172429/IMG_1998.jpg , Delta Side , First arriving Engine

Sat. 05/18/24
LOCATED: Have You Seen Floyd Riach?
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/18/24 2:20 PM

UPDATE 05/18/2024 2:15 PM

Canyonville, Ore. - Floyd Riach has been located and is safe. Search and Rescue Deputies coordinated with the Oregon State Police who conducted an aerial search of the area. Riach was located walking off of a private property near where he was reported to have been last seen. Deputies later contacted Riach walking along Interstate 5 near milepost 110. He was given a courtesy ride to meet with his family. 

The Sheriff's Office would like to thank the community for their assistance. 


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ORIGINAL RELEASE 5/18/24 12:00 PM

CANYONVILLE, Ore. - Douglas County Search and Rescue is currently searching for a missing Days Creek man. 

On Saturday, May 18, 2024, shortly before 6:00 a.m., 9-1-1 dispatchers received a report that 45-year-old Floyd Russell Riach of Days Creek had not arrived home. Riach had last been seen at milepost 110 on Interstate 5 when he refused medical transport and exited an ambulance. Riach had indicated he would be walking to Canyonville. His whereabouts are currently unknown. 

Riach is described as a white male adult who stands 6'02" tall, weighs 160 lbs, with gray hair and blue eyes. He was last seen wearing a black hooded sweatshirt that reads “Pacific Northwest” and has an image of Big Foot, a pair of gray cargo style pants and black shoes.

Search and Rescue crews are currently searching along the freeway for any signs of Riach and are seeking information from the public. Anyone who may have observed Riach or someone matching his description after 3:00 a.m. on May 18, 2024, is encouraged to contact the Douglas County Sheriff's Office at (541) 440-4471 referencing incident #24-2060. 

 

 


Fri. 05/17/24
The Oregon National Guard honors U.S. Army Maj. (ret.) Charles L. Deibert during memorial service (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 05/17/24 8:31 PM
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CLACKAMAS, Ore. – A memorial service with full military honors was held for U.S. Army Maj. (ret.) Charles L. Deibert at Willamette National Cemetery in Clackamas, Oregon on May 17, 2024. A recipient of The Distinguished Service Cross for his service during combat operations in Vietnam, Deibert served in the Oregon Army National Guard for 15 years and would later serve for five years in the Army Reserves.

Initially enlisting in the Marine Corps in 1956, he joined the Oregon National Guard two years later in 1958. He attended Officer Candidate School, flight school, jump school and jungle survival school before volunteering for service in Vietnam in 1966. Assigned as a platoon leader to the 220th Reconnaissance Airplane Company, he would fly over 570 missions in the Cessna O-1 Bird Dog, directly saving hundreds of U.S. troops, making him one of the most decorated Oregon military aviators.

Highlighting his extraordinary heroism with operations against an armed hostile force on September 10, 1967, in the Republic of Vietnam, Deibert distinguished himself with exceptional gallant actions as he supported a Marine battalion engaged in battle with an estimated two-regiment North Vietnamese Army force.

Despite the extreme dangers of being shot down by friendly artillery barrages and hostile anti-aircraft fire, (then) Captain Deibert flew into the area, making several low passes through a curtain of continuous fire, helping locate enemy troop concentrations. After advising the Marines of the enemy situation, he called for tactical air support and continued making low level flights over enemy strongpoints.

Describing Deibert’s exemplary military service, Maj. Gen. (ret.) Raymond F. Rees, the former Adjutant General of the Oregon National Guard, offered a fitting eulogy for his long career of service to the United States Army.

“To me as a fellow Vietnam veteran, Larry was representative of the vast majority of Vietnam veterans,” Rees said. “That ten of thousands of those veterans served their nation, and returned to become productive members of society and leaders in their community.”

During the eulogy, Rees described the accomplishment of years of military service but also touched on his impacts in the business community and the importance of family and faith.

“I hope to capture in a few words, the scope and breadth of a well-lived life and the essence of a man who lived each day as a new day, a new opportunity and new adventure,” Rees said. “He was successful in a wide ranging business career and as entrepreneur…and was a caring and loving husband, father and patriarch.”

Among his other military awards, Deibert was recognized with The Distinguished Flying Cross (two awards), The Bronze Star, The Meritorious Service Medal, Air Medal, The Army Commendation Medal, The Presidential Unit Citation, Army Parachute Badge, and Army Senior Aviation Badge and other accolades.

Deibert served as the National Commander of the Legion of Valor from 2001-2002. After his retirement, he was appointed as the Civilian Aide to the U.S. Secretary of the Army from 2003 to 2017. 

-30-

 

Released Photos from Memorial Service:

240517-Z-CH590-1011: Maj. Gen. (ret.) Raymond F. Rees (left), along with former Oregon Governor Ted Kulongoski (center-left), Brig. Gen. Alan Gronewold, Adjutant General, Oregon (center-right) and Susan Malone (right), pause for a photo prior to the start of the Memorial Service for Major (retired) Charles L. Deibert, held on May 17, 2024 at Willamette National Cemetery, Clackamas, Oregon. During his military career, Maj. Deibert was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross during combat operations in Vietnam. He served for two years in the Marine Corps before joining the Oregon Army National Guard for 15 years, and later served in the Army Reserves for five years. After his retirement he was appointed as the Civilian Aide to the U.S. Secretary of the Army from 2003-2017. (National Guard photo by John Hughel, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

240517-Z-CH590-1060: The Presentation of the American Flag is performed by the Oregon Army National Guard Funeral Honor Guard members during the Memorial Service for Maj. (retired) Charles L. Deibert held at Willamette National Cemetery, Clackamas, Oregon on May 17, 2024. During his military career, Maj. Deibert was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross during combat operations in Vietnam. He served for two years in the Marine Corps before joining the Oregon Army National Guard for 15 years, and later served in the Army Reserves for five years. After his retirement he was appointed as the Civilian Aide to the U.S. Secretary of the Army from 2003-2017. (National Guard photo by John Hughel, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

240517-Z-CH590-1034 and 240517-Z-CH590-1207: Maj. Gen. (ret.) Raymond F. Rees (left), the former Adjutant General for the Oregon National Guard, delivers the Eulogy during the Memorial Service for Major (retired) Charles L. Deibert, held on May 17, 2024 at Willamette National Cemetery, Clackamas, Oregon. During his military career, Maj. Deibert was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross during combat operations in Vietnam. He served for two years in the Marine Corps before joining the Oregon Army National Guard for 15 years, and later served in the Army Reserves for five years. After his retirement he was appointed as the Civilian Aide to the U.S. Secretary of the Army from 2003-2017. (National Guard photo by John Hughel, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

240517-Z-CH590-1234: Mr. David Winterholler address those in attendance with remembrance remarks during the Memorial Service for Major (retired) Charles L. Deibert, held on May 17, 2024 at Willamette National Cemetery, Clackamas, Oregon. During his military career, Maj. Deibert was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross during combat operations in Vietnam. He served for two years in the Marine Corps before joining the Oregon Army National Guard for 15 years, and later served in the Army Reserves for five years. After his retirement he was appointed as the Civilian Aide to the U.S. Secretary of the Army from 2003-2017. (National Guard photo by John Hughel, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

240517-Z-CH590-1025: Distinguished guest and elected officials pause for the Invocation at the start of the Memorial Service for Major (retired) Charles L. Deibert, held on May 17, 2024 at Willamette National Cemetery, Clackamas, Oregon. During his military career, Maj. Deibert was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross during combat operations in Vietnam. He served for two years in the Marine Corps before joining the Oregon Army National Guard for 15 years, and later served in the Army Reserves for five years. After his retirement he was appointed as the Civilian Aide to the U.S. Secretary of the Army from 2003-2017. (National Guard photo by John Hughel, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

240517-Z-CH590-1285: Brig. Gen. Alan Gronewold, Adjutant General, Oregon, renders a hand salute to Suzanne Deibert after presenting her with the American Flag during the Memorial Service for her husband Major (retired) Charles L. Deibert, held on May 17, 2024 at Willamette National Cemetery, Clackamas, Oregon. During his military career, Maj. Deibert was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross during combat operations in Vietnam. He served for two years in the Marine Corps before joining the Oregon Army National Guard for 15 years, and later served in the Army Reserves for five years. After his retirement he was appointed as the Civilian Aide to the U.S. Secretary of the Army from 2003-2017. (National Guard photo by John Hughel, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)




Attached Media Files: 2024-05/962/172417/240517-Z-CH590-1285.jpg , 2024-05/962/172417/240517-Z-CH590-1234.jpg , 2024-05/962/172417/240517-Z-CH590-1207.jpg , 2024-05/962/172417/240517-Z-CH590-1060.jpg , 2024-05/962/172417/240517-Z-CH590-1034.jpg , 2024-05/962/172417/240517-Z-CH590-1025.jpg , 2024-05/962/172417/240517-Z-CH590-1011.jpg

05-17-24 Douglas County Fairgrounds More Than Just a Fair (Photo)
Douglas Co. Government - 05/17/24 3:24 PM
2024-05/6789/172410/05-17-24_DC_Fairgrounds_-_More_than_Just_a_Fair.png
2024-05/6789/172410/05-17-24_DC_Fairgrounds_-_More_than_Just_a_Fair.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-05/6789/172410/thumb_05-17-24_DC_Fairgrounds_-_More_than_Just_a_Fair.png

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

May 17, 2024

Douglas County Fairgrounds More Than Just a Fair! 

 

(Douglas County, Ore.) Douglas County Commissioners Chris Boice, Tim Freeman, and Tom Kress are excited to celebrate National Fairgrounds Appreciation Month with a nod to our own Douglas County Fairgrounds Complex.  While most people think of the fairgrounds as a place where the annual fair is held, our fairgrounds complex offers so much more than just a place to go every August for funnel cakes, Ferris wheel rides and rock concerts. So, much, more.  It’s where our community comes together with friends and family to have a good time, share stories, celebrate, grieve, train, learn, support youth, and serve our community in crisis.

 

The County Commissioners are proud to support the hard work our fairgrounds staff does in putting on not only one of the best fairs around, but also for the work they do year-round for all the events they host.  As I have said before, our Douglas County Fairgrounds Complex is one of our most valuable and underappreciated County assets.  County residents are missing out if they don’t take advantage of the plethora of events and opportunities they offer,” stated Douglas County Commissioner and Fairgrounds Liaison, Tom Kress. 

 

Annually the Douglas County Fairgrounds is host to hundreds of events that host thousands of visitors, including the annual Christmas Craft Fair, Challenge of Champions Bull Riding Series, Father Daughter Dance, Home Show, Umpqua Fishery Enhancement Derby, Spring Craft Fair, Quilt Show, Lamb Show, Goat Show, Respect for Law Banquet, Master Gardeners Plant and Garden Expo, Gem Show, Circus on Ice, Retriever Club Shows, 4-H and FFA Shows, Graffiti Show and Shine, Dog Show, 4th of July Fireworks, Gun & Knife Show, First Citizens Banquet, Fall Craft Fair, Roseburg Outlaw Kart Races, Monster Trucks, Jackpot Youth Shows, Sportsman’s and Outdoor Show, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, Dirt Track Races, K9s Unleashed, Barrel Races, Swap Meet & Fall Fling Car Show, Umpqua Valley Junior Livestock Classic, Umpqua Valley Gymnastics Riverside Classic, Poker Craze – Texas Holdem’ Tournament, Wedding Expo, Southern Oregon Rod & Custom Show, Horse Shows, Dance Competitions, Proms and School Dances, Benefit Car Shows, Annual Meetings, Roseburg Chamber Luncheons, DC Mounted Posse Events, Pro Wrestling Events, Dahlia Show, Conventions, Board Meetings, Seminars, Trade Shows, Weddings, Memorials, Class and Family Reunions, Birthday Parties, Retirement Parties, Celebrations of Life, RV Shows, Oregon Equestrian Team Events, and Fundraisers.  In addition to these annual events, the Douglas County Commissioners have made sure that the Douglas County Fairgrounds has been there when our community needed them by hosting Animal Rescue and Shelter Operations; Red Cross Emergency Shelters; Wildfire Base Camp and Command Centers; Vaccination, Flu and COVID Testing Clinics; Law Enforcement and Fire Department Trainings; Emergency and First Aid Training; Motorcycle Riding Classes and the special reverse Douglas County Veterans Day Parade in 2020.

 

The 74-acre Douglas County Fairgrounds Complex is home to six community buildings (Douglas Hall, Exhibit Building, Floral Building, Community Building, Pavilion Arena and River Arena); three animal boarding barns (horse, cow and rabbit/poultry); a dirt track speedway and grandstands; amphitheater; two covered outdoor pavilions (Food Court and Douglas Timber Operators); an outdoor livestock arena; two parks (Umpqua Park and the Playground); Roseburg Playschool Co-op (Preschool for ages 2-pre-K); Year-Round RV Park with 50 RV spots; six parking lots; several maintenance buildings and three concession stands/kitchens.  Unlike most other fairground complexes in the Pacific Northwest, the Douglas County Fairgrounds Complex is open year-round for event rentals.  It boasts some of the largest indoor spaces in the state, offers convenient professional onsite catering services, and unique river and fishing access. 

 

The first recorded fair in Douglas County occurred in 1860 when an agricultural fair was held in Oakland. During the 1880s Roseburg was the site of the Southern Oregon District Fair, encompassing Jackson, Josephine, Coos, Curry, and Douglas Counties. People came from all over the state by train, buggy and horseback to explore the fair.  Most of the activity back then was around the Harness Races that were run on the Frank Alley Ranch located on East Douglas Avenue. Residents brought flowers, handiwork, baked goods, and crafts to display and sell at the event.  In 1920 there was finally enough support generated for a County Fair, which was held in Reedsport for about $750. However, during the Great Depression fair activity died out and for nearly twenty years no events were held.  In 1937, Earl Britton, who was head of the local 4H Clubs, worked to revive interest in a local County Fair and began hosting 4-H displays in the Roseburg Armory. In 1944, the County Court signed an order for the purchase of land where the present Fairgrounds Complex is located. Voters approved a $30,000 tax levy to buy the property. An advisory board was appointed, followed by the first Fair Board. In 1945 the first Douglas County Fair was held with one display building where 4-H and FFA activities were held. In addition to our County Commissioners over the years, many local businesses, service groups, and organizations including the Douglas County Sheriff's Posse, 4H, and Douglas Timber Operators have been actively involved in making the fairgrounds complex what it is today. 

 

The Douglas County Fairground’s roots really do run deep in our community, and they are absolutely grounds for everyone.  To find out more about what the Douglas County Fairgrounds has to offer, log onto our website at https://douglasfairgrounds.com/

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Media Contact: Tamara Howell, Douglas County Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist, Douglas County Public Affairs Office | Office: (541) 957-4896 | Cell: (541) 670-2804 | Email: a.howell@douglascountyor.gov">tamara.howell@douglascountyor.gov




Attached Media Files: 2024-05/6789/172410/05-17-24_DC_Fairgrounds_-_More_than_Just_a_Fair.png

Saturday, May 18: Celebrate Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander Heritage Month at the Oregon Historical Society with Free Admission and All Ages Activities (Photo)
Oregon Historical Society - 05/17/24 3:21 PM
Courtesy KALO Hawaiian Civic Club
Courtesy KALO Hawaiian Civic Club
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-05/2861/172157/thumb_IMG_9633.jpeg

Portland, OR — The Oregon Historical Society (OHS) is excited to partner with KALO Hawaiian Civic Club to celebrate Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander (AANHPI) Heritage Month with free museum admission and a day of activities for all ages on Saturday, May 18, from 10am to 5pm! This event is also presented in partnership with Oregon Rises Above Hate, a coalition of people and organizations who seek to give voice to AANHPI communities. 

In addition to educational videos and a craft corner hosted by KALO, the event will also feature two Papa Ulana Launiu (Weaving with Coconut Leaves) workshops, a traditional practice of Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander people. These two-hour workshops led by Maui Grown 808, LLP offer an opportunity for community members to learn about the artwork, its history, and its meaning from artists traveling to Oregon from Lahaina, Maui. Maui Grown 808, LLP are artists Aunty Ui and Uncle Mario of Lahaina, Maui. Each participant will leave with a beautiful, new hat.

These workshops cost $25 to attend ($20 for OHS members) and are open to all people ages twelve and older. Pre-registration is recommended and can be done online at ohs.org/ulana.

Schedule of Events

10:15am
Oli and Opening Protocol
An oli is an Indigenous Hawaiian chant that is a traditional way to begin Hawaiian events.

10:30am–12:30pm
Ulana Workshop 1

11am–3pm
Keiki Corner Crafts
All attendees are invited to take part in keiki (child) crafts especially geared towards visitors under 12 who are not eligible for the Ulana workshops. 

12:30pm–1:30pm
Educational Videos 
Attendees will have the opportunity to watch educational videos about Hawaiian history and culture to connect the past to the events of the day.

1:30pm–3:30pm
Ulana Workshop 2

Native Hawaiians were among the earliest outsiders in present-day Oregon. The future state’s first resource to be exploited by outsiders was animal pelts, highly valued for trimming garments and making hats. Prevailing winds meant that ships heading to Oregon for that purpose routinely stopped in the Hawaiian Islands, also known as the Sandwich Islands. To learn more about this history, read “Hawaiians in the Oregon Country,” an entry on The Oregon Encyclopedia by Jean Barman and Bruce McIntyre Watson.


About the Oregon Historical Society

For nearly 125 years, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of objects, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms, educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and complex as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view. 
 

About KALO Hawaiian Civic Club

Ka ʻAha Lāhui O ʻOlekona Hawaiian Civic Club of Oregon & SW Washington (KALO HCC) is a local 501(c)3 organization located in Beaverton, Oregon. KALO HCC strives to actively participate in the promotion, perpetuation, and practice of the Native Hawaiian culture and values by advocating and elevating the voices of Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander communities through cultural practices and educational opportunities. KALO HCC is housed at the AloHā Resource & Community Center (ARCC), which is an inclusive space for anyone in the community to enjoy. KALO HCC has a Community Pantry & Clothing Closet, both free services, as well as multiple workspaces/meeting areas with free Wi-Fi. The ARCC is open every weekday from 10am to 5pm.




Attached Media Files: Courtesy KALO Hawaiian Civic Club

Popular Shellburg Falls Recreation Area reopens after 2020 wildfire reconstruction (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/17/24 1:56 PM
A new mountain bike trailhead that includes new parking, picnic table and sign is part of the Shellberg Recreation Area in the Santiam State Forest.
A new mountain bike trailhead that includes new parking, picnic table and sign is part of the Shellberg Recreation Area in the Santiam State Forest.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-05/1072/172406/thumb_New-Biking-Trailhead.JPG

SALEM, Oregon--One of the most popular Santiam State Forest recreation areas, Shellburg Falls, will reopen today after being closed in the aftermath of the 2020 Labor Day wildfires.

“It’s almost unbelievable how wildfire can impact the landscape,” said Joe Offer, Oregon Department of Forestry’s (ODF) Recreation Manager.  “At Shellburg, we lost bridges, wooden signs and even the timbers on the ground used for steps burned up.  Yet our picnic pavilion with a metal roof survived.  It shows how wildfire burns at different rates, different severity, and skips around the landscape.  You can see that here at Shellburg.”

ODF estimates up to 75 percent of trees in the area were burned or partially burned. This made the department’s responsibility to manage state forests to provide economic, environmental and social benefits to Oregonians challenging.

A salvage harvest sale was conducted to get valuable timber out before it became unusable and to remove hazardous trees near roads, recreation areas and other infrastructure for the safety of the public.

“During those operations it gave the recreation staff time to evaluate and then reimagine the area to improve safety, access, and the overall experience in the forest for Shellburg users,” said Offer.

The challenge was the department did not get any more funds or positions to address the sever loss of recreation infrastructure.

“We have 1.5 fulltime recreation positions for the entire Santiam State Forest,” said Offer.  “That’s a challenge to carry out normal operations let alone rebuilding several recreation areas after fires. We also did not get any additional funds to replace lost infrastructure.”

With limited staff and budget, ODF relies on a unique partnership with South Fork Forest Camp (a joint Department of Corrections and ODF facility in Tillamook State Forest) and local non-profit groups to get much of the rebuilding and maintenance work done.

“The adults in custody from South Fork make and install all our signage,” said Offer. 

They also do trail work and provide labor outside of fire season when they contribute crews to fight wildfires.

“For Shellburg, the Salem Area Trail Alliance, Cascade Trail Crew and Trailkeepers of Oregon are key partners,” said Offer.  “Without their help, I’m not sure when we would have reopened.”

Some of the major changes to Shellburg include the closure of the old trailhead and the conversion of the small campground to the new main trailhead.  The new one is approximately six miles, mostly on gravel forest roads, from the old one.

“We had safety issues with people parking on the paved county road on busy days and access issues across private land with the old trail,” said Offer.  “The new trail head eliminates both those issues.”

There are two trails to the falls now, the first is Upper Shellburg Falls Trail that is approximately 1.5 miles round trip. This gives hikers a view from above or parallel to the falls. The second is the Lower Shellburg Falls Trail which is four miles round trip and ends up at the base of the falls. 

“In the future we plan to build a bridge below the falls to connect the trails,” said Offer. 

The other big change is the trail no longer goes behind the falls.

“There are loose rocks and gravel—so it is unstable and not safe.  We had to close that,” said Offer. 

There are barriers and signs warning people not to go behind the falls.

In addition to the trails to the falls, there are other hiking and mountain biking trails in the newly opened area that people can explore. 

“Our hope is people see this as an outdoor destination and not just one trail,” said Offer. “The falls are beautiful, but the other area trails will be interesting for people to see especially as the different impacted areas of the forest recover from those 2020 fires.”

In addition to Shellburg, all other campgrounds in the Clatsop, Santiam and Tillamook State Forests will open for the season today. To see a complete list, go to ODF’s website.  

The one major exception is the Butte Creek Falls Recreation Area in the Santiam State Forest. Salvage logging operations are on-going there from the 2020 fires, but it should reopen later this summer once hazard trees are removed from the access roads. 




Attached Media Files: A new mountain bike trailhead that includes new parking, picnic table and sign is part of the Shellberg Recreation Area in the Santiam State Forest. , This new bridge replaced the one that was destroyed in 2020 on the Shellberg Upper Trail. Volunteers from Trailkeepers of Oregon hauled in more than 100 tons of rock and installed the bridge. , The upper trail allows hikers to see the falls from above. Scorched tress and regrowth of vegetation provide a unique view perspective of the impact of wildfire to the area. No matter, the falls remain picture perfect. , The Shellberg Falls Lower Trail ends right in front of the falls. The old trails went behind the falls, but loose rocks and gravel made it unsafe to continue use of the old trail. Future plans call for a new bridge at the base of the falls to connect the upper and lower trail. But for now, hikers will have to back track on the same trail.

Oregon Department of Early Learning and Care Launches New Data Dashboard showing 96% Enrollment for the Preschool Promise Program
Ore. Dept. of Early Learning and Care - 05/17/24 1:44 PM

Oregon Department of Early Learning and Care Launches New Data Dashboard showing 96% Enrollment for the Preschool Promise Program

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

May 17, 2024 

Contact: 

Kate Gonsalves, (503) 428-7292 

delc.media@delc.oregon.gov 

SALEM, ORE. - The Oregon Department of Early Learning and Care (DELC) launched a new data dashboard demonstrating positive trends around the strong growth of Preschool Promise Program. The data shows thousands of families across the state are successfully accessing free, high quality preschool. Preschool Promise is a preschool program serving children ages 3-4, in a variety of early learning settings, in all 36 Oregon counties. The program is available to families who are living at or below 200 percent of the Federal Poverty Level. For a family of four that amounts to a yearly annual income at or below $60,000.   

“Preschool Promise is helping to ensure that families with young children have preschool options that align with the learning environment they know will work best for their child and their family,” said DELC Director Alyssa Chatterjee. “I’m pleased to see the strength of the program reflected in the data. These aren’t just statistics, each data point on the graph represents families positively impacted by the Preschool Promise program.”  

 “Here in Medford, many families would be unable to attend our program without Preschool Promise funding,” said Sunny Spicer, Executive Director at Oregon Center for Creative Learning. “For many families, receiving that funding is the turning point to stability. Each day, I see the transformational impact that access to preschool provides to families. It’s the key to find employment, the pathway to housing, or the doorway to the services they have been seeking.”  

 Previously, the Preschool Promise program faced challenges with utilization during the pandemic when a child care provider workforce shortage created significant enrollment challenges for public preschool programs. Today, with the launch of DELC’s in-house procurement office, the data shows strong improvements and a positive trajectory in expanding the number of grantees and the number of preschool slots filled statewide. 

 The success of the program would not be possible without Early Learning Hubs that enroll children with grantees. This “mixed delivery model” spans across more than 300 sites in a variety of settings. Schools are one of the main delivery options of the program. This model reflects the unique needs of families looking for an appropriate preschool program including the need for extended hours, sibling considerations, culturally responsive care, or a preference for home based setting. 

 “Every family should have the access to free, culturally responsive preschool programs that meet their family's needs,” said Dayna Jung, Preschool Promise Manager. “Preschool Promise engages parents as partners in their child’s learning and development. I’m thrilled to see the data reflect how impactful this program is. This dashboard increases transparency and allows the public to spot trends and see how we are working to establish inclusive, welcoming environments for all families.”  

 The interactive Preschool Promise data dashboard helps to illustrate the broad need for child care across the state with maps that include county based information. Additional dashboards for other high quality DELC programs including Oregon Prenatal to Kindergarten are in development. To see the current dashboards, please visit the DELC website: Department of Early Learning and Care : Data and Research Homepage : Data : State of Oregon   

 In addition to the data dashboard, the agency also recently announced a new opportunity for providers interested in Preschool Promise. A Request for Applications (RFA) for the Preschool Promise program went live this week for the 2024-2025 program year. The agency welcomes applications from interested entities across the state to reallocate a total of 358 slots. Additionally, DELC is offering eligible applicants the opportunity to be placed in the Preschool Promise applicant waitlist pool for all 16 Early Learning Hubs to be considered when future slots become available. Materials must be received by 5:00p on June 17, 2024. To read more about the opportunity, or to learn more about Preschool Promise eligibility and enrollment please visit the Preschool Promise page on the DELC website.  

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About the Oregon Department of Early Learning and Care
The Department of Early Learning and Care’s mission is to foster coordinated, culturally appropriate, and family-centered services that recognize and respect the strengths and needs of all children, families, and early learning and care professionals. More information about DELC is available at Oregon.gov/DELC. You can also connect with DELC on Facebook or sign up for news alerts and updates


Fatal Crash- HWY 66- Jackson County
Oregon State Police - 05/17/24 11:56 AM

Jackson County, Ore. 15 May 24- On Wednesday, May 15, 2024, at 10:23 a.m., Oregon State Police responded to a motorcycle versus log truck crash on Hwy 66, near milepost 11, in Jackson County.

The preliminary investigation indicated a westbound Harley Davidson motorcycle, operated by George Henry Macomber (66) of Klamath Falls, crossed the double yellow line into the eastbound lane for unknown reasons and struck an eastbound Kenworth log truck, operated by Robert David Sandene (44) of Cave Junction, head-on.

The operator of the Harley Davidson (Macomber) was transported and declared deceased at the hospital.

The operator of the Kenworth (Sandene) was not injured during the collision.

The highway was impacted for approximately 3 hours during the on-scene investigation. The cause of the crash is under investigation.

OSP was assisted by Ashland Fire and Rescue and ODOT.

 

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About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon. 


Bushnell's School of Nursing Receives $2.5M Grant
Bushnell University - 05/17/24 11:03 AM

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Bushnell’s School of Nursing Receives $2.5M Grant

 

Lane Community Health Council Makes Significant Investment in Nursing Education

 

Eugene, OR — Bushnell University’s School of Nursing, one of the anchor academic programs within the College of Health Professions, has received a sizable grant from Lane Community Health Council (LCHC) to expand its efforts to meet the nursing workforce shortage in Lane County. As a part of its ongoing mission to improve the health and well-being of residents of Lane County, LCHC has designated $2.5 million to help Bushnell build a state-of-the-art Nursing Simulation Lab and to provide scholarships for student nurses completing their Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing (ABSN) degree for clinical practice. 

 

Lane Community Health Council is partnering with Bushnell University to meet the ongoing crisis of the nursing shortage in our region through this significant investment in nursing education.  Bushnell University has quickly distinguished itself among the ABSN programs in the state for its innovative approach and successful clinical and academic outcomes. These funds will support ongoing excellence in the School of Nursing as one of the best healthcare programs in the region while also maximizing student enrollment capacity in the program. This will allow Bushnell to meet the state-wide nursing shortage more quickly and effectively. Additionally, the funds will be deployed to address systemic inequities in healthcare by recruiting more students from diverse populations. The School of Nursing is committed to best practices in educating nurses on the healthcare needs of the most vulnerable and marginalized in our communities. 

 

Nursing simulation labs are the hallmark of modern clinical nursing education. Simulation training utilizes high-tech, responsive patient manikins, providing students the opportunity to apply their academic knowledge to real-life medical situations. In simulated scenarios, nursing students get to both observe their peers and evaluate their own care using video recording and playback technology. This prepares student nurses efficiently and effectively prior to their required in-person clinical rotations in traditional hospital and community health settings.

 

This generous funding from LCHC, along with additional contributions from individual donors, family foundations, and local businesses, brings the fundraising efforts of Bushnell’s Health Professions Initiative to a total of just over $4.5M since the accelerated program began in January 2022. Together with the generous donation of over 11,000 square feet of education space in the Center for Medical Education and Research (CMER) at PeaceHealth’s Sacred Heart Medical Center University District (UD) campus, these funds provide the University much needed start-up costs to equip and establish this innovative nursing program. 

 

Bushnell’s nursing graduates are already making a difference in Oregon, with 62% of them choosing to stay in Lane County and over 90% practicing in-state. ABSN students can complete this full-time, pre-licensure nursing program in 12 months. Bushnell graduates currently have a 100% first-time passing rate on the required licensure exam for nursing practice (NCLEX-RN) and a 100% job placement rate upon completion. The program is fully accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) and approved by the Oregon State Board of Nursing (OSBN). 

 

Bushnell seeks to raise an additional $4.0M for the Health Professions Initiative through ongoing fundraising efforts and community partnerships. Additional resources will serve ongoing needs of the School of Nursing and expand behavioral health education through the Clinical Mental Health Counseling (CHMC) graduate programs. Through this initiative, Bushnell will be able to enhance scholarship opportunities, train and graduate more healthcare professionals, and enlarge the scope of health education options in our region. 

 

 

About Bushnell University

Founded in 1895 Bushnell University helps students discover and answer God’s call on their lives. Devoted to offering a Christ-centered environment, Bushnell encourages students to grow in wisdom, informed by faith, leading to lives of service. Accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities, the University was founded by pastor-educator Eugene C. Sanderson and pioneer businessman and church leader James A. Bushnell.

 

Bushnell is the largest private university in Eugene’s vibrant University District. The University offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees for undergraduate and graduate studies through on campus, online, and hybrid course formats. More information about the University is available at www.bushnell.edu.

 

About Lane Community Health Council

The Lane Community Health Council (LCHC) collaborates closely with physicians, hospitals, other healthcare providers and local community organizations to improve the health and well-being of residents in Lane County.

 

The LCHC governs our local Coordinated Care Organization (CCO), PacificSource Community Solutions, in agreement with the Oregon Health Authority (OHA), serving Medicaid members enrolled in the CCO on the Oregon Health Plan (OHP). The LCHC works to guide the design, development and implementation of strategic initiatives in support of the CCO, in service to the mission of better health, better care and better value for our members in Lane County.

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Hospital Association of Oregon Considers Appeal of U.S. District Court Ruling
Hospital Association of Oregon - 05/17/24 11:02 AM

Concerns remain about the state’s Health Care Market Oversight Program

Lake Oswego, Ore.—A U.S. District Court judge ruled yesterday that a state law creating the Health Care Market Oversight Program does not violate the Due Process Clause of the U.S. Constitution. The Hospital Association of Oregon brought the lawsuit, and it can appeal to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.

The Oregon Legislature passed HB 2362 in 2021 to create the Health Care Market Oversight Program, which gives Oregon Health Authority (OHA) significant power to oversee transactions involving health care entities, and aims to promote transparency, support statewide priorities, and monitor impacts. But since its passage, there have been concerns about the law’s negative impacts.

“Proponents of this law said it would improve health equity and protect access to care, which we wholeheartedly support. However, the law fails to accomplish those objectives,” said President and CEO Becky Hultberg. “Instead, we have an agency that has been given too much power, and it has created costly and onerous processes that have proven both arbitrary and unpredictable.”

The hospital association challenged the law on two grounds: first, the law’s open-ended and vague wording violates the Due Process Clause of the U.S. Constitution because it imposes costs and penalties without fair notice or defined standards. And second, the law violates the Oregon Constitution because it delegates legislative power to a state agency, OHA.

While the federal court ruled the law doesn’t violate the Due Process Clause of the U.S. Constitution, it declined jurisdiction over the state constitutional claim and did not consider it on its merits.

“Rather than protect Oregonians, this law may be harming them,” Hultberg said. “It has created an environment where health care arrangements serving the public may be hindered, while allowing arrangements detrimental to the public to proceed. We continue to be worried about the impact this law will have on access to health care services, especially for the most vulnerable people in our state.” 

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Attached Media Files: 2024-05/1635/172392/HCMO_lawsuit_press_release_v.2.pdf

Private Security and Investigator Policy Committee (PSIPC) -- Recruitment
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 05/17/24 9:37 AM

Department of Public Safety Standards and Training

Memorandum

 

DATE:           May 10, 2024

TO:               All Oregon Private Security Providers and Interested Individuals

FROM:          Suzy Herring

                    Program Manager

SUBJECT:     Private Security and Investigator Policy Committee (PSIPC) – Recruitment

 

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (Department or DPSST) is accepting letters of interest, accompanying interest form, for two different openings on the

Private Security and Investigator Policy Committee. The recruitment is open until Thursday, June 13, 2024. The two openings are:

  • One person representing the public, who has never been employed or utilized as a private security provider or an investigator; and is not related within the second degree by affinity or consanguinity to a person who is employed or utilized as a private security provider or investigator.
  • One person representing the health care industry.

The Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee established by Oregon Revised Statute 181A.375, and is charged with the responsibility of developing policies, requirements, standards, and rules relating to the private security and private investigator disciplines. All recommended policies, requirements, standards, and rules are submitted to the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training (Board) for consideration. The PSIPC meets on a quarterly basis. The meeting calendar is listed here:  https://www.oregon.gov/dpsst/BD/Pages/default.aspx. Members of the PSIPC may be eligible for reimbursement of costs incurred traveling to and from meetings.

Nominations for membership must be submitted to the Department for presentation to the Board chairperson for consideration. All appointments to the committee will be subject to ratification by the Board. The term of an appointed member is two years. An appointed member may be appointed to a second term.

If you are interested, you must complete and submit a Policy Committee Interest Form. This recruitment closes at 5pm on June 13, 2024. Interest forms must be received prior to the deadline. The interest form is available on the DPSST website. Here is a link to the form. Please send your completed interest form to:

Samantha Kossa

4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, OR 97317

Samantha.Kossa@dpsst.oregon.gov

Phone 971.209.8235


DPSST - Board & Policy Committee Recruitments (Application Deadline 6/13/2024)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 05/17/24 9:34 AM

2024 Board on Public Safety Standards & Training

 and Policy Committee

Open Vacancy – Recruitments

 

The Board on Public Safety Standards & Training (BPSST) and established Policy Committees have open vacancies looking to be filled. The current vacancies are as follows:

BPSST: All Board applications must be submitted through Workday.com

  • Administrator of a Municipality recommended to the Governor by the executive body of the League of Oregon Cities
  • Representative of the collective bargaining unit that represents the largest number of individual workers in the DOC
  • One member who is a district attorney recommended to the Governor by the Oregon District Attorneys Association
  • One chief of police recommended to the Governor by the Oregon Association Chiefs of Police

Policy Committees: All Policy Committee applications are due by June 13, 2024.

Telecommunications Policy Committee:

  • One person representing telecommunicators
  • One person representing the public who has never been employed or utilized as a telecommunicator

Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee:

  • One person representing the health care industry
  • One person representing the public who has never been employed or utilized as a private security provider or investigator

Corrections Policy Committee:

  • One Corrections Officer who is employed by the Department of Corrections at a women's correctional facility and who is a member of a bargaining unit

Police Policy Committee:

  • One person representing the public who has never been employed or utilized as a police officer, certified reserve officer, reserve officer or regulatory specialist
  • One command officer representing the Oregon State Police

 

To inquire about a vacancy, please visit Department of Public Safety Standards & Training : Board on Public Safety Standards & Training and Policy Committees : Boards and Committees : State of Oregon.

If interested in applying for a Policy Committee position, please complete and submit the Policy Committee Interest Form found under the ‘Board and Committee Resources’ section of the website listed above.

If interested in applying for a BPSST position, please complete the online application at Workday Board and Commission Opportunities. (Please note that an account may need to be created if not already in Workday)

For further information regarding the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training or its respective Policy Committees, please contact Samantha Kossa samantha.kossa@dpsst.oregon.gov

 

Thank you,

DPSST Board & Committees Staff


ROAD CLOSURE UPDATE: N. Game Farm Road
Lane Co. Government - 05/17/24 9:00 AM
Road Name:North Game Farm Road
Location:North Eugene
Closure Details:

May 20- 21: North Game Farm Road will be closed to all traffic between Crescent Avenue and Coburg Road on Monday, May 20, and Tuesday, May 21, from 4:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. for paving. 

Traffic will be controlled by flaggers south of Crescent Avenue. Expect heavy traffic and delays mid-day. Use Coburg Road to avoid the work zone.

May 22–24: Work will continue on North Game Farm between Coburg Road and Old Coburg Road from 6:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. The road will be open to traffic and controlled by flaggers. 

Alternate routes:

 

Coburg Road and Crescent Avenue

Reason for closure:

 

Paving

Thu. 05/16/24
Nice Weather Leads to Early Season Technical Rescue at "High Rock" (Photo)
Sweet Home Fire Dist. - 05/16/24 7:40 PM
2024-05/5505/172380/135803_high_rock.jpeg
2024-05/5505/172380/135803_high_rock.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-05/5505/172380/thumb_135803_high_rock.jpeg

Sweet Home Fire crews were dispatched at 4:40 this afternoon for a report of a female who fell approximately 10 feet onto a rock ledge just beneath the water on the banks of the South Santiam. The patient complained of severe back pain and was unable to stand. Crews responded with Linn County Search and Rescue and Linn County Sheriff's Deputies and located the victim who required a rope system to safely extricate her to the roadway. The patient was packaged in a stokes basket and a high angle rescue was necessary to raise the patient to a landing from which the crew was then able to carry her the remaining distance. She was transported by ambulance to a local hospital in stable condition. Two brush rigs, an ambulance, a rescue unit, and a staff vehicle responded from Sweet Home Fire with a total of 11 rescuers. From the Linn County Sheriff's Office, 4 deputies and 2 Search and Rescue personnel responded.




Attached Media Files: 2024-05/5505/172380/135803_high_rock.jpeg , 2024-05/5505/172380/135805_high_rock.jpeg , 2024-05/5505/172380/135808_high_rock.jpeg

5/8/24 - LCSO Case #24-2181 - Deputies arrest male for robbery and assault (Photo)
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/16/24 5:52 PM
Glenwood Arrest
Glenwood Arrest
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-05/6111/172378/thumb_Glenwood_Arrest.png

On April 27th, Lane County Sheriff’s deputies responded to a report of a robbery in the 4100 block of Franklin Boulevard, Eugene. The victim met an unknown male at a public location to purchase an item being sold online, then again later in the evening to purchase another item. This time they met in a less public area. The suspect pointed a handgun at the victim, demanded money, and struck him in the face twice. The victim complied, and then was able to escape.

Detectives identified the suspect as Joshua Randall Welty, 24, of Glenwood. On May 8th, they located Welty and arrested him for Robbery in the First Degree, Assault in the Second Degree, Unlawful Use of a Weapon, and Menacing. On May 9th, detectives and deputies served a search warrant in the 1700 block of Concord Street. Additional evidence was located. As of May 16th, Welty is still in custody.

The Lane County Sheriff’s Office reminds residents to always meet in a public place when buying and selling, ideally at a location with cameras.  




Attached Media Files: Glenwood Arrest

Public Notice - Winston-Dillard Fire District No. 5 Regular Board Meeting
Douglas Co. Fire Dist. No.2 - 05/16/24 4:57 PM

BOARD REGULAR MEETING NOTICE

The Board of Directors of Winston-Dillard Fire District No. 5 will hold its Regular Board meeting at WDFD Fire Station at 250 SE Main St., Winston, OR on Monday, May 20, 2024 at 5:30 p.m. To comply with House Bill 2560, those that wish to participate can attend through videoconferencing or telephonically. If you plan on attending the meeting, please call the business office at 541-679-8721 during normal business hours prior to 4:00 p.m. on Monday, May 20, 2024, for instructions.

The Board agenda to include but not limited to:

   1. Monthly Financial Report     

        

The meeting location is accessible to person with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting to Winston-Dillard Fire District No. 5 at 541-679-8721


Public Notice - Douglas County Fire District No. 2 Regular Board Meeting
Douglas Co. Fire Dist. No.2 - 05/16/24 4:55 PM

BOARD REGULAR MEETING NOTICE     

The Board of Directors of Douglas County Fire District No. 2 will hold its Regular Board meeting at the Winston Dillard Fire Station located at 250 SE Main St. Winston, OR 97496 on Monday May 20th, 2024, at 5:30 pm. To comply with House Bill 2560, those that wish to participate can attend through videoconferencing or telephonically. If you plan on attending the meeting, please call the business office at 541-673-5503 during normal business hours prior to 4:00 p.m. on Monday May 20, 2024, for instructions. 

The Board agenda to include but not limited to:                    

  1. Monthly Financials
  2. Annexation Request

 

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting to DCFD #2 at 541-673-5503.


Public Notice - Central Douglas Fire & Rescue Authority Regular Board Meeting
Douglas Co. Fire Dist. No.2 - 05/16/24 4:53 PM

CENTRAL DOUGLAS FIRE & RESCUE AUTHORITY REGULAR BOARD MEETING NOTICE

The Board of Directors of Central Douglas Fire & Rescue Authority will hold its Regular Board meeting at Winston Dillard Fire District located at 250 SE Main St. Winston, OR 97496 on Monday May 20, 2024, at 5:30 p.m. A supplemental budget adjustment will be considered at this meeting.  To comply with House Bill 2560, those that wish to participate can attend through videoconferencing or telephonically. If you plan on attending the meeting, please call the business office at 541-673-5503 during normal business hours prior to 4:00 p.m. on Monday May 20, 2024, for instructions.

The Board agenda to include but not limited to:                 

  1. Monthly Financials
  2. FY24 Supplemental Budget Adjustment – HEARING
  3. Resolution 2024-07: FY24 Supplemental Budget Adjustment
  4. Board Policies – 1st Reading
  5. Ambulance Rate Setting

 

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting to administration at 541-673-5503.


Reward for information about poisoning case that killed wolves, eagle, and other wildlife- Wallowa County
Oregon State Police - 05/16/24 3:33 PM

REWARD FOR INFORMATION ABOUT POISONING CASE THAT KILLED WOLVES, EAGLES AND OTHER WILDLIFE - WALLOWA COUNTY

 

The Oregon State Police (OSP) Fish & Wildlife Division is partnering with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Office of Law Enforcement to investigate the unlawful poisoning of three gray wolves, two golden eagles, a mountain lion, and a coyote in the Imnaha River drainage in February of 2024 (link to USFWS Press Release). It should be noted that the suspected source of poison was removed from the landscape by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife to prevent further poisonings. 

In addition to the aforementioned incident, the OSP Fish & Wildlife Division is also asking for the public’s assistance in identifying the person(s) responsible for the unlawful take of additional gray wolves, and the killing of domestic dogs in several other locations in Wallowa County, OR:

  1. During the months of July and October of 2023, F&W Troopers responded to the unlawful take of two wolves respectively, which had been poisoned within the Chesnimnus Wildlife Management Unit, approximately 30 miles northeast of Enterprise, OR. The poisonings and cause of death were confirmed through the Clark R. Bavin National Fish and Wildlife Forensic Laboratory.
  2. During April 2024, F&W Troopers responded to the unlawful take of a wolf, which is suspected of being poisoned in the Wenaha Wildlife Management Unit, approximately 5 miles west of Troy, OR. Investigators are awaiting a confirmed cause of death from the National Fish and Wildlife Forensics Laboratory.
  3. During April 2024, F&W Troopers responded to a domestic dog which was poisoned and within the Sled Springs Wildlife Management. This location is approximately 9 miles north of Enterprise, OR. The poisoning was confirmed through a veterinary clinic.
  4. During late April 2024, F&W Troopers responded to another domestic dog which is suspected of being poisoned within the Snake River Management Unit. This location is approximately 6 miles north of Imnaha, OR. 

Anyone with information regarding these cases is urged to contact OSP Senior Trooper Sean Carothers through the Turn in Poachers (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888 or dial OSP (mobile).  TIPs can remain anonymous. 

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 


The Turn In Poachers (TIP) program is a collaboration between the Oregon State Police, Oregon Hunters Association, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Oregon Wildlife Coalition, Oregon Outfitter and Guides Association, and the Oregon State Marine Board. 

 

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of the following big game mammals. 

 

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Bighorn Sheep

5 Points-Rocky Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Pronghorn Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

 

The TIP program also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of the following fish and wildlife species. Cash rewards can also be awarded for habitat destruction, illegally obtaining hunting or angling license or tag, lending or borrowing big game tags, spotlighting, or snagging.

 

CASH REWARDS: 


Oregon Hunters Association (OHA) Cash Rewards:

$2,000 Bighorn Sheep, Mountain Goat or Moose 

$1,000 Elk, Deer or Antelope 

$600 Bear, Cougar or Wolf

$300 Habitat Destruction 

$200 Illegally obtaining Oregon hunting or angling license or tags

$200 Unlawful Lending/Borrowing Big Game Tag(s)

$200 Game Fish & Shellfish

$200 Game Birds or Furbearers

$200 Spotlighting

$200 Snagging/Attempt to Snag

 

Oregon Wildlife Coalition (OWC) Cash Rewards:

$500 Hawk, Falcon, Eagle, Owl, Osprey

$500 Cougar, Bobcat, Beaver (public lands only), Black bears, Bighorn Sheep, Marten, Fisher, Sierra Nevada Red Fox

$1,000 Species listed as “threatened" or “endangered" under state or federal Endangered Species Act (excludes fish) 

$11,500 Wolf

 

 

Oregon Outfitters & Guides Association (OOGA) Cash Rewards

$200 Acting as an Outfitter Guide for the Illegal Killing of Wildlife, Illegally Obtaining Oregon Hunting or Angling Licenses or Tags, or Illegally Offering to Act as an Outfitter Guide as defined in ORS 704.010 and 704.020.

 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP (677)
TIP email: TIP@osp.oregon.gov  (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)


OHA advisory: Consumption of raw milk may carry H5N1 risk
Oregon Health Authority - 05/16/24 1:20 PM

May 16, 2024

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov

OHA advisory: Consumption of raw milk may carry H5N1 risk

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon Health Authority (OHA) is reminding people of the risks associated with raw (unpasteurized) milk consumption amid the current H5N1 “bird flu” outbreak in dairy cattle.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently tested 297 retail milk samples from 38 states for H5N1 virus. About 20% of these samples tested positive for H5N1 viral fragments, but none contained live infectious virus because the H5N1 virus had been killed through pasteurization.

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), there are 49 dairy cattle H5N1 outbreaks across nine states. No outbreaks have occurred in Oregon, but H5N1 is believed to be more widespread than current testing suggests.

“We know that if H5N1 is present in the milk of infected dairy cattle, it will be killed by pasteurization,” said Dean Sidelinger, M.D., M.S.Ed., health officer and state epidemiologist at OHA. “Drinking raw milk carries many health risks, and those risks may now include H5N1 infection.”

Pasteurized milk is extremely safe and has undergone a heating process that kills disease-causing bacteria and viruses. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), people who consume unpasteurized milk are at risk for a variety of illnesses such as E. coli and Salmonella. Only pasteurized milk is sold in stores and provided to children in school lunches.

Raw milk that someone consumes from the same farm over a duration of time may not always be safe. Raw milk can get contaminated in many ways. While good safety practices can reduce the chance of germs getting in raw milk, they cannot eliminate all risk.

The Oregon Department of Agriculture is offering free testing for H5N1 to dairy farms of any size in Oregon. For additional information regarding this new no-cost testing program, please visit: https://www.oregon.gov/oda/programs/AnimalHealthFeedsLivestockID/AHLicensing/Pages/Approved-Bovine-HPAI-Sampler.aspx.

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Log Truck Crash on Upper Calapooia (Photo)
Sweet Home Fire Dist. - 05/16/24 11:54 AM
2024-05/5505/172358/log_truck_4.jpeg
2024-05/5505/172358/log_truck_4.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-05/5505/172358/thumb_log_truck_4.jpeg

Fire crews from Sweet Home were dispatched to a crash on Upper Calapooia at 9:52 this morning. The caller reported that the crash involved a log truck and that there were wires down. A command vehicle, an ambulance, a brush truck, and a rescue unit responded from Sweet Home Fire with 6 firefighters. Crews arrived to find a loaded log truck had failed to negotiate a corner and had tipped over onto the passenger side spilling it's logs and shearing off a power pole. The crash left one power line suspended low across the road and two lines broken, laying across the scene. The single occupant of the vehicle had self-extricated prior to the arrival of responders, and was uninjured. Fire crews controlled traffic while two lineman from Pacific Power cleared the power line hazard. The scene was turned over to three Linn County Sheriff's Deputies, the road was closed until a heavy wrecker could arrive to remove the log truck and logs, and clear the roadway.




Attached Media Files: 2024-05/5505/172358/log_truck_4.jpeg , 2024-05/5505/172358/log_truck_3.jpeg , 2024-05/5505/172358/log_truck_2.jpeg

Open-Air Train Rides in June! (Photo)
Oregon Rail Heritage Center - 05/16/24 11:51 AM
2024-05/7355/172357/OpenAirTrainRide_ORHF.jpg
2024-05/7355/172357/OpenAirTrainRide_ORHF.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-05/7355/172357/thumb_OpenAirTrainRide_ORHF.jpg

Saturday, June 1 and Saturday, June 29

1:00pm, 2:00pm, 3:00pm and 4:00pm

Adults: $15; Kiddos 3-12: $10; Children 2 and under ride free (on lap); Military & Seniors: $13.50

Join us for a 45-minute train ride in open air rail cars along the Willamette River in the heart of Portland. Excellent for viewing wildlife, paddleboarders and Oaks Park rides!

Open air cars are pulled by a diesel locomotive and depart from the Oregon Rail Heritage Center at 2250 SE Water Avenue in Portland, Oregon. Be sure to save a little time before or after to check out the museum.

Visit www.orhf.org/Saturday-train-rides for ticketing and more information.




Attached Media Files: 2024-05/7355/172357/OpenAirTrainRide_ORHF.jpg

Celebrate All Dads with a Train Ride! (Photo)
Oregon Rail Heritage Center - 05/16/24 11:44 AM
Celebrate All Dads!
Celebrate All Dads!
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-05/7355/172356/thumb_Dad_TrainRide.jpg

Saturday, June 15, 2024

1:00pm, 2:30pm and 4:00pm

45-minute round-trip train rides pulled by the BNSF 3613 diesel locomotive will depart from the Enginehouse at 2250 SE Water Avenue in Portland. Enjoy scenic landscape and wildlife along the east bank of the Willamette River. 

Tickets: $20 for adults; $15 kiddos 3-12; Children 2 and under ride free (on lap); Military & Seniors $18

Visit www.orhf.org/saturday-train-rides for tickets and more information.

Snacks and adult & kid-friendly beverages will be available for purchase. We will have plenty of old beer for dad! Onboard activities for kids of all ages.




Attached Media Files: Celebrate All Dads!

Nonmedical vaccine exemptions for kindergartners hits record high
Oregon Health Authority - 05/16/24 10:37 AM

May 16, 2024

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov

Nonmedical vaccine exemptions for kindergartners hits record high

But OHA finds most Oregon parents, guardians still choose to immunize kids

PORTLAND, Ore.—Schools reported the highest rate ever for students claiming nonmedical exemptions from the state’s school vaccination requirements, new Oregon Health Authority (OHA) data show.

Statewide, 8.8% of kindergartners had a nonmedical exemption for one or more required vaccines, up from 8.1% in 2023 and 6.9% in 2022. In 2023, Oregon had the second highest nonmedical exemption rate in the country, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data.

Analysts with OHA’s Oregon Immunization Program found that 86.4% of kindergartners received all required vaccines in 2024, down from 87.1% in 2023 and 88.4% in 2022. The decrease in kindergarten immunization rates marks two consecutive years of decline.

Stacy de Assis Matthews, immunization school law coordinator at the Oregon Immunization Program, said the best defense against vaccine-preventable diseases is a well-immunized community, which also protects children who cannot be immunized because of age or medical condition.

“The concern is that a highly contagious disease, such as measles, will be introduced to a school that doesn’t have high immunization rates and that students will become sick,” Matthews said. She noted that, as of May 10, there were 132 cases of measles in the U.S. in 2024, of which 81% were unvaccinated or had unknown vaccination status, CDC data show.

But by far, most Oregon parents and guardians choose to have their children immunized, Matthews said. Schools reported that 91% of students in kindergarten through 12th grade received all required vaccines in 2024. However, this rate has been decreasing over time.

“School immunization laws help make sure kids can go to school in a safe and healthy environment free of vaccine-preventable diseases,” Matthews said. “These laws help support OHA’s goal of eliminating health disparities by 2030 by making sure each child’s immunization record is checked annually, and any child who is behind can be brought up to date on vaccines every year.”

Data from Oregon’s ALERT Immunization Information System provides a detailed look at childhood immunizations and adolescent immunizations, including immunization rates by race and ethnicity. OHA also maintains a summary of kindergarten immunization and exemption rates, which were updated this month, and a county and state immunization and exemption rate dashboard updated in August 2023 (2024 data will be available later this summer).

OHA also has individual school and child care immunization rate interactive maps (2024 data will be available later this summer) and individual school and child care immunization rate spreadsheets, also updated this month.

There are several resources for parents and guardians to get their kids vaccinated:

  • Information about immunization requirements for the 2024-2025 school year and school immunization forms are available in 17 languages.
  • If a person needs help in finding a clinic, they can contact 211 or their local health department. 211Info has English and Spanish speakers available, as well as interpreter services in many different languages.
  • If a child has Medicaid/Oregon Health Plan or no insurance, or is American Indian/Alaska Native, immunizations are available at low or no cost through the Vaccines for Children program.

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Eastern Oregon Man Sentenced to More Than 12 Years in Federal Prison for Sexually Abusing Two Minors He Met Online
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 05/16/24 10:34 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A La Grande, Oregon man was sentenced to more than 12 years in federal prison Wednesday for sexually abusing and transporting two minors from Washington State he met through Snapchat.

Albert Wayne Johnson, 42, was sentenced to 151 months in federal prison and 10 years’ supervised release.

According to court documents, on August 8, 2022, deputies from the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office responded to a call of two minors abandoned at Barton Park in Boring, Oregon. The children told the deputies they met Johnson on Snapchat and that he had driven them from Washington State through Idaho and into Oregon, and had sexually abused both during the trip. Along the way, Johnson stopped at a motel in Othello, Washington, where he abused the children, and a campground near La Grande, where he continued to abuse one of the children. After arriving in Boring, Johnson left the children at a campsite in Barton Park and never returned.

In August 2022, after receiving information about the abduction and abuse that had occurred, detectives from the Othello Police Department contacted the motel in Othello and obtained surveillance footage showing Johnson with the two children.

On August 30, 2022, officers and deputies from the La Grande Police Department, Union County Sheriff’s Office, Union County Probation Department, and Umatilla Tribal Police Department located Johnson at his residence in La Grande and arrested him on an outstanding parole violation warrant.

On October 5, 2022, Johnson was charged by criminal complaint with coercing and enticing a minor and transporting a minor with intent to engage in criminal sexual activity. Later, on November 2, 2022, a federal grand jury in Portland returned a three-count indictment charging Johnson with traveling across state lines to engage in a sexual act with a minor, transporting a minor with intent to engage in criminal sexual activity, and commission of a sex offense by a registered sex offender.

On January 24, 2024, Johnson pleaded guilty to transporting a minor with intent to engage in criminal sexual activity.

This case was investigated by the FBI Pendleton Resident Agency with assistance from the Othello Police Department, La Grande Police Department, Union County Sheriff’s Office, Union County Probation Department, Umatilla Tribal Police Department, and Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office. It was prosecuted by Cassady Adams, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

Anyone who has information about the physical or online exploitation of children are encouraged to call the FBI at (503) 224-4181 or submit a tip online at tips.fbi.gov.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative launched in May 2006 by the Justice Department to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.justice.gov/psc.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Oregon Community Trees announces speakers for June 27 Oregon Urban Forestry Conference in Eugene (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/16/24 10:30 AM
Jena Hughes from the Dept. of Land Conservation and Development will explain just how urgent the need for more housing is in Oregon as one of the speakers at the "More Housing, More Trees: Giving Oregonians Both" urban forestry conference in Eugene on June 27.
Jena Hughes from the Dept. of Land Conservation and Development will explain just how urgent the need for more housing is in Oregon as one of the speakers at the "More Housing, More Trees: Giving Oregonians Both" urban forestry conference in Eugene on June 27.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-05/1072/172349/thumb_Jena_Hughes_photo.jpg

(EUGENE, Ore.) – Oregon Community Trees is announcing the names of the three individual speakers at the June 27th Oregon Urban Forestry Conference, being held in Eugene this year. “More Housing, More Trees: Giving Oregonians Both” is the theme of this year’s conference, which is jointly sponsored by the Oregon Dept. of Forestry and USDA Forest Service. 

The latest speaker to confirm is Dutch-Canadian ecological engineer and author Nadina Galle.  Galle’s new book entitled The Nature of Our Cities: Harnessing the Power of the Natural World to Survive a Changing Planet will be published by HarperCollins on June 18. She is winner of the European Space Agency’s top prize for her work on individual tree crown delineation to combat urban deforestation. She has received a number of other academic and entrepreneurial awards, including a Fulbright scholarship for a fellowship at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Senseable City Lab, where she still holds a research affiliation. Just this year she was named a National Geographic Explorer, researching how growing cities across Latin America are plugging into the Internet of Nature.  At the conference, Galle will appear virtually and make the case for more tree canopy. 

Making the case for why Oregon needs more housing will be Jena Hughes, a Housing and Growth Management Analyst at the Oregon Dept. of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD). There, she looks for creative solutions to address complex housing challenges guided by equity and sustainability. Before joining DLCD, Hughes spent seven years as a long-range planner in local government. She worked primarily on housing and land-use issues. Hughes studied Sustainable Environmental Design and City and Regional Planning at the University of California, Berkeley. 

Opening speaker for the conference is Eugene mayoral candidate Kaarin Knudson. Knudson is a licensed architect, educator and leader with more than 20 years’ experience advancing sustainable design and community-led solutions. In 2017 she founded the housing advocacy organization Better Housing Together to increase housing affordability, diversity, and supply in Lane County. She has been a longtime member of the City Club of Eugene, and was its president in 2022-23. She advised on the implementation of Oregon’s landmark middle housing laws and for the creation of Eugene’s Affordable Housing Trust Fund. She teaches a graduate urban design workshop at the University of Oregon and is co-author of a new textbook, The Sustainable Urban Design Handbook.

Two afternoon panels will dive deeply into discussions of creative ways cities can find new spaces to add tree canopy and how to preserve trees during multi-family housing development. Among the confirmed panelists are:

  • Ted Labbe, founding board member of DePave, a non-profit dedicated to urban re-greening.
  • Ryan Gilpin, consulting arborist and owner of Nidus Consulting. Gilpin is a contributing author of a book on best management practices for protecting trees during construction.
  • Portland developer Eli Spivak.
  • Chris Neamtzu, who as Planning Director for the City of Wilsonville planned and implemented many residential neighborhoods where preserved trees are the focal point. He is now Wilsonville’s Community Development Director.
  • Trees for Life Oregon board member Jim Gersbach. The organization advocates for the preservation of large, healthy shade trees and the space to plant them in Oregon’s urban communities.

There will also be a variety of poster presentations on topics such as methods of tree preservation during construction, ideas for redesigning streets and right-of-way planting strips to make room for larger trees, and similar concepts. Anyone interested in submitting a presentation can do so here. 

Early registration for the conference is $150 until May 24 and $180 after that. Students can register for $80. Price includes a boxed lunch and social hour beverages and snacks following the conference. To register or for more information, please  go to More Housing, More Trees: Giving Oregonians Both by Oregon Community Trees (givelively.org)

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Attached Media Files: Jena Hughes from the Dept. of Land Conservation and Development will explain just how urgent the need for more housing is in Oregon as one of the speakers at the "More Housing, More Trees: Giving Oregonians Both" urban forestry conference in Eugene on June 27. , Eugene mayoral candidate and housing advocate Kaarin Knudson is to be opening speaker at the Oregon Urban Forestry Conference this year in Eugene. She'll stress the importance of balancing the need for more housing with the need to ensure equitable and adequate canopy for residents of fast-densifying cities and towns. , Dutch-Canadian ecological engineer and author of a new book will be one of three speakers at the June 27 Oregon Urban Forestry Conference in Eugene.

Free camping, day-use, and activities to celebrate State Parks Day June 1
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/16/24 10:11 AM

SALEM, Ore—Celebrate State Parks Day with free parking and free RV and tent site camping at all Oregon State Parks June 1 as well as special events at selected parks.

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) will waive day-use parking fees at the 25 locations that charge them and camping fees for all tent, RV and horse campsites June 1. 

OPRD will also waive day-use parking fees June 2, to support Free Fishing Days offered by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. 

State Parks Day has been a tradition since 1998 to thank Oregonians for their support of the state park system over many decades.

“Each Oregon state park is here today because of the support, investment and care from Oregonians and all visitors,” said OPRD Director Lisa Sumption. “We host State Parks Day in June to show our appreciation for everyone’s commitment to preserving Oregon’s special places.” 

State Parks Day Events

Several free special events are planned June 1 to celebrate State Parks Day:

Carl G. Washburne: Hot dog BBQ noon-1 p.m. in campground B Loop, across from site 32.

Fort Stevens: Come and play disc golf 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Lil' Oozlefinch Putting Course.  Make a putt, win a special prize! Loaner discs available to use.  Giveaways and prizes for all who attend. 

Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail - Mark O. Hatfield West Trailhead: Rangers and park partners will be at the Visitor Center 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. with information and self-guided activities.

Jessie Honeyman: Hot dog BBQ 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the back patio of the Historic Cleawox Lodge.

L.L. Stub Stewart: The Friends of Stub Stewart State Park encourages all to come to the Community Fair at the Hilltop Day-use Area Picnic Shelter 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Visit the booths and tables hosted by local fire departments, state forestry agencies, and local volunteer organizations.  There will also be interpretive displays and arts and crafts activities for everyone.

Milo McIver:  Join a park ranger at the Interpretive Shelter for a Plant Identification Scavenger Hunt 10-11 a.m. Learn about the different traits of plants and how to determine which species grow within the park. Plan to spend approximately 20-30 minutes learning about edible fruits and prickly plants and then 30 minutes on the trail completing the scavenger hunt. 

Silver Falls State Park: Learn about the emerald ash borer (EAB) and its role as a threat to Oregon's ash trees. Oregon State Parks and Oregon Department of Forestry staff will be on hand 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. to share information about this destructive pest at the Discovery Table in the Stone Circle in the South Falls day-use area. 

Spring Valley Access: Easy, ½-mile guided hike exploring native plants 11 a.m. Meet at the main parking lot near 8900 Wallace Road NW, Salem, OR, 97304. 

The Cove Palisades: Festival of the Land is a free festival that celebrates the diverse history, food and culture of Central Oregon 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The event includes Dutch oven cooking demonstrations, kids’ games and activities, petting “zoo”, mini farmers market, pollinator, wildfire, and fish displays, and more. 

Visit the stateparks.oregon.gov event calendar for a list of additional events this summer.

For camping availability, please check oregonstateparks.reserveamerica.com or visit first-come-first served sites: https://stateparks.oregon.gov/index.cfm?do=reserve.first-come

About Oregon Parks and Recreation Department

The mission of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is to provide and protect outstanding natural, scenic, cultural, historic and recreational sites for the enjoyment and education of present and future generations. The department manages 254 Oregon State Parks comprising more than 100,000 acres. Learn more at stateparks.oregon.gov.

 


Tip of the Week for the week of May 20, 2024 - Move Over. It's the Law. (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/16/24 10:00 AM
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MOVE OVER. IT’S THE LAW

Every day, first responders take on personal risk to serve our communities and save lives. Even a routine traffic stop has become risky. The following information comes from the Oregon Department of Transportation (www.oregon.gov/ODOT) and can help keep first responders and commuters safer.

There have been many cases where officers are pulled over on the side of the road when drivers have then crashed into them at high speeds. That’s why there’s a strict law in Oregon designed to help prevent these situations from happening again. 

The Move Over Law (ORS 811.147) states that if you are approaching any type of emergency vehicle, tow truck or roadside assistance vehicle which is stopped on the roadside with emergency lights activated, you must:

  • MOVE OVER into another available lane.
  • If you can’t safely change lanes, SLOW DOWN to a speed that is at least 5 mph below the posted or designated speed of the roadway.
  • In all cases, the driver must try to provide as much room as possible for the emergency vehicle, tow truck or roadside assistance vehicle.

The Move Over Law is in place to help protect law enforcement officers, emergency workers, tow operators and those who routinely provide assistance to motorists along the highways. This group of dedicated professionals face a deadly threat on a daily basis: speeding and inattentive drivers. But the law also exists to protect you. The flashing lights are your cue to move over and slow down. 

If you are approaching the scene of a crash, carefully watch for emergency workers directing traffic and follow all of their instructions.

For more information and tips visit our website at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon. 
 

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Attached Media Files: 2024-05/5490/172160/05.16.24_Move_Over._Its_the_Law._.pdf , 2024-05/5490/172160/05.16.24_Move_Over._Its_the_Law._.docx , 2024-05/5490/172160/Tip_of_the_Week_Images_-_Move_Over._Its_the_Law..png

Four Local Nonprofits Awarded $600,000 by OnPoint Community Credit Union & Federal Home Loan Bank of Des Moines (Photo)
OnPoint Community Credit Union - 05/16/24 9:30 AM
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Funding presented in partnership with the FHLB Des Moines boosts critical work of Habitat for Humanity Portland Region, Hacienda CDC, AGE+ and The Freshwater Trust

PORTLAND, Ore., May 16, 2024 — OnPoint Community Credit Union, in partnership with Federal Home Loan Bank of Des Moines today announced a $600,000 Member Impact Fund grant to four Oregon nonprofits dedicated to affordable housing and environmental conservation. The recipients are Habitat for Humanity Portland Region, Hacienda CDCAGE+ and The Freshwater Trust

Each organization will use its funding to enhance vital community development projects across the region. The four nonprofits receiving this funding were selected by OnPoint based on their current needs in the housing and community development space.

“Each of these organizations plays a pivotal role in fostering stability, growth and resilience in our region,” said Rob Stuart, President and CEO of OnPoint Community Credit Union.This funding is a critical step towards enhancing the quality of life in the communities we serve. We are proud to partner with the Federal Home Loan Bank of Des Moines to provide these grants and invest in a brighter, more sustainable future for all Oregonians.”

How FHLB funding works

The FHLB Des Moines is a government sponsored enterprise that supports both mortgage lending and related community investment, with more than 1,200 member institutions. OnPoint’s membership means that for every dollar it donates, the FHLB Des Moines donates $3. This helps the credit union maximize its support of local nonprofits focused on economic development, affordable housing and conservation. 

FHLB Des Moines’s matching grant program, which was introduced in 2023, will provide nearly $20 million to eligible organizations to strengthen communities in Oregon, Hawaii, Montana, North Dakota, Guam, American Samoa and the Northern Mariana Islands this year. In 2024, FHLB Des Moines increased the available grant money in its Member Impact Fund by $10 million.

“We are thrilled to see grants from our Member Impact Fund having a direct, positive impact on communities in Oregon, advancing affordable housing and community development needs in a meaningful way,” said Kris Williams, President and CEO of FHLB Des Moines.

Below are details on each of the nonprofits receiving these grants thanks to OnPoint and the FHBL Member Impact Fund partnership:

Habitat for Humanity Portland Region has built and repaired homes for over 3,000 people with low incomes across the region since 1981. Habitat has over 100 affordable housing units across the Portland Metro region under construction this year, but currently lacks the required construction support to meet the growing demand for housing. Through the Member Impact fund grant, Habitat Portland Region will receive $100,000 to add more support to help build and repair more homes.

“OnPoint Community Credit Union is a growing partner that enhances our work in many ways including volunteerism and vital funding. We are so thankful for this incredible $100,000 grant from OnPoint in collaboration with the Federal Home Loan Bank of Des Moines. This funding will allow us to hire Americorps positions that will help us grow our volunteer engagement and build more homes throughout the Portland region,” said Steve Messinetti, CEO and President, Habitat for Humanity Portland Region.

Hacienda CDC is Oregon's largest Latino-led, Latino-serving housing organization. Since 1992, it has developed 12 affordable housing communities and served 2,400 people across Portland, Gresham, Molalla and Oregon City. OnPoint has provided financial support to Hacienda CDC since 2015, including donating $5,000 to the Portland Mercado Relief Fund to help vendors from its business development program affected by a fire. Hacienda CDC’s $200,000 Member Impact Fund grant will go toward the development of its new 122-unit affordable housing project in Hillsboro. 

“In Hacienda’s experience, developing affordable housing is a community effort that gets us to the finish line. For example, our Dolores Affordable Housing Project was awarded through a competitive process, which included land from the City of Hillsboro and $10.5 million of capital from Portland, Oregon’s Metro Housing Bond, among several other funding sources. Even with all this support, we still have a funding gap. This investment from OnPoint will be instrumental in bridging that gap and ensuring a commitment to affordable housing in Washington County. We are truly grateful for this community partnership with OnPoint.” said Ernesto Fonseca, CEO, Hacienda CDC.

AGE+ advocates for equitable aging in Oregon by engaging in partnerships and developing innovative programs that build capacity and address the challenges and opportunities of the aging population. AGE+ has developed a creative solution that supports housing-challenged rural communities in building affordable, accessible housing for older residents. AGE+ will use its $200,000 Member Impact Fund grant to replicate their success and share their expertise with communities so more older Oregonians have a place to call home.

“This collaboration with OnPoint is a testament to our mutual dedication to innovation and equity for underserved communities. These funds ensure AGE+ can continue to roll out its modular construction approach of affordable accessible housing for older adults in a rural community, still recovering devastating wildfires,” said Stephanie Hooper, AGE+, President & CEO.

The Freshwater Trust employs advanced technology and scientific expertise to restore and protect freshwater ecosystems. The Freshwater Trust provides capacity for local groups like water districts and farmer collectives to secure and prioritize funding for high-impact conservation projects, such as upgrading irrigation systems, planting trees to provide shade and lower water temperature, and aid the recovery of endangered species. The Freshwater Trust will receive a $100,000 Member Impact Fund grant to build more capacity for its various conservation initiatives.

“This generous donation from OnPoint represents an investment in a new approach to conservation. We need to have laser focus on solutions that are big enough – and bold enough – to match the scale of the problem. The Freshwater Trust is creating a path that ensures every action translates to a positive outcome for the environment and it’s possible because of the support of organizations like OnPoint. Our mission is to preserve and restore freshwater ecosystems and we are grateful to have them as a partner,” said Kimberlee Obilana, Vice President, People & Operations, The Freshwater Trust.

About OnPoint’s Community Giving 
OnPoint provides funding for nonprofits, local government-sponsored projects, educational institutions and foundations that positively impact its membership area. In 2023, OnPoint donated more than $2.5 million donated to 305 nonprofits in Oregon and Southwest Washington focused on diversity, equity and inclusion, financial education, food and shelter, climate change and youth services. For more information about OnPoint’s community giving efforts, visit https://www.onpointcu.com/community-giving/.

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving over 554,000 members and with assets of $9 billion. Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union’s membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 28 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Coos, Crook, Curry, Deschutes, Douglas, Gilliam, Hood River, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Morrow, Multnomah, Polk, Sherman, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington, Wheeler and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. OnPoint Community Credit Union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA). More information is available at www.onpointcu.com or 503-228-7077 or 800-527-3932.

ABOUT FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OF DES MOINES

The Federal Home Loan Bank of Des Moines is deeply committed to strengthening communities, serving 13 states and three U.S Pacific territories as a member-owned cooperative. We work together with over 1,200 member institutions to support affordable housing, economic development and community improvement. 

FHLB Des Moines is one of 11 regional Banks that make up the Federal Home Loan Bank System. Members include community and commercial banks, credit unions, insurance companies, thrifts and community development financial institutions. FHLB Des Moines is wholly owned by its members and receives no taxpayer funding. For additional information about FHLB Des Moines, please visit www.fhlbdm.com.

 

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Murdock Trust announces grants to Oregon nonprofits
M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust - 05/16/24 9:03 AM

Today, the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust published its Q1 2024 Grants Report. The report announces:

  • 96 total grants to Pacific Northwest nonprofits totaling $16.9 million.
  • This includes more than $4.5 million through 18 grants to nonprofits serving the Oregon community.
  • The report can be found here. A full list of grantees can be found here.

The M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust is a private, nonprofit foundation that has invested more than $1.4 billion in nonprofits serving the Pacific Northwest since 1975. For details, please visit our website murdocktrust.org.


Committees to review historic property and archaeology grant applications
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/16/24 7:07 AM

Two separate committees will meet to score and rank applications for the Preserving Oregon and Diamonds in the Rough Grant programs. The recommendations from the committees will be forwarded to the State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation for final review and approval June 21, 2024. 

Both meetings will be online and in-person at 725 Summer St NE, Salem, Oregon. 

The Diamonds in the Rough Grant Review Committee will meet May 29, 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Please see the agenda for access details. 

The Preserving Oregon Grant Review Committee will meet June 5, 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Please see the agenda for access details. 

Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling 503-986-0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting. For information about the grants contact Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail: i.Gill@oprd.oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oprd.oregon.gov


Benton County Emergency Management Programs Collaborate on Wildfire Evacuation Drill
Benton Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/16/24 5:40 AM

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The City of Corvallis and Benton County Emergency Management (BCEM) programs are pleased to announce their collaboration on a wildfire evacuation drill for Benton County on Saturday, May 18th, from 9:00 am to 12:00 pm. 

The County's Temporary Evacuation Point (TEP) is the Kalapuya Building on SW Research Way, Corvallis. The City’s TEP will be the Northwest Hills Community Church on Walnut in Corvallis. The drills will involve Community Emergency Response Team volunteers to ensure a coordinated and effective response. 

The drill will serve as a valuable opportunity for residents and emergency responders to practice wildfire evacuation procedures and test communication systems. It is part of ongoing efforts to enhance emergency preparedness in Benton County. 

"We are excited to partner with the City of Corvallis on this important drill," said BCEM Manager Bryan Lee. "By working together, we can better prepare our community for emergencies and ensure that everyone is safe and informed." 

Residents can sign up for emergency evacuation route notifications with the Linn-Benton ALERT system at https://sheriff.bentoncountyor.gov/linn-benton-alert/. After signing up for the alerts you will receive all emergency-related notifications related to your location. 

Participating households have been provided detailed information about the exercise. Community members may notice additional traffic in the area as the evacuation drill gets underway. Unless there is an emergency, neighbors are advised to not call 9-1-1. Please contact the Benton County Call Center at 541-766-6200 with questions about the drill.

For more information about the wildfire evacuation drill and how you can participate, please contact Benton County Emergency Management at gencymanagement@bentoncountyor.gov">emergencymanagement@bentoncountyor.gov or call 541-766-6864.

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Wed. 05/15/24
Lane County Sheriff's Office attempting to locate assault suspect in McKenzie area (Photo)
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/15/24 5:38 PM
McKenzie Safety Info
McKenzie Safety Info
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The Lane County Sheriff's Office is attempting to locate William David McCormick, 52. He is a person of interest in an assault investigation. McCormick was recently last seen in the Vida and McKenzie Bridge area.

If you have any information regarding McCormick’s location, please call the Lane County Sheriff’s Office at 541-682-4141 and reference case #24-2445.




Attached Media Files: McKenzie Safety Info , McCormick photo

Media Advisory - Possible Traffic and Delays at Ballot Dropoff Box Amidst Wildfire Drill on May 18 (Photo)
Benton Co. Government - 05/15/24 4:07 PM
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WHO:  Benton County Voters

WHAT:  Possible traffic and interruption on ballot dropoff box at 4500 SW Research Way.

WHEN:  Saturday, May 18, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.    

WHY:  This weekend, the City of Corvallis & Benton County Emergency Management programs are conducting a Wildfire Evacuation Drill for the County on May 18, utilizing the Kalapuya Building as a Temporary Evacuation Point (TEP). Despite this, the Ballot Box at the Kalapuya Building at 4500 Research Way will remain accessible to the public, however delays may happen. 

For further information and to locate additional ballot drop sites, please visit Elections-Ballot Drop Sites - Benton County Records and Elections, Oregon.

This advisory is to ensure voters are fully aware of logistical considerations regarding ballot drop-off locations. 

Don't miss your chance to have your voice heard in the May primary election. Every vote counts in shaping our community's future.

Learn more about the May primary: 2024 Primary Election - Benton County Records and Elections, Oregon (bentoncountyor.gov)




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Fatal Crash- HWY 126 - Lane County
Oregon State Police - 05/15/24 4:02 PM

Lane County, Ore. 14 May 24- On Tuesday, May 14, 2024, at 2:13 p.m., Oregon State Police responded to a two-vehicle crash on Hwy-126, near milepost 1.5, in Lane County.

The preliminary investigation indicated a westbound Toyota Rav4, operated by Katherine Lee Horath (46) of Myrtle Creek, crossed into the eastbound lane for unknown reasons and struck a Chevrolet Equinox, operated by Rainbow Adah Tornell (52) of Eugene, head-on.

A passenger in the Toyota, Reania Danielle Horath (30) of Myrtle Creek, was declared deceased at the scene. The operator of the Toyota (Katherine Horath) and passengers- Timothy Richard Worrell (34) of Myrtle Creek and a female juvenile- were all transported to a local medical center for treatment of injuries.

The operator of the Chevrolet (Tornell) and a passenger, Siage Jacqueline Donaldson (25) of Eugene, were transported to a local medical center for treatment of injuries.

The highway was impacted for approximately 4 hours during the on-scene investigation. The cause of the crash is under investigation.

OSP was assisted by the Florence Police Department, Siuslaw Valley Fire, and ODOT.

 

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About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon. 


Lincoln City Homicide Investigation (Photo)
Lincoln City Police - 05/15/24 3:18 PM

On Tuesday, May 15th, at approximately 8:05pm the Lincoln City Police Department responded to a report of an assault in the parking lot of the Ashley Inn (3430 NE Highway 101). Officers arriving at the scene found one male, 69-year-old Milwaukie resident Bradley Jay Cole, seriously injured and unconscious.

30-year-old Roland Evans-Freke, a transient, was detained and later lodged at the Lincoln County Jail for Murder in the Second Degree, Assault in the Second degree, and Robbery in the Second Degree.

LCPD Officers, North Lincoln Fire and Rescue, and Pacific West Ambulance provided medical care to Mr. Cole, but were unable to resuscitate him.  Mr. Cole was pronounced deceased at the scene.

At this time there is no reason to believe there is any danger to the public.

LCPD would like to thank North Lincoln Fire and Rescue, Pacific West Ambulance, Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office, and the Oregon State Police for their assistance in this case.

We will continue to release additional information as the investigation unfolds. Anyone with any information regarding this investigation is asked to contact Detective Sergeant Weaver at 541-994-3636.

Submitted by:  

Sergeant Torin Liden

Lieutenant Jeffrey Winn




Attached Media Files: 2024-05/6142/172316/Enhanced_Media_Release_Patrol_Car_Sunrise.tiff

Committee for Family Forestlands meets for special meeting May 20
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/15/24 3:10 PM

SALEM, Ore. — The Committee for Family Forestlands will meet virtually for a special meeting on Monday, May 20 from 1 to 3 p.m. To join virtually, please use the Zoom video conference information found on the agenda

The committee’s agenda includes:

  • Discuss comments on Vision for Oregon’s Forests

The meeting is open to the public to attend online via Zoom. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 24 hours before the meeting by emailing estlands@odf.oregon.gov">committee.of.family.forestlands@odf.oregon.gov.

The 13-member committee researches policies that affect family forests, natural resources and forestry benefits. Based on its findings, the committee recommends actions to the Oregon Board of Forestry and the State Forester. View more information on the CFF webpage.


Pictures and video from the largest Cascadia preparedness exercise of its kind to date
Oregon Dept. of Human Services - 05/15/24 3:01 PM

Over the last two days, staff and volunteers from Lincoln County, City of Newport and the Oregon Department of Human Services Office of Resilience and Emergency Management worked together to erect the state’s second evacuation assembly point (EAP). This emergency preparedness exercise is the largest Cascadia preparedness exercise of its kind to date. It took a little more than three hours to set up all 18 tents, which included dormitories, eating area, shower tent and command post. Fifty-seven staff and volunteers spent the night in dormitory tents. 

Rep. David Gomberg, Rep. Paul Evans, Lincoln County Commissioner Kaety Jacobson, Lincoln County Emergency Manager Samantha Buckley and ODHS Director Fariborz Pakseresht gave brief comments to the media and answered their questions. 

Media remarks were followed by a meeting of the Lincoln County Board of Commissioners live from the EAP site. 

The highlight of the afternoon was an aerial demonstration involving Scappoose Fire District, Life Flight and the Coast Guard. Scappoose used drones to simulate different emergency scenarios including delivering communications equipment and medical supplies to the EAP. Life Flight landed a helicopter to deliver medical supplies. The Coast Guard simulated rescuing a person from the ground and hoisting them up to a hovering helicopter. 

Pictures and videos of the exercise are available to download at: https://spaces.hightail.com/receive/vUf9bdRivQ


Western States Boating Administrators Association Annual Conference being Held in Astoria
Oregon State Marine Board - 05/15/24 1:00 PM

The Oregon State Marine Board’s representative for the Western States Boating Administrators Association (WSBAA), along with other agency staff will be attending the WSBAA annual conference in Astoria, May 20 – 23.

“Having the conference in our backyard is a tremendous opportunity to showcase our incredible boating state,” says Brian Paulsen, the Marine Board’s Boating Safety Program Manager and Boating Law Administrator for Oregon. “It’s even more special because two of our marine law enforcement partners are receiving regional awards for their exceptional service and contribution to recreational boating safety in Oregon. They will receive their awards during the award dinner reception on May 22.”

Sergeant Nate Thompson from the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office was nominated for the prestigious Hollister Award. In 2023, Sergeant Thompson led the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office marine patrol team and completed over 7,000 boater contacts during the boating season. In whole, the program completed 1/5th of the total boater contacts made statewide among the other 31 County Sheriff’s Offices and the Oregon State Police. Sergeant Thompson and his team also assisted neighboring counties during the peak salmon fishing seasons for heightened awareness and boating safety patrols. Sergeant Thompson has been with the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office for over 20 years, where the majority of that time he has worked in marine law enforcement. Sergeant Thompson exemplifies excellence in education through enforcement, positive interactions with boaters, boating safety intervention by conversation, and training the next generation of marine law enforcement officers. He has undeniably made a tremendous impact on thousands of boaters across Oregon and trained dozens of marine law enforcement officers for the future of boating safety.

Also from Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office, Marine Deputy Adam Peterson was nominated for the Western Region’s Officer of the Year Award. Since being assigned to marine patrol, Deputy Peterson completed 5,826 boater safety compliance examinations. In 2023, Deputy Peterson logged 429 motorized and 1,405 non-motorized boater contacts. Knowing that most drownings occur when boaters are not wearing a life jacket, he issued 27 citations and 56 warnings for life jacket violations. 

In 2023, 246 citations were written for life jacket violations in Oregon, meaning Deputy Peterson accounted for over 1/10th of all life jacket citation violations statewide. 

Deputy Petersons dedication to marine law enforcement and boating safety is shown not only through his public interactions, but also by his dedication to training other marine law enforcement around the state. Deputy Peterson is one of the top marine instructors in the Oregon State Marine Board’s marine law enforcement training program. His ability to operate a drift boat, jet boat and teach marine law enforcement to his peers surpasses every and all expectations. Evaluations from his peers include words such as “professional”, “dedicated” and “heroic.”   

The Western States Boating Administrators Association (WSBAA) is a non-profit organization that brings together boating law administrators and recreational boating professionals from the Western United States, including American Samoa, Guam, and the Northern Mariana Islands, and U.S. Coast Guard to discuss boating safety issues of mutual concern. The annual conference is the stage for collaborative conversations to share best practices in boating education, law enforcement, waterway management; promote greater uniformity in boating laws and recognize the achievements of members. 


Circuit Court and County Clerk team up to offer free wedding ceremonies in celebration of anniversary of same-sex marriage ruling (Photo)
Lane Co. Government - 05/15/24 12:55 PM
Calvin Orlando Smith
Calvin Orlando Smith
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-05/6775/172311/thumb_SmithCalvinOrlando.jpg

Ten couples will say “I do” on Friday, May 17, at the Lane County Courthouse as part of a Love Is Love celebration. The afternoon will begin with a welcome from Lane County Circuit Court Judge Kamala Shugar, Presiding Lane County Circuit Court Judge Jay McAlpin, and Lane County Commissioner Laurie Trieger. There will be a discussion of the significant ruling that made same-sex marriage available in Oregon with U.S. District Court Judge Michael McShane and attorney Jennifer Middleton. The couples will then exchange vows in ceremonies officiated by several Circuit Court judges. The wedding ceremonies will be followed by a reception for the couples and their guests.

 

“Ten years ago, Judge McShane’s ruling recognized marriage equality in our state, ensuring access to all Oregonians,” said Judge Shugar. “To have so many community members and organizations come together to celebrate love is a wonderful way to mark this anniversary. It will be an honor to be part of these couples’ special day.”

 

MEDIA OPPORTUNITY: 

 

Journalists are welcome to attend and cover the event, including some of the marriage ceremonies. 

 

When: Friday, May 17, at 1:30 p.m.

Where: Harris Hall in the Lane County Public Service Building (125 E. 8th Avenue)

Details: Welcome at 1:30 p.m.; marriage ceremonies beginning at 2:30 p.m.; reception following

 

 

Actor and music artist Calvin Orlando Smith will sing at the event, accompanied by pianist Gus Russell. Local organizations have donated decorations, flowers, cake, photography and more. Fees for marriage licenses are being covered by Lane County Commissioner Laurie Trieger and the Circuit Court waived the standard officiant fee. 

 

University of Oregon law student Sean Downing will moderate the discussion with McShane and Middleton. 

 

The Love Is Love celebration honors the tenth anniversary of Judge McShane’s ruling in the consolidated cases of Rummell vs. Kitzhaber and Geiger vs. Kitzhaber that held Oregon’s exclusion of same-sex couples from marriage was unconstitutional. On May 19, 2014, Judge McShane ruled that Oregon’s ban on marriage for lesbian and gay couples (Measure 36) violated the U.S. Constitution. His ruling paved the way for couples to begin marrying immediately. 

 

More information about Judge McShane, Judge Shugar, Sean Downing, and Calvin Orlando Smith is attached. 

 

Event partners:

Lane County Circuit Court, Lane County Clerk’s Office, Lane County Bar Association, the Hershner Hunter, Hutchinson Cox, Johnson Johnson Lucas and Middleton, and Corson and Johnson law firms, Oregon Women Lawyers, Lane County Women Lawyers, University of Oregon School of Law OUTLaws, Abcam, HIV Alliance, Transponder, Pride Eugene, and Dragon Song Farm.


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Attached Media Files: Biographies , Calvin Orlando Smith , Sean Downing , Judge Kamala Shugar , Judge Michael McShane

Correction: Western Oregon University announces Congresswoman Andrea Salinas as commencement speaker (Photo)
Western Oregon University - 05/15/24 10:24 AM
2024-05/1107/172305/Salinas_OfficialPortrait_(1)_(1)_(1).jpeg
2024-05/1107/172305/Salinas_OfficialPortrait_(1)_(1)_(1).jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-05/1107/172305/thumb_Salinas_OfficialPortrait_(1)_(1)_(1).jpeg

MONMOUTH, Ore.Western Oregon University announces its 2024 commencement on Saturday, June 15 at 10 a.m. on the MacArthur Field. Over 1,237 students are eligible to walk across the stage and graduate, completing a significant milestone in their lives. Nearly 50 percent of Western students are first-generation, meaning they are the first in their families to graduate with a four-year degree.

A first-generation student herself, Western is proud to announce its commencement speaker, Congresswoman Andrea Salinas. Salinas, the daughter of a Mexican immigrant, is one of the first Latinas to represent Oregon in Congress. After putting herself through college, Salinas pursued public service as a congressional aide and policy advisor, as well as an advocate for labor unions, environmental groups, and reproductive rights organizations. In 2017, she was appointed to the Oregon House of Representatives and served through the end of her term in 2022. In the Oregon House of Representatives, she served as House Majority Whip and was the Chair of the House Health Care Committee.

In Congress, Salinas is proud to serve on the House Agriculture and House Science, Space, and Technology Committees, where she crafts policies that will help level the playing field for Oregon farmers and rural communities and create more good-paying, union jobs. As Co-Chair of the bipartisan Mental Health Caucus, she has prioritized making mental health care and addiction treatment more accessible and affordable.

"We are honored to welcome Congresswoman Salinas as the keynote speaker for this year’s commencement ceremony,” remarked President Jesse Peters. “As both a first-generation American and a first-generation college student herself, she understands the transformative power of education. Her remarks will undoubtedly inspire our graduates, highlighting the possibilities that lie ahead for them. Western Oregon University is the only four-year public university serving her district. We value her advocacy for higher education and the support she has extended to our university.”

“As a first-generation college student myself, I am so grateful for the opportunity to speak at this year’s commencement ceremony,” said Rep. Salinas. “Growing up, my parents taught me the importance of hard work, perseverance, and community—the very same values that Western instills in each and every one of its students. I know these graduates have the skills they need to succeed, and I look forward to congratulating the Class of 2024 as they take the next big step into the future.”

 

###

 

About Western Oregon University

Western Oregon University, established in Monmouth in 1856, proudly stands as Oregon's oldest public university. Hosting around 4,000 students, Western embodies a mid-sized, NCAA Division II institution, with approximately 80% of its students hailing from within the state. Notably, its diverse student body comprises individuals from underrepresented backgrounds, veterans, and non-traditional learners. Western stands as the preferred campus in Oregon for those pursuing an enriching education within a nurturing, student-focused environment, characterized by faculty-led instruction.  Together we succeed.


 




Attached Media Files: 2024-05/1107/172305/Salinas_OfficialPortrait_(1)_(1)_(1).jpeg

When in doubt, stay out: Increasing temperatures create potential for toxins in water
Oregon Health Authority - 05/15/24 10:09 AM

May 15, 2024

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov

When in doubt, stay out: Increasing temperatures create potential for toxins in water

PORTLAND, Ore.—As summer approaches, Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reminds people heading outdoors to enjoy Oregon’s lakes, rivers and reservoirs to be on the look-out for potentially toxic cyanobacteria blooms.

Cyanobacteria are beneficial bacteria found in all fresh water worldwide. The bacteria can multiply into blooms in any water body under the right conditions — warm weather, sunlight, water temperature, nutrients and water chemistry. Many blooms are harmless, but some can produce cyanotoxins that make people and animals sick.

Exposure to cyanotoxins occurs when water is swallowed while swimming, or when people inhale water droplets during high-speed activities such as water-skiing or wakeboarding. Symptoms of exposure to cyanotoxins include:

  • Diarrhea
  • Cramps
  • Vomiting
  • Numbness
  • Dizziness and fainting

Although cyanotoxins are not absorbed through the skin, people with sensitive skin can develop a red, raised rash when wading, playing or swimming in or around a bloom.

Children and pets are particularly sensitive to illness because of their size and activity levels. Similarly, livestock and wildlife can become ill and die after drinking from water bodies, troughs or other sources of drinking water affected by blooms and potential toxins.

Dogs can get extremely ill and even die within minutes to hours of exposure to cyanotoxins by drinking the water, licking their fur or eating the toxins from floating mats or dried crust along the shore. It is very important to get a pet to a veterinarian as soon as possible if they exhibit diarrhea, vomiting, breathing problems, difficulty walking or standing, or loss of appetite.

Very few freshwater bodies in Oregon are monitored for cyanotoxins. For this reason, it is important for people to carefully observe any water body they choose to recreate in before taking the plunge.

OHA recommends that everyone stay out of water that looks foamy, scummy, thick like pea-green or blue-green paint, or where brownish-red mats are present. Additionally, since blooms can wash up on the shore, people should avoid areas with algal mats that are either attached, floating or stranded on the shore.

Even then, looks can be deceiving. Certain blooms grow on or near the bottom of water bodies such as lakes and rivers. While some blooms make and release toxins into the water, they don’t change how the surface of the water looks, making them hard to see.

Community members looking for visual examples can find pictures of algae blooms in the Algae Bloom Photo Gallery or watch an explainer video on blooms at OHA’s official YouTube channel. If you are unsure, follow OHA’s guidance of “When in doubt, stay out.”

Open recreational areas where blooms are identified can still be enjoyed for activities such as camping, hiking, biking, picnicking and bird watching. By being aware of signs of a bloom and taking appropriate precautions to reduce or eliminate exposure, local communities can enjoy water activities such as canoeing, boating and fishing, as long as boat speeds do not create excessive water spray, and fish are cleaned appropriately.

To learn if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, visit the Harmful Algae Bloom website or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

For health information or to report an illness, contact OHA at 971-673-0440. For campground or lake information, call the local management agency.

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Press Release: Oregon's Nonfarm Payroll Employment Rises by 4,900 in April
Oregon Employment Department - 05/15/24 10:00 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
May 15, 2024

CONTACT INFORMATION:
umenauer@employ.oregon.gov">Gail Krumenauer, State Employment Economist
(971) 301-3771
Video and Audio available at 10 a.m.
David Cooke, Economist (971) 375-5288

Oregon’s Nonfarm Payroll Employment Rises by 4,900 in April

In April, Oregon’s seasonally adjusted nonfarm payroll employment rose by 4,900 jobs, following a revised gain of 2,600 jobs in March. April’s gains were largest in health care and social assistance (+1,700 jobs); construction (+1,500); and manufacturing (+900). Monthly declines were largest in professional and business services (-1,100 jobs).

Over the past two years, health care and social assistance continued to add jobs at a rapid, consistent pace. The sector grew by 16,600 jobs, or 5.9%, since April 2023 following a gain of 13,900 jobs, or 5.2%, between April 2022 and April 2023. Within the broader sector, social assistance accelerated its expansion in recent months, as it added 4,800 jobs during the past five months. The three component industries within health care each expanded rapidly over the past 12 months: nursing and residential care facilities (+3,300 jobs); hospitals (+2,900); and ambulatory health care services (+2,800).

Government, which added 9,400 jobs, or 3.1%, since April 2023, was the only other major sector growing quickly in the past 12 months. Each of its three components grew rapidly during that time: local government (+6,100 jobs, or 2.7%); state government (+2,100 jobs, or 4.6%); and federal government (+1,200 jobs, or 4.2%).

Meanwhile, more than half of the major industries reduced employment over the past 12 months, with manufacturing (-3,700 jobs, or -1.9%) and retail trade (-2,300 jobs, or -1.1%) cutting the most. Furthermore, professional and business services (-1,600 jobs); information (-1,100); and construction (-1,000) each shed at least 1,000 jobs.

Oregon’s unemployment rate was 4.2% in April, the same as in February and March. Since October 2021, Oregon’s unemployment rate has stayed between 3.4% and 4.2%, averaging 3.9%. The U.S. unemployment rate was 3.9% in April and 3.8% in March.

###

Next Press Releases

The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the April county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, May 21, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for May on Thursday, June 20.




Attached Media Files: 2024-05/930/172302/employment_in_Oregon_--_April_2024_--_press_release.pdf

Remembering those who gave all in service of Lane County during National Police Week (Photo)
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/15/24 8:16 AM
Fallen heroes of Lane County Sheriff's Office
Fallen heroes of Lane County Sheriff's Office
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-05/6111/172300/thumb_Police_Week.jpg

This week marks National Police Week. This week pays special recognition to those law enforcement officers who have lost their lives in the line of duty for the safety and protection of others while honoring those who commit themselves to the field of law enforcement. Our own county has had many deputies – and even a sheriff – lay down their lives in service to the people of our county.  Join us in remembering their sacrifice. 

Sheriff W. W. Withers

February 7, 1903 - Sheriff William W. Withers was killed attempting to apprehend Elliott Lyons, a horse thief, wanted in Jackson County. The slayer escaped, but a huge posse was formed and he was captured in Creswell under a train that was heading out of town.  In Eugene, Oregon, under the direction of Fred Fisk, a deputy under Withers and a Lane County Judge, witnessed the hanging of Lyons outside the Lane County Courthouse. This was the last public function of the kind in the state.  He was survived by his wife and son. 

Deputy C. Rollin Wicks

May 14, 1937 - Deputy Rollin Wicks was killed by a neighbor during arrest after the man shot and wounded another neighbor while engaged in a dispute. Deputy Wicks was unarmed at the time. Deputies surrounded the house for five hours while tear gas was rushed to the scene from Salem. The suspect later died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound after holding off deputies, state police officers, employees of the nearby Booth Kelly Mill and residents of Wendling.

Chief Criminal Detective David Hefner

July 13, 1957 - Chief Criminal Detective David D. Hefner responded to a family disturbance call in the River Road area. During the altercation, Detective Hefner was shot in the back.  Trooper Charles Sanders was shot and killed when he arrived on scene to assist. Detective Hefner spent four months in a local hospital before succumbing to the wound. The suspect was sentenced to 25 years, but was paroled after 9 years. Hefner was survived by his wife and five children.

Deputy Robert Riley

August 17, 1958 - Deputy Robert M. Riley was riding in an off-duty capacity with a Springfield Police Officer and merchant patrolman. While in pursuit of a speeding vehicle that was fleeing the scene of a reported alarm activation, an intoxicated driver turned in front of the patrol car. The officer used evasive measures to avoid the drunk driver, but in doing so ran into a car in a gas station lot and then a telephone pole. Mr. Riley, a Lane County reserve deputy, died as a result of the injuries suffered in the accident. Riley was survived by his wife and son.

Deputy Carlton Smith

July 6, 1965 - Deputy Carlton Smith was killed on his first night of patrol as a solo officer. While making a traffic stop in the area which is now the Valley River Center off ramp, he was shot by Carl Cletus Bowles and Wilford Gray, both escaped convicts. Carl Cletus Bowles escaped from Oregon State Penitentiary custody June of 1974 and was the focus of a huge manhunt in Eugene on June 14, 1974. He subsequently kidnapped a couple from South Eugene and later murdered them in Washington. He was recaptured and convicted of the homicides. Deputy Smith left a widow, Margaret Perdue, five sons and a daughter. Randy Smith became a Captain with the Lane County Sheriff's Office and another son, Don Smith, worked as a Eugene Police officer.  One of his step-grandsons is currently a patrol sergeant at the Sheriff’s Office. 

Detective Roy Dirks

April 11, 1975 - Detective Roy H. Dirks was investigating a drowning incident in the Blue River area when he was shot and killed by Belinda Lederer, a member of the Norman "Snake" Brooks family. Lederer was convicted of manslaughter and Brooks was convicted of hindering prosecution. The suspects belonged to a communal group that had prior contacts with Detective Dirks. Roy previously was a resident deputy in the Cottage Grove area.  He was survived by his four children. 

Sergeant Carl Frazier

October 9, 1979 - Sgt. Carl L. Frazier died of a heart attack climbing a hill during a marijuana eradication investigation near Florence. Sergeant Frazier had served as the supervisor for the Florence outpost of the Lane County Sheriff's Office.




Attached Media Files: Fallen heroes of Lane County Sheriff's Office

ReBuild Beaverton High - $253 Million Project Largest in 2022 Bond (Photo)
Publix Northwest PR-PA - 05/15/24 8:00 AM
Trevor_Wyckoff_photo_Graduate_Account-Manager
Trevor_Wyckoff_photo_Graduate_Account-Manager
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-05/6911/172296/thumb_Wyckoff_Trevor_2020.jpg

PRESS RELEASE  - May 15, 2024

Subhead: Construction Begins at Beaverton High School With 1994 Graduate Heading The Team - Skanska to Rebuild Largest School Project Within 2022 Bond 

New structure will improve learning through gathering, study, and flex spaces  (See rendering attached)

Skanska, a leading global development and construction firm, has broken ground to rebuild the historic Beaverton High School, at 13000 S.W. 2nd Avenue. 

The new Beaverton High School will comprise a 300,500-square-foot, three-story building surrounding a 15,500-square-foot, enclosed courtyard. Construction work includes a new academic and gymnasium building as well as new student and staff parking lots, athletic field structures and landscaping, with an opening date of fall, 2026. With just over $211 million in budgeted funds for construction and building materials, the new high school and campus will be the largest project within the Beaverton School District #48J’s 2022 bond. 

The new building will include pre-fabricated exterior walls built offsite and transported for installation; solar panels, skylights and large windows to reduce the school’s dependence on electricity while providing ample natural light. 

As the oldest high school in the city, Beaverton High is also believed to be the oldest in-use public high school in the state of Oregon in its original location and building. The original structure, which has been modified and added onto over many years, dates back to 1916.

“We look forward to having a modernized campus that meets students’ needs and functions as community evacuation center in case of a disaster,” said Andrew Kearl , Principal at Beaverton High School. “Skanska is well positioned to ensure student safety during construction, while supporting our efforts to provide a positive learning environment throughout the construction process.” 

“As a Beaverton High graduate, I’m honored to rebuild this school to better serve the existing and future student body,” said Trevor Wyckoff, Skanska account manager and senior vice president who is overseeing the project (Class of 1994). “I have confidence in Skanska’s ability to deliver a school that improves the student experience and exceeds the expectations of the community. I hope our work will inspire students to go into construction, we could use more BHS grads to impact our industry. I look forward to celebrating alongside students, teachers, administrators, and neighbors when we complete this project.” 

The school’s current, standalone cafeteria building will remain, with a new covered walkway connecting it to the new academic and gymnasium building. The new academic spaces will also entail new shop space for instruction to support the school’s emerging career technical education curriculum.

The new construction plan also includes a modernized performing arts area and athletic field improvements. The new theater will have modern features, including cedar wood to improve acoustics and bring in elements from the existing theater into the new space. “Skanska built the popular Patricia Reser Center for the Arts just a few blocks away, so we are excited to bring this important and recent expertise to Beaverton High’s arts community,” added Wyckoff.

Enhancements to the athletic fields on the south and west parts of Beaverton High’s campus will include re-turfing, adding four tennis courts and constructing a new field house adjacent to the baseball diamonds.

After students and staff move into the new academic center, the current school will be demolished to make way for increased parking access and to alleviate congestion and overflow into surrounding neighborhoods.

The project’s live construction camera can be found at https://view.ceros.com/skanska/beaverton-high-school/p/4. 

Contact

About Skanska

Skanska uses knowledge and foresight to shape the way people live, work, and connect. More than 135 years in the making, we’re one of the world’s largest development and construction companies. We operate in select markets throughout the Nordics, Europe and the United States. Skanska in the U.S. is headquartered in New York City with 28 offices around the country. In 2023, construction in the U.S. generated $7.1 billion in revenue, and as a developer in the U.S., Skanska has invested a total value of $4.6 billion in commercial and multi-family projects. Together with our customers and the collective expertise of our 6,500 teammates in the U.S. and 27,000 globally, we create innovative and sustainable solutions that support healthy living beyond our lifetime. 

 




Attached Media Files: Trevor_Wyckoff_photo_Graduate_Account-Manager , Credit: BRIC Architecture

Busy Wildfire season is on the horizon. The Red Cross says get ready now, prepare and volunteer.
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 05/15/24 8:00 AM

Volunteers are needed to support families affected by continuous disasters.   

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

[Portland, ORE, May 14, 2024] Residents of Oregon and SW Washington are anticipating another busy wildfire season as the climate crisis threatens to upend more communities. The best defense during an emergency is to be prepared and the American Red Cross, Cascades Region advises everyone to get ready now. 

“Today, the Red Cross is responding to more large disasters — almost twice as many — than we did a decade ago,” said Priscilla Fuentes, CEO of the Red Cross Cascades Region. “This growing need for help means we need more volunteers trained and ready to support families facing their darkest moments. Plus, it is critical for Oregon and SW Washington residents to make an emergency plan now.” 

The number of billion-dollar disasters in the U.S. has increased 85% in just the last decade as disasters grow in frequency and intensity. People across the country are feeling the impact as an estimated 2.5 million were forced from their homes by weather-related disasters in 2023 — with more than a third displaced for longer than a month. 

LOCALLY:

  • In 2020, Oregon experienced the worst wildfires on record, burning over a million acres of land. The Red Cross sheltered thousands of people for months across the state.  
  • In 2021, Oregon experienced a heat dome with record high temperatures. Later that summer, we responded to the Bootleg Fire which was the third largest in Oregon history.  
  • In 2022, dozens of fires consumed 465,000 acres. The Red Cross opened 10 shelters in one month alone. A wildfire erupted in Clark County in October, an unusually late time in the year.  
  • In 2023, the Red Cross started the summer with four times as many wildfire responses than the previous year. Our Cascades Region sent people on over 300 deployments, from Alaska to Florida, Puerto Rico, and the Maui wildfires. 
  • In 2024, we are anticipating warmer summer temperatures which can intensify wildfire activity. 

Comprising 90% of the Red Cross workforce, volunteers are continuously providing shelter, comfort, hot meals, health services and recovery support to families in need across the country. We need you! 

VOLUNTEER TODAY The Red Cross is seeking new volunteers who are team-oriented and want to make an immediate difference. Visit redcross.org/volunteertoday to sign up. Free online training will be provided 

HOW TO PREPARE YOUR HOUSEHOLD With the increasing risk of climate-driven disasters, help keep your family safe by getting prepared today.  

  • Build an emergency kit with bottled water, non-perishable food, a flashlight, and battery-powered radio. Also include medications, copies of important papers, cell phone chargers and emergency contact information.
  • Make an evacuation plan with what to do in case you are separated from your family during an emergency and if you must evacuate. Make sure to coordinate with your child’s school, your work and your community’s emergency plans — and don’t forget your pets.
  • Know how to stay informed by finding out how local officials will contact you during a disaster and how you will get important information, such as evacuation orders.

Plus, download the free Red Cross First Aid app so you’ll know what to do if emergency help is delayed and the free Emergency app for weather alerts, open Red Cross shelter locations and more safety tips. Choose whether you want to view the content in English or Spanish with an easy-to-find language selector. Find these and all the Red Cross apps in smartphone app stores by searching for the American Red Cross or going to redcross.org/apps. 

 

About the American Red Cross:  

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides comfort to victims of disasters; supplies about 40% of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; distributes international humanitarian aid; and supports veterans, military members, and their families. The Red Cross is a nonprofit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to deliver its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or CruzRojaAmericana.org, or follow us on social media.  

 

# # # 


Lane County Public Health Declares Community-wide Pertussis Outbreak
Lane Co. Government - 05/15/24 6:56 AM

Lane County Public Health (LCPH) has declared a community-wide pertussis outbreak due to a surge in cases surpassing typical community, regional, or seasonal expectations. In the last 7 days, the number of presumptive and confirmed cases has doubled, putting the total number of cases at nearly 40, with more awaiting lab results. While some of the cases are linked, there are sporadic cases scattered throughout the area indicating community spread. So far in 2024, there have been 120 cases statewide in Oregon, as compared to 17 at this time last year. LCPH emphasizes the urgency for the community to implement precautionary measures to mitigate further spread of this highly contagious respiratory infection.

 

“We are seeing a number of cases in very young children and at-risk populations,” said LCPH Deputy Health Officer, Dr. Lisandra Guzman. “Their health depends on our actions, so now is the time to do everything we can to protect them.”

 

Recognizing the severity of pertussis, especially for vulnerable populations such as infants, pregnant people, young children, and individuals with underlying medical conditions, LCPH emphasizes the importance of getting tested at the earliest onset of symptoms, staying up to date with pertussis vaccinations, and practicing good respiratory hygiene. This is especially crucial for pregnant people and those in close contact with young children.

 

Infants and children <7 years old should adhere to the DTaP vaccination series, while adolescents are advised to obtain a single dose of Tdap, ideally at age 11 or 12, to bolster community immunity. Pregnant people should receive a Tdap during the third trimester of each pregnancy to provide vital protection for themselves and their infants. Adults should also receive at least 1 dose of Tdap vaccine, and can receive one every 10 years. Pertussis vaccination is available through your primary care provider, local pharmacies, and for those without insurance, a Federally Qualified Health Center.

 

Pertussis, commonly called "whooping cough," is a highly contagious respiratory tract infection caused by the Bordetella pertussis bacteria. Pertussis can spread through the air when infected people cough or sneeze. In an unvaccinated population, one case of pertussis can cause as many as 16 new cases. Pertussis usually starts with mild upper respiratory symptoms that can sometimes mimic seasonal allergies, the common cold, or even influenza, underscoring the importance of timely testing for those individuals in close contact with a vulnerable person.

 

Symptoms also include prolonged coughing fits, often accompanied by a distinctive "whoop" sound during inhalation, gagging or vomiting while coughing, and exhaustion. Complications, if left untreated, especially in infants, can be severe and include pneumonia, dehydration, seizures, and even brain damage.

 

Call 9-1-1 immediately if you or your child is:

 

· Struggling to breathe

 

· Turning blue or purple

 

LCPH recommends practicing good hygiene to prevent the spread of the bacteria that cause pertussis and other respiratory illnesses:

 

· Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing.

 

· Throw away used tissues in a waste basket right away.

 

· Cough or sneeze into your upper sleeve or elbow if you don't have a tissue. Never cough into your hands, as pertussis can be spread this way.

 

· Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

 

· Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.

 

· Stay home when you are sick

 

In the event of a pertussis diagnosis, adherence to prescribed antibiotics and isolation from others until you are no longer infectious is crucial. Individuals can transmit the bacteria from the onset of symptoms for up to three weeks after coughing fits begin.

 

For more information about pertussis prevention and treatment, visit the LCPH website, at http://www.lanecountyor.gov/publichealth