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Mon. 01/18/21
Two Rivers Correctional Institution reports in-custody death
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 01/18/21 6:06 PM

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody (AIC) died January 18, 2021. He was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution and passed away at a local hospital. He tested positive for COVID-19 and was between 55 and 65 years old. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. Department-wide, this is the thirty-third AIC to die who tested positive for COVID-19.

For more information on COVID-19 cases inside Oregon’s prisons, please visit DOC’s COVID-19 website. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 13,000 adults in custody who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state.

Anyone entering DOC property is required to wear a mask or face covering in any indoor work setting or other indoor premises regardless of distance from others unless they are in a private, individual office not shared by anyone else; or they are actively eating or drinking AND at least six (6) feet of distance can be maintained between other people.

Institutions continue to clean and disinfect numerous times a day. DOC asks AICs to report symptoms of COVID-19 to medical staff. Posters are in all DOC institutions encouraging individuals to maintain proper hygiene and to uphold appropriate social distancing to the extent possible. Health screening processes are in place before staff are allowed to enter facilities. This screening includes a temperature check and a screening questionnaire. Visiting remains closed until further notice.

DOC has begun administering COVID-19 vaccinations – eventually offering to all DOC staff, contractors, Oregon Corrections Enterprises employees, and AICs. Prioritization of vaccines will be determined by guidance from the Oregon Health Authority (OHA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), and the Governor’s Office.

Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, DOC issued a press release when an AIC passed away. This notification would include the person’s name, county of conviction, sentence length, and date of death. However, no cause of death would be listed because the Medical Examiner makes that determination. In order to balance the desire for transparency with our legal obligation to protect personal health information, we have changed the AIC death notification process when someone dies who has tested positive for COVID-19. DOC is working with the Oregon Health Authority to publish COVID-19 related data and information on the OHA website.


Oregon reports 666 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/18/21 1:05 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 1,803, Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 666 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 133,851.

Vaccinations in Oregon 

Today, OHA is reporting that 11,951 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 8,409 vaccine doses were administered on Jan. 17. 

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 216,925 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. All vaccinations occurred at Oregon hospitals, long-term care facilities, emergency medical service (EMS) agencies, urgent care facilities and Local Public Health Authorities (LPHAs). 

To date, 335,075 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon. 

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today. 

COVID-19 hospitalizations 

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 342, which is 19 fewer than yesterday. There are 94 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is one fewer than yesterday. 

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity. 

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (10), Clackamas (57), Columbia (6), Coos (1), Crook (9), Deschutes (51), Douglas (11), Hood River (3), Jackson (40), Jefferson (2), Josephine (9), Lake (1), Lane (81), Lincoln (5), Linn (8), Malheur (4), Marion (79), Morrow (6), Multnomah (140), Polk (9), Umatilla (29), Wasco (10), Washington (87), Yamhill (8).

Oregon’s 1801st COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive Jan. 4 and died Jan. 8 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1802nd COVID-19 death is a 55-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive Dec. 27 and died Jan. 16 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1803rd COVID-19 death is a 99-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive Jan. 3 and died Jan. 15 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Updated information is available for Oregon’s 1,800th death: Her place of death was confirmed as her residence.

County

Cases1

Total deaths2

Baker

568

5

Benton

1,705

14

Clackamas

11,698

138

Clatsop

686

5

Columbia

1,049

18

Coos

938

15

Crook

621

10

Curry

324

5

Deschutes

4,999

36

Douglas

1,687

43

Gilliam

51

1

Grant

213

1

Harney

175

4

Hood River

954

21

Jackson

6,930

85

Jefferson

1,705

25

Josephine

1,743

33

Klamath

2,428

38

Lake

230

5

Lane

8,353

109

Lincoln

996

17

Linn

3,116

46

Malheur

3,135

52

Marion

16,247

239

Morrow

938

10

Multnomah

28,467

459

Polk

2,455

40

Sherman

47

0

Tillamook

365

2

Umatilla

6,793

68

Union

1,114

16

Wallowa

96

3

Wasco

1,081

23

Washington

18,734

171

Wheeler

20

1

Yamhill

3,190

45

Total

133,851

1,803

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases

ELRs Received 1/17

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

41

2

43

4.7%

Benton

128

8

136

5.9%

Clackamas

1,212

70

1,282

5.5%

Clatsop

51

2

53

3.8%

Columbia

115

8

123

6.5%

Coos

67

1

68

1.5%

Crook

75

11

86

12.8%

Curry

5

0

5

0.0%

Deschutes

517

46

563

8.2%

Douglas

188

13

201

6.5%

Gilliam

2

0

2

0.0%

Grant

11

0

11

0.0%

Harney

6

0

6

0.0%

Hood River

108

6

114

5.3%

Jackson

614

22

636

3.5%

Jefferson

93

4

97

4.1%

Josephine

178

13

191

6.8%

Klamath

54

11

65

16.9%

Lake

14

2

16

12.5%

Lane

1,448

78

1,526

5.1%

Lincoln

112

3

115

2.6%

Linn

246

10

256

3.9%

Malheur

42

7

49

14.3%

Marion

962

96

1,058

9.1%

Morrow

13

4

17

23.5%

Multnomah

2,647

180

2,827

6.4%

Polk

157

7

164

4.3%

Sherman

3

0

3

0.0%

Tillamook

30

1

31

3.2%

Umatilla

197

33

230

14.3%

Union

22

0

22

0.0%

Wallowa

20

1

21

4.8%

Wasco

137

10

147

6.8%

Washington

1,737

109

1,846

5.9%

Wheeler

2

0

2

0.0%

Yamhill

424

17

441

3.9%

Statewide

11,678

775

12,453

6.2%

Total ELRs Received

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

6,276

1,516

7,792

19.5%

Benton

83,038

2,594

85,632

3.0%

Clackamas

291,714

16,574

308,288

5.4%

Clatsop

22,809

1,146

23,955

4.8%

Columbia

27,472

1,342

28,814

4.7%

Coos

24,589

837

25,426

3.3%

Crook

10,175

852

11,027

7.7%

Curry

6,533

244

6,777

3.6%

Deschutes

109,713

6,785

116,498

5.8%

Douglas

42,166

1,448

43,614

3.3%

Gilliam

744

28

772

3.6%

Grant

2,917

168

3,085

5.4%

Harney

2,233

175

2,408

7.3%

Hood River

21,171

1,216

22,387

5.4%

Jackson

135,314

8,676

143,990

6.0%

Jefferson

12,525

1,488

14,013

10.6%

Josephine

35,517

1,663

37,180

4.5%

Klamath

31,782

2,498

34,280

7.3%

Lake

1,750

267

2,017

13.2%

Lane

265,307

8,620

273,927

3.1%

Lincoln

30,327

1,971

32,298

6.1%

Linn

85,121

5,774

90,895

6.4%

Malheur

15,299

4,413

19,712

22.4%

Marion

220,450

22,917

243,367

9.4%

Morrow

4,722

1,074

5,796

18.5%

Multnomah

666,812

39,947

706,759

5.7%

Polk

44,526

3,101

47,627

6.5%

Sherman

971

42

1,013

4.1%

Tillamook

9,599

325

9,924

3.3%

Umatilla

43,503

6,999

50,502

13.9%

Union

8,566

877

9,443

9.3%

Wallowa

1,699

59

1,758

3.4%

Wasco

21,638

1,153

22,791

5.1%

Washington

420,360

26,490

446,850

5.9%

Wheeler

282

18

300

6.0%

Yamhill

83,768

4,391

88,159

5.0%

Statewide

2,791,388

177,688

2,969,076

6.0%


Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Update - January 18, 2021
Douglas Co. Government - 01/18/21 12:16 PM
DCCRT
DCCRT
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-01/6789/141707/thumb_DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_72020.jpg

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the agencies that make up the DCCRT

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – January 18, 2021

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY UPDATE

 

(Douglas County, Ore.)  Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results: As of 12:00 pm Today, Monday, January 18, 2021, there are ELEVEN (11) people with new positive test results to report since our noon case update yesterday.  The total number of cases (people with positive test results and presumptive) in Douglas County is now at 1,690.  Currently, there are SIX (6) Douglas County COVID-19 patients that are being hospitalized, five locally and one out-of-the-area.  Our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, under the direction of the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, who administer our local public health program and oversee the work by Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, our Douglas County Public Health Officer and Douglas Public Health Network, continue to devote all resources available to our local COVID response.

 

MLK Day and Day of Service

Today, we celebrate the life and legacy of Martin Luther King Jr., as well as the “Day of Service” in his honor.  First observed 35 years ago, Martin Luther King Jr. Day or sometimes called MLK Day, commemorates the birth of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., who was born on January 15, 1929, in Atlanta, Georgia.  On November 3, 1983, President Ronald Reagan signed a bill establishing the holiday and on January 20, 1986, the first national MLK Day holiday was observed.   This year also marks the 26th Anniversary of the “Day of Service”, that celebrates the Civil Rights leader’s life and legacy. Observed each year as “a day on, not a day off,” MLK Day is the only federal holiday designated as a national day of service to encourage all Americans to volunteer to improve their communities. Your Douglas County Commissioners encourage you to give back by volunteering as much as you can, and perhaps jumpstart a longer-term personal commitment for community service. 

 

Douglas County, OR - COVID-19 - Case Update

Date

Thursday,

January 14, 2021

Friday,

January 15, 2021

Saturday,

January 16, 2021

Sunday,

January 17, 2021

MLK Day, Monday, January 18, 2021

Total COVID-19 Cases

1,636

1,659

1,669

1,679

1690

People w/ Positive PCR or Antigen Test Results

1,549

1,572

1,579

1,589

1600

Presumptive

87

87

90

90

90

Total Currently Hospitalized

11

11

8

8

6

Total Currently in Isolation

164

163

169

179

190

Total COVID-19 Related Deaths

43

43

43

43

43

Total COVID-19 vaccines distributed

to Local Public Health and Total

deployed to local vaccinators

900/400

900/400

900/900

900/900

900/900

Our daily update includes the total number of cases in Douglas County, which combines people with positive test results and presumptives, as well as a breakout of those case numbers. There will be times when a presumptive will move to a positive test result, and our total case number will not change because the case has already been counted. We added a new line to provide an accurate total of the number of vaccines that Local Public Health has received to date, as well as the number we have deployed to local vaccinators.  Our numbers do NOT include other sites like the Roseburg VA, Mercy Medical Center, EMS, Cow Creek Tribe and local care facilities that received their vaccines directly from the Federal and State Government in order to begin direct vaccinations to the first priority group. 

 

How Do I Get More Information About the COVID-19 Vaccine Locally?

You can get more information by emailing DPHN at our new COVID-19 vaccine email address, vaccines@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  DPHN will do their best to respond with the most current information available, sign up health providers as vaccinators, schedule volunteers, and connect those that are eligible for the vaccine with those that have the vaccine, as soon as the vaccine becomes available.  DPHN, through our Local Public Health Authority, our Douglas County Commissioners, set up a new email for the COVID-19 vaccine in Douglas County.  So, for local answers to questions about vaccine eligibility, availability and volunteer opportunities, please email vaccines@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Additionally, we encourage you to contact your Doctor, Physician, Family Practitioner or the Medical Office you frequent and encourage them to sign up as a vaccinator, so you can possibly go to them for the vaccine once it is available.  If you are a member of the Cow Creek Band of the Umpqua Tribe of Indians, please contact them for information on their COVID-19 vaccination program, (541) 672-9405.

 

Vaccine Distribution to Local Public Health

The latest round of vaccines that were received late last week have all been deployed to our approved local health care providers (vaccinators) in Douglas County.  They are quickly working to vaccinate the current identified list of ELIGIBLE Douglas County residents in accordance with the priority group guidelines and criteria set by the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC) and Oregon Health Authority (OHA).  Right now, they are still working through the identified priority populations in the first group; which include health care workers, long term care workers, home care workers, EMS and first responders. (Click here Oregon's most up-to-date list of eligible residents).  To date, we have not received enough vaccines to complete the first phase of eligible residents or hold a community event. But, that does not mean that we are not prepared for a local vaccination event.  Our team is ready, able and willing to do an event, all we need is the vaccine. We ask for your continued patience, as we work through the maze of changes, logistic issues and limited vaccine distribution.

 

COVID-19 Vaccine: High Demand and Low Supply

We know that you may have heard reports that the CDC and OHA are making changes to the vaccine eligibility guidelines, it does not mean that the vaccine is available for everyone that is eligible in Douglas County.  We have NOT received the new guidelines on the changes yet, so we are continuing with the current prioritization levels until we receive those new rules and guidelines.  It is a supply and demand issue, that we have no control over.  While we are seeing high local demand for the vaccine, unfortunately the supply chain of vaccines has not caught up to the current demand.  We continue to submit requests to OHA daily for more vaccines to be sent to Douglas County, so we can move forward with vaccinations for everyone that is eligible.  Please know that if you want the vaccine, we want you to have it, and are working 24/7 to make that happen.  Rest assured, that when the new rules are finalized, and we start to receive more vaccines, we will begin to systematically offer them to additional eligible populations in an orderly, fair and equitable manner. 

 

Oregon’s COVID-19 Vaccine Information

Again it is important to note that we are not the ones setting the guidelines for vaccines eligibility or distribution.  We are following the current priority group guidelines and criteria set by the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC) and Oregon Health Authority (OHA).  We understand that our residents have many questions, so do we.  Like you, we are patiently awaiting more vaccines and more information.  If you have questions or need more information about the COVID-19 vaccine in Oregon, check out the resources listed below.  In the meantime, we ask that you be patient and continue to follow the well documented recommendations for COVID health and safety. 

 

We Encourage You to Protect You and Your Family

We do not know the timeline for the vaccine or when the local guidelines will be lessened, so we encourage everyone, for the sake of our local businesses, services and residents, to gauge your risk level, and make the best choice in order protect yourself and those around you.  We have provided education on the widely proven COVID-19 safety measures, and encourage you to limit your contact with others not from your household, stay home if you are sick, and wear face coverings where recommended.  Click here, for a graphic on how to protect you and your family from COVID-19 spread.  We know how important family, businesses and faith are to you, so we ask that you consider all options available in order to eliminate and minimize the spread of the COVID-19 virus in our communities in order to help protect the ones you love, the businesses you love and the places you love to go.

 

Local Cases Being Supported in Isolation and Quarantine

Currently, DPHN is supporting 190 cases in isolation, as well as another 323 contacts in quarantine in Douglas County. Isolation is recommended for confirmed and presumptive cases, quarantine is recommended for contacts of confirmed or presumptive cases.  Currently, staff is supporting an astounding 513 total contacts and cases in isolation or quarantine.  This number represents a snapshot of the significant amount of work being done locally to help control the spread of COVID-19.

 

COVID-19 Information in Oregon

OHA reports new cases daily on their website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.  OHA reports include presumptive COVID-19 cases in their total case numbers.  The DCCRT separates the number of people with new positive test results and new presumptives, and uses OHA’s definition of presumptive as those having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR or antigen test for COVID-19.  DPHN performs their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who test positive, as well as those that may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive while advising and supporting quarantine and isolation.  OHA has chosen to no longer report negative test results or recovered cases, so we will no longer be reporting this data in our daily update.  Please contact the OHA directly for more information.

 

Facebook Live with Dr. Bob

Join us Tuesday, January 19, 2021 at 6:00 pm for the next Facebook Live with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, the Douglas County Public Health Officer. The show is hosted by DPHN on the DPHN Facebook pageResidents are encouraged to submit their questions during the live show or can email questions to: ookquestions@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org">Facebookquestions@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Dr. Bob and the DPHN team will do their best to respond to as many questions as they can during the live shows.

 

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Hotline (541) 464-6550

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners and DPHN continue to offer a local resource hotline for Douglas County residents for COVID-19.  The hotline provides answer to frequently asked questions, basic information and referrals to resources and services.  The Hotline is staffed from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.

 

ACCESS ACCURATE, LOCAL COVID-19 INFORMATION

Stay up to date with accurate local COVID-19 information on the Douglas County Government website or Douglas County Facebook page and the DPHN website or DPHN Facebook page.  Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer, DPHN and the DCCRT have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020. 

 

ACCESS STATE COVID-19 INFORMATION

To access information on the State of Oregon and Federal COVID-19 response go to Oregon Health Authority, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and 211Info.  If you have questions or need more information on statewide guidelines or risk levels, go to the State’s Building a Safe and Strong Oregon website or the Governor’s COVID-19 website or call the Business Oregon's Navigator Hotline at (833) 604-0880.  Please do not call 911, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office or Douglas County Offices to report compliance issues with the State of Oregon, OHA or Governor’s orders.  The Governor has directed the State offices for Oregon Occupational Safety and Health (OSHA) and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) to be the enforcement agencies responsible for ensuring restaurants, bars, and other businesses comply with COVID-related guidelines.  To report compliance issues contact them directly OSHA: (800) 922-2689 or OSHA website or OLCC (503) 872-5000 or OLCC website.

 

###

 

Contact Tamara Howell, Public Information Officer, Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, (541) 670-2804 cell (541) 957-4896 tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us   

Contact Vanessa Becker, Public Information Officer, Douglas Public Health Network, (541) 817-6552 cell (541) 440-3571 vanessa@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org




Attached Media Files: DCCRT , Hi Lo

Two Rivers Correctional Institution reports in-custody death - updated - thirty-second COVID-19 related death
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 01/18/21 8:24 AM

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody (AIC) died January 17, 2021. He was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution and passed away at a local hospital. He tested positive for COVID-19 and was between 55 and 65 years old. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. Department-wide, this is the thirty-second AIC to die who tested positive for COVID-19.

For more information on COVID-19 cases inside Oregon’s prisons, please visit DOC’s COVID-19 website. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 13,000 adults in custody who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state.

Anyone entering DOC property is required to wear a mask or face covering in any indoor work setting or other indoor premises regardless of distance from others unless they are in a private, individual office not shared by anyone else; or they are actively eating or drinking AND at least six (6) feet of distance can be maintained between other people.

Institutions continue to clean and disinfect numerous times a day. DOC asks AICs to report symptoms of COVID-19 to medical staff. Posters are in all DOC institutions encouraging individuals to maintain proper hygiene and to uphold appropriate social distancing to the extent possible. Health screening processes are in place before staff are allowed to enter facilities. This screening includes a temperature check and a screening questionnaire. Visiting remains closed until further notice.

DOC has begun administering COVID-19 vaccinations – eventually offering to all DOC staff, contractors, Oregon Corrections Enterprises employees, and AICs. Prioritization of vaccines will be determined by guidance from the Oregon Health Authority (OHA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), and the Governor’s Office.

Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, DOC issued a press release when an AIC passed away. This notification would include the person’s name, county of conviction, sentence length, and date of death. However, no cause of death would be listed because the Medical Examiner makes that determination. In order to balance the desire for transparency with our legal obligation to protect personal health information, we have changed the AIC death notification process when someone dies who has tested positive for COVID-19. DOC is working with the Oregon Health Authority to publish COVID-19 related data and information on the OHA website.


Sun. 01/17/21
Oregon reports 799 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, one new death
Oregon Health Authority - 01/17/21 2:13 PM

Jan. 17, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 799 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, one new death

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 1,800 the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 799 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 133,205.

Vaccinations in Oregon 

Today, OHA reported that 15,784 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 12,781 vaccine doses were administered on Jan. 16.

Based on updated totals, OHA is meeting Gov. Kate Brown’s goal of ensuring 12,000 vaccinations a day. The Governor required the benchmark to be met by the end of the two-week period that began Jan. 4. Today we surpassed 200,000 doses of COVID vaccine administered to Oregonians.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 204,974 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. All vaccinations were administered by Oregon hospitals, long-term care facilities, emergency medical service (EMS) agencies, urgent care facilities and Local Public Health Authorities (LPHAs).

To date, 335,075 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today. 

COVID-19 hospitalizations 

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 361, which is four fewer than yesterday. There are 95 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is three more than yesterday. 

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity. 

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (12), Clackamas (66), Clatsop (16), Columbia (10), Coos (5), Crook (6), Curry (6), Deschutes (46), Douglas (11), Gilliam (3), Harney (2), Hood River (3), Jackson (30), Jefferson (15), Josephine (30), Klamath (6), Lake (1), Lane (53), Lincoln (6), Linn (7), Malheur (7), Marion (86), Morrow (5), Multnomah (102), Polk (34), Tillamook (3), Umatilla (57), Union (10), Wasco (8), Washington (131), Yamhill (20).

Oregon’s 1,800th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive Dec. 6 and died Dec. 25. Location of death is being confirmed. She had underlying conditions.

County

Cases1

Total deaths2

Baker

568

5

Benton

1,695

14

Clackamas

11,642

138

Clatsop

686

5

Columbia

1,043

18

Coos

937

15

Crook

610

10

Curry

324

5

Deschutes

4,952

36

Douglas

1,677

43

Gilliam

51

1

Grant

213

1

Harney

175

4

Hood River

951

21

Jackson

6,892

85

Jefferson

1,702

25

Josephine

1,735

33

Klamath

2,428

38

Lake

230

5

Lane

8,272

108

Lincoln

991

17

Linn

3,108

46

Malheur

3,131

52

Marion

16,172

238

Morrow

933

10

Multnomah

28,337

458

Polk

2,446

40

Sherman

47

0

Tillamook

365

2

Umatilla

6,765

68

Union

1,114

16

Wallowa

96

3

Wasco

1,071

23

Washington

18,644

171

Wheeler

20

1

Yamhill

3,182

45

Total

133,205

1,800

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases

ELRs Received 1/16

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

57

6

63

9.5%

Benton

298

11

309

3.6%

Clackamas

1,178

65

1,243

5.2%

Clatsop

185

12

197

6.1%

Columbia

133

12

145

8.3%

Coos

194

6

200

3.0%

Crook

65

11

76

14.5%

Curry

114

2

116

1.7%

Deschutes

502

40

542

7.4%

Douglas

158

8

166

4.8%

Gilliam

20

1

21

4.8%

Grant

54

0

54

0.0%

Harney

3

2

5

40.0%

Hood River

119

7

126

5.6%

Jackson

853

35

888

3.9%

Jefferson

58

4

62

6.5%

Josephine

210

12

222

5.4%

Klamath

182

17

199

8.5%

Lake

32

5

37

13.5%

Lane

1,404

53

1,457

3.6%

Lincoln

81

1

82

1.2%

Linn

229

4

233

1.7%

Malheur

79

5

84

6.0%

Marion

1,104

105

1,209

8.7%

Morrow

21

0

21

0.0%

Multnomah

2,920

138

3,058

4.5%

Polk

182

18

200

9.0%

Sherman

4

0

4

0.0%

Tillamook

59

2

61

3.3%

Umatilla

196

42

238

17.6%

Union

11

0

11

0.0%

Wallowa

4

0

4

0.0%

Wasco

151

7

158

4.4%

Washington

1,857

157

2,014

7.8%

Wheeler

1

0

1

0.0%

Yamhill

514

14

528

2.7%

Statewide

13,232

802

14,034

5.7%

Total ELRs Received

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

6,235

1,514

7,749

19.5%

Benton

82,910

2,586

85,496

3.0%

Clackamas

290,502

16,504

307,006

5.4%

Clatsop

22,758

1,144

23,902

4.8%

Columbia

27,357

1,334

28,691

4.6%

Coos

24,522

836

25,358

3.3%

Crook

10,100

841

10,941

7.7%

Curry

6,528

244

6,772

3.6%

Deschutes

109,196

6,739

115,935

5.8%

Douglas

41,978

1,435

43,413

3.3%

Gilliam

742

28

770

3.6%

Grant

2,906

168

3,074

5.5%

Harney

2,227

175

2,402

7.3%

Hood River

21,063

1,210

22,273

5.4%

Jackson

134,700

8,654

143,354

6.0%

Jefferson

12,432

1,484

13,916

10.7%

Josephine

35,339

1,650

36,989

4.5%

Klamath

31,728

2,487

34,215

7.3%

Lake

1,736

265

2,001

13.2%

Lane

263,859

8,542

272,401

3.1%

Lincoln

30,215

1,968

32,183

6.1%

Linn

84,875

5,764

90,639

6.4%

Malheur

15,257

4,406

19,663

22.4%

Marion

219,488

22,821

242,309

9.4%

Morrow

4,709

1,070

5,779

18.5%

Multnomah

664,165

39,767

703,932

5.6%

Polk

44,369

3,094

47,463

6.5%

Sherman

968

42

1,010

4.2%

Tillamook

9,569

324

9,893

3.3%

Umatilla

43,306

6,966

50,272

13.9%

Union

8,544

877

9,421

9.3%

Wallowa

1,679

58

1,737

3.3%

Wasco

21,501

1,143

22,644

5.0%

Washington

418,623

26,381

445,004

5.9%

Wheeler

280

18

298

6.0%

Yamhill

83,344

4,374

87,718

5.0%

Statewide

2,779,710

176,913

2,956,623

6.0%

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution and other useful information.

 

You are subscribed to Oregon Health Authority News Releases. View all OHA news releases


Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Update - January 17, 2021
Douglas Co. Government - 01/17/21 12:44 PM
Hi Lo
Hi Lo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-01/6789/141699/thumb_image-asset.png

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the agencies that make up the DCCRT

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – January 17, 2021

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY UPDATE

 

(Douglas County, Ore.)  Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results: As of 12:00 pm Today, Sunday, January 17, 2021, there are TEN (10) people with new positive test results to report since our noon case update yesterday.  The total number of cases (people with positive test results and presumptive) in Douglas County is now at 1,679.  Currently, there are EIGHT (8) Douglas County COVID-19 patients that are being hospitalized, six locally and two out-of-the-area.  Our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, under the direction of the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, who administer our local public health program and oversee the work by Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, our Douglas County Public Health Officer and Douglas Public Health Network, continue to devote all resources available to our local COVID response.

 

Vaccine Distribution to Local Public Health

The latest round of vaccines that were received earlier week have all been deployed to our approved local health care providers (vaccinators) in Douglas County.  They are quickly working to vaccinate the current identified list of ELIGIBLE Douglas County residents in accordance with the priority group guidelines and criteria set by the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC) and Oregon Health Authority (OHA).  Right now, they are still working through the identified priority populations in the first group; which include health care workers, long term care workers, home care workers, EMS and first responders. (Click here Oregon's most up-to-date list of eligible residents).  To date, we have not received enough vaccines to complete the first phase of eligible residents or hold a community event. But, that does not mean that we are not prepared for a local vaccination event.  Our team is ready, able and willing to do an event, all we need is the vaccine. We ask for your continued patience, as we work through the maze of changes, logistic issues and limited vaccine distribution.

 

Douglas County, OR - COVID-19 - Case Update

Date

Wednesday,

January 13, 2021

Thursday,

January 14, 2021

Friday,

January 15, 2021

Saturday,

January 16, 2021

Today, Sunday, January 17, 2021

Total COVID-19 Cases

1,622

1,636

1,659

1,669

1679

People w/ Positive PCR or Antigen Test Results

1,536

1,549

1,572

1,579

1589

Presumptive

86

87

87

90

90

Total Currently Hospitalized

8

11

11

 

8

Total Currently in Isolation

173

164

163

169

179

Total COVID-19 Related Deaths

43

43

43

43

43

Total COVID-19 vaccines distributed

to Local Public Health and Total

deployed to local vaccinators

400/400

900/400

900/400

900/900

900/900

Our daily update includes the total number of cases in Douglas County, which combines people with positive test results and presumptives, as well as a breakout of those case numbers. There will be times when a presumptive will move to a positive test result, and our total case number will not change because the case has already been counted. We added a new line to provide an accurate total of the number of vaccines that Local Public Health has received to date, as well as the number we have deployed to local vaccinators.  Our numbers do NOT include other sites like the Roseburg VA, Mercy Medical Center, EMS, Cow Creek Tribe and local care facilities that received their vaccines directly from the Federal and State Government in order to begin direct vaccinations to the first priority group. 

 

How Do I Get More Information About the COVID-19 Vaccine Locally?

You can email DPHN at our new COVID-19 vaccine email address, vaccines@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org, to get the latest information and get matched up with a vaccinator, once the supply of vaccines arrives for your eligibility group. DPHN, through our Local Public Health Authority, our Douglas County Commissioners, set up a new email for the COVID-19 vaccine in Douglas County.  DPHN will do their best to respond with the most current information available, sign up vaccinators and volunteers, and connect those that are eligible for the vaccine with those that have the vaccine, as soon as the vaccine becomes available. For answers to questions about vaccine eligibility, availability and volunteer opportunities, please email vaccines@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Additionally, we encourage you to contact your Doctor, Physician, Family Practitioner or the Medical Office you frequent and encourage them to sign up as a vaccinator, so you can possibly go to them for the vaccine once it is available.  If you are a member of the Cow Creek Band of the Umpqua Tribe of Indians, please contact them for information on their COVID-19 vaccination program, (541) 672-9405. 

 

COVID-19 Vaccine: High Demand and Low Supply

We know that you may have heard reports that the CDC and OHA are making changes to the vaccine eligibility guidelines, it does not mean that the vaccine is available for everyone that is eligible in Douglas County.  We have NOT received the new guidelines on the changes yet, so we are continuing with the current prioritization levels until we receive those new rules and guidelines.  It is a supply and demand issue, that we have no control over.  While we are seeing high local demand for the vaccine, unfortunately the supply chain of vaccines has not caught up to the current demand.  We continue to submit requests to OHA daily for more vaccines to be sent to Douglas County, so we can move forward with vaccinations for everyone that is eligible.  Please know that if you want the vaccine, we want you to have it, and are working 24/7 to make that happen.  Rest assured, that when the new rules are finalized, and we start to receive more vaccines, we will begin to systematically offer them to additional eligible populations in an orderly, fair and equitable manner. 

 

Oregon’s COVID-19 Vaccine Information

Again it is important to note that we are not the ones setting the guidelines for vaccines eligibility or distribution.  We are following the current priority group guidelines and criteria set by the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC) and Oregon Health Authority (OHA).  We understand that our residents have many questions, so do we.  Like you, we are patiently awaiting more vaccines and more information.  If you have questions or need more information about the COVID-19 vaccine in Oregon, check out the resources listed below.  In the meantime, we ask that you be patient and continue to follow the well documented recommendations for COVID health and safety. 

 

We Encourage You to Protect You and Your Family

We do not know the timeline for the vaccine or when the local guidelines will be lessened, so we encourage everyone, for the sake of our local businesses, services and residents, to gauge your risk level, and make the best choice in order protect yourself and those around you.  We have provided education on the widely proven COVID-19 safety measures, and encourage you to limit your contact with others not from your household, stay home if you are sick, and wear face coverings where recommended.  Click here, for a graphic on how to protect you and your family from COVID-19 spread.  We know how important family, businesses and faith are to you, so we ask that you consider all options available in order to eliminate and minimize the spread of the COVID-19 virus in our communities in order to help protect the ones you love, the businesses you love and the places you love to go.

 

Local Cases Being Supported in Isolation and Quarantine

Currently, DPHN is supporting 179 cases in isolation, as well as another 333 contacts in quarantine in Douglas County. Isolation is recommended for confirmed and presumptive cases, quarantine is recommended for contacts of confirmed or presumptive cases.  Currently, staff is supporting an astounding 512 total contacts and cases in isolation or quarantine.  This number represents a snapshot of the significant amount of work being done locally to help control the spread of COVID-19.

 

COVID-19 Information in Oregon

OHA reports new cases daily on their website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.  OHA reports include presumptive COVID-19 cases in their total case numbers.  The DCCRT separates the number of people with new positive test results and new presumptives, and uses OHA’s definition of presumptive as those having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR or antigen test for COVID-19.  DPHN performs their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who test positive, as well as those that may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive while advising and supporting quarantine and isolation.  OHA has chosen to no longer report negative test results or recovered cases, so we will no longer be reporting this data in our daily update.  Please contact the OHA directly for more information.

 

Facebook Live with Dr. Bob

Join us Tuesday, January 19, 2021 at 6:00 pm for the next Facebook Live with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, the Douglas County Public Health Officer. The show is hosted by DPHN on the DPHN Facebook pageResidents are encouraged to submit their questions during the live show or can email questions to: ookquestions@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org">Facebookquestions@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Dr. Bob and the DPHN team will do their best to respond to as many questions as they can during the live shows.

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Hotline (541) 464-6550

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners and DPHN continue to offer a local resource hotline for Douglas County residents for COVID-19.  The hotline provides answer to frequently asked questions, basic information and referrals to resources and services.  The Hotline is staffed from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.

 

ACCESS ACCURATE, LOCAL COVID-19 INFORMATION

Stay up to date with accurate local COVID-19 information on the Douglas County Government website or Douglas County Facebook page and the DPHN website or DPHN Facebook page.  Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer, DPHN and the DCCRT have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020. 

 

ACCESS STATE COVID-19 INFORMATION

To access information on the State of Oregon and Federal COVID-19 response go to Oregon Health Authority, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and 211Info.  If you have questions or need more information on statewide guidelines or risk levels, go to the State’s Building a Safe and Strong Oregon website or the Governor’s COVID-19 website or call the Business Oregon's Navigator Hotline at (833) 604-0880.  Please do not call 911, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office or Douglas County Offices to report compliance issues with the State of Oregon, OHA or Governor’s orders.  The Governor has directed the State offices for Oregon Occupational Safety and Health (OSHA) and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) to be the enforcement agencies responsible for ensuring restaurants, bars, and other businesses comply with COVID-related guidelines.  To report compliance issues contact them directly OSHA: (800) 922-2689 or OSHA website or OLCC (503) 872-5000 or OLCC website

###

Contact Tamara Howell, Public Information Officer, Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, (541) 670-2804 cell (541) 957-4896 tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us   Contact Vanessa Becker, Public Information Officer, Douglas Public Health Network, (541) 817-6552 cell (541) 440-3571 vanessa@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org




Attached Media Files: Hi Lo , DCCRT

Missing person in Waldport
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/17/21 9:27 AM

On January 15, 2021, at approximately 5:17 pm, Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office Dispatch received a report of a missing person, last seen in the area of Bayshore, Waldport, Oregon. The missing person, identified as Toni L. Goessman, 60, of Waldport, was reported to be last seen walking her dogs approximately 2 hours prior.

The caller, Mr. Goessman, reported Mrs. Goessman had left on a walk with their two Boxer breed dogs. Mr. Goessman became concerned when one of their two dogs returned by itself to their residence, soaking wet.  Mr. Goessman drove around the area, looking for his wife. Mr. Goessman reported Mrs. Goessman regularly goes on walks with their dogs on the beach. Mr. Goessman was unable to search on foot due to limited mobility. Mr. Goessman reported it was out of the ordinary for Mrs. Goessman to be without their dogs.

Lincoln County Sheriff’s deputies responded to the area and conducted a preliminary search. Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office Search and Rescue was activated, and additional personnel began searching the area. The U.S. Coast Guard was also notified and their assistance was requested.

At about 10:32 pm, Search and Rescue volunteers discovered Mrs. Goessman, deceased in the surf near the mouth of the Alsea River. Their other dog, “Tango”, described as a brown Boxer with a white chest, was not found. Circumstances surrounding Mrs. Goessman’s death did not appear suspicious.

Mr. Goessman was notified of Mrs. Goessman’s death and Bateman Funeral Home responded to the location. The Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office extends its deepest condolences to the Goessman family and would like to remind members of the public to please use caution when recreating near waterways.


Two Rivers Correctional Institution reports in-custody death
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 01/17/21 9:18 AM

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody (AIC) died the evening of January 16, 2021. He was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution and passed away at a local hospital. He tested positive for COVID-19 and was between 75 and 85 years old. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. Department-wide, this is the thirty-first AIC to die who tested positive for COVID-19.

For more information on COVID-19 cases inside Oregon’s prisons, please visit DOC’s COVID-19 website. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 13,000 adults in custody who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state.

Anyone entering DOC property is required to wear a mask or face covering in any indoor work setting or other indoor premises regardless of distance from others unless they are in a private, individual office not shared by anyone else; or they are actively eating or drinking AND at least six (6) feet of distance can be maintained between other people. Masks are mandatory at all times in many work areas.

Institutions continue to clean and disinfect numerous times a day. DOC asks AICs to report symptoms of COVID to medical staff. Posters are in all DOC institutions encouraging individuals to maintain proper hygiene and to uphold appropriate social distancing to the extent possible. Health screening processes are in place before staff are allowed to enter facilities. This screening includes a temperature check and a screening questionnaire. Visiting remains closed until further notice.

DOC has begun administering COVID-19 vaccinations – eventually offering to all DOC staff, contractors, Oregon Corrections Enterprises employees, and adults in custody (AICs). Prioritization of vaccines will be determined by guidance from the Oregon Health Authority (OHA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), and the Governor’s Office.

Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, DOC issued a press release when an AIC passed away. This notification would include the person’s name, county of conviction, sentence length, and date of death. However, no cause of death would be listed because the Medical Examiner makes that determination. In order to balance the desire for transparency with our legal obligation to protect personal health information, we have changed the AIC death notification process when someone dies who has tested positive for COVID-19. DOC is working with the Oregon Health Authority to publish COVID-19 related data and information on the OHA website.

####


Sat. 01/16/21
Tidewater man arrested for Burglary and Assault charges
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/16/21 9:23 PM

On January 15, 2021, at approximately 5:52 pm, Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office Dispatch received a 911 call reporting a stabbing that occurred on E Little Albany Loop, Tidewater, Oregon. The reporting party told Dispatch the victim was able to get away from the suspect and seek help from a neighbor. Dispatch received multiple calls during the response including one reporting the suspect’s location.

Lincoln County Sheriff’s deputies responded to the scene and detained Branden Michael Gross, 29, of Tidewater. After Mr. Gross was detained and the scene was secured, medics with Pacific West Ambulance and Central Oregon Coast Fire/Rescue assessed the adult female victim. The victim sustained multiple stab wounds in the midsection which were determined to be non-life-threatening. She was transported to Samaritan Pacific Communities Hospital.

Investigation determined the victim arrived home in the evening and found Mr. Gross upstairs, inside her home. The victim was able to wrestle Mr. Gross out of the residence through the back door while screaming for help.  Mr. Gross turned back toward the residence and entered again through the back door. Another physical struggle ensued, and Mr. Gross stabbed the victim with a knife two times in the area of her abdomen.

Neighbors were alerted to the victim’s screaming and responded to the location to find Mr. Gross and the victim in a physical struggle at the back door. Neighbors intervened and got between the victim and Mr. Gross. During this time, the victim was able to escape and go to a neighbor’s residence and Mr. Gross was able to escape the victim’s residence through the front door.

Mr. Gross was located at a nearby residence and arrested for the crimes of Burglary in the first degree, Unlawful Use of a Weapon and Assault in the second degree with a total bail set at $300,000. He was transported and lodged at the Lincoln County Jail. Investigation revealed the suspect was unknown to the victim. It was reported that Mr. Gross suffers from mental health issues.  


Two Rivers Correctional Institution reports in-custody death
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 01/16/21 6:00 PM

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody (AIC) died January 16, 2021. He was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution and passed away at a local hospital. He tested positive for COVID-19 and was between 75 and 85 years old. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. Department-wide, this is the thirtieth AIC to die who tested positive for COVID-19.

For more information on COVID-19 cases inside Oregon’s prisons, please visit DOC’s COVID-19 website. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 13,000 adults in custody who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state.

Anyone entering DOC property is required to wear a mask or face covering in any indoor work setting or other indoor premises regardless of distance from others unless they are in a private, individual office not shared by anyone else; or they are actively eating or drinking AND at least six (6) feet of distance can be maintained between other people. Masks are mandatory at all times in many work areas.

Institutions continue to clean and disinfect numerous times a day. DOC asks AICs to report symptoms of COVID to medical staff. Posters are in all DOC institutions encouraging individuals to maintain proper hygiene and to uphold appropriate social distancing to the extent possible. Health screening processes are in place before staff are allowed to enter facilities. This screening includes a temperature check and a screening questionnaire. Visiting remains closed until further notice.

DOC has begun administering COVID-19 vaccinations – eventually offering to all DOC staff, contractors, Oregon Corrections Enterprises employees, and adults in custody (AICs). Prioritization of vaccines will be determined by guidance from the Oregon Health Authority (OHA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), and the Governor’s Office.

Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, DOC issued a press release when an AIC passed away. This notification would include the person’s name, county of conviction, sentence length, and date of death. However, no cause of death would be listed because the Medical Examiner makes that determination. In order to balance the desire for transparency with our legal obligation to protect personal health information, we have changed the AIC death notification process when someone dies who has tested positive for COVID-19. DOC is working with the Oregon Health Authority to publish COVID-19 related data and information on the OHA website.

####


Updated: Oregon reports 1,173 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 41 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/16/21 5:30 PM

Jan. 16, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Updated: OHA is meeting the Governor’s vaccination benchmark and ELR tables corrected

Oregon reports 1,173 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 41 new deaths

Portland, Ore. — There are 41 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 1,799, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,173 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 132,412.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 16,117 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 11,332 vaccine doses were administered on Jan. 15.

Based on updated totals, OHA is meeting Gov. Kate Brown’s goal of ensuring 12,000 vaccinations a day. The Governor required the benchmark to be met by the end of the two-week period that began Jan. 4.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 189,190 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. All vaccinations were administered by Oregon hospitals, long-term care facilities, emergency medical service (EMS) agencies, urgent care facilities and Local Public Health Authorities (LPHAs).

To date, 335,075 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 365, which is 22 fewer than yesterday. There are 92 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is five fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (15), Benton (27), Clackamas (75), Clatsop (8), Columbia (18), Coos (7), Crook (20), Curry (1), Deschutes (62), Douglas (16), Gilliam (1), Harney (5), Hood River (14), Jackson (56), Jefferson (12), Josephine (18), Klamath (56), Lake (1), Lane (95), Lincoln (12), Linn (37), Malheur (8), Marion (117), Morrow (6), Multnomah (216), Polk (23), Tillamook (5), Umatilla (70), Union (9), Wallowa (2), Wasco (12), Washington (125), Wheeler (1) and Yamhill (23).

Oregon’s 1,759 COVID-19 death is a 32-year-old man in Marion County who died Dec. 30 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,760 COVID-19 death is a 47-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 9 and died on Jan. 8 at Oregon Health and Sciences University. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,761 COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old man in Deschutes County who tested positive on Jan. 10 and died on Jan. 13 at St. Charles Medical Center - Bend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,762 COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man in Deschutes County who tested positive on Jan. 3 and died on Jan. 15 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,763 COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Dec. 16 and died on Jan. 8 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,764 COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 31 and died on Jan. 11 at Tuality Community Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,765 COVID-19 death is a 44-year-old man in Josephine County who tested positive on Dec. 22 and died on Jan. 2 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,766 COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Jan. 4 and died on Jan. 9 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,767 COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Dec. 21 and died Jan. 8 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,768 COVID-19 death is a 58-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Dec. 20 and died on Jan. 14 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,769 COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old man in Malheur County who tested positive on Jan. 11 and died on Jan. 14 at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,770 COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Dec. 22 and died on Jan. 5 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,771 COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Dec. 1 and died on Jan. 1 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,772 COVID-19 death is a 100-year-old woman in Josephine County who tested positive on Jan. 2 and died on Jan. 12 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,773 COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man in Polk County who tested positive on Dec. 1 and died on Dec. 17 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,774 COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 15 and died on Dec. 20 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,775 COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Jan. 6 and died on Jan. 8 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,776 COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Clatsop County who tested positive on Nov. 16 and died on Jan. 3 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,777 COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old woman in Benton County who tested positive on Dec. 10 and died on Dec. 31 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,778 COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old woman in Klamath County who tested positive on Jan. 11 and died on Jan. 14 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,779 COVID-19 death is a 51-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Nov. 19 and died on Jan. 7 at Oregon Health and Sciences University. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1780th COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 24 and died on Jan. 7 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,781 COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 10 and died on Dec. 27 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,782 COVID-19 death is a 61-year-old woman in Linn County who tested positive on Dec. 9 and died on Jan. 10 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,783 COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old woman in Crook County who tested positive on Dec. 8 and died on Dec. 20 at St. Charles Medical Center - Bend. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,784 COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Dec. 7 and died on Dec. 20 at his residence He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,785 COVID-19 death is a 56-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on Dec. 16 and died on Dec. 30 at St. Anthony Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,786 COVID-19 death is a 58-year-old woman in Deschutes County who tested positive on Dec. 21 and died on Dec. 31 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,787 COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old woman in Polk County who tested positive on Dec. 21 and died on Jan. 14 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,788 COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 25 and died on Jan. 12 at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,789 COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 28 and died on Jan. 11 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,790 COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old woman in Linn County who tested positive on Dec. 28 and died on Jan. 9 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,791 COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old woman in Klamath County who tested positive on Dec. 29 and died on Jan. 13 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,792 COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man in Klamath County who tested positive on Dec. 27 and died on Jan. 13 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,793 COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 14 and died on Jan. 7 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,794 COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old man in Linn County who tested positive on Dec. 23 and died on Jan. 10 at Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,795 COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old woman in Coos County who tested positive on Jan. 5 and died on Jan. 15 at Bay Area Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,796 COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old man in Linn County who tested positive on Jan. 5 and died on Jan. 8. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,797 COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old woman in Klamath County who tested positive on Jan. 4 and died on Jan. 14 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,798 COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old man in Jackson County who died on Jan.  7 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,799 COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old man in Marion County who died on Jan. 7 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

     

County

Cases1

Total deaths2

Baker

566

5

Benton

1,684

14

Clackamas

11,577

138

Clatsop

669

5

Columbia

1,033

18

Coos

933

15

Crook

604

10

Curry

318

5

Deschutes

4,907

36

Douglas

1,666

43

Gilliam

48

1

Grant

213

1

Harney

173

4

Hood River

948

21

Jackson

6,862

84

Jefferson

1,687

25

Josephine

1,706

33

Klamath

2,422

38

Lake

229

5

Lane

8,219

108

Lincoln

985

17

Linn

3,102

46

Malheur

3,124

52

Marion

16,085

238

Morrow

927

10

Multnomah

28,237

458

Polk

2,413

40

Sherman

47

0

Tillamook

362

2

Umatilla

6,709

68

Union

1,104

16

Wallowa

96

3

Wasco

1,063

23

Washington

18,512

171

Wheeler

20

1

Yamhill

3,162

45

Total

132,412

1,799

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

ELRs Received 1/8 - Corrected

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

25

4

29

13.8%

Benton

1,117

33

1,150

2.9%

Clackamas

1,710

60

1,770

3.4%

Clatsop

132

10

142

7.0%

Columbia

146

16

162

9.9%

Coos

134

8

142

5.6%

Crook

83

24

107

22.4%

Curry

57

9

66

13.6%

Deschutes

1,137

63

1,200

5.3%

Douglas

387

7

394

1.8%

Gilliam

1

0

1

0.0%

Grant

4

0

4

0.0%

Harney

6

3

9

33.3%

Hood River

143

5

148

3.4%

Jackson

1,026

67

1,093

6.1%

Jefferson

115

12

127

9.4%

Josephine

436

28

464

6.0%

Klamath

164

20

184

10.9%

Lake

8

1

9

11.1%

Lane

3,423

100

3,523

2.8%

Lincoln

147

15

162

9.3%

Linn

1,212

50

1,262

4.0%

Malheur

92

7

99

7.1%

Marion

1,268

115

1,383

8.3%

Morrow

19

6

25

24.0%

Multnomah

4,428

203

4,631

4.4%

Polk

443

23

466

4.9%

Tillamook

4

0

4

0.0%

Umatilla

59

0

59

0.0%

Union

352

57

409

13.9%

Wallowa

52

4

56

7.1%

Wasco

6

0

6

0.0%

Washington

210

6

216

2.8%

Wheeler

2,414

128

2,542

5.0%

Yamhill

958

21

979

2.1%

Statewide

21,918

1,105

23,023

4.8%

 

Total ELRs Received - Corrected

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

6,178

1,508

7,686

19.6%

Benton

82,612

2,575

85,187

3.0%

Clackamas

289,324

16,439

305,763

5.4%

Clatsop

22,573

1,132

23,705

4.8%

Columbia

27,224

1,322

28,546

4.6%

Coos

24,328

830

25,158

3.3%

Crook

10,035

830

10,865

7.6%

Curry

6,414

242

6,656

3.6%

Deschutes

108,694

6,699

115,393

5.8%

Douglas

41,820

1,427

43,247

3.3%

Gilliam

722

27

749

3.6%

Grant

2,852

168

3,020

5.6%

Harney

2,224

173

2,397

7.2%

Hood River

20,944

1,203

22,147

5.4%

Jackson

133,847

8,619

142,466

6.0%

Jefferson

12,374

1,480

13,854

10.7%

Josephine

35,129

1,638

36,767

4.5%

Klamath

31,546

2,470

34,016

7.3%

Lake

1,704

260

1,964

13.2%

Lane

262,455

8,489

270,944

3.1%

Lincoln

30,134

1,967

32,101

6.1%

Linn

84,646

5,760

90,406

6.4%

Malheur

15,178

4,401

19,579

22.5%

Marion

218,384

22,716

241,100

9.4%

Morrow

4,688

1,070

5,758

18.6%

Multnomah

661,245

39,629

700,874

5.7%

Polk

44,187

3,076

47,263

6.5%

Sherman

964

42

1,006

4.2%

Tillamook

9,510

322

9,832

3.3%

Umatilla

43,110

6,924

50,034

13.8%

Union

8,533

877

9,410

9.3%

Wallowa

1,675

58

1,733

3.3%

Wasco

21,350

1,136

22,486

5.1%

Washington

416,766

26,224

442,990

5.9%

Wheeler

279

18

297

6.1%

Yamhill

82,830

4,360

87,190

5.0%

Statewide

2,766,478

176,111

2,942,589

6.0%

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution and other useful information


Deer Ridge Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (UPDATE 29th AIC COVID-19 positive death)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 01/16/21 4:34 PM

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody (AIC) died January 16, 2021. He was incarcerated at Deer Ridge Correctional Institution and passed away at a local hospital. He tested positive for COVID-19 and was between 55 and 65 years old. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. Department-wide, this is the twenty-ninth AIC to die who tested positive for COVID-19.

For more information on COVID-19 cases inside Oregon’s prisons, please visit DOC’s COVID-19 website. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 13,000 adults in custody who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state.

Anyone entering DOC property is required to wear a mask or face covering in any indoor work setting or other indoor premises regardless of distance from others unless they are in a private, individual office not shared by anyone else; or they are actively eating or drinking AND at least six (6) feet of distance can be maintained between other people. Masks are mandatory at all times in many work areas.

Institutions continue to clean and disinfect numerous times a day. DOC asks AICs to report symptoms of COVID to medical staff. Posters are in all DOC institutions encouraging individuals to maintain proper hygiene and to uphold appropriate social distancing to the extent possible. Health screening processes are in place before staff are allowed to enter facilities. This screening includes a temperature check and a screening questionnaire. Visiting remains closed until further notice.

DOC has begun administering COVID-19 vaccinations – eventually offering to all DOC staff, contractors, Oregon Corrections Enterprises employees, and adults in custody (AICs). Prioritization of vaccines is determined by guidance from the Oregon Health Authority (OHA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), and the Governor’s Office.

Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, DOC issued a press release when an AIC passed away. This notification would include the person’s name, county of conviction, sentence length, and date of death. However, no cause of death would be listed because the Medical Examiner makes that determination. In order to balance the desire for transparency with our legal obligation to protect personal health information, we have changed the AIC death notification process when someone dies who has tested positive for COVID-19. DOC is working with the Oregon Health Authority to publish COVID-19 related data and information on the OHA website.

####


Oregon reports 1,173 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 41 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/16/21 4:02 PM

Jan. 16, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 1,173 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 41 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 41 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 1,799, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,173 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 132,412.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 16,117 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 11,332 vaccine doses were administered on Jan. 15.

Based on updated totals, OHA is close to meeting Gov. Kate Brown’s goal of ensuring 12,000 vaccinations a day. The Governor required the benchmark to be met by the end of the two-week period that began Jan. 4.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 189,190 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. All vaccinations were administered by Oregon hospitals, long-term care facilities, emergency medical service (EMS) agencies, urgent care facilities and Local Public Health Authorities (LPHAs).

To date, 335,075 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 365, which is 22 fewer than yesterday. There are 92 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is five fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (15), Benton (27), Clackamas (75), Clatsop (8), Columbia (18), Coos (7), Crook (20), Curry (1), Deschutes (62), Douglas (16), Gilliam (1), Harney (5), Hood River (14), Jackson (56), Jefferson (12), Josephine (18), Klamath (56), Lake (1), Lane (95), Lincoln (12), Linn (37), Malheur (8), Marion (117), Morrow (6), Multnomah (216), Polk (23), Tillamook (5), Umatilla (70), Union (9), Wallowa (2), Wasco (12), Washington (125), Wheeler (1) and Yamhill (23).

Oregon’s 1,759 COVID-19 death is a 32-year-old man in Marion County who died Dec. 30 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,760 COVID-19 death is a 47-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 9 and died on Jan. 8 at Oregon Health and Sciences University. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,761 COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old man in Deschutes County who tested positive on Jan. 10 and died on Jan. 13 at St. Charles Medical Center - Bend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,762 COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man in Deschutes County who tested positive on Jan. 3 and died on Jan. 15 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,763 COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Dec. 16 and died on Jan. 8 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,764 COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 31 and died on Jan. 11 at Tuality Community Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,765 COVID-19 death is a 44-year-old man in Josephine County who tested positive on Dec. 22 and died on Jan. 2 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,766 COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Jan. 4 and died on Jan. 9 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,767 COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Dec. 21 and died Jan. 8 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,768 COVID-19 death is a 58-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Dec. 20 and died on Jan. 14 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,769 COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old man in Malheur County who tested positive on Jan. 11 and died on Jan. 14 at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,770 COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Dec. 22 and died on Jan. 5 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,771 COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Dec. 1 and died on Jan. 1 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,772 COVID-19 death is a 100-year-old woman in Josephine County who tested positive on Jan. 2 and died on Jan. 12 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,773 COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man in Polk County who tested positive on Dec. 1 and died on Dec. 17 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,774 COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 15 and died on Dec. 20 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,775 COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Jan. 6 and died on Jan. 8 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,776 COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Clatsop County who tested positive on Nov. 16 and died on Jan. 3 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,777 COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old woman in Benton County who tested positive on Dec. 10 and died on Dec. 31 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,778 COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old woman in Klamath County who tested positive on Jan. 11 and died on Jan. 14 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,779 COVID-19 death is a 51-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Nov. 19 and died on Jan. 7 at Oregon Health and Sciences University. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1780th COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 24 and died on Jan. 7 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,781 COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 10 and died on Dec. 27 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,782 COVID-19 death is a 61-year-old woman in Linn County who tested positive on Dec. 9 and died on Jan. 10 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,783 COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old woman in Crook County who tested positive on Dec. 8 and died on Dec. 20 at St. Charles Medical Center - Bend. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,784 COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Dec. 7 and died on Dec. 20 at his residence He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,785 COVID-19 death is a 56-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on Dec. 16 and died on Dec. 30 at St. Anthony Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,786 COVID-19 death is a 58-year-old woman in Deschutes County who tested positive on Dec. 21 and died on Dec. 31 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,787 COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old woman in Polk County who tested positive on Dec. 21 and died on Jan. 14 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,788 COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 25 and died on Jan. 12 at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,789 COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 28 and died on Jan. 11 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,790 COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old woman in Linn County who tested positive on Dec. 28 and died on Jan. 9 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,791 COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old woman in Klamath County who tested positive on Dec. 29 and died on Jan. 13 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,792 COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man in Klamath County who tested positive on Dec. 27 and died on Jan. 13 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,793 COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 14 and died on Jan. 7 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,794 COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old man in Linn County who tested positive on Dec. 23 and died on Jan. 10 at Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,795 COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old woman in Coos County who tested positive on Jan. 5 and died on Jan. 15 at Bay Area Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,796 COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old man in Linn County who tested positive on Jan. 5 and died on Jan. 8. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,797 COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old woman in Klamath County who tested positive on Jan. 4 and died on Jan. 14 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,798 COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old man in Jackson County who died on Jan.  7 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,799 COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old man in Marion County who died on Jan. 7 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

 

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution and other useful information.

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Snake River Correctional Institution reports in-custody death
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 01/16/21 1:34 PM
Daniel R. Clinebell
Daniel R. Clinebell
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-01/1070/141686/thumb_Clinebell_D.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Daniel R. Clinebell, died the evening of January 15, 2021. Clinebell was incarcerated at Snake River Correctional Institution (SRCI) in Ontario and passed away while on hospice care. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified.

Clinebell entered DOC custody on February 15, 2007, from Marion County with an earliest release date of December 7, 2055. Clinebell was 66 years old.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of approximately 13,000 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

 

SRCI is a multi-custody prison in Ontario that houses approximately 3,000 adults in custody. SRCI has multiple special housing units including disciplinary segregation, intensive management, infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care, and an administrative segregation unit. SRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including a contact center, laundry, and sign shop. SRCI specializes in incentive housing, specialized housing, individuals with mental health/medical vulnerabilities, education and trades programs, cognitive and parenting programs, and institution work programs. SRCI opened in 1991 and is the largest correctional institution in the state.

####

 




Attached Media Files: Daniel R. Clinebell

Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Update - January 16, 2021
Douglas Co. Government - 01/16/21 12:32 PM
DCCRT
DCCRT
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-01/6789/141685/thumb_DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_72020.jpg

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the agencies that make up the DCCRT

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – January 16, 2021

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY UPDATE

 

(Douglas County, Ore.)  Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results: As of 12:00 pm Today, Saturday, January 16, 2021, there are SEVEN (7) people with new positive test results and THREE (3) to report since our noon case update yesterday.  The total number of cases (people with positive test results and presumptive) in Douglas County is now at 1,669.  Currently, there are EIGHT (8) Douglas County COVID-19 patients that are being hospitalized, six locally and two out-of-the-area.  Our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, under the direction of the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, who administer our local public health program and oversee the work by Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, our Douglas County Public Health Officer and Douglas Public Health Network, continue to devote all resources available to our local COVID response.

 

Reminder: Vaccine Distribution to Local Public Health

The latest round of vaccines that we received this week have all been deployed to our approved local health care providers (vaccinators) in Douglas County.  They are quickly working to vaccinate the current identified list of ELIGIBLE Douglas County residents in accordance with the priority group guidelines and criteria set by the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC) and Oregon Health Authority (OHA).  Right now, they are still working through the identified priority populations in the first group; which include health care workers, long term care workers, home care workers, EMS and first responders. (Click here Oregon's most up-to-date list of eligible residents).  To date, we have not received enough vaccines to move to the next phase or wave, or to hold a large community event. But, that does not mean that we are not prepared for a local vaccination event.  Our team is ready, able and willing to do an event, all we need is the vaccine. We ask for your continued patience, as we work through the maze of changes, logistic issues and limited vaccine distribution.

 

Douglas County, OR - COVID-19 - Case Update

Date

Tuesday,

January 12, 2021

Wednesday,

January 13, 2021

Thursday,

January 14, 2021

Friday,

January 15, 2021

Saturday, January 16, 2021

Total COVID-19 Cases

1,596

1,622

1,636

1,659

1669

People w/ Positive PCR or Antigen Test Results

1,510

1,536

1,549

1,572

1579

Presumptive

86

86

87

87

90

Total Currently Hospitalized

9

8

11

11

8

Total Currently in Isolation

158

173

164

163

169

Total COVID-19 Related Deaths

42

43

43

43

43

Total COVID-19 vaccines distributed

to Local Public Health and Total

deployed to local vaccinators

---

400/400

900/400

900/400

900/900

Our daily update includes the total number of cases in Douglas County, which combines people with positive test results and presumptives, as well as a breakout of those case numbers. There will be times when a presumptive will move to a positive test result, and our total case number will not change because the case has already been counted. We added a new line to provide an accurate total of the number of vaccines that Local Public Health has received to date, as well as the number we have deployed to local vaccinators.  Our numbers do NOT include other sites like the Roseburg VA, Mercy Medical Center, EMS, Cow Creek Tribe and local care facilities that received their vaccines directly from the Federal and State Government in order to begin direct vaccinations to the first priority group. 

 

Reminder: COVID-19 Vaccine: High Demand and Low Supply

We know that you may have heard reports that the CDC and OHA are making changes to the vaccine eligibility guidelines, it does not mean that the vaccine is available for everyone that is eligible in Douglas County at this time.  We have NOT received new guidelines or rules on the changes yet, so we are continuing with the current prioritization levels until we receive those new rules and guidelines.  It is a supply and demand issue, that we have no control over.  While there is demand, and far more people that are eligible and want to get the vaccine, unfortunately the supply chain of vaccines has not caught up to the current demand for them.  We continue to submit requests to OHA daily for more vaccines to be sent to Douglas County, so we can move forward with vaccinations for everyone that is eligible.  Please know that if you want the vaccine, we want you to have it, and are working 24/7 to make that happen.  Rest assured, that when the new rules are finalized, and we start to receive more vaccines, we will begin to systematically offer them to additional eligible populations in an orderly, fair and equitable manner.  DPHN, through our Local Public Health Authority and Administrators, our Douglas County Board of Commissioners, have set up a new email address for questions about COVID-19 vaccines in Douglas County.  DPHN will do their best to respond with the most current information we have, sign up vaccinators and volunteers, and connect those that are eligible for the vaccine with those that have the vaccine, as soon as the vaccine becomes available. For answers to questions about vaccine eligibility, availability and volunteer opportunities, please email vaccines@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org

 

COVID-19 Vaccine Information in Oregon

Again it is important to note that we are not the ones setting the guidelines for vaccines eligibility or distribution.  We are following the current priority group guidelines and criteria set by the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC) and Oregon Health Authority (OHA).  We understand that our residents have many questions, so do we.  Like you, we are patiently awaiting more vaccines and more information.  If you have questions or need more information about the COVID-19 vaccine in Oregon, check out the resources listed below.  In the meantime, we ask that you be patient and continue to follow the well documented recommendations for COVID health and safety. 

 

Please Continue to Protect You and Your Family

We will continue to encourage everyone, for the sake of our local businesses, services and residents, to gauge your risk level, and make the best choice in order protect yourself and those around you.  We have provided education on the widely proven COVID-19 safety measures, and encourage you to limit your contact with others not from your household, stay home if you are sick, and wear face coverings where recommended.  Click here, for a graphic on how to protect you and your family from COVID-19 spread.  We know how important family, businesses and faith are to you, so we ask that you consider all options available in order to eliminate and minimize the spread of the COVID-19 virus in our communities in order to help protect the ones you love, the businesses you love and the places you love to go.

 

Local Cases Being Supported in Isolation and Quarantine

Currently, DPHN is supporting 169 cases in isolation, as well as another 353 contacts in quarantine in Douglas County. Isolation is recommended for confirmed and presumptive cases, quarantine is recommended for contacts of confirmed or presumptive cases.  Currently, staff is supporting an astounding 522 total contacts and cases in isolation or quarantine.  This number represents a snapshot of the significant amount of work being done locally to help control the spread of COVID-19.

 

COVID-19 Information in Oregon

OHA reports new cases daily on their website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.  OHA reports include presumptive COVID-19 cases in their total case numbers.  The DCCRT separates the number of people with new positive test results and new presumptives, and uses OHA’s definition of presumptive as those having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR or antigen test for COVID-19.  DPHN performs their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who test positive, as well as those that may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive while advising and supporting quarantine and isolation.  OHA has chosen to no longer report negative test results or recovered cases, so we will no longer be reporting this data in our daily update.  Please contact the OHA directly for more information.

 

Facebook Live with Dr. Bob

Join us Tuesday, January 19, 2021 at 6:00 pm for the next Facebook Live with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, the Douglas County Public Health Officer. The show is hosted by DPHN on the DPHN Facebook pageResidents are encouraged to submit their questions during the live show or can email questions to: ookquestions@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org">Facebookquestions@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Dr. Bob and the DPHN team will do their best to respond to as many questions as they can during the live shows.

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Hotline (541) 464-6550

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners and DPHN continue to offer a local resource hotline for Douglas County residents for COVID-19.  The hotline provides answer to frequently asked questions, basic information and referrals to resources and services.  The Hotline is staffed from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

ACCESS ACCURATE, LOCAL COVID-19 INFORMATION

Stay up to date with accurate and local COVID-19 information in Douglas County on the Douglas County Government website or Douglas County Facebook page and the DPHN website or DPHN Facebook page.  Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer, DPHN and the DCCRT have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020. 

 

ACCESS STATE COVID-19 INFORMATION

To access information on the State of Oregon and Federal COVID-19 response go to Oregon Health Authority, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and 211Info.  If you have questions or need more information on statewide guidelines or risk levels, go to the State’s Building a Safe and Strong Oregon website or the Governor’s COVID-19 website or call the Business Oregon's Navigator Hotline at (833) 604-0880.  Please do not call 911, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office or Douglas County Offices to report compliance issues with the State of Oregon, OHA or Governor’s orders.  The Governor has directed the State offices for Oregon Occupational Safety and Health (OSHA) and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) to be the enforcement agencies responsible for ensuring restaurants, bars, and other businesses comply with COVID-related guidelines.  To report compliance issues contact them directly OSHA: (800) 922-2689 or OSHA website or OLCC (503) 872-5000 or OLCC website

###

 

Contact Tamara Howell, Public Information Officer, Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, (541) 670-2804 cell (541) 957-4896 tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us   

Contact Vanessa Becker, Public Information Officer, Douglas Public Health Network, (541) 817-6552 cell (541) 440-3571 vanessa@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org




Attached Media Files: DCCRT

Fri. 01/15/21
Testing reveals first case of U.K. variant of COVID-19 in Oregon
Oregon Health Authority - 01/15/21 6:08 PM

Jan. 15, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Testing reveals first case of U.K. variant of COVID-19 in Oregon

PORTLAND, Ore. — Oregon Health Authority has been notified today that a person in Oregon, identified as a Multnomah County resident, has tested positive with the variant COVID-19 virus strain originally detected in the United Kingdom.

This is the first identification in Oregon of the United Kingdom variant strain, also called strain B.1.1.7 or SARS-CoV-2 VOC 202012/01. The individual has no known travel history. Health officials are still investigating the possible sources of infection. The strain has been detected in several states, including California.

“The detection of the first case of this variant strain is a concern, and we have been monitoring movement of this strain,” said Dean Sidelinger, M.D., health officer and state epidemiologist at OHA. “As we learn more about this case and the individual who tested positive for this strain, OHA continues to promote effective public health measures, including wearing masks, maintaining six feet of physical distance, staying home, washing your hands, and avoiding gatherings and travel.”

Information about the characteristics of COVID-19 variants is rapidly emerging, for the U.K. strain and another variant first found in South Africa.

Viruses constantly mutate, and new variants of a virus are expected to occur over time. Multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 have been documented in the United States and globally during this pandemic. Most variants do not change how the virus behaves, and many disappear. 

Scientists are working to learn more about how easily they might spread, and currently there is no evidence that these variants cause more severe illness or increased risk of death, or affect vaccine effectiveness, according to the Centers for the Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Multnomah County public health staff is working tonight and through the weekend to go back over details with this individual related to their isolation plan, contacts and any possible exposures.

“Confirming this strain locally is distressing,” said Multnomah County Health Officer Dr. Jennifer Vines. “Until we have enough vaccine, we must continue using face masks, distancing, and limiting our social interactions.”

The CDC provides case data information in the United States.

Oregonians can continue to work together to prevent more lives being lost to the virus by doing the following:

  • Maintain six feet of physical distance;
  • Wear a face covering when outside the house;
  • Practice good hand hygiene;
  • Avoid any gatherings with people you don’t live with;
  • If you start to have symptoms — even mild ones — consult with a medical provider quickly to get instructions on how to care for yourself and your household members and also whether to get tested;
  • And finally, if you get a call from public health, answer it, and take their advice on how to protect yourself and those around you.

Updated: Oregon reports 1,037 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 21 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/15/21 6:03 PM

Jan. 15, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Updated: Oregon reports 1,037 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 21 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 21 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 1,758, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,037 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 131,258.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 26,936 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 10,618 vaccine doses were administered on Jan. 14 and 16,318 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Jan. 14.

Based on updated totals, OHA is meeting Gov. Kate Brown’s goal of ensuring 12,000 vaccinations a day. The Governor required the benchmark to be met by the end of the two-week period that began Jan. 4.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 173,073 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. All vaccinations were administered by Oregon hospitals, long-term care facilities, emergency medical service (EMS) agencies, urgent care facilities and Local Public Health Authorities (LPHAs).

To date, 326,300 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 387, which is 28 fewer than yesterday. There are 97 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is four fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (21), Clackamas (54), Clatsop (4), Columbia (11), Coos (3), Crook (4), Curry (1), Deschutes (43), Douglas (21), Grant (31), Harney (1), Hood River (4), Jackson (52), Jefferson (14), Josephine (48), Klamath (14), Lake (1), Lane (86), Lincoln (5), Linn (16), Malheur (5), Marion (95), Morrow (5), Multnomah (155), Polk (23), Umatilla (111), Union (7), Wallowa (2), Wasco (14), Washington (141) and Yamhill (43).

Oregon’s 1,738th COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Dec. 31 and died on Jan. 8 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,739th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man in Deschutes County who tested positive on Jan. 4 and died on Jan. 13 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,740th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old woman in Josephine County who tested positive on Dec. 28 and died on Jan. 11 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,741st COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old man in Klamath County who tested positive on Dec. 20 and died on Jan. 7 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,742nd COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Klamath County who tested positive on Dec. 26 and died on Jan. 10 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,743rd COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old woman in Klamath County who tested positive on Dec. 28 and died on Jan. 10 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,744th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Klamath County who tested positive on Dec. 28 and died on Jan. 11 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,745th COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old man in Morrow County who tested positive on Nov. 13 and died on Nov. 17 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,746th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Aug. 28 and died on Oct. 29 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,747th COVID-19 death is a 52-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 14 and died on Nov. 10 at Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,748th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 9 and died on Nov. 12 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,749th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 17 and died on Jan. 11 at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,750th COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 25 and died on Jan. 12 at her residence. She had no underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,751st COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 24 and died on Jan. 9 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,752nd COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 4 and died on Jan. 12 at Providence Portland Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,753rd COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 8 and died on Jan. 12 at Kaiser Permanente Sunnyside Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,754th COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old woman in Umatilla County who tested positive on Dec. 17 and died on Jan. 11 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,755th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old woman in Umatilla County who tested positive on Dec. 21 and died on Dec. 20 at her residence. She had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 1,756th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old man in Yamhill County who tested positive on Jan. 5 and died on Jan. 10 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,757th COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old woman in Curry County who tested positive on Dec. 9 and died on Dec. 18 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,758th COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old man in Harney County who tested positive on Jan. 8 and died on Jan. 8 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution and other useful information.


01-15-2021 NOTICE OF HOLIDAY CLOSURE - Martin Luther King Jr. Day
Douglas Co. Government - 01/15/21 3:57 PM
MLK Day Closure
MLK Day Closure
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-01/6789/141672/thumb_mlk_day_closure.png

Douglas County Board of Commissioners

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

January 15, 2021

 

 

NOTICE OF HOLIDAY CLOSURE

Martin Luther King Jr. Day

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.) The Douglas County Board of Commissioners would like to remind citizens that government offices in the Douglas County Courthouse, located at 1036 SE Douglas Avenue in Roseburg, as well as the Douglas County Justice Building, Douglas County Courthouse Annex, Douglas County Museum, Douglas County Landfill and Transfer Stations, Douglas County Fairgrounds and All External Douglas County Government Offices will be closed to the public on Monday, January 18, 2021, in observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

 

            As always, even when Douglas County government offices are closed, many officials and public employees are still working. Our Sheriff’s Deputies, 911 communications and DCSO staff will continue to provide law enforcement protection and emergency assistance for our residents.  If you have an emergency, call 9-1-1.  If you need to reach dispatch for a non-emergency, call the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office non-emergency number at (541) 440-4471.   

 

            The Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, our Public Health Officer, DPHN staff, the DCCRT’s Joint Information Center staff and the Douglas County Commissioners will continue to work on the COVID-19 response regardless of the holiday.

           

The Douglas County Board of Commissioners understand that all of our holiday and memorial days will be decidedly different during this worldwide pandemic, but we hope you will join us in honoring this day, while continuing to make safe and healthy choices, and taking measures to protect those you love in order to keep Douglas County a wonderful place to live, work and play.




Attached Media Files: MLK Day Closure

We're partnering with Sunshine Division on MLK Day to provide 90k meals to families in need (Photo)
Kaiser Permanente Northwest - 01/15/21 3:30 PM
Kaiser Permanente volunteers safely prepare the 3,000 Sunshine Division food boxes that will be distributed on MLK Day 2021.
Kaiser Permanente volunteers safely prepare the 3,000 Sunshine Division food boxes that will be distributed on MLK Day 2021.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-01/5557/141664/thumb_Kaiser-Permanente-Sunshine-Division-Volunteers-2021.jpg

PORTLAND, Oregon (January 15, 2021): While looking forward to the year ahead, Sunshine Division and Kaiser Permanente remain aware of the many families and individuals within our community who are in need of food. They have joined together to do something special on this important holiday to help offer healing for our community.

As such, Sunshine Division and Kaiser Permanente are proud to announce their upcoming free food box distribution day in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day on Monday, Jan. 18, 2021.

Kaiser Permanente’s donation of $90,000 will provide 90,000 meals. That equates to 1,000 food boxes delivered through Sunshine Division’s home delivery program, another 1,000 bulk food deliveries to partnering agencies and organizations in the Longview, Vancouver, Clackamas, Cornelius and Salem areas. Plus another 1,000 drive-up food boxes made available for families and individuals needing to safely pick up a food box at the two locations described in further detail below.

“Continuing Dr. King’s vision of giving back and honoring diversity, equity and inclusion is an essential part of Kaiser Permanente’s mission,” said Jeff Collins, President of Kaiser Permanente’s Northwest region. “We know that connecting people who are food insecure with the resources they need to achieve total health is crucial. In a year that has been marked with so much unrest and uncertainty, the role that each of us plays to foster healthy, inclusive communities is more important than ever.”

Volunteers from Kaiser Permanente will also help to home deliver food boxes and place food boxes inside the cars of families and individuals who drive-up to either of the two locations to receive their food box.

"With this $90,000 grant from Kaiser Permanente, we will be able to provide free food to more than 3,000 families and individuals. This partnership is one we are looking forward to expanding in the future," said Kyle Camberg, Executive Director of Sunshine Division. "We share a similar philosophy with Kaiser Permanente in that we believe no one should go hungry. On an important holiday such as this, which honors the amazing legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr., we hope this event offers needed healing within the communities we serve, given the difficult year we have endured."

The safety of Sunshine Division’s clients and Kaiser Permanente volunteers remains a top priority. As such, all food boxes provided at either location will be loaded into client’s cars in a socially distanced manner by Sunshine Division staff and Kaiser Permanente volunteers. Masks will be required to be worn by all parties present in the client’s cars when interacting with staff and volunteers, and masks will be worn at all times while volunteers make deliveries to food box recipients.

Families and individuals in need are invited to come to either Sunshine Division’s North Thompson food pantry location, or Sunshine Division’s vacant Safeway store location, where they run their emergency home delivery program, on Monday, January 18, from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. to receive a free food box; no questions asked.

Sunshine Division’s two locations for drive-by food box pick-up are provided below:

  • 687 N. Thompson St. Portland, OR 97227 (N Thompson food pantry location)
  • 221 NE 122nd Ave. Portland, OR 97230 (Vacant Safeway store – Sunshine Division’s food delivery program)

The home deliveries and bulk food deliveries have already been claimed.

Media is invited to attend the following event:

What: Food box packing and distribution
When: 11 a.m.-noon on Monday, Jan. 18, 2021
Where: 221 N.E. 122nd Ave. (corner of N.E. 122nd and Glisan St.)

Visuals: Volunteers packing food and loading into cars; vehicles pulling up to get their boxes; Kaiser Permanente President, Jeff Collins, packing food boxes.

ABOUT SUNSHINE DIVISION

Since 1923, Sunshine Division has provided free emergency food and clothing to families and individuals in times of crisis. During the year 2020, at the height of the COVID-19 crisis, Sunshine Division launched their expanded emergency food delivery program. With the help of the Portland Police Bureau, and numerous local supporters, Sunshine Division provided more than 4.8 MILLION meals to over 180,000 households through their two food pantries, home deliveries, and bulk food distribution program. In the new year, Sunshine Division’s ongoing food delivery model continues to help them meet the growing need thousands of local families are experiencing by providing free food so that no goes hungry.  

For more information, please visit: www.sunshinedivision.org

ABOUT KAISER PERMANENTE

For 75 years, Kaiser Permanente has been committed to shaping the future of health and health care — and helping our members, patients, and communities experience more healthy years. We are recognized as one of America’s leading health care providers and not-for-profit health plans. Since July 21, 1945, Kaiser Permanente’s mission has been to provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. We currently serve 12.4 million members in 8 states and the District of Columbia. Care for members and patients is focused on their total health and guided by their personal Permanente Medical Group physicians, specialists, and team of caregivers. Our expert and caring medical teams are empowered and supported by industry-leading technology advances and tools for health promotion, disease prevention, state-of-the-art care delivery, and world-class chronic disease management. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education, and the support of community health.

For more information, please visit: about.kaiserpermanente.org




Attached Media Files: Kaiser Permanente volunteers safely prepare the 3,000 Sunshine Division food boxes that will be distributed on MLK Day 2021. , Kaiser Permanente volunteers safely prepare the 3,000 Sunshine Division food boxes that will be distributed on MLK Day 2021. , Kaiser Permanente volunteers safely prepare the 3,000 Sunshine Division food boxes that will be distributed on MLK Day 2021.

Public notice and request for comment on 1915 (k) K Plan amendment
Oregon Department of Human Services - 01/15/21 2:34 PM

(Salem, Ore.) - The Oregon Department of Human Services’ Office of Developmental Disabilities Services and Office of Aging and People with Disabilities are seeking public comment regarding the 1915 (k) state plan amendment.

The 1915 (k) State Plan amendment is requesting to:

  • Add an acute care hospital as an approved setting in the 1915 (k) State Plan.
  • Remove the prohibition of using physical therapists and occupational therapists.
  • Allow long-term care community nursing services in settings in which nursing services are currently restricted by rule, contract, or K Plan language.
  • Allow two Medicaid home-delivered meals per day.
  • Increase local approval limit for electronic devices from $500 to $1,200.
  • Update Group Care Homes for Children (GCH) rate methodology.

 

The proposed 1915 (k) amendment is online at https://www.oregon.gov/dhs/SENIORS-DISABILITIES/DD/Compass/20-xxx-K-plan-draft.pdf.

Print versions of the waiver amendments are posted in local offices:

Members of the public are invited to provide any comments, suggestions or questions related to individuals receiving services through the Office of Developmental Disabilities Services to Joli Schroader; Department of Human Services, 500 Summer St. NE, Salem, OR 97301-1079 or .schroader@dhsoha.state.or.us">joli.r.schroader@dhsoha.state.or.us

 

Comments, suggestions or questions related to individuals receiving services through the Office of Aging and People with Disabilities should contact Beth Jackson; Department of Human Services, 500 Summer St. NE, Salem, OR 97301-1079 or  eth.Jackson3@dhsoha.state.or.us">Beth.Jackson3@dhsoha.state.or.us

The deadline for comments is Feb. 17, 2021. Mail responses must be received by this date in order to be considered.


Oregon reports 1,037 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 21 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/15/21 2:20 PM

Jan. 15, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 1,037 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 21 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 21 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 1,758, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,037 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 131,258.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, the Oregon Health Authority reported that 26,936 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 10,618 vaccine doses were administered on Jan. 14 and 16,318 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Jan. 14.

Based on updated totals, the Oregon Health Authority is meeting Gov. Kate Brown’s goal of ensuring 12,000 vaccinations a day. The Governor required the benchmark to be met by the end of the two-week period that began Jan. 4.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. The Oregon Health Authority has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 173,073 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. All vaccinations were administered by Oregon hospitals, long-term care facilities, emergency medical service (EMS) agencies, urgent care facilities and Local Public Health Authorities (LPHAs).

To date, 326,300 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data.

Cases and deaths

NOTE: Death details are being reviewed and will be posted in an updated version of this press release.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (21), Clackamas (54), Clatsop (4), Columbia (11), Coos (3), Crook (4), Curry (1), Deschutes (43), Douglas (21), Grant (31), Harney (1), Hood River (4), Jackson (52), Jefferson (14), Josephine (48), Klamath (14), Lake (1), Lane (86), Lincoln (5), Linn (16), Malheur (5), Marion (95), Morrow (5), Multnomah (155), Polk (23), Umatilla (111), Union (7), Wallowa (2), Wasco (14), Washington (141) and Yamhill (43).

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution and other useful information.


Hospitals Support Gov. Brown's Decision to Delay Vaccine Eligibility Expansion
Oregon Assn. of Hosp. and Health Systems (OAHHS) - 01/15/21 2:12 PM

Following Governor Brown’s decision to postpone the expansion of the group eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine to include educators and those aged 65 and over, OAHHS President and CEO Becky Hultberg issued the following statement:

“When the federal government announced this week that the full reserve of vaccine would be released to states and that Oregon would be offering doses to educators and those aged 65+, we were supportive but skeptical that the supply would meet this massive increase in the number of Oregonians who would become eligible.

Now we all have learned that there will be no increase in the number of vaccine doses delivered to Oregon. We support Governor Brown’s decision to delay the expansion until we can be sure that the doses are in hand to meet this demand.

It is unfortunate that the news on Monday set unrealistic expectations about the available supply of vaccine.

Until more vaccine is delivered, Oregon’s hospitals will continue their work to administer the vaccine to as many members of the Phase 1a group as possible. Many of our hospitals have scheduled large scale vaccination events to continue their progress with the Phase 1a cohort.

From the beginning, the COVID-19 vaccine rollout has been unpredictable. At the 11th hour, hospitals shouldered a huge part of the burden for distribution of the doses, with little outside support. The fact that the playing field keeps changing makes this work even more difficult in the midst of a pandemic, as our overburdened staffs take care of a surge of patients. 

When the COVID-19 vaccines became available, the state of Oregon directed hospitals to administer the first doses to their frontline caregivers and others with patient contact. Many of our hospitals have finished this step. Then in early January hospitals were asked to expand their reach to vaccinate the rest of Phase 1a, and our facilities have leaned into this work.

We are grateful to all of the Oregonians who have worked so hard to help bring us through the pandemic, especially our frontline health care workers. This is a team effort, and Oregon’s hospitals will continue to do whatever it takes to help us beat COVID-19.”

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About OAHHS: Founded in 1934, OAHHS is a statewide, nonprofit trade association that works closely with local and national government leaders, business and citizen coalitions, and other professional health care organizations to enhance and promote community health and to continue improving Oregon’s innovative health care delivery system.




Attached Media Files: 2021-01/1635/141662/FINAL_Vax_Plan_Change_Statement__01_15_2021.docx

Western Oregon University Board of Trustees Committee Takes Steps Toward Search for Interim President
Western Oregon University - 01/15/21 1:32 PM

MONMOUTH, Ore. – The Western Oregon University (WOU) Board of Trustees Executive, Governance and Trusteeship Committee (EGTC) on Thursday met to consider language for a new presidential search policy. As part of the discussion, the group affirmed its intention, pending full board approval, to search for an interim president to replace retiring President Rex Fuller.

 

The committee worked to craft a WOU-specific policy governing presidential searches, a process that previously had been managed through the Oregon University System (OUS). When the state’s seven public universities were made independent in 2015, they were at liberty to create their own presidential hiring policies; this is the first time WOU has needed its own policy as Fuller has been in his position since 2015.

 

The full Board of Trustees had indicated that a search for an interim president made more sense at this time for a number of reasons. On Thursday, the EGTC drafted guidelines for both interim and regular presidential searches, including potential timelines.

 

“We want to ensure all constituents are involved in the search for the next long-term WOU president, and we will begin that process in fall 2021,” said Board of Trustees Chair Betty Komp. “The proposed policy will go to the full board at its regular meeting on Feb. 17 with the recommendation of completing an interim hiring process in the next five months.”

 

Board of Trustees Secretary and University General Counsel Ryan Hagemann underscored that the search for a university president will be transparent, involve voices from across campus, and will include opportunities for constituent participation. The university does not intend to hire a consultation firm if it chooses the interim route, and no candidates have been identified, Hagemann said.

 

About Western Oregon University

Western Oregon University, founded in 1856 and located in Monmouth, is the state’s oldest public university. Serving approximately 4,500 students, WOU is a mid-sized, NCAA Division II institution with nearly 75 percent of the student population being from Oregon. A significant portion of attendees are members of under-represented groups, veterans or non-traditional students. WOU is Oregon’s campus of choice for those seeking a transformative education in a supportive, student-centered learning community where classes are taught by faculty. Together we succeed.

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Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Update - January 15, 2021
Douglas Co. Government - 01/15/21 12:11 PM
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Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the agencies that make up the DCCRT

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – January 15, 2021

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY UPDATE

 

(Douglas County, Ore.)  Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results: As of 12:00 pm Today, Friday, January 15, 2021, there are TWENTY-THREE (23) people with new positive test results to report since our noon case update yesterday.  The total number of cases (people with positive test results and presumptive) in Douglas County is now at 1,659.  Currently, there are ELEVEN (11) Douglas County COVID-19 patients that are being hospitalized, eight locally and three out-of-the-area.  Our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, under the direction of the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, who administer our local public health program and oversee the work by Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, our Douglas County Public Health Officer and Douglas Public Health Network, continue to devote all resources available to our local COVID response.

 

Vaccine Distribution to Local Public Health

The latest round of available vaccines (500) that were sent to Local Public Health less than 48 hours ago, have been deployed to our approved local health care providers (vaccinators) in Douglas County.  They are quickly working to vaccinate the current identified list of ELIGIBLE Douglas County residents in accordance with the priority group guidelines and criteria set by the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC) and Oregon Health Authority (OHA).  Right now, they are still working through the identified priority populations in the first group; which include health care workers, long term care workers, home care workers, EMS and first responders. (Click here Oregon's most up-to-date list of eligible residents).  To date, we have not received enough vaccines to move to the next phase or wave, or to hold a large community event. But, that does not mean that we are not prepared for a local vaccination event.  Our team is ready, able and willing to do an event, all we need is the vaccine.  So, we ask for your continued patience, as we work through the maze of changes, logistic issues and limited vaccine distribution.  

 

Douglas County, OR - COVID-19 - Case Update

Date

Monday,

January 11, 2021

Tuesday,

January 12, 2021

Wednesday,

January 13, 2021

Thursday,

January 14, 2021

Today, Friday, January 15, 2021

Total COVID-19 Cases

1,575

1,596

1,622

1,636

1659

People w/ Positive PCR or Antigen Test Results

1,489

1,510

1,536

1,549

1572

Presumptive

86

86

86

87

87

Total Currently Hospitalized

8

9

8

11

11

Total Currently in Isolation

172

158

173

164

163

Total COVID-19 Related Deaths

42

42

43

43

43

Total COVID-19 vaccines distributed to Local Public Health and Total administered to eligible residents

---

---

400/400

900/400

900/400

Our daily update includes the total number of cases in Douglas County, which combines people with positive test results and presumptives, as well as a breakout of those case numbers. There will be times when a presumptive will move to a positive test result, and our total case number will not change because the case has already been counted. We added a new line to provide an accurate total of the number of vaccines that Local Public Health has received to date, as well as the number we have administered to eligible residents.  Our numbers do NOT include other sites like the Roseburg VA, Mercy Medical Center, EMS, Cow Creek Tribe and local care facilities that received their vaccines directly from the Federal and State Government in order to begin direct vaccinations to the first priority group. 

 

COVID-19 Vaccine: Low Supply vs High Demand

We wanted to let you know that even though you have heard reports that the CDC and OHA are making changes to the vaccine eligibility guidelines, it does not mean that the vaccine is available for everyone that is eligible in Douglas County at this time.  It is a supply and demand issue, that we have no control over.  While there is demand, and far more people that are eligible and want to get the vaccine, unfortunately the supply chain of vaccines has not caught up to the current demand for them.  We continue to submit requests to OHA daily for more vaccines to be sent to Douglas County, so we can move forward with vaccinations for everyone that is eligible.  

 

Additionally, as Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, our Douglas County Public Health Official stated yesterday, “We do NOT have guidelines or rules on the changes yet, so we are continuing with the current prioritization levels until we receive those new rules and guidelines.  Our focus remains on our most vulnerable populations, including first responders, those who live in nursing homes and health care workers that serve vulnerable populations.  We want to distribute vaccine quickly, fairly and in a manner that prioritizes those who are most at risk for serious illness and death from COVID, especially our senior population.  But, we also recognize that eligibility for a vaccine, and availability of the vaccine, are not yet aligned.   We are working diligently with our state health partners to find a remedy for that.  If you want the vaccine, we want you to have it, and are working 24/7 to make that happen.

 

Rest assured, that when the new rules are finalized, and we start to receive more vaccines, we will begin to systematically offer them to additional eligible populations in an orderly, fair and equitable manner.  DPHN, through our Local Public Health Authority and Administrators, our Douglas County Board of Commissioners, have set up a new email address for questions about COVID-19 vaccines in Douglas County.  DPHN will do their best to respond with the most current information we have, sign up vaccinators and volunteers, and connect those that are eligible for the vaccine with those that have the vaccine, as soon as the vaccine becomes available. For answers to questions about vaccine eligibility, availability and volunteer opportunities, please email vaccines@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org

 

COVID-19 Vaccine Information in Oregon

Again it is important to note that we are not the ones setting the guidelines for vaccines eligibility or distribution.  We are following the current priority group guidelines and criteria set by the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC) and Oregon Health Authority (OHA).  We understand that our residents have many questions, so do we.  Like you, we are patiently awaiting more vaccines and more information.  If you have questions or need more information about the COVID-19 vaccine in Oregon, check out the resources listed below.  In the meantime, we ask that you be patient and continue to follow the well documented recommendations for COVID health and safety. 

 

Reminder: All Douglas County Businesses Have the Ability to Be Open

We announced earlier this week that Douglas County residents and businesses would remain in our current State mandated risk level.  The State of Oregon notified Douglas County that Douglas County will remain in the High Risk Level for the next two-week period, beginning today, Friday, January 15, 2012, and continuing through Thursday, January 28, 2021. This risk level allows ALL of our local business the opportunity to be OPEN, with some limitations on capacity. We want to continue to thank our residents and businesses for staying within the recommended guidelines, and for making good decisions in order for our communities to continue to stay open.  The new risk level does not affect the ability of faith based organizations and local school districts to offer in-person services and classes.  They are able to make decisions for their own congregations and educational programs. 

 

Reminder: Please Stay Safe

We will continue to encourage everyone, for the sake of our local businesses, services and residents, to gauge your risk level, and make the best choice in order protect yourself and those around you.  We have provided education on the widely proven COVID-19 safety measures, and encourage you to limit your contact with others not from your household, stay home if you are sick and wear face coverings where recommended.  We know how important family, businesses and faith are to you, so we ask that you consider all options available in order to eliminate and minimize the spread of the COVID-19 virus in our communities in order to help protect the ones you love, the businesses you love and the places you love to go.

 

Local Cases Being Supported in Isolation and Quarantine

Currently, DPHN is supporting 163 cases in isolation, as well as another 330 contacts in quarantine in Douglas County. Isolation is recommended for confirmed and presumptive cases, quarantine is recommended for contacts of confirmed or presumptive cases.  Currently, staff is supporting an astounding 493 total contacts and cases in isolation or quarantine.  This number represents a snapshot of the significant amount of work being done locally to help control the spread of COVID-19.

 

COVID-19 Information in Oregon

OHA reports new cases daily on their website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.  OHA reports include presumptive COVID-19 cases in their total case numbers.  The DCCRT separates the number of people with new positive test results and new presumptives, and uses OHA’s definition of presumptive as those having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR or antigen test for COVID-19.  DPHN performs their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who test positive, as well as those that may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive while advising and supporting quarantine and isolation.  OHA has chosen to no longer report negative test results or recovered cases, so we will no longer be reporting this data in our daily update.  Please contact the OHA directly for more information.

 

Facebook Live with Dr. Bob

Join us Today, Friday, January 15, 2021 at 4:00 pm for the next Facebook Live with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, the Douglas County Public Health Officer. The show is hosted by DPHN on the DPHN Facebook pageResidents are encouraged to submit their questions during the live show or can email questions to: ookquestions@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org">Facebookquestions@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Dr. Bob and the DPHN team will do their best to respond to as many questions as they can during the live shows.

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Hotline (541) 464-6550

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners and DPHN continue to offer a local resource hotline for Douglas County residents for COVID-19.  The hotline provides answer to frequently asked questions, basic information and referrals to resources and services.  The Hotline is staffed from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.

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ACCESS ACCURATE, LOCAL COVID-19 INFORMATION

Stay up to date with accurate and local COVID-19 information in Douglas County on the Douglas County Government website or Douglas County Facebook page and the DPHN website or DPHN Facebook page.  Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer, DPHN and the DCCRT have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020. 

 

 

ACCESS STATE COVID-19 INFORMATION

To access information on the State of Oregon and Federal COVID-19 response go to Oregon Health Authority, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and 211Info.  If you have questions or need more information on statewide guidelines or risk levels, go to the State’s Building a Safe and Strong Oregon website or the Governor’s COVID-19 website or call the Business Oregon's Navigator Hotline at (833) 604-0880.  Please do not call 911, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office or Douglas County Offices to report compliance issues with the State of Oregon, OHA or Governor’s orders.  The Governor has directed the State offices for Oregon Occupational Safety and Health (OSHA) and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) to be the enforcement agencies responsible for ensuring restaurants, bars, and other businesses comply with COVID-related guidelines.  To report compliance issues contact them directly OSHA: (800) 922-2689 or OSHA website or OLCC (503) 872-5000 or OLCC website

 

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Contact Tamara Howell, Public Information Officer, Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, (541) 670-2804 cell (541) 957-4896 tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us   

Contact Vanessa Becker, Public Information Officer, Douglas Public Health Network, (541) 817-6552 cell (541) 440-3571 vanessa@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org




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50,000 reasons to faint
Oregon Lottery - 01/15/21 10:45 AM
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Jan. 15, 2021 - Salem, Ore. – When most people stop on the way to work, they pick up coffee, tea or a soda. Diana C. of Salem decided to pick up something a little more substantial, a $50,000 Powerball prize. 

“I normally don’t buy tickets,” Dianna said when she claimed her prize, “but I saw that the jackpots were so big, I decided to get $10 of Powerball.” 

Thursday morning, back at work at the Marion County Juvenile Department, she noticed the ticket in her purse and decided to check the numbers. 

“I saw I hit the Powerball, so I knew I won some money,” she said. “When I looked at the other numbers, I almost fainted. I’m not going to lie.” 

She couldn’t contain her excitement and decided to share the news with some co-workers, and then called to make her appointment to claim that prize at the Oregon Lottery that same day. She had hit four out of five numbers and the Powerball on her quick pick ticket.  

“I am going to play some more, the big prize is still out there,” she said. “I am going to use this to pay off some bills and it’s nice to have that peace of mind.” 

Saturday’s Powerball drawing is an estimated $640 million, which would be a $478.7 million cash value. If won, it will be the fifth largest jackpot in Powerball game history and the ninth largest jackpot in U.S. lottery history. This is the highest the Powerball jackpot has been since March 2019, and it’s causing an increase in sales in lottery tickets all around Oregon. 

Diana purchased her winning ticket at the US Market on Cherry Avenue in Keizer. Sam Singh, owner of the store, said that as the jackpots for both Powerball and Mega Millions have been growing, he has seen more and more customers add lottery tickets to their purchases. 

“It’s always this way when the jackpots get this big,” he said. “Having a winner like this will help sales, because they think it could happen to them.” 

Before Diana’s $50,000 win, Singh said the biggest winning ticket he had sold was in the $30,000 to $40,000 range. 

“This is very exciting and I feel great,” he said. “We hope to sell more, and even the big one. My advice to players is to buy more tickets. As much as you play, it increases your chances to win.” 

 

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $12 billion for economic development, public education, Outdoor School, state parks, Veteran Services and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org 

 

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Artist Relief Program awards announced; 646 Oregon artists to receive $1.25 million in relief grant awards
Oregon Arts Commission - 01/15/21 10:21 AM
Kirista Trask in-studio, Astoria, visual arts.
Kirista Trask in-studio, Astoria, visual arts.
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Salem, Oregon – Relief grants ranging from $1,000 to $5,000 will be awarded to 646 diverse artists across Oregon through an Artist Relief Program created by the Oregon Arts Commission in partnership with Oregon Community Foundation and the James F. and Marion L. Miller Foundation. The awards expend the $1.25 million available for the program.

“Artists are the creative core of our communities and help define who we are. They inspire us to innovate, to learn and grow,” said Brian Rogers, executive director of the Oregon Arts Commission. “We are thankful to be able to provide support as our artists continue to suffer great losses due to the pandemic.

“While the requests far exceeded available funds,” Rogers added, “we hope the awards will help artists sustain their practice until better times arrive. We are extremely grateful to our partners at Oregon Community Foundation and the Miller Foundation for making this program possible.”

A total of 1,158 eligible applications reporting more than $18 million in revenue loss were received. Twenty-nine panelists from around the state served on five discipline-based panels that reviewed and evaluated applications based on published review criteria: professional artistic practice; impact of cancellations and loss of revenue on artistic practice; and need and access to other resources. A geographic distribution model ensured artists were funded in every region of the state. An average of 65% of applications were funded from each of the state’s 12 regions.

“The James F. and Marion L. Miller Foundation has been supporting Oregon artists for two decades through funding the visual, literary and performing arts organizations that employ Oregon’s creative workers,” said Martha Richards, executive director of the Miller Foundation. “In light of the impacts of both the pandemic and 2020 wildfires, we felt it critical to offer our support directly to artists for the first time. Together with our partners in the Artist Relief Program, we hope these grants help our state’s artists through this crisis. Now more than ever, we recognize artists’ vital role in our communities and consider their creativity and contributions as vital to our state’s recovery.”

“The relief applications submitted by working artists across Oregon demonstrated both the deep need and courageous resilience in our arts communities,” added Jerry Tischleder, Oregon Community Foundation’s program officer for arts and culture. “It’s crushing to recognize all that has been lost and I’m humbled that OCF could play a role in mending a portion of the damages. I applaud the review panels across the state who dug in to direct how funds would be allocated – it was hard work that couldn’t have been done without broad community input.”

The awarded artists represent a wide array of artistic disciplines including: Literature (creative non-fiction, fiction, play writing and poetry); dance (including choreography); music (composition and music performance); theatre and performance art; folk and traditional arts; visual arts (crafts, drawing, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, mixed media and new media); design arts; and media arts.

See a full list of artist awards by county: https://bit.ly/3nNdfD1

                   

The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of Business Oregon (formerly Oregon Economic and Community Development Department) in 1993, in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities. In 2003, the Oregon legislature moved the operations of the Oregon Cultural Trust to the Arts Commission, streamlining operations and making use of the Commission’s expertise in grantmaking, arts and cultural information and community cultural development. 

The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature and with federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust. More information about the Oregon Arts Commission is available online at: www.oregonartscommission.org.

 




Attached Media Files: Kirista Trask in-studio, Astoria, visual arts. , Victoria Schmidt, Burns, multidisciplinary, “Pressed Pansies Longhorn Bull Skull.” , "Structure #12" from the series Proposal for Habitat for Humankind by Diego Morales-Portillo, Portland, visual arts. , Nubia Monks, Ashland, theater arts. From Oregon Shakespeare Festival’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream (2020).” Photo by Jenny Graham. , Tinamarie Ivey, Corvallis, theater arts. From Oregon Contemporary Theatre’s production of “The Cake.” , Colton Haney, Union, music , Dyana Fiediga, Hood River, visual arts. Photo by Sarah Kathryn Wainwright. , Pius Cheung, Eugene, music , Carlos Calica, Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, multidisciplinary , Feryal Abbasi-Ghnaim, Milwaukie, folk/traditional arts. Photo courtesy of Tatreez and Tea.

DCBS releases national study on workers' compensation costs
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 01/15/21 10:14 AM

Jan. 15, 2021

(Salem) – Oregon’s workers’ compensation rates remain among the lowest in the nation as shown by the 2020 edition of the Oregon workers’ compensation rate ranking study. This reflects the state’s success in making workplaces safer and keeping costs under control.

The biennial study, released today by the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS), ranks all 50 states and Washington, D.C., based on premium rates that were in effect Jan. 1, 2020.

Oregon had the seventh least expensive rates in 2020, a slight drop from its ranking in a tie for the sixth least expensive state in 2018, the last time the study was done. Oregon workers’ compensation rates are declining further – an average of 5.6 percent – in 2021, marking eight straight years of declining premiums. In fact, average rates have fallen 48 percent during the 2013 to 2021 time period. Workers’ compensation pays injured workers for lost wages and medical care for job-related injuries.

“Oregon continues to demonstrate that it’s possible to maintain low employer costs while providing strong benefits,” Oregon Gov. Kate Brown said. “We must remain committed to working together to balance worker health, safety, and benefits with employer rates, and to help workers who are injured heal and return to work quickly.”

The study shows New Jersey had the most expensive rates, followed by New York. Meanwhile, the least expensive rates are those of North Dakota. In the west, California’s rates were the fourth most expensive, while Washington’s rates were the 22nd most expensive and Idaho was the 19th most expensive.

Oregon researchers also compared each state’s rates to the national median (that of the 26th ranked state) rate of $1.44 per $100 of payroll. Oregon’s rate of $1.00 is 69 percent of the median.

In order to have a valid comparison between states that have various mixes of industries, the study calculates rates for each state using the same mix of the 50 industries with the highest workers’ compensation claims costs in Oregon.

A summary of the study was posted today; the full report will be published later this year.

Oregon has conducted these studies in even-numbered years since 1986, when Oregon’s rates were among the highest in the nation. The department reports the results to the Oregon Legislature as a performance measure. Oregon’s relatively low rate today underscores the state’s workers’ compensation system reforms and its focus on workplace safety and health. 

Oregon has long taken a comprehensive approach to making workplaces safer, keeping business costs low, and providing strong worker benefits. This approach includes enforcing requirements that employers carry insurance for their workers, keeping medical costs under control, and helping injured workers return to work sooner and minimize the effect on their wages.

“Through collaboration and hard work, Oregon continues to prove we know how to keep workplaces safe and costs down,” said Andrew Stolfi, DCBS director. “DCBS will keep doing its best to hold costs down for businesses and ensure workers are kept safe and receive the benefits they are due.”

Here are some key links for the study and workers’ compensation costs:
• To read a summary of the study, go to https://www.oregon.gov/dcbs/reports/Documents/general/prem-sum/20-2082.pdf.
• Prior years’ summaries and full reports with details of study methods can be found at https://www.oregon.gov/dcbs/reports/protection/Pages/general-wc-system.aspx  
• Information on workers’ compensation costs in Oregon, including a map with these state rate rankings, is at https://www.oregon.gov/dcbs/cost/Pages/index.aspx

Learn about Oregon’s return-to-work programs, workers’ compensation insurance requirements, and more at https://wcd.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx

Request a no-cost workplace safety or health consultation, and learn about workplace safety and health requirements and resources at https://osha.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx

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The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov.


Statement By U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams on Recent Political Violence
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 01/15/21 9:00 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Billy. J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, released the following statement on recent political violence:

"Like most Americans, I watched in disgust and anger as radical insurrectionists stormed the U.S. Capitol in a shocking display of political violence. There is no question these violent acts were domestic terrorism aimed at disrupting Congress’ Constitutional duty to certify the electoral victory of President-elect Joe Biden. The Justice Department and U.S. Attorney’s Offices throughout the country are working tirelessly to investigate and prosecute all forms of domestic terrorism including this attack on our government, and those responsible will be brought to justice.

As we approach next week’s inauguration, the threat of similar political violence around the country and here in Oregon remains. Our office is working closely with the FBI, Federal Protective Service, Oregon State Police, Portland Police Bureau, and other local, state, and federal law enforcement partners to identify, investigate, and disrupt anyone intent on engaging in violence here in Oregon.

We need the public’s help to keep our communities safe and protect all Oregonians’ First Amendment rights. We urge you to submit any information you have about real or potential threats of violence at any upcoming demonstrations or events throughout the state. Tips can be submitted directly to the FBI by calling (503) 224-4181 or by visiting tips.fbi.gov.”

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Attached Media Files: PDF Statement

Thu. 01/14/21
Two Rivers Correctional Institution reports in-custody death
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 01/14/21 7:16 PM

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody (AIC) died January 14, 2021. He was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution and passed away at a local hospital. He tested positive for COVID-19 and was between 65 and 75 years old. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. Department-wide, this is the twenty-eighth AIC to die who tested positive for COVID-19.

For more information on COVID-19 cases inside Oregon’s prisons, please visit DOC’s COVID-19 website. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 13,000 adults in custody who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state.

Anyone entering DOC property is required to wear a mask or face covering in any indoor work setting or other indoor premises regardless of distance from others unless they are in a private, individual office not shared by anyone else; or they are actively eating or drinking AND at least six (6) feet of distance can be maintained between other people. Masks are mandatory at all times in many work areas.

Institutions continue to clean and disinfect numerous times a day. DOC asks AICs to report symptoms of COVID to medical staff. Posters are in all DOC institutions encouraging individuals to maintain proper hygiene and to uphold appropriate social distancing to the extent possible. Health screening processes are in place before staff are allowed to enter facilities. This screening includes a temperature check and a screening questionnaire. Visiting remains closed until further notice.

DOC has begun administering COVID-19 vaccinations – eventually offering to all DOC staff, contractors, Oregon Corrections Enterprises employees, and adults in custody (AICs). Prioritization of vaccines will be determined by guidance from the Oregon Health Authority (OHA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), and the Governor’s Office.

Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, DOC issued a press release when an AIC passed away. This notification would include the person’s name, county of conviction, sentence length, and date of death. However, no cause of death would be listed because the Medical Examiner makes that determination. In order to balance the desire for transparency with our legal obligation to protect personal health information, we have changed the AIC death notification process when someone dies who has tested positive for COVID-19. DOC is working with the Oregon Health Authority to publish COVID-19 related data and information on the OHA website.

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Public Meeting Notice: Dog Advisory Control Board
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/14/21 7:08 PM

PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE: 

ROSEBURG, Ore. - The Douglas County Dog Advisory Control Board will hold a meeting on Tuesday, January 19, 2021, at 6:00 p.m. at the Douglas County Sheriff's Office (Justice Building - Room 210), located at 1036 SE Douglas Avenue, Roseburg, Oregon 97470.

The agenda meeting agenda can be located at: www.dcso.com/dogboard

Douglas County attempts to provide public accessibility to its services, programs and activities.

Please contact the Sheriff's Office located in Room 210 of the Justice Building at the

Douglas County Courthouse, 1036 SE Douglas Ave. Roseburg, OR 97470

541- 440-4449, at least 48 hours prior to the scheduled meeting time if you need an accommodation.

TDD users please call Oregon Telecommunications Relay Service at 1-800-735-2900.

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Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meets January 21
Oregon Health Authority - 01/14/21 4:29 PM

What: A regular public meeting of the Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board.

When: Jan. 21, 1-4 p.m.

Where: The meeting will be held via free conference line at 971-277-2343, access code 51340644#.

Agenda: After the public comment period, topics will include updates on the charter for meaningful involvement; diversity; supervisor phone trees; the hospital’s COVID-19 response; court findings; and membership.

Details: The Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board advises the superintendent, Oregon Health Authority director, and legislators on issues related to the safety, security and care of patients. Members include consumers, providers, advocates, legislators, community members, consumer families and OSH union members.

For more information, see the board’s website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/osh/Pages/advisory-board.aspx.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jacee Vangestel at 503-945-2852, 711 TTY or jacee.m.vangestel@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon reports 1,152 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 29 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/14/21 3:44 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 29 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 1,737, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,152 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 130,246.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, the Health Authority reported that 16,355 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 10,172 vaccine doses were administered on Jan. 13 and 6,183 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Jan. 13.

Based on updated totals, the Oregon Health Authority announced that vaccination sites across the state met Gov. Kate Brown’s goal of ensuring 12,000 vaccinations a day at the end of last week. Vaccine providers in Oregon administered 12,039 total doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines on Jan. 8, 2021. The Governor required the benchmark to be met by the end of the two-week period that began Jan. 4.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72-hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. The Health Authority has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

“While we hit the Governor’s goal of hitting 12,000 vaccines administered in a day last week,” said OHA Director Patrick Allen, “we want to sustain and expand our daily totals. The state can’t achieve our goal to deliver vaccinations quickly, efficiently and equitably, all on our own. I’m grateful for the hard work that staff in hospitals, local health clinics and other sites have put into ramping up vaccinations for Oregonians. Vaccines are the safest and most effective way we can end this pandemic.”

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 146,137 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. All vaccinations were administered by Oregon hospitals, long-term care facilities, emergency medical service (EMS) agencies, urgent care facilities and Local Public Health Authorities (LPHAs).

To date, 321,425 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 415, which is 19 fewer than yesterday. There are 101 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is two fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

NOTE: Death details are being reviewed and will be posted in an updated version of this press release.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (7), Benton (23), Clackamas (70), Clatsop (11), Columbia (15), Coos (11), Crook (12), Curry (1), Deschutes (82), Douglas (16), Harney (6), Hood River (9), Jackson (75), Jefferson (12), Josephine (18), Klamath (17), Lake (3), Lane (94), Lincoln (2), Linn (23), Malheur (14), Marion (137), Morrow (9), Multnomah (185), Polk (13), Umatilla (60), Union (19), Wasco (14), Washington (162), Wheeler (2) and Yamhill (30). 


Potential protest activity expected at the state capitol in the coming days
Salem Police Dept. - 01/14/21 3:29 PM

Thursday, January 14, 2021

Salem, Ore. — The Salem Police Department and Oregon State Police are aware of potential demonstrations and civil unrest at the Oregon State Capitol this weekend, January 16-17, 2021, and the following week on January 19-20. Information on these events is limited and rapidly evolving. Based on current information, the protest start times vary between 9 a.m. and noon.

“We are well aware of the potential protests being discussed between now and Inauguration Day,” remarked Police Chief Trevor Womack during a presentation at the January 11 meeting of the Salem City Council about the department’s strategic approach to protests and marches in Salem. “We are closely communicating and coordinating with our partners to make sure we are prepared.”

As a reminder, for events that occur at the state capitol, the Oregon State Police (OSP) has jurisdiction and enforcement responsibility. Additionally, OSP issued a statement on Wednesday, January 13 which announced the utilization of the Oregon National Guard to assist with the expected events at the state capitol. The Salem Police Department will work in a support role to OSP and assist as requested and needed.

About the possibility of additional protest-related impacts to the community, Chief Womack added, “We stand ready and equipped to guard our community and will work to minimize any adverse impacts to our neighborhoods and streets.”

To the extent possible, residents are encouraged to avoid the vicinity of the state capitol on the dates mentioned given enforcement activities and disruptions to traffic flow may occur.

Please monitor the Salem Police Department or OSP’s media platforms for any traffic or police advisories.

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Facebook | Twitter | Nextdoor | FlashAlert Newswire | Subscribe to the Salem Community Alert System

Commonly Asked Questions About Protests in Salem


North Bend School District - Budget Committee Members Needed
North Bend Sch. Dist. - 01/14/21 3:09 PM

January 2021

North Bend School District’s Board of Directors is seeking candidates for the District’s Budget Committee.

Interested people should submit a letter of interest by 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, January 28, 2021 to the North Bend School District, Attn: Board of Directors, 1913 Meade Street, North Bend OR 97459 or email letter of interest to info@nbend.k12.or.us

The Board will make the appointments at its Regular Board Meeting scheduled for February 4, 2021.

     To be eligible for appointment, the appointive member must:

          1. Live and be registered to vote in the district;

          2. Not be an officer, agent or employee of the district

 

For further information, please call (541) 751-6797.


SUBJECT INDICTED ON Murder in the 2nd Degree, Burglary in the 1st Degree X4, and Theft in the 1st Degree 20s-02838 (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/14/21 2:42 PM
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01.14.2021 – Lincoln County, Oregon

On January 14, 2021, a Lincoln County Grand Jury indicted 52 year old Waldport resident, Jack E. Sigler, on charges of Murder in the Second Degree, four counts of Burglary in the First Degree and one count of Theft in the First Degree in connection with the death of Mark Campbell on December 6, 2020 in Waldport, Oregon.

On December 6, 2020, Lincoln County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to the report of a burglary in progress at 1680 S. Crestline Drive, Apartment #3, Waldport, Oregon.  Upon arrival, deputies found Mark Campbell unresponsive inside the apartment.  Mr. Campbell was subsequently pronounced deceased at the scene.  The cause of death was determined to be severe trauma received from multiple stab wounds.

The Lincoln County Major Crime Team conducted an extensive investigation into the death of Mark Campbell.  Multiple witnesses were interviewed, physical evidence was gathered from several locations and submitted to the Oregon State Police Crime Lab for forensic analysis. On January 13, 2021, the Oregon State Police Crime Lab completed forensic analysis on physical evidence submitted, a Grand Jury proceeding was scheduled for the following day. The Grand Jury returned with an indictment on the listed charges.


The Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office received assistance in the criminal investigation from the Oregon State Police Criminal Investigation Unit (CID), Oregon State Police Forensics, City of Newport Police Department, City of Lincoln City Police Department and the Lincoln County District Attorney’s Office.

Sheriff Curtis Landers would like to personally thank all the agencies involved in the investigation leading to the indictment in the tragic death of Mark Campbell. Sheriff Landers expresses his sincere condolences to all those affected by this tragedy in our community.

Further information regarding the investigation/prosecution of this case should be directed to the Lincoln County District Attorney’s Office.  

 

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Attached Media Files: 2021-01/5490/141621/News_Release_01.14.2021_(Homocide_Arrest)_(1).doc , 2021-01/5490/141621/Sigler_Jack.png

Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Update - January 14, 2021
Douglas Co. Government - 01/14/21 12:13 PM
DCCRT
DCCRT
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-01/6789/141620/thumb_DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_72020.jpg

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the agencies that make up the DCCRT

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – January 14, 2021

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY UPDATE

 

(Douglas County, Ore.)  Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results: As of 12:00 pm Today, Thursday, January 14, 2021, there are THIRTEEN (13) people with new positive test results and ONE (1) new presumptive to report since our noon case update yesterday.  The total number of cases (people with positive test results and presumptive) in Douglas County is now at 1,636.  Currently, there are ELEVEN (11) Douglas County COVID-19 patients that are being hospitalized, eight locally and three out-of-the-area.  Our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, under the direction of the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, who administer our local public health program and oversee the work by Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, our Douglas County Public Health Officer and Douglas Public Health Network, continue to devote all resources available to our local COVID response.

 

Vaccine Distribution to Local Public Health

Good news today, our Local Public Health has received 500 more COVID-19 vaccines, and they have been distributed to approved local health care providers in Douglas County for immediate vaccination of ELIGIBLE Douglas County residents in accordance with the priority group guidelines and criteria set by the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC) and Oregon Health Authority (OHA).  Right now, we are still working through the identified priority populations in the first group (1a). (Click here for the most up-to-date list of eligible residents).  We ask for your continued patience, as we work through the maze of changes, logistic issues and limited vaccine distribution.  

 

COVID-19 Vaccine: An Issue of Supply and Demand

We wanted to let you know that even though you have heard reports that the CDC and OHA are making changes to the vaccine eligibility guidelines, it does not mean that the vaccine is available for everyone that is eligible in Douglas County at this time.  It is a supply and demand issue, that we have no control over.  While there is demand, and far more people that are eligible to get the vaccine, unfortunately the supply chain of vaccines has not caught up to the demand.  We continue to submit requests to OHA for more vaccines to be sent to Douglas County, so we can move forward with vaccinations for everyone that is eligible. At this time, we have not received enough vaccines to move to the next phase or wave, or to hold a large community event.  DPHN, through our Local Public Health Authority and Administrators, the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, have set up a new email address for questions about COVID-19 vaccines in Douglas County.  The new email is for inquiries from residents, businesses, health care workers, medical offices and volunteers.  DPHN will do their best to respond with the most current information we have, sign up vaccinators and volunteers, and connect those that are eligible for the vaccine with those that have the vaccine, as soon as the vaccine becomes available. New Email for Douglas County COVID-19 Vaccine Questions:  For answers to questions about vaccine eligibility, availability and volunteer opportunities, please email vaccines@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org

 

 

Douglas County, OR - COVID-19 - Case Update

Date

Sunday,

January 10, 2021

Monday,

January 11, 2021

Tuesday,

January 12, 2021

Wednesday,

January 13, 2021

Thursday, January 14, 2021

Total COVID-19 Cases

1,566

1,575

1,596

1,622

1636

People w/ Positive PCR or Antigen Test Results

1,480

1,489

1,510

1,536

1549

Presumptive

86

86

86

86

87

Total Currently Hospitalized

8

8

9

8

11

Total Currently in Isolation

190

172

158

173

164

Total COVID-19 Related Deaths

42

42

42

43

43

Total COVID-19 vaccines distributed to Local Public Health and Total administered to eligible residents

---

---

---

400/400

900/400

Our daily update includes the total number of cases in Douglas County, which combines people with positive test results and presumptives, as well as a breakout of those case numbers. There will be times when a presumptive will move to a positive test result, and our total case number will not change because the case has already been counted. We added a new line to provide an accurate total of the number of vaccines that Local Public Health has received to date, as well as the number we have administered to eligible residents.  Our numbers do NOT include other sites like the Roseburg VA, Mercy Medical Center, EMS, Cow Creek Tribe and local care facilities that received their vaccines directly from the Federal and State Government in order to begin direct vaccinations to the first priority group. 

 

A Message from Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, Our Douglas County Public Health Officer

We are very grateful that two safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines, Pfizer and Moderna, have been approved and have begun to arrive in Douglas County.  The two available vaccines have been purchased by the Federal Government, and have been distributed to Federal Agencies based on identified priority populations, and the remaining vaccines have been sent to State Health Authorities for distribution based on their identified priority populations. 

 

First Round Sent Directly from the Federal Government and their partners:

  • Through the Veterans’ Administration for the Roseburg VA Staff, and eventually patients.
  • To Lower Umpqua Hospital for their staff
  • To Mercy Medical Center for their staff
  • To Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians
  • Through the Federal Pharmacy Partnership for nursing homes, memory-care facilities and other congregate care sites.

 

Second Round Sent from OHA and their partners:

  • To EMS to vaccinate EMS providers and other first responders
  • To Local Public Health to Douglas Public Health Network

 

Just this week, DPHN has signed up several new vaccinators. Vaccinators are local health care providers that are interested in giving out the public health doses of vaccine in our community, and have been approved to do so. As of noon, January 12, a total of 400 doses had been delivered to Douglas Public Health Network, 100% of those vaccines have already been administered.  This vaccine has been shared among our fabulous community providers in Douglas County and has already been given, mostly to urgent care providers. This distribution has been following the current Phase 1a priority populations as set by the CDC and OHA.  These providers include:

  • Aviva
  • South River
  • Umpqua Health Alliance- Newton Creek
  • Nova Urgent Care
  • Several small practices

 

The recent announcement by the federal and state government indicates that there will be a shift in vaccine priorities beginning on January 23, 2021.  However, we do NOT have guidelines or rules on this change yet, so we are continuing with the current prioritization levels until we receive those new rules and guidelines.  We are hopeful that we receive them before January 23. Our focus remains on our most vulnerable populations, including first responders, those who live in nursing homes and health care workers that serve vulnerable populations. We also realize that age is the most potent predictor of bad outcomes, and we desperately want to protect our seniors. We want to distribute vaccine quickly, fairly and in a manner that prioritizes those who are most at risk for serious illness and death from COVID, especially our senior population.  But, we also recognize that eligibility for a vaccine, and availability of the vaccine, are not yet aligned.   We are working diligently with our state health partners to find a remedy for that.  If you want the vaccine, we want you to have it, and are working 24/7 to make that happen.

 

The Vaccine Plan for Douglas County is to continue to follow the priority guidelines, support our partners that are already providing vaccines, continue to expand the number of vaccinators locally and quickly funnel the local public health vaccines we receive to those providing vaccinations for the widest distribution of vaccine across the county.  We are working to have vaccinators all across the county, including in our coastal communities, like Reedsport. We intend to continue to distribute through our community partners, and are looking at the possibility of occasional large scale community events.  As of today, we have not received enough vaccine for any large community events. These large scale events will likely be by invitation only, to ensure that our most vulnerable and priority populations get vaccinated first, followed by other eligible people, hopefully in the very near future.   We expect to add a number of community vaccine providers to the list possibly including your doctor, your clinic and many local pharmacies.  In order to increase access to the vaccines, we are also planning to include new vaccine providers, like dentists!  Our goal would be to have the vaccine available at 30 or more sites scattered through the county, but of course, that depends on getting enough vaccine from the State and Federal government.

 

Right now, Local Public Health, DPHN and our partner vaccinators we are working through the priority populations in group 1A.  If you are in group 1A, please send an e-mail to vaccines@douglaspublichealhtnetwok.org, and we will try to match those who are not yet vaccinated with local vaccine providers, once we receive the vaccines.  When the new rules are finalized, and we start to receive more vaccines, we will begin to systematically offer them to additional eligible populations in an orderly, fair and equitable manner.

 

Reminder: All Douglas County Businesses Have the Ability to Be Open

We announced earlier this week that Douglas County residents and businesses would remain in our current State mandated risk level.  The State of Oregon notified Douglas County Monday, that we would not be moving out of the current level based on our COVID-19 case count over the last two weeks.  Douglas County will remain in the High Risk Level for the next two-week period, beginning Friday, January 15, 2012, and continuing through Thursday, January 28, 2021. This risk level allows ALL of our local business the opportunity to be OPEN, with some limitations on capacity. We want to continue to thank our residents and businesses for staying within the recommended guidelines, and for making good decisions in order for our communities to continue to stay open.  The new risk level does not affect the ability of faith based organizations and local school districts to offer in-person services and classes.  They are able to make decisions for their own congregations and educational programs. 

 

Reminder

We will continue to encourage everyone, for the sake of our local businesses, services and residents, to gauge your risk level, and make the best choice in order protect yourself and those around you.  We have provided education on the widely proven COVID-19 safety measures, and encourage you to limit your contact with others not from your household, stay home if you are sick and wear face coverings where recommended.  We know how important family and faith are to you, so we ask that you consider all options available in order to eliminate and minimize the spread of the COVID-19 virus in our communities in order to help protect the ones you love, the businesses you love and the places you love to go.

Local Cases Being Supported in Isolation and Quarantine

Currently, DPHN is supporting 164 cases in isolation, as well as another 304 contacts in quarantine in Douglas County. Isolation is recommended for confirmed and presumptive cases, quarantine is recommended for contacts of confirmed or presumptive cases.  Currently, staff is supporting an astounding 468 total contacts and cases in isolation or quarantine.  This number represents a snapshot of the significant amount of work being done locally to help control the spread of COVID-19.

 

COVID-19 Vaccine in Oregon

We understand that our residents have many questions, so do we.  Like you, we are patiently awaiting more vaccines and more information.  If you have questions or need more information about the COVID-19 vaccine in Oregon, check out the resources listed below.  In the meantime, we ask that you be patient and continue to follow the well documented recommendations for COVID health and safety. 

 

 

Oregon COVID-19 Information

OHA reports new cases daily on their website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.  OHA reports include presumptive COVID-19 cases in their total case numbers.  The DCCRT separates the number of people with new positive test results and new presumptives, and uses OHA’s definition of presumptive as those having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR or antigen test for COVID-19.  DPHN performs their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who test positive, as well as those that may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive while advising and supporting quarantine and isolation.  OHA has chosen to no longer report negative test results or recovered cases, so we will no longer be reporting this data in our daily update.  Please contact the OHA directly for more information.

 

Facebook Live with Dr. Bob

Join us Friday, January 15, 2021 at 4:00 pm for the next Facebook Live with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, the Douglas County Public Health Officer. The show is hosted by DPHN on the DPHN Facebook pageResidents are encouraged to submit their questions during the live show or can email questions to: ookquestions@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org">Facebookquestions@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Dr. Bob and the DPHN team will do their best to respond to as many questions as they can during the live shows.

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Hotline (541) 464-6550

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners and DPHN continue to offer a local resource hotline for Douglas County residents for COVID-19.  The hotline provides answer to frequently asked questions, basic information and referrals to resources and services.  The Hotline is staffed from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.

 

ACCESS ACCURATE, LOCAL COVID-19 INFORMATION

Stay up to date with accurate and local COVID-19 information in Douglas County on the Douglas County Government website or Douglas County Facebook page and the DPHN website or DPHN Facebook page.  Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer, DPHN and the DCCRT have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020. 

 

ACCESS STATE COVID-19 INFORMATION

To access information on the State of Oregon and Federal COVID-19 response go to Oregon Health Authority, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and 211Info.  If you have questions or need more information on statewide guidelines or risk levels, go to the State’s Building a Safe and Strong Oregon website or the Governor’s COVID-19 website or call the Business Oregon's Navigator Hotline at (833) 604-0880.  Please do not call 911, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office or Douglas County Offices to report compliance issues with the State of Oregon, OHA or Governor’s orders.  The Governor has directed the State offices for Oregon Occupational Safety and Health (OSHA) and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) to be the enforcement agencies responsible for ensuring restaurants, bars, and other businesses comply with COVID-related guidelines.  To report compliance issues contact them directly OSHA: (800) 922-2689 or OSHA website or OLCC (503) 872-5000 or OLCC website

 

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Contact Tamara Howell, Public Information Officer, Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, (541) 670-2804 cell (541) 957-4896 tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us   

Contact Vanessa Becker, Public Information Officer, Douglas Public Health Network, (541) 817-6552 cell (541) 440-3571 vanessa@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org




Attached Media Files: DCCRT

Oregon wildfire recovery debris removal begins with hazard trees
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 01/14/21 10:30 AM
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SALEM – Crews around the state are beginning to clear roads and private properties of trees damaged in September’s wildfires.

The tree clearing is part of the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Debris Management Task Force’s effort to provide cleanup for homes and businesses in the eight affected counties – Clackamas, Douglas, Jackson, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn and Marion. The work paves the way for rebuilding efforts, community recovery and helps revitalize Oregon’s economy.

Before crews begin clearing hazard trees from private property, they will clear remaining logs and debris from roadsides. Drivers in fire-affected areas should keep an eye out for crews and be prepared to stop.

State contractors are marking trees for removal with blue dot and a barcode tracking tag. Many other entities, including utilities and private companies, continue with their own tree removal operations and have their own markings.

On private property, dead or dying trees will be removed if they pose a threat to the safety of cleanup crew or public right of ways. Ash and structural debris removal will soon follow, including concrete and other household and construction materials, from private homes and businesses. A list of what is included in cleanup is available.

Hazard trees and ash and debris cleanup are the focus of Step 2 of the cleanup, and includes homes, mobile home parks, second homes, businesses and other structures. Step 1 involved removal of hazardous household waste and was completed in December.

Home and business owners must sign an All Wildfire Debris Right of Entry Form with their county to allow cleanup crews onto their property. Visit https://wildfire.oregon.gov/ or call 503-934-1700 to submit your form and for more information. Even those who did not join in Step 1 of the cleanup may still opt into the program.

Participating property owners also need to complete a questionnaire about their property, to help with planning and ensure an efficient, safe removal of debris.

The contractors

As the task force’s contract manager, the Oregon Department of Transportation is awarding three types of contracts for Step 2: hazard tree removal, debris and ash removal, and monitoring.

Given the large geographic area and volume of work, ODOT awarded the hazard tree, and ash and debris removal contracts over multiple operational areas and not as a single statewide contract.

A separate company is monitoring the cleanup work, environmental testing, and document completion of Step 2 property by property. The Federal Emergency Management Agency requires an independent company to perform monitoring work. This firm will monitor contractors removing hazard trees, ash, and debris to ensure cleanup and safety protocols and proper accounting. FEMA requires monitoring to control costs, reduce waste, and help eliminate fraud.

ODOT has awarded the following contracts:

Monitoring (1)

CDR Maguire Emergency Management

  • Based in Florida 
  • Contract: $75.5 million
  • Awarded Nov. 19, 2020

Hazard Tree Removal (3)

Ceres Disaster Recovery – Disaster Recovery – Ceres Environmental

  • Based in Florida
  • Contracts awarded Nov. 25, 2020
    Archie Creek Fire, OR 138, $25.78 million
    Thielson Fire, OR 138, $2.07 million
    Two Four Two Fire, U.S. 97, $1.91 million

ECC – https://www.ecc.net/ecc/

  • Based in California
  • Contracts awarded: Nov. 30, 2020
    Beachie Creek / Lionshead Fire, OR 22, $17.18 million
    Riverside Fire, OR 224, $71.63 million

Suulutaaq Inc. – suulutaq.com

  • Based in Alaska, with an operations office in Eugene
  • Contract awarded Nov. 30, 2020
    Holiday Farm Fire, OR 126, $22.94 million

A video describing the OR 126 Holiday Farm Fire hazard tree removal work is available.

Ash and debris removal contracts have been awarded and that work also begins later this month.

Oregon’s 2020 Labor Day fires constitute the largest and most expensive disaster in our state’s history, burning over 1 million acres and destroying over 5,000 structures.

Initial estimates put the debris cleanup from the September 2020 Oregon wildfires at over $600 million, including $326 million for ash and debris removal and $295 million to remove hazard trees.

More information

Wildfire cleanup webpage: https://wildfire.oregon.gov/cleanup 
Wildfire debris cleanup hotline: 503-934-1700 or e@odot.state.or.us">odot.wildfire@odot.state.or.us
Highway travel conditions: TripCheck.com 

Oregon’s Debris Management Task Force, which includes the Oregon Office of Emergency Management, Oregon Department of Transportation, and Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, is coordinating federal, state, and local government agencies to clean up debris from the 2020 Oregon wildfires.

You can get this document in other languages, large print, braille or a format you prefer. Contact David Cardona, OEM Language Access Coordinator at 971-719-1183 or email dona@state.or.us">david.cardona@state.or.us. We accept all relay calls or you can dial 711.

 




Attached Media Files: 2021-01/3986/141617/Hwy_126_log_deck.jpg , 2021-01/3986/141617/Wildfire_TreeBarCode.jpg , 2021-01/3986/141617/OR_22_bluedot_markings_web.JPG

Anglers remove more than 100,000 predators from river system during the pandemic
Bonneville Power Administration - 01/14/21 9:46 AM

Portland, Ore. – The Bonneville Power Administration and its partners report that in 2020, for the 23rd consecutive season, the Northern Pikeminnow Sport Reward Program met its annual goal to remove 10% to 20% of pikeminnow, 9 inches or longer, in the Columbia and Snake rivers that prey on juvenile salmon and steelhead.

  • Fish removed                              103,114
  • Registered anglers                     2,450
  • Average angler catch                 6.5 fish/day
  • Total paid to anglers                 $839,461
  • Top angler
    • Fish removed                     5,579
    • Total earnings                  $48,501

The program, funded by BPA and administered by Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission and the states of Oregon and Washington, has run for 30 years, typically from May 1 through Sept. 30. In response to the COVID-19 outbreak last spring, governors in Washington and Oregon closed or limited fishing in some areas and curtailed access to some boat ramps. Those facilities were reopened later in May and the sport reward program began 11 days later than usual. To help make up for the delayed start, the season was extended to Oct. 11, 2020. 

“The COVID-19 pandemic presented some unique challenges for implementing a sport-reward fishery that relies on recreational angler participation,” said Eric Winther, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Columbia River Predator Control Program project leader. “We realized in the spring that circumstances would require some flexibility in how we operated the registration stations and that many of our return anglers might have to rethink their own recreation plans. All things considered, despite the late start to the season, anglers were able to spend a full five-month season on the rivers and remove thousands of pikeminnow for the program.”

When the season opened May 11, registered anglers again had the opportunity to make $5 to $8 for each northern pikeminnow at least 9 inches long, and specially tagged northern pikeminnow were worth $500. Program managers temporarily increased the reward to a flat $10 per fish late in the season to spur angler participation – which was a bit lower than normal due to the pandemic – and to take advantage of favorable river conditions during the season’s 11-day extension in October. However, the program will resume its pre-pandemic bounties when the northern pikeminnow season kicks off again in spring of 2021.

The goal of the sport reward fishing program is to reduce the number of larger northern pikeminnow in the Columbia and Snake rivers. Since 1990, anglers paid through the program have removed more than 5.2 million predatory pikeminnow.

“Northern pikeminnow is a native species that eats millions of juvenile salmon and steelhead each year in the Columbia and Snake river systems,” says Eric McOmie, BPA program manager. “When we remove the larger northern pikeminnow, more young salmon and steelhead have a better chance of making it to the ocean and eventually returning to the basin as adults.”

Biologists estimate that the program has reduced predation on young salmon and steelhead by up to 40% from pre-program levels.

The 2021 season is expected to operate from May 1 through Sept. 30, 2021. For more information about the program, call 800-858-9015 or visit www.pikeminnow.org.

About BPA

The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale, carbon-free hydropower from 31 federal dams in the Columbia River Basin. It also markets the output of the region’s only nuclear plant. BPA delivers this power to more than 140 Northwest electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA also owns and operates more than 15,000 circuit miles of high-voltage power lines and 261 substations, and provides transmission service to more than 300 customers. In all, BPA provides nearly a third of the power generated in the Northwest. To mitigate the impacts of the federal dams, BPA implements a fish and wildlife program that includes working with its partners to make the federal dams safer for fish passage. It also pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain safe, affordable, reliable electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov  

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Conference of Local Health Officials meets January 21 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 01/14/21 9:46 AM

Jan. 14, 2021

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139 PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Conference of Local Health Officials meets January 21 via Zoom

What: The monthly public meeting of the Conference of Local Health Officials (CLHO). 

Agenda:  Communicable disease investigation prioritization; Vaccine Advisory Committee update; COVID-19 Funding; COVID-19 response.

Agenda is subject to change and is posted with meeting materials on the CLHO website at http://www.oregonclho.org/ prior to meeting.

There is no public comment period during this meeting.

When: Thursday, January 21, 9:30-11:00 a.m.

Where: Via Zoom meeting.  All attendees MUST register at

https://www.zoomgov.com/meeting/register/vJIscO2orjosHBpyhZBk_uqQhBEu4yIU5j0

Background: The Conference of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the foundational capabilities and programs and any other public health program or activity under ORS 431.147. (ORS 431.340)

Program contact: Danna Drum, 503-957-8869, um@state.or.us">danna.k.drum@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Danna Drum at 503-957-8869, 711 TTY or um@state.or.us">danna.k.drum@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Public Health Advisory Board meets on Jan. 21
Oregon Health Authority - 01/14/21 9:42 AM

Jan.14, 2021

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board meets on Jan. 21

What: The Public Health Advisory Board will hold a meeting.

Agenda: Approve November meeting minutes; discuss nominations for chair position; review 2021 subcommittee objectives; hear update on COVID-19 response.

When: Thursday, Jan. 21, 2-3:30 p.m. The meeting is open to the public. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Zoom conference call: (669) 254-5252; meeting ID: 160 932 6045.

Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Cara Biddlecom: at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY, or a.m.biddlecom@state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Lane County Public Health COVID-19 January 14th Case Update: Live Virtual Press Conference at 10:30
Lane Co. Government - 01/14/21 9:41 AM

Lane County Public Health (LCPH) was notified of at least 61 additional positive cases of COVID-19 and two deaths.This makes a total of  ?eight thousand  and fifty two cases. 

New Vaccine Email Update Sign-Up Available On Lane County COVID-19  Website

8,052 (+61) total cases-  Note that this includes confirmed and presumptive.

Of our cases (confirmed and presumptive): 

Hospitalized: 32 (-1)

·ICU: 9 (of the 32)

Deaths: 107 (+2)

Infectious: 415 (-42)

Persons Under Monitoring: 594 (+17)

Individuals having received at least the first dose of vaccine: 8,556

 

Testing: OHA is now excluding negative labs from Opera in an effort to improve performance. This includes historic negative labs. 

Data regarding Lane County testing, patient status, case ZIP codes and more is available at www.LaneCountyOR.gov/localdata

The State of Oregon has created a COVID-19 web page with resources at http://coronavirus.oregon.gov.

High Risk Individuals who had contact with these community members will be contacted by Lane County Public Health so they can work with their health care providers on next steps. Communicable disease investigations are underway. If a public contact exposure point is identified, that information will be shared with the public.

 

Presumptive cases are people without a positive PCR test who have COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. Though not confirmed by a positive diagnostic test, presumptive cases have a high likelihood of having COVID-19 because of the specific nature of the symptoms and known exposure.

 


All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group to meet January 20
Oregon Health Authority - 01/14/21 9:38 AM

Jan. 14, 2021

Contact: Philip Schmidt, 503-360-7435, philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us  (media inquiries)

Brian Toups, 503-385-6542rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group to meet January 20

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group.

When: January 20, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Where: The All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group Jan. 20 meeting will be by webinar and conference line only.

The public may join remotely through a webinar and conference line:

Agenda: General updates: APAC Vendor Transition; Consolidated Appropriation Act, 2021 AKA COVID-19 Relief bill; Oregon 2021 legislative session; APAC 2021 goals; Public Comment; adjourn

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/All-Payer-All-Claims-TAG.aspx.  

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brian Toups at, 503-385-6542, 711 TTY, rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Statement by FBI Special Agent in Charge Renn Cannon on Potential Violence in Oregon
FBI - Oregon - 01/14/21 9:31 AM

The FBI’s Portland Field Office, working with the Oregon State Police, the Salem Police Department, the Portland Police Bureau, and all of our other local, state, and federal partners, is preparing for any potential violent activity related to the recent unrest in Washington, D.C. and elsewhere.

Given the unrest at the United States Capitol on January 6, 2021, we are maintaining a heightened posture to monitor for any emerging threats to our region. We are focused on identifying, investigating, and disrupting individuals who were involved in the siege of the U.S. Capitol and/or those who may continue to incite violence and engage in criminal activity here locally. 

To that end, the FBI in Oregon is running a command post to gather intelligence and coordinate with our law enforcement partners on potential threats. We also have special agents, bomb technicians, the FBI Evidence Response Team, tactical teams, intelligence teams, and others to support investigations and counter any potential threat of violence to the state capitol, federal buildings, and our shared community. 

We need the public’s help to protect our state and the rights of peaceful protesters. We are urging people in Oregon to call us at (503) 224-4181 or go to tips.fbi.gov to submit information regarding any potential violence at any upcoming protest or event. You can also call 1 (800) CALL-FBI. If you know of an immediate emergency, call 911. 

We cannot be successful without the help of the American people as work to fulfill our mission: protect the American people and uphold the U.S. Constitution. 

### 


DPSST Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 01/14/21 9:28 AM

For Immediate Release                                        

January 14, 2021

Contact:    Mona Riesterer
                 (503) 378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Telecommunication Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting on February 3, 2021 at 9:00 a.m. in the Governor Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Mona Riesterer at (503) 378-2431.

The Telecommunication Policy meeting will be live streamed on the DPSST Facebook page @ https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon

Agenda Items:

1.  Introductions

2.  Approve Minutes of November 4, 2020

3.  Administrative Closures

      Linsay Hale

4.  Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-008-0015, 259-008-0290, 259-008-0300 and 259-008-0310; Moral Fitness Standards Relating to Discrimination – Review of Comments

      Presented by Jennifer Howald

5.   Staff Update

6.   Next Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting May 5, 2021 @ 9:00 a.m.

                                                        Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Telecommunication Policy members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Long-term disaster recovery manager selected for Holiday Farm Fire (Photo)
Lane Co. Government - 01/14/21 8:30 AM
Matt McRae
Matt McRae
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-01/6775/141585/thumb_McRae_Matt_02.jpg

Matt McRae has been selected as the long-term disaster recovery manager by Lane County. McRae will lead long-term recovery efforts along the McKenzie Corridor as residents and businesses work to rebuild following the Holiday Farm Fire. He will start on January 25, 2021.

 

"As a native of Oregon, I have a deep love of the McKenzie River Valley and it is a real privilege to be selected to serve our community in this role," said McRae.

 

The long-term disaster recovery manager is a two-year position and is responsible for planning and coordinating fire recovery activities and projects; collaborating with partners in the government, private, and non-profit sectors; and preparing and delivering reports and making recommendations in accordance with FEMA disaster recovery guidelines.

 

McRae has demonstrated skill in bringing large, diverse groups together to work toward a common goal, strong communication skills, and a passion for serving the community.

 

McRae brings previous experience in emergency planning and hazard mitigation. Most recently, he served as the climate policy strategist for Our Children’s Trust. Prior to this work, he served at the City of Eugene for 13 years in several positions including as the project manager for the Eugene/Springfield Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan where he led the City’s first Climate and Hazards Vulnerability Assessment, as a climate policy analyst where he led the development of the City’s first Climate Action Plan, and as a volunteer coordinator where he led the City’s Stream Team and the Community Gardens Program.

 

McRae holds a bachelor’s of science in environmental studies from Utah State University.

 

 

###




Attached Media Files: Matt McRae

Medicare Advantage open enrollment available until March 31 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 01/14/21 8:28 AM
SHIBA logo
SHIBA logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-01/1073/141596/thumb_shiba_logo.jpg

(Salem) – Jan. 1 marked the beginning of the 2021 Medicare Advantage open enrollment period for Medicare beneficiaries with an existing Medicare Advantage plan. Beneficiaries who take advantage of this open enrollment period will have coverage that starts the first day of the month after the enrollment action.

Before March 31, beneficiaries who already have a Medicare Advantage plan can:

  • Change to a different Medicare Advantage plan, either with or without drug coverage.
  • Enroll in a stand-alone Part D (prescription drug) plan, which returns the beneficiary to Original Medicare.

“This is a helpful time period for beneficiaries that are not satisfied with the new Medicare Advantage plan they chose for 2021 or for beneficiaries currently enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan, but who missed the annual Dec. 7 deadline to compare and change plans,” said Lisa Emerson, program analyst for the Senior Health Insurance Benefits Assistance (SHIBA) program.

Beneficiaries can make only one change during this enrollment period and cannot change from one stand-alone Part D prescription drug plan to another stand-alone Part D prescription drug plan.

Other enrollment opportunities if someone missed the Dec. 7 deadline:

  • Oregonians have one five-star plan through Kaiser Permanente that will accept enrollments at any time throughout the year.
  • Anyone affected by COVID-19 or Oregon’s wildfires may still have time to enroll in a plan under a four-month special enrollment period, which begins the date affected. There are other guidelines to qualify.
  • Anyone affected by nonrenewing plans (e.g., Moda Med-Advantage) still has time to choose a plan.

Oregon’s SHIBA program is available to help beneficiaries understand their options. To find free, local Medicare counseling help, go to dcbspage.org/SHIBALOCAL or call 800-722-4134 (toll-free) to speak to a state-certified Medicare counselor.

SHIBA counselors can help Oregonians navigate the Medicare.gov Plan Finder tool to enter prescriptions and compare the cost and benefits of individual drug plans, provide enrollment guidance, and answer any other questions related to Medicare benefits. All of these services are available remotely statewide to ensure the safety of both clients and counselors.

###

Oregon’s Senior Health Insurance Benefits Assistance (SHIBA) program is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS), Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter: twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on insurance, mortgages, investments, workplace safety, and more.




Attached Media Files: SHIBA logo

Tip of The Week for January 18, 2021 - Tie It Down
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/14/21 6:50 AM
2021-01/5490/141606/Tie_It_Down.PNG
2021-01/5490/141606/Tie_It_Down.PNG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-01/5490/141606/thumb_Tie_It_Down.PNG

  TIP OF THE WEEK

 

Date:  January 14, 2021              FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:     Sheriff Curtis Landers

                   541-265-0654

                   s@co.lincoln.or.us">lcsheriff@co.lincoln.or.us

 

Tie It Down

Thinking of making that annual or semi-annual trip to the dump? Ridding your home of unwanted items and trash is a great way to keep it a healthy, safe, and clutter-free place.

Remember also, that we want to keep our environment and fellow motorists healthy and safe. So, take a moment to inspect your cargo. Are there any light, loose items that can scatter and become unsightly litter or pollution along the roadway?  Or worse, unsecured larger items that may fall out and cause another drive to swerve or crash?

The National Sheriffs' Association Traffic Safety Committee likes to keep awareness of the problem with unsecured loads.  Research by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety estimates that road debris played a role in more than 50,000 crashes each year in a four-year period. These resulted in over 9,800 injuries and approximately 125 deaths.

To be secured, loads should be:

  • Tied down with rope, netting or straps
  • Tied directly to the vehicle or trailer
  • Covered entirely with a sturdy tarp or netting
  • NOT overloaded
  • Packed with lighter weight items at the bottom and evenly distributed to prevent them from sliding.

 

For more information and tips please visit our website at: www.lincolncountysheriff.net and like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.




Attached Media Files: 2021-01/5490/141606/011421_Tie_It_Down.pdf , 2021-01/5490/141606/Tie_It_Down.PNG

Wed. 01/13/21
*Updated* Oregon reports 1,346 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 41 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/13/21 7:58 PM

Oregon reports 1,346 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 41 new deaths

January 13, 2021

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 41 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 1,708, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,346 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 129,109.

Note: A human error resulted in the loss of a small number of reports submitted through the online portal from 6:45 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. on Jan. 13.

OHA does not know what types of reports were lost (lab reports, REALD reports or MIS-C reports). Based on recent reporting volume, we estimate that these results were likely negative or pending lab results and that no more than 20 would have been received during the time of the error. We are reaching out to all parties who recently submitted reports through the online portal to request that anyone who submitted from 6:45 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. on Jan. 13 to resubmit those results.

OHA will continue to review and assess the process.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, 14,722 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 9,071 vaccine doses were administered on Jan. 12 and 5,651 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Jan. 12.

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 129,782 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. All vaccinations were administered by Oregon hospitals, long-term care facilities, emergency medical service (EMS) agencies, urgent care facilities and Local Public Health Authorities (LPHAs).

To date, 321,225 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 434, which is 31 more than yesterday. There are 103 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is 10 more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Weekly COVID-19 cases increase, deaths surge

OHA’s COVID-19 Weekly Report was released today and showed sharp increases in daily cases and positive tests.

OHA reported 8,150 new daily cases during the week of Monday, Jan. 4 through Sunday, Jan. 10, a 3% increase over the previous week.

There were 357 persons hospitalized for COVID-19.

COVID-19 related deaths surged to 177, up from 73 the previous week.

There were 113,648 tests for COVID-19 for the week of Jan. 3 through Jan. 9. The percentage of positive tests increased to 8.2%.

People age 20 to 49 have accounted for 55% of COVID-19 cases, while people 70 and older have accounted for 77% of deaths associated with the virus.

Today’s COVID-19 outbreak report shows 202 active COVID-19 outbreaks in senior living communities and congregate living settings, with three or more confirmed cases or one or more COVID-19 related deaths.

Cases and deaths

The new cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (16), Benton (29), Clackamas (105), Clatsop (10), Columbia (13), Coos (9), Crook (19), Deschutes (89), Douglas (25), Gilliam (1), Grant (8), Harney (2), Hood river (6), Jackson (58), Jefferson (23), Josephine (64), Klamath (32), Lake (2), Lane (98), Lincoln (3), Linn (50), Malheur (24), Marion (97), Morrow (9), Multnomah (307), Polk (28), Tillamook (11), Umatilla (52), Union (7), Wasco (13), Washington (110) and Yamhill (26).

“Every death from COVID-19 is a loss for friends and families,” said Dr. Bukhosi Dube, senior health advisor with the Oregon Health Authority’s Public Health Division. “Today's reported death of a 19-year-old, who had underlying conditions shows, again, that because a person may be younger than the most at-risk groups, they may still suffer life-threatening consequences from the virus.”

While older people are at higher risk of having more severe outcomes, including hospitalizations and death, COVID-19 has led to hospitalizations of persons under the age of 40. State data show that about 5% of patients who have been hospitalized for their illness were between the ages of 10 to 39 years old. In Oregon, this is the fourth COVID-19 related death in individuals younger than 30 since the beginning of the pandemic.

As of Jan. 13, 103 persons between the ages of 10 and 19 have been hospitalized with COVID-19 in Oregon.

Oregon’s 1,668th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Dec. 8 and died on Dec. 25 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,669th COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Jan. 9 and died on Jan. 10 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,670th COVID-19 death is a 98-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Dec. 2 and died on Dec. 8 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,671st COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old man in Columbia County who tested positive on Nov. 12 and died on Dec. 12 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,672nd COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old woman in Crook County who became symptomatic on Jan. 1 and died on Jan. 8 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,673rd COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Curry County who died on Dec. 20 at Curry General Hospital. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,674th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old woman in Douglas County who tested positive on Nov. 21 and died on Jan. 4 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,675th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Dec. 10 and died on Jan. 11 at Providence Medford Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,676th COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old woman in Jefferson County who tested positive on Dec. 28 and died on Jan. 10 at St. Charles Medical Center—Bend. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,677th COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Dec. 10 and died on Dec. 19 at McKenzie Willamette Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,678th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Jan. 2 and died on Jan. 10 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart—Riverbend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,679th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 16 and died on Dec. 3 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,680th COVID-19 death is a 19-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 19 and died on Dec. 6 at Oregon Health Science University. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,681st COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 25 and died on Jan. 2 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,682nd COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old woman in Benton County who tested positive on Dec. 14 and died on Jan. 1 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,683rd COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 16 and died on Nov.  30 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,684th COVID-19 death is a 64-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 23 and died on Nov. 22 at Portland VA Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,685th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 23 and died on Dec. 5 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,686th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 24 and died on Dec. 7 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,687th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 27 and died on Dec. 11 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,688th COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 2 and died on Dec. 15 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,689th COVID-19 death is a 50-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 6 and died on Dec. 15 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,690th COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 10 and died on Dec. 20 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,691st COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 11 and died on Dec. 20 at Providence Portland Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,692nd COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 16 and died on Dec. 19 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,693rd COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Multnomah County who died on Dec. 26 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,694th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 28 and died on Dec. 19 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,695th COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old man in Polk County who tested positive on Dec. 11 and died on Jan. 1 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,696th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old woman in Polk County who tested positive on Dec. 23 and died on Jan. 4 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,697th COVID-19 death is a 58-year-old woman in Polk County who tested positive on Dec. 28 and died on Jan. 9 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,698th COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on Dec. 27 and died on Jan. 1 at Good Shepherd Community Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,699th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on Dec. 28 and died on Jan. 6 at Kadlec Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,700th COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on Dec. 30 and died on Jan. 10 at Kadlec Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,701st COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 3 and died on Dec. 11 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,702nd COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 12 and died on Jan. 2 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,703rd COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 9 and died on Dec. 22 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,704th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 24 and died on Jan. 7 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,705th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 30 and died on Jan. 4 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,706th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Dec. 4 and died on Dec. 17 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,707th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Jan. 4 and died on Jan. 8 at Willamette Valley Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,708th COVID-19 death is a 27-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 18 and died on Nov. 27 at Oregon Health Science University. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution and other useful information.


01-13-21 Statement from the Douglas County District Attorney
Douglas Co. Government - 01/13/21 5:02 PM

OFFICE OF THE DOUGLAS COUNTY DISTRICT ATTORNEY

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

January 13, 2021

 

Statement from the Douglas County District Attorney

 

I feel compelled to respond, as other elected officials have, to the activities of a group calling themselves, Citizens Against Tyranny. 

 

It is my understanding that Citizens Against Tyranny, through means of intimidation, want all elected officials in Douglas County to sign in support of their declaration.  The declaration invites public shaming and banning of individual citizens from merchants and services in the county.  The declaration calls for shamming and banning of officials and private citizens who do not support the declaration.  The declaration states that such individuals “will be publicly known”.  I have already seen in the news that two women were placed on such a “list” and endured such attempted shaming.

 

This kind of response to the COVID-19 crisis, its impact on the health of our community and individual financial difficulties, is not the answer.  Our Board of Commissioners have and continue to carefully walk a path to balance those competing crises and have exemplified a balanced response to the issue.

 

I will not participate in or sign on to the Citizens Against Tyranny’s ill-intended approach to this difficult issue.   Public shamming and banning of certain “listed” Douglas County citizens is offensive to our democracy and the due process of law. It’s simply not who we are in Douglas County.

 

 

Sincerely,

Rick Wesenberg

 

###




Attached Media Files: 2021-01/6789/141603/01-13-21_Statement_from_the_Douglas_County_District_Attorney.pdf

Oregon State Police Investigating Construction Flagger that was Struck - Clackamas County
Oregon State Police - 01/13/21 4:57 PM

On Wednesday, January 13, 2021, at approximately 10:45 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a vehicle incident on Hwy 26 near milepost 32.

Preliminary investigation revealed that Portland General Electric (PGE) employees were repairing damaged power lines on the north side of Hwy 26.  A PGE truck, operated by Joshua Rinard (41) of Sandy, was being repositioned when it backed into, Brenda Stader (50) of Portland, who was working as a flagger to assist with traffic control. 

PGE was utilizing flaggers contracted through Northwest Traffic Control.

Stader sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by the Sandy Fire Department and ODOT


Healthcare Partners Team-Up To Vaccinate Groups 2-3
Lane Co. Government - 01/13/21 4:39 PM

Lane County Public Health (LCPH) has the unique task of helping to vaccinate those serving some of our most vulnerable community members in groups 2 and 3 under the Phase 1a guidance from Oregon Health Authority (OHA) while our hospital partners, EMS, and clinical partners focus on groups 1-4. As of Monday, January 11, planning was in place to hold mass vaccination clinics to accomplish this effort, but following OHA’s allocation to LCPH of only 100 doses, those plans were in danger of being canceled. Thanks to the generosity and partnership of McKenzie-Willamette Medical Center and Nova Health, that work will be accomplished.

“This is yet another example of how the partnerships between Lane County and our provider community benefit our entire community,” said Lane County Senior Public Health Officer, Dr. Patrick Luedtke.

To that end, MCKW was willing to contribute 975 doses of the Pfizer vaccine and Nova Health was able to contribute 500 doses of the Moderna vaccine. These vaccines will be distributed at two mass vaccination clinics administered by LCPH this weekend.

“Helping our community receive vaccinations is essential to the slowing of this virus, and McKenzie-Willamette Medical Center is thankful for the opportunity to do so,” said McKenzie-Willamette Medical Center CEO David Elgarico.

“It’s a privilege to share the COVID-19 vaccines with our community partners, its imperative that we all work together to vaccinate as many people as quickly as possible” said Nova Health CEO Jim Ashby

Lane County is prioritizing organizations and individuals in groups 2-3 based on risk level with an emphasis on equity. Invitations will be issued directly to those able to be vaccinated via established communication channels. Additional clinics for groups 2-3 will be forthcoming.
###


01-13-2021 AOCC - Northern Spotted Owl Critical Habitat Exclusion Final Rule Response
Douglas Co. Government - 01/13/21 4:32 PM
AOCC
AOCC
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-01/6789/141599/thumb_logo-main.png

The Association of O&C Counties (AOCC)

For your consideration, we are sharing a press release from the Association of Oregon and California Counties, of which Douglas County Commissioner Tim Freeman is the current President. 

PRESS RELEASE
January 13, 2021

The Association of O&C Counties (AOCC) today expressed strong support for the recently announced decision of the US Fish & Wildlife Service to exclude all O&C lands from the 9.5 million acres previously designated by that agency as "critical habitat" for the Northern Spotted Owl.

"This is a result AOCC has been seeking for a long time and we are pleased the agency finally agreed with us," said Tim Freeman, a Commissioner of Douglas County who is also President of AOCC.

The O&C lands are required by federal law to be managed by the BLM for sustained yield timber production. The 18 Counties with O&C lands in them are entitled to 50 percent of the proceeds from the sale of timber from the lands, with the remaining 50 percent returned to the U.S. Treasury. Counties have relied on their share of harvest receipts to provide essential public services since 1937. AOCC has argued since 2012 that designation as critical habitat interferes with sustained yield management as required by law.

"NSO habitat will be maintained and even increased through sustained yield management on the O&C lands," said Rocky Mc Vay, AOCC's executive Director. "A new management plan will be prepared in the near future and serve as a fresh model for how to support the needs of the NSO. This is an opportunity to demonstrate how sustained yield management can provide both economic as well as environmental benefits," said Mc Vay.

AOCC has long espoused sustained yield management as a means of achieving a full array benefits from these valuable forestlands.  Removing the redundant and unnecessary "critical habitat" label will allow focus on how sustained yield strategies can maintain and increase NSO habitat. As three examples: (1) Sustained yield strategies that employ extended cycles between harvest can provide substantial amounts of high-quality habitat over time. (2) Most of the existing high-quality spotted owl habitat on the O&C lands is fragmented. Sustained yield strategies can help overcome this fragmentation by designating older forest emphasis areas that improve habitat quality and concentration over time. (3) Much of the O&C lands are in fire-prone condition with existing high-quality habitat at risk due to high fuel loads. Management to improve fire resiliency while producing timber is a cost-effective method for maintaining and improving high quality habitat over time.

"A new BLM plan offers an opportunity to go beyond inflexible land use designations to recognize how sustained yield management can simultaneously improve habitat levels at the landscape scale and reduce losses from wildfire, all while producing timber and revenue needed by communities and the nation," commented Mc Vay.

For the outline of one of many possible sustained yield management scenarios designed to provide a wide range of environmental benefits while still complying with the O&C Act, see the following: http://www.oandc.org/proposed-future-management/.

Eliminating ridged labels like "critical habitat" on the O&C lands is a necessary first step to achieving the promise of sustained yield.  O&C timber receipts have been an important component of County budgets since 193 7. Historically, payments exceeded $134 million annually, in current value dollars. (See p. 18, Governor's O&C Lands Report, Tuchmann and Davis, 2013.) In recent years, the Counties share of O&C receipts has been less than $25 million. The adverse impact on the Counties ability to provide public services has been dramatic. At the same time, the reduced availability of timber to supply mills has caused mill closures and the loss of tens of thousands of irreplaceable jobs.

The exclusion of O&C lands from NSO critical habitat follows a 2019 decision in favor of AOCC in Association of Oregon & California Counties v. Brian Steed et al. USDC, District of Columbia Civil Case No. 16-1602 (RJL). The Court in that case held that the all O&C timberlands must be managed by the BLM according to principles of sustained yield, and that ESA restrictions do not eliminate the BLM's obligations to manage for sustained yield.

"The exclusion of O&C lands from NSO critical habitat was the logical next step for the government to take, to restore the O&C lands to the kind of management federal law requires," said Commissioner Freeman.

"After 80 years of sustained yield management over half of the O&C timberlands remain late successional forest. Sustained yield management of these lands can continue to provide many forest values, including older forest conditions, while simultaneously supporting the social and economic needs of the rural communities in Oregon," said Commissioner Freeman. "We are happy to see rational and positive decision making by the federal government. It has been a very long process and there is still more to do before community’s start seeing the results of better management, but this is a major step in the right direction."

For additional information, contact Rocky Mc Vay at 541-412-1624 or Rocky@blupac.com




Attached Media Files: AOCC N Spotted Owl , AOCC

Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update - Jan. 13, 2021 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 01/13/21 4:04 PM
2021-01/3986/141595/2020-19-09_OR_4562_Detroit_Mt_Hagen_DeMob_01_(1).jpg
2021-01/3986/141595/2020-19-09_OR_4562_Detroit_Mt_Hagen_DeMob_01_(1).jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-01/3986/141595/thumb_2020-19-09_OR_4562_Detroit_Mt_Hagen_DeMob_01_(1).jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update for Jan.13, 2021, to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. See today's Wildfire Recovery update here

Photo Captions:

Lane County, Ore. - September 19, 2020 - Wildfire destruction on Mt. Hagen. Photo by Jeremy Porter/FEMA.
File: 2020-19-09_OR_4562_Detroit_Mt_Hagen_DeMob_01.jpg

Blue River, Ore. - September 30, 2020 - The process to remove damaged trees has begun. The Holiday Farm Fire destroyed businesses, homes and vehicles in Blue River, Oregon. Photo by David Yost/FEMA.
File: 2020-30-09_4562_ORFires_BlueRiver_1971.jpg

 




Attached Media Files: 2021-01/3986/141595/2020-19-09_OR_4562_Detroit_Mt_Hagen_DeMob_01_(1).jpg

Local World War II Veteran Turns 100 Years old
Roseburg Police Dept. - 01/13/21 4:03 PM
2021-01/5489/141598/Couch1.jpg
2021-01/5489/141598/Couch1.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-01/5489/141598/thumb_Couch1.jpg

We had the great honor today of wishing a happy birthday to a special Roseburg resident. We were told that John Couch is turning 100 years old tomorrow, January 14th.

Mr. Couch is a World War II veteran and is currently living at Bridgewood Rivers Assisted Living in Roseburg. We had a vehicle processional with representatives from the Roseburg Police Department, Roseburg Fire Department, Oregon Army National Guard's Charlie Company, and several of Couch's friends.

Happy Birthday Mr. Couch! Congratulations, and thank you from the bottom of our hearts for your service to our great Country!




Attached Media Files: 2021-01/5489/141598/Couch1.jpg , 2021-01/5489/141598/IMG_5287.jpg , 2021-01/5489/141598/couch.jpg

Pacific Power restores electric service to more than 25,000 customers overnight in wake of windstorm
Pacific Power - 01/13/21 3:56 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Hotline: 503-813-6018

 

Pacific Power restores electric service to more than 25,000 customers overnight in wake of windstorm

 

PORTLAND. Ore. (Jan. 13, 2021) — A fast-moving blast of wind and intense rain hit the Northwest Jan. 12-13 causing power outages from Crescent City, Calif. to the upper reaches of the Yakima Valley in central Washington. Working overnight, Pacific Power crews and contractors totaling about 200 individuals restored 25,000 of the 28,000 customers who were out at the peak of the storm.

 

As of 4 p.m. today, 3,000 customers are in the process of being restored. A majority of these customers are expected to have service restored by 8 p.m. The communities with the largest  remaining outages include:

 

  • Willamette Valley (Albany, Corvallis, Lebanon, Stayton), 1,700
  • Crescent City, Calif., 750
  • Yakima Valley, 150
  • Coos County, 100

 

“Our crews are continuing restoration work with the goal of getting all service restored by this evening,” said Allen Berreth, vice president of operations. “We appreciate the patience that customers have shown during this outage and we want to remind everyone to stay clear of any down lines you may see. Assume they are live and dangerous and give us a call to report them.”

 

Pacific Power encourages customers to report outages by calling 1-877-508-5088 or text OUT to 722797. Text STAT to 722797 to check the status of your outage.

 

Customers and media representatives can also track outages of any size online. Updates will be made as new information becomes available or at least hourly at pacificpower.net/outage.

To ease the inconvenience of power outages and assist crews in restoring power, Pacific Power suggests the following tips and safety precautions:

  • Stay away from all downed power lines and utility lines. Even if the lines are not sparking, they could be energized and extremely dangerous. Call 911 and report the outage to Pacific Power at 1-877-508-5088.
  • Don’t drive over downed power lines.
  • Maintain safe distances from workers. Repair work is being done under our COVID-19 safety protocols. Waves and acknowledgement are welcome, but please allow crews to do their work at an appropriate distance both for operational and COVID-19 safety.
  • Turn on your porch light. After crews complete repairs, they patrol the area of the power failure to see if any lights are still out
  • Check on your neighbors, especially those who may need special assistance. Also, check with others who have electricity, to see if you can visit.
  • If you have power at this time, keep mobile devices charged so that may be used in an emergency. Before anything happens, download the Pacific Power app to your smart device so you can have information readily available.
  • Keep refrigerator and freezer doors closed. Most food requiring refrigeration can be kept safely in a closed refrigerator for several hours. An unopened refrigerator will keep food cold for about 4 hours. A full freezer will keep the temperature for about 48 hours.
  • Remember your pets! Pets who spend a lot of time outdoors need more food in the winter because keeping warm depletes energy.
  • If you are using alternate heat or cooking sources, remember to allow plenty of ventilation. Never burn charcoal for heating or cooking indoors.
  • If you are using a generator, make sure to follow all manufacturer’s instructions. Make sure the generator is outside and not near any household air intakes. Do not connect the generator directly to your breaker box as this can create a dangerous situation for crews working on the powerlines. Instead, plug essential appliances directly into the generator.

 

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Nurse Staffing Advisory Board holds virtual quarterly meeting Jan. 27
Oregon Health Authority - 01/13/21 2:50 PM

Jan. 13, 2021

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Nurse Staffing Advisory Board holds virtual quarterly meeting Jan. 27

What: The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board is holding its quarterly meeting.

Agenda:

  • Review minutes from October and December NSAB meetings
  • Membership updates
  • Status updates
  • Committee updates
  • Open action items
  • Program improvement
  • Emerging issues in nurse staffing
  • Public comment

The agenda will be available on www.healthoregon.org/nursestaffing.

When: Jan. 27, 1-5 p.m.

Where:

ZoomGov meeting; dial: 669-254-5252

Meeting ID: 160 109 9025

Passcode: 528324

The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board advises the Oregon Health Authority on the administration of Oregon’s nurse staffing laws; identifies trends, opportunities and concerns related to nurse staffing; makes recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority based on those trends, opportunities and concerns; and reviews the enforcement powers and processes under Oregon’s nurse staffing laws.

Program contact: Kimberly Voelker erly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us">kimberly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Kimberly Voelker, MPH at 971-803-0914, 711 TTY or erly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us">kimberly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Updated: Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Update - January 13, 2021 (Photo)
Douglas Co. Government - 01/13/21 2:25 PM
DCCRT
DCCRT
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-01/6789/141590/thumb_DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_72020.jpg

UPDATE CORRECTION: Please note that there are currently, EIGHT (8) Douglas County COVID-19 patients that are being hospitalized, six locally and two out-of-the-area. 

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the agencies that make up the DCCRT

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – January 13, 2021

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY UPDATE

 

(Douglas County, Ore.)  Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results: As of 12:00 pm Today, Wednesday, January 13, 2021, there are TWENTY-SIX (26) people with new positive test results and ONE (1) death to report since our noon case update yesterday.  The total number of cases (people with positive test results and presumptive) in Douglas County is now at 1,622Currently, there are EIGHT (8) Douglas County COVID-19 patients that are being hospitalized, six locally and two out-of-the-area.  Our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, under the direction of the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, who administer our local public health program and oversee the work by Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, our Douglas County Public Health Officer and Douglas Public Health Network, continue to devote all resources available to our local COVID response.

 

COVID-19 Related Death of a Douglas County Resident

Our Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer, has confirmed the death of another Douglas County resident related to the COVID-19 virus. Our forty-third death is an 84-year-old woman who was diagnosed with COVID-19 on Saturday, November 21, 2020 and passed away on Monday, January 4, 2021.  In the interest of privacy for the loved ones of this resident, no additional information will be released.   Each death related to COVID-19 is painful for all Douglas County residents, and a sad reminder of the terrible impact COVID-19 has had in our local communities. The Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Dr. Dannenhoffer, DPHN and the DCCRT team extend our heartfelt condolences and sympathies to all family members, friends, relatives, co-workers and community members of those who have passed after contracting this deadly virus.

 

Douglas County, OR - COVID-19 - Case Update

Date

Saturday,

January 9, 2021

Sunday,

January 10, 2021

Monday,

January 11, 2021

Tuesday,

January 12, 2021

Wednesday, January 13, 2021

Total COVID-19 Cases

1,545

1,566

1,575

1,596

1622

People w/ Positive PCR or Antigen Test Results

1,458

1,480

1,489

1,510

1536

Presumptive

87

86

86

86

86

Total Currently Hospitalized

6

8

8

9

8

Total Currently in Isolation

176

190

172

158

173

Total COVID-19 Related Deaths

42

42

42

42

43

Total COVID-19 vaccines distributed to Local Public Health and Total administered to eligible residents

---

---

---

---

400/400

Our daily update includes the total number of cases in Douglas County, which combines people with positive test results and presumptives, as well as a breakout of those case numbers. Please note there will be times when a presumptive will move to a positive test result, and our total case number will not change because the case has already been counted.

 

Vaccine Distribution to Local Public Health

As you can see in the chart above, we have added a new line in our daily chart in order to provide an accurate total of the number of vaccines that Local Public Health has received to date, as well as the number we have administered to eligible residents.  Please note that our numbers do NOT include other sites like the Roseburg VA, Mercy Medical Center, EMS, Cow Creek Tribe and local care facilities that received their vaccines directly from the Federal and State Government in order to begin direct vaccinations to the first priority group.  We wanted to let you know that our Local Public Health has received and administered our first round of COVID-19 vaccines to eligible Douglas County residents in accordance with the priority guidelines and criteria set by the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC) and Oregon Health Authority (OHA).  As of noon yesterday, Tuesday, January 12, 2020, Douglas County has received 400 COVID-19 vaccines and all 400 of those have been administered to eligible residents at 6 approved local medical clinics.  At this time, we have not received enough vaccines to move to the next phase or wave, or to hold a large community event. We are hopeful that we will get a larger distribution of the vaccine soon, so we can move forward with vaccinations for everyone that is eligible.  Right now, we are still working through the priority populations in group – Phase 1A.  CDC and OHA are still working on the logistics and distribution of COVID-19 vaccines, and as soon as the new guidelines are finalized, and we begin to get a steady supply of vaccines, we can start moving our way down the eligibility list.  DPHN, through our Local Public Health Authority and Administrators, the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, have set up a new email address for questions about COVID-19 vaccines in Douglas County.  The new email is for inquiries from residents, businesses, health care workers, medical offices and volunteers.  DPHN will do their best to respond with the most current information we have, and connect those that are eligible for the vaccine with those that have the vaccine, as soon as the vaccine becomes available.

 

New Email for Douglas County COVID-19 Vaccine Questions: For all questions about vaccine eligibility, availability and volunteer opportunities, please email vaccines@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org

 

Reminder: All Douglas County Businesses Have the Ability to Be Open

Yesterday we announced that Douglas County residents and businesses would remain in our current State mandated risk level.  The State of Oregon notified Douglas County Monday, that we would not be moving out of the current level based on our COVID-19 case count over the last two weeks.  So, Douglas County will remain in the High Risk Level for the next two-week period, beginning Friday, January 15, 2012, and continuing through Thursday, January 28, 2021. This risk level allows ALL of our local business the opportunity to be OPEN, with some limitations on capacity. We want to continue to thank our residents and businesses for staying within the recommended guidelines, and for making good decisions in order for our communities to continue to stay open.  The new risk level does not affect the ability of faith based organizations and local school districts to offer in-person services and classes.  They are able to make decisions for their own congregations and educational programs. 

 

Clarification: Douglas County Sees Increase in Local Case Numbers

Yesterday, we talked about the spreader events and circumstances for our recent surge is case numbers.  We wanted to clarify a term we used yesterday.  We said that during recent case investigations several epilink outbreaks were linked to residents who attended holiday celebrations, traveled to COVID hot spot areas, invited people to visit from out of the area and attended in-person unprotected congregate social gatherings where COVID-19 safety measures were not being followed.  For clarification, an epilink or epidemiological link is what a place or person or a group, who’ve tested positive for COVID-19 or are considered presumptive, have in common, such as a business, co-worker, friend, school, daycare, fellow parishioner, relative or family member.  We will continue to encourage everyone, for the sake of our local businesses, services and residents, to gauge your risk level, and make the best choice in order protect yourself and those around you.  We have provided education on the widely proven COVID-19 safety measures, and encourage you to limit your contact with others not from your household, stay home if you are sick and wear face coverings where recommended.  We know how important family and faith are to you, so we ask that you consider all options available in order to eliminate and minimize the spread of the COVID-19 virus in our communities in order to help protect the ones you love, the businesses you love and the places you love to go.

 

Local Cases Being Supported in Isolation and Quarantine

Currently, DPHN is supporting 173 cases in isolation, as well as another 242 contacts in quarantine in Douglas County. Isolation is recommended for confirmed and presumptive cases, quarantine is recommended for contacts of confirmed or presumptive cases.  Currently, staff is supporting an astounding 415 total contacts in isolation or quarantine.  This number represents a snapshot of the significant amount of work being done locally to help control the spread of COVID-19.

 

COVID-19 Vaccine in Oregon

We understand that our residents have many questions, so do we.  Like you, we are patiently awaiting more information.  If you have questions or need more information about the COVID-19 vaccine in Oregon, check out these resources: 

As soon as more information is made available about the next phases and vaccine availability, we will pass the information along.  In the meantime, we ask that you be patient and continue to follow the well documented recommendations for COVID health and safety. 

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Information

OHA reports new cases daily on their website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.  OHA reports include presumptive COVID-19 cases in their total case numbers.  The DCCRT separates the number of people with new positive test results and new presumptives, and uses OHA’s definition of presumptive as those having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR or antigen test for COVID-19.  DPHN performs their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who test positive, as well as those that may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive while advising and supporting quarantine and isolation.  OHA has chosen to no longer report negative test results or recovered cases, so we will no longer be reporting this data in our daily update.  Please contact the OHA directly for more information.

 

Facebook Live with Dr. Bob

Join us Friday, January 15, 2021 at 4:00 pm for the next Facebook Live with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, the Douglas County Public Health Officer. The show is hosted by DPHN on the DPHN Facebook pageResidents are encouraged to submit their questions during the live show or can email questions to: ookquestions@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org">Facebookquestions@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Dr. Bob and the DPHN team will do their best to respond to as many questions as they can during the live shows.

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Hotline (541) 464-6550

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners and DPHN continue to offer a local resource hotline for Douglas County residents for COVID-19.  The hotline provides answer to frequently asked questions, basic information and referrals to resources and services.  The Hotline is staffed from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.

 

ACCESS ACCURATE, LOCAL COVID-19 INFORMATION

Stay up to date with accurate and local COVID-19 information in Douglas County on the Douglas County Government website or Douglas County Facebook page and the DPHN website or DPHN Facebook page.  Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer, DPHN and the DCCRT have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020. 

 

ACCESS STATE COVID-19 INFORMATION

To access information on the State of Oregon and Federal COVID-19 response go to Oregon Health Authority, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and 211Info.  If you have questions or need more information on statewide guidelines or risk levels, go to the State’s Building a Safe and Strong Oregon website or the Governor’s COVID-19 website or call the Business Oregon's Navigator Hotline at (833) 604-0880.  Please do not call 911, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office or Douglas County Offices to report compliance issues with the State of Oregon, OHA or Governor’s orders.  The Governor has directed the State offices for Oregon Occupational Safety and Health (OSHA) and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) to be the enforcement agencies responsible for ensuring restaurants, bars, and other businesses comply with COVID-related guidelines.  To report compliance issues contact them directly OSHA: (800) 922-2689 or OSHA website or OLCC (503) 872-5000 or OLCC website

 

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Contact Tamara Howell, Public Information Officer, Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, (541) 670-2804 cell (541) 957-4896 tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us   

Contact Vanessa Becker, Public Information Officer, Douglas Public Health Network, (541) 817-6552 cell (541) 440-3571 vanessa@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org




Attached Media Files: DCCRT

Oregon reports 1,346 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 41 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/13/21 1:14 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 41 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 1,708, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,346 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 129,109.

Note: A human error resulted in the loss of a small number of reports submitted through the online portal from 6:45am to 8:30am on Jan.13.

OHA does not know what types of reports were lost (lab reports, REALD reports, or MIS-C reports). Based on recent reporting volume, we estimate that these results were likely negative or pending lab results and that no more than 20 would have been received during the time of the error. We are reaching to all parties who recently submitted reports through the online portal to request that anyone who submitted from 6:45am to 8:30am on Jan. 13.to resubmit those results.

OHA will continue to review and assess the process.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, 14,722 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 9,071 vaccine doses were administered on Jan. 12 and 5,651 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Jan. 12.

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 129,782 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. All vaccinations were administered by Oregon hospitals, long-term care facilities, emergency medical service (EMS) agencies, urgent care facilities and Local Public Health Authorities (LPHAs).

To date, 321,225 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 434, which is 31 more than yesterday. There are 103 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is 10 more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

NOTE: Death details are being reviewed and will be posted in an updated version of this press release.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (16), Benton (29), Clackamas (105), Clatsop (10), Columbia (13), Coos (9), Crook (19), Deschutes (89), Douglas (25), Gilliam (1), Grant (8), Harney (2), Hood river (6), Jackson (58), Jefferson (23), Josephine (64), Klamath (32), Lake (2), Lane (98), Lincoln (3), Linn (50), Malheur (24), Marion (97), Morrow (9), Multnomah (307), Polk (28), Tillamook (11), Umatilla (52), Union (7), Wasco (13), Washington (110) and Yamhill (26).

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Hospitals Will Embrace Challenge to Vaccinate Seniors, Educators When More Doses Arrive
Oregon Assn. of Hosp. and Health Systems (OAHHS) - 01/13/21 12:09 PM

HOSPITALS WILL EMBRACE CHALLENGE TO VACCINATE SENIORS, EDUCATORS WHEN MORE DOSES ARRIVE

                           Plenty of work will be needed to get ready for more vaccine sent by the federal government

Lake Oswego, Ore. – January 13, 2021 – Hospitals will start preparations for a big increase in the number of Oregonians who can soon receive the COVID-19 vaccine after the Centers for Disease Control unexpectedly expanded the eligibility guidelines and Governor Brown followed suit.

Starting January 23, educators and everyone 65 and older will be included. The federal government will release its full stock of vaccine doses to the states. That supply, however, will likely not  be enough to handle the larger number of eligible recipients.

Hospital leaders applauded the move while signaling that there is much logistical work ahead to vaccinate the new larger cohort. “Oregon’s hospitals have been enthusiastic partners in bringing the COVID-19 vaccine to our residents, and we are happy that more vaccine is being sent to Oregon,” said Becky Hultberg, OAHHS President & CEO. “Just as our hospital teams have done whatever it takes to care for Oregonians suffering from this virus, we will bring that same drive and determination to the expanded vaccine effort.”

Details on the larger scale distribution effort are yet to be worked out. Portland area hospitals have recently begun partnerships with metro area public health departments to identify and vaccinate providers not affiliated with large health systems. That work will soon be expanded to include teachers and senior citizens.

Governor Brown will provide more details on the distribution plans on January 15. “If you are an Oregonian who is newly eligible for vaccination, I am asking for your patience,” she said. Read Governor Brown’s statement here.

Until the new program begins on January 23 Oregon will continue to follow the initial OHA Phase 1a guidelines.

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About OAHHS: Founded in 1934, OAHHS is a statewide, nonprofit trade association that works closely with local and national government leaders, business and citizen coalitions, and other professional health care organizations to enhance and promote community health and to continue improving Oregon’s innovative health care delivery system.




Attached Media Files: 2021-01/1635/141582/FINAL_Vaccine_Announcement_01_13_2021_.pdf

Lane County Public Health COVID-19 January 13th Case Update *Correction*
Lane Co. Government - 01/13/21 12:03 PM

Lane County Public Health (LCPH) was notified of at least 112 additional positive cases of COVID-19 and two deaths.This makes a total of seven thousand nine hundred and ninety one cases. 

LCPH is asking for help from our media partners to help reiterate that Saturday and Sunday's clinics are for Groups 2-3 in Phase 1a, and by invitation only.

 

7,991(+112) total cases-  Note that this includes confirmed and presumptive.

Of our cases (confirmed and presumptive): 

Hospitalized: 33 (+3)

·ICU: 5 (of the 33)

Deaths: 105 (+2)

Infectious: 457 (+24)

Persons Under Monitoring: 577

Individuals having received at least the first dose of vaccine: 8,008

 

Testing: OHA is now excluding negative labs from Opera in an effort to improve performance. This includes historic negative labs. 

Data regarding Lane County testing, patient status, case ZIP codes and more is available at www.LaneCountyOR.gov/localdata

 

The State of Oregon has created a COVID-19 web page with resources at http://coronavirus.oregon.gov.

High Risk Individuals who had contact with these community members will be contacted by Lane County Public Health so they can work with their health care providers on next steps. Communicable disease investigations are underway. If a public contact exposure point is identified, that information will be shared with the public.

Presumptive cases are people without a positive PCR test who have COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. Though not confirmed by a positive diagnostic test, presumptive cases have a high likelihood of having COVID-19 because of the specific nature of the symptoms and known exposure.


The Oregon State Police to Utilize Oregon National Guard at State Capitol
Oregon State Police - 01/13/21 12:00 PM

Oregon State Police Superintendent Terri Davie requested and was granted the activation of members of the Oregon National Guard to assist with potential upcoming civil unrest/protests by Governor Kate Brown.

“The Oregon State Police will continue to take a neutral role in ensuring Oregonians exercise their First Amendment rights,” said Oregon State Police Superintendent Davie. “For the past seven months, your Troopers have responded throughout Oregon to various protests, unlawful assemblies and riots.  Our goals have always been to protect people, protect people’s rights and to protect property. The recent events at our Nation's Capitol building and at our own statehouse illustrate the need for law enforcement to be prepared and appropriately staffed for any large gatherings,” Davie added.

The Oregon Army National Guard will be deployed as necessary and their deployment locations will not be made public. OSP and the ONG routinely work and train together in response to Oregon’s challenges, including civil unrest, human remain recovery in the recent wildfire response and safeguarding our communities in times of crisis.

“With the Oregon National Guard supplementing OSP ranks, we will be ready to ensure peaceful events and handle emergency situations,” said Oregon State Police Captain Timothy Fox.

Oregon State Police will continue to work with our local, state and federal partners in planning for potential events at the Oregon State Capitol or any other jurisdiction in Oregon. OSP will continue to leverage their strong partnerships with local and federal law enforcement, in efforts to provide safety to legislators and employees conducting the people’s business in the Capitol.

The Oregon State Police does not discuss the specifics of potential threats or tactical plans made unless it is determined there is a public safety need.

 


Lane County and Community LendingWorks distribute $3.6 million in small business grants to 239 Lane County businesses
Lane Co. Government - 01/13/21 11:53 AM

Lane County and Community LendingWorks have notified 239 businesses that they are recipients of a collective $3.6 million in funding from the small business grants offered in December.

 

The funding was provided by the State of Oregon. Counties were notified of the funding at the end of November and were given through the end of 2020 to conduct an application process and select recipients.

 

In total, 26 percent of the funds will be distributed to rural businesses, 22 percent to Springfield businesses and 52 percent to Eugene businesses, which closely matches the geographical distribution of small businesses in Lane County.

 

“Local businesses are the lifeblood of our community,” said Lane County Community & Economic Development Manager Austin Ramirez. “Getting this money into the hands of business owners – and advocating for more – is incredibly important if we are going to help keep businesses open and people employed.”

 

Applications were available from December 3 through December 13 for local businesses with fewer than 25 full-time equivalent employees, as well as sole proprietors.

 

Recipients were selected in two rounds of random drawings. Selection was random in order to ensure businesses that submitted applications closer to the deadline were just as likely to be selected as others.

 

The first drawing for 75 percent of the overall funding was conducted among applications from businesses in the tourism, hospitality or event sectors, along with businesses closed as a result of the Governor’s ordered freezes (e.g., gyms, museums, sports courts, etc.), rural businesses or majority women-, disabled-, veteran-, or minority-owned businesses.

 

The remaining 25 percent of the funds were dispersed in the second random drawing that included all other eligible applicants, as well as those not selected in the first drawing.

 

The need is far greater than what local resources can address; nearly 1,600 businesses in Lane County requested more than $24 million in funding in this round of grants alone. Lane County will continue to advocate for more small business support and disperse any additional funding quickly and equitably.

 

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Oregon National Guard joins Salem Health to vaccinate Oregonians (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 01/13/21 11:45 AM
2021-01/962/141577/210112-Z-YJ247-003.jpg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-01/962/141577/thumb_210112-Z-YJ247-003.jpg

SALEM, Ore. – Oregon National Guardsmen joined Salem Health at the Oregon State Fairgrounds in Salem, Oregon on Jan. 12, to assist them with their efforts to distribute the COVID-19 vaccination to Oregonians. More than 40 medical personnel initially activated to directly support Salem Health operations.

Just over a week ago, Salem Health set up their distribution plan and began administering vaccinations to the public. Since Jan. 7, over 8,500 vaccinations have been administered; with the help of the National Guard yesterday, the site reached over 10,000 vaccinations.

Upon realizing the site would be unable to vaccinate enough people under the current system, Salem Health Hospitals and Clinics, President and CEO, Cheryl Nester Wolfe, initiated the plan to establish a separate vaccination distribution site. Her forward thinking led to the first COVID-19 vaccination distribution site of its kind in the state of Oregon.

“We are the only mass vaccination clinic set up,” stated Wolfe. “We have somewhere around 50,000 people to vaccinate in Marion County alone.”

The Oregon State Fairgrounds was designated as the logical choice by Wolfe and her team due to current busing route access, the centralized location for Marion County and Salem residents, as well as the large building and available parking. The established infrastructure of the State Fairgrounds as an alternative hospital location was originally established in March of 2020 at the beginning of the Coronavirus outbreak.

Once aware of Salem Health’s plan to set up a vaccination distribution site at the State Fairgrounds, Amie Wittenberg, Director of the Emergency Department, Trauma and Psychiatric Services at Salem Hospital and the Operations Section Chief for the vaccination response, arrived with her team to ensure all necessary safety precautions and health protocols were followed.  

“Once we heard the site location was confirmed, we came down to the building to see what tools we had,” stated Wittenberg. “We started dreaming up our plan starting with the essentials: screening to ensure COVID safety measures were in place, a registration area, a vaccination prep station, a vaccination station, and finally, a process to identify post vaccination monitoring.”

The Salem Health staff working to vaccinate Oregonians at the State Fairgrounds continues to manage their hospital jobs as well as the vaccination site. The impact and workload on the hospital dating back to last March and the start of the COVID-19 Pandemic has been significant.

“We are planning on being here up to six months,” stated Wittenberg. “Everyone’s dug in to volunteer and work extra to serve, but we need to preserve our employees and ensure we have the ability to facilitate at the hospital and clinic level.” 

On Jan. 8, Oregon Governor Kate Brown announced the activation of the Oregon National Guard to assist with the distribution of the COVID-19 Vaccination. The news of Guard activation to assist with vaccinations was a relief for Salem Health.

“We need Guardsmen to help with giving vaccinations, we need help with security and parking, we need everything,” stated Nester Wolfe. “When I heard the Governor announce the Guard was coming to help, it was just a blessing.”

Oregon Guardsmen arrived at the State Fairgrounds on the morning of Jan. 12, and began their onboarding process to integrate with Salem Health as soon as possible. By noon, Citizen-Soldiers and Airmen were preparing and giving vaccinations, processing individuals on the electronic medical record system, monitoring the post vaccination area, monitoring controlled entry and exit points, and assisting with vehicle and foot traffic control.

“When we heard there was a potential to partner with the Guard and to actually work together… it’s a once in a life time opportunity,” expressed Wittenberg. “Since February, we have worked and served at all different levels. It’s been a lot. To have the Guard’s partnership, you can’t put a price on it.”

Since March 2020, Oregon National Guardsmen have been activated to support the state’s COVID-19 Pandemic response, distribute PPE throughout the state, assisted with the largest wildfire season on record, and to protect lives and property during civil disturbances.

Oregon Air National Guard Public Affairs Officers:  Major Heather Bashor, 503-779-9889, .bashor.1@us.af.mil">heather.bashor.1@us.af.mil

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Photos: 

210112-Z-YJ247-001: Oregon National Guard Members arrived at the Oregon State Fairgrounds in Salem, Ore., Jan. 12, 2021 and begin to in-process, train, and assist Salem Health with their vaccination efforts. By noon, Guardsmen were prepping and giving vaccinations as well as assisting with monitoring, prescreening, and registration. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Major Heather Bashor, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

210112-Z-YJ247-002: Oregon National Guard Service Members arrive early at the Oregon State Fairgrounds in Salem, Ore., Jan. 12, 2021, to in-process train, and begin assisting Salem Health with their COVID-19 Vaccination efforts. Cheryl R. Nester Wolfe, President and CEO of Salem Health Hospitals and Clinics welcomed the Guardsmen  to the site and thanked them for their service. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Major Heather Bashor, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

210112-Z-YJ247-003: Oregon National Guardsmen arrived at the Oregon State Fairgrounds in Salem, Ore., Jan. 12, 2021, to in-process train, and begin assisting Salem Health with their COVID-19 Vaccination efforts before assisting Salem Health. Airmen and Soldiers went through an onboarding process to prepare them to integrate easily with their staff. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Major Heather Bashor, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

210113-Z-YJ247-001: Oregon National Guard Spc. Toby SeWell assigned to the Oregon Army National Guard Medical Command, administers the COVID-19 vaccination to a Salem resident at the Oregon State Fairgrounds in Salem, Ore., Jan. 13, 2021. The Oregon National Guard was activated by Oregon Gov. Kate Brown on Jan. 8, to assist with the State's vaccination efforts. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Major Heather Bashor, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

https://www.flickr.com/photos/oregonmildep/albums/72157717741831206




Attached Media Files: 2021-01/962/141577/210112-Z-YJ247-003.jpg , 2021-01/962/141577/210112-Z-YJ247-002.jpg , 2021-01/962/141577/210112-Z-YJ247-001.jpg , 2021-01/962/141577/210113-Z-YJ247-001.jpg

Oregon's Iverson elected chair of national Young Farmers & Ranchers Committee
Oregon Farm Bureau - 01/13/21 11:06 AM
Jon Iverson, newly elected chair of the AFBF Young Farmers & Ranchers Committee
Jon Iverson, newly elected chair of the AFBF Young Farmers & Ranchers Committee
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Oregon’s Iverson elected chair of national Young Farmers & Ranchers Committee

January 13, 2021: Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is proud to announce that Jon Iverson, a family farmer from Woodburn, has been elected chair of American Farm Bureau Federation’s (AFBF) National Young Farmers & Ranchers (YF&R) Committee.

Iverson, a third-generation farmer and member of Clackamas County Farm Bureau, was elected to the yearlong post by his fellow members on the national YF&R committee. YF&R is a program within Farm Bureau providing networking and leadership development opportunities for next-generation leaders of this esteemed grassroots advocacy organization.

“It was an honor gain the respect of the AFBF YF&R Committee and have their vote of confidence. It means a lot coming from the exceptional people I’m serving with,” said Iverson, who officially begins his term on Jan. 13, 2021.

“We are incredibly proud to have Oregon’s own Jon Iverson elected as chair of the AFBF YF&R Committee,” said OFB Executive Vice President Dave Dillon. “Jon has done outstanding work on Oregon’s YF&R Committee and at the County Farm Bureau level, and it has been truly inspirational watching him evolve into the extraordinary leader he is today. We’re sure he will do an excellent job serving as chair of the AFBF YF&R Committee.”

In 2020, Iverson was appointed to the AFBF YF&R Committee by AFBF President Zippy Duvall after being nominated by OFB. As chair of the committee, Iverson will have a seat on the AFBF Board of Directors, will help guide the national committee in its activities for the year, and will serve as a national spokesperson for the YF&R program.

In Oregon, Iverson served on the state YF&R Committee from 2008 through 2020, including two terms as vice chair. He also has served as president of Clackamas County Farm Bureau.

Iverson is the third generation on Iverson Family Farms in Woodburn. The diversified farm grows tulips, grass seed, vetch seed, squash, hazelnuts, hemp for oil, and wine and table grapes. Barb Iverson, Iverson’s aunt, serves as president of Oregon Farm Bureau.


Iverson’s goals as AFBF YF&R Committee Chair

In his one-year term, Iverson has four primary goals: membership engagement, mental health awareness, fostering international connections, and giving a strong voice to YF&R.

“YF&R is an important driver of membership within Farm Bureau, bringing in and developing new volunteer leaders,” said Iverson. “With the pandemic, we’re having to rethink how we engage these new members and get them excited to be involved, without the opportunity to meet in person or attend conferences.”

Last summer, the AFBF YF&R committee launched Ag Connect. Ag Connect is an hourlong Zoom meeting held on the third Monday of every month, and it features a guest speaker focusing on a predetermined topic, such as improving member engagement or a farm tour, followed by discussion and networking time.

“Ag Connect is fantastic, and I hope to get more YF&R members to participate. It’s a great way to not only learn about important ag-related issues, but also to meet other farmers and ranchers from different parts of the country,” said Iverson.

Information about Ag Connect sessions is available on the AFBF YF&R and OFB YF&R Facebook pages.

Part of Iverson’s membership initiative is to encourage more participation by young Farm Bureau members who may not be farming or ranching full time, but who are still passionate about agriculture.

“There are a lot of young farmers who want to get back on the farm, but haven’t had the opportunity to yet, and there are others who work in ag-related industries or who are really passionate about agriculture. I want those people to know they’re welcome in Farm Bureau,” said Iverson. “As population of farmers and ranchers shrinks every year, the more allies we have, the stronger our industry will be.”

Mental health awareness for farmers and ranchers is another priority for Iverson.

“Because of the pandemic and other significant stressors weighing on those who work in agriculture, some farmers and ranchers have really struggled,” said Iverson. “Suicide rates in farming are high, and it’s something we need to address. We need to let farmers and ranchers who’re struggling know that there’s hope and there’s help.”

The American Farm Bureau offers many resources on the Farm State of Mind website, including warning signs, conversation starters, and a training to learn how to help those who may be struggling.

“Mental health awareness will be a topic in an upcoming Ag Connect session, and it’s something I want to keep promoting at the national level,” said Iverson.

Building connections between farmers and ranchers, no matter where they live, is also a goal for Iverson.

Now that so many Farm Bureau members are familiar with using Zoom and other virtual meeting platforms, Iverson hopes to use that tool to build stronger relationships between farmers and ranchers not only in the United States, but abroad.

“One of the things I’m really passionate about is giving farmers an international perspective,” said Iverson. “I’d like to connect with other young farmer organizations from around the world and give American young farmers and ranchers a chance to interact with peers from other countries.”

While many of the challenges working in agriculture are shared across the globe, the way farmers and ranchers tackle those challenges may differ — and there’s much to be learned by sharing information, said Iverson.

“We have a good relationship with the young farmers organization in Canada. They’re going to host our Ag Connect meeting in January,” he said.

Giving a strong voice to YF&R on the AFBF Board of Directors is Iverson’s fourth goal.

“There’s a lot of experience and wisdom on the AFBF Board and the decisions they make will affect younger Farm Bureau members their whole career,” said Iverson. “I want to make sure there’s that young voice on the board and that the beliefs and roles of young farmers and ranchers are heard and acknowledged.”

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Editors: “Farm Bureau” is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit, general farm organization representing the interests of farming and ranching families in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon at the county level in 1919 and the state level in 1932, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties.

http://www.oregonfb.org 




Attached Media Files: Jon Iverson, newly elected chair of the AFBF Young Farmers & Ranchers Committee

Oregon OSHA offers Spanish-language online training for roofing safety
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 01/13/21 9:49 AM
DCBS logo
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(Salem) – Oregon OSHA has launched a free Spanish-language online video training course to help employers and workers address fall hazards and increase safety in the roofing industry.

The course, “Fall Protection for Roofing,” is part of the division’s ongoing work to expand its Spanish-language computer-based training to broaden the audience for its educational offerings.

“This course provides a solid foundation and plenty of tools for strengthening fall protection in roofing,” said Roy Kroker, consultation and public education manager for Oregon OSHA. “But it is more than that. It also helps employers and workers address such fall hazards by removing language barriers.”

The course includes insights from industry leaders and covers a comprehensive set of topics. Those topics include hazard identification, fall protection equipment and systems, safe access, and training.

The need to address fall hazards cannot be overstated. Each year in the U.S., more than 310 construction workers are killed and more than 10,350 are seriously injured by falls from heights, according to federal data. About 81 percent of deaths from roofs occur in the construction industry.

The Spanish-language “Fall Protection for Roofing” course includes the opportunity to receive a certificate of completion. Visit more Spanish-language courses. Learn about the PESO program. Learn about Oregon OSHA’s education and training services.

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Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

 

 




Attached Media Files: DCBS logo , Oregon OSHA logo

Hermiston Man Wins $100,000 Powerball Prize
Oregon Lottery - 01/13/21 9:47 AM
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Jan. 13, 2021 - Salem, Ore. – Laurie Longhorn, manager of the Short Stop #1 in Hermiston thinks she will see even more customers come in tonight after her store sold a $100,000 winning Powerball ticket last week. 

“The higher the jackpot gets, the more people come in,” Longhorn said. “With this news we might see even more people.” 

Bradley Plate of Hermiston purchased his winning ticket at the Short Stop #1 in Hermiston. Plate’s Powerball ticket for the Saturday, Jan. 9 Powerball drawing matched four of the white ball numbers, leaving one white ball number and the power ball number unmatched. By matching those four numbers, and wisely adding the Power Play multiplier option, Plate’s $50,000 prize was doubled to $100,000, thanks to the Power Play multiplier of 2 that was drawn for that drawing. The jackpot was $470 million for the Jan. 9 drawing.  

The Powerball jackpot, currently at $550 million for the Wednesday, Jan. 13 drawing, is the ninth largest jackpot in the game’s history. According to Longhorn, that type of jackpot, and Thursday night’s $750 million Mega Millions jackpot are bringing some joy to retailers facing difficult times this year. 

Longhorn said her store sold a larger Keno jackpot a few years ago, but to her knowledge, this is the largest prize they have sold. 

“This really is awesome news, it would be amazing if we sold the jackpot ticket tonight,” Longhorn said. “We have lots more people coming in and getting tickets. Customers always tell us if they win the big one they will come back and give some to us.” 

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $12 billion for economic development, public education, Outdoor School, state parks, Veteran Services and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org 

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Attached Media Files: Powerball logo

Bonneville Power Administration working on power line outages
Bonneville Power Administration - 01/13/21 8:56 AM

Bonneville Power Administration working on power line outages
Utility customers working on multiple outages on their systems as well

Portland, Oregon – Heavy winds and saturated soil have combined to take BPA power lines from the central Oregon Coast to the Puget Sound coast and areas inland out of service.

“This storm hit us hard on the coast and the west side overnight,” said John Lahti, BPA Transmission Field Services vice president. “Our crews are working to assess the damage and repair lines as quickly and safely as possible to restore power to our customers experiencing outages.”

Multiple field crews are responding to the outages and damage. If you have questions regarding BPA outages, please contact Doug Johnson, BPA senior spokesperson at 503-713-7658.


Stimulus payments are coming: Don't throw out the Earned Income Payment debit card
Oregon Department of Human Services - 01/13/21 7:40 AM

The U.S. Treasury has begun issuing its second round of stimulus payments. People who don't receive a direct deposit by early January should look for either a check from IRS or Economic Impact Payment (EIP) debit card in the mail. People will not necessarily be paid the same way they received their first stimulus payment.

 

 How to identify the card: The envelope will have a return address of Money Network Cardholder Services, PO Box 247022, Omaha, NE 68124. This is not a scam. This is this card:

(See attached.) 

 

 

Most individuals will receive $600 and $1,200 for married couples filing a joint return and $600 for each qualifying child. New: Couples filing jointly with just one member of the couple with a work-eligible Social Security Number will now be eligible for payments for the taxpayers and their qualifying children.

People do not need to take any action right now to receive their stimulus payment. Eligible individuals who do not receive their payment or who did not receive their first stimulus payment can claim it (under the Recovery Rebate Credit) when they file their 2020 tax return this year. People who do not normally file tax returns should also file a 2020 tax return if they do not receive their stimulus payment.

More information about the distribution of stimulus payments is in the IRS press release and in new FAQs.

There is also information about how to use the card from the National Consumer Law Center: NCLC's fact sheet.

For free or reduced cost tax filing help: https://cashoregon.org/ or call 211.




Attached Media Files: EIP News Release , EIP VISA CARD

Limited in person instruction canceled today 1/13
Lebanon Community Schools - 01/13/21 7:18 AM

All limited in person instruction canceled for Lebanon community schools today 1/13. 


Tue. 01/12/21
*Updated * Oregon reports 1,203 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 54 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/12/21 8:59 PM

Jan. 12, 2021

Updated to include death details.

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 1,203 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 54 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 54 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state's death toll to 1,667, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today. The high number of deaths serves as a reminder that the pandemic continues to pose a threat to our friends, neighbors, co-workers and communities.

The rising case count that surged in November and December is one factor attributed to today's record-tying high death count. The counting of deaths from death certificates may take time to process because they are determined by physicians and then sent to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for further review before the cause of death is ultimately determined. Once this information is confirmed, the information is reported back with a final cause of death to states. This lagging indicator is now being captured today.

The OHA reported 1,203 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 127,780.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, 10,465 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 6,668 vaccine doses were administered on Jan. 11 and 3,797 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Jan. 11.

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 115,060 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. All vaccinations were administered by Oregon hospitals, long-term care facilities, emergency medical service (EMS) agencies, urgent care facilities and Local Public Health Authorities (LPHAs).

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 403, which is six fewer than yesterday. There are 93 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is nine more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (8), Benton (16), Clackamas (98), Clatsop (11), Columbia (1), Coos (9), Crook (19), Curry (8), Deschutes (56), Douglas (21), Gilliam (1), Harney (3), Hood River (11), Jackson (61), Jefferson (19), Josephine (39), Klamath (46), Lake (3), Lane (89), Lincoln (6), Linn (24), Malheur (32), Marion (97), Morrow (4), Multnomah (265), Polk (10), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (53), Union (5), Wasco, (10), Washington (155) and Yamhill (21).

Oregon’s 1,614th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old man in Deschutes County who tested positive on Dec. 2 and died on Dec. 28 at St. Charles Medical Center—Bend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,615th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old man in Deschutes County who tested positive on Jan. 1 and died on Jan. 8 at St. Charles Medical Center—Bend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,616th COVID-19 death is a 99-year-old woman in Deschutes County who tested positive on Jan. 4 and died on Jan. 9 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,617th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Deschutes County who tested positive on Nov. 24 and died on Dec. 30 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,618th COVID-19 death is a 59-year-old man in Jefferson County who tested positive on Dec. 23 and died on Dec. 18 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,619th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old woman in Jefferson County who tested positive on Dec. 30 and died on Jan. 2 at St. Charles Medical Center—Bend. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,620th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Klamath County who tested positive on Dec. 22 and died on Jan. 4 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,621st COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old woman in Klamath County who tested positive on Dec. 17 and died on Dec. 26 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,622nd COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Dec. 18 and died on Dec. 26 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,623rd COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old woman in Klamath County who tested positive on Dec. 28 and died on Jan. 9 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,624th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Klamath County who tested positive on Dec. 28 and died on Jan. 6 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,625th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old woman in Lake County who tested positive on Nov. 16 and died on Dec. 22 at Lake District Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,626th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Dec. 11 and died on Jan. 5 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,627th COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Dec. 18 and died on Jan. 5 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,628th COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Dec. 26 and died on Jan. 5 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,629th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old woman in Linn County who tested positive on Dec. 7 and died on Dec. 28 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,630th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old man in Linn County who died on Dec. 29 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,631st COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 30 and died on Dec. 23 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,632nd COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Dec. 4 and died on Dec. 23 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,633rd COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Dec. 11 and died on Dec. 24 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,634th COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 30 and died on Dec. 23 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,635th COVID-19 death is a 101-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Dec. 14 and died on Dec. 29 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,636th COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Dec. 21 and died on Jan. 4 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,637th COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Dec. 22 and died on Jan. 1 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,638th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Jan. 2 and died on Jan. 2 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,639th COVID-19 death is a 59-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Dec. 18 and died on Dec. 27 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,640th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 9 and died on Jan. 1 at Adventist Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,641st COVID-19 death is a 65-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 22 and died on Dec. 22 at Adventist Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,642nd COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 18 and died on Jan. 2 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,643rd COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 8 and died on Dec. 25 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,644th COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 22 and died on Dec. 22 at Adventist Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,645th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 9 and died on Jan. 4 at Oregon Health Science University. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,646th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 6 and died on Dec. 25 at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,647th COVID-19 death is a 33-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 1 and died on Dec. 30 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,648th COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 23 and died on Jan. 3 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,649th COVID-19 death is a 55-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 13 and died on Dec. 30 at Hillsboro Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,650th COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old man in Polk County who tested positive on Dec. 29 and died on Jan. 5 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,651st COVID-19 death is a 63-year-old woman in Umatilla County who died on Dec. 27 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,652nd COVID-19 death is a 97-year-old woman in Wasco County who died on Dec. 30 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,653rd COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 23 and died on Jan. 5 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,654th COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 10 and died on Jan. 2 at her residence. She had no underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,655th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Nov. 16 and died on Dec. 29 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,656th COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old man in Yamhill County who tested positive on Dec. 18 and died on Jan. 4 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,657th COVID-19 death is a 63-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Dec. 20 and died on Dec. 23 at Willamette Valley Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,658th COVID-19 death is a 30-year-old woman in Josephine County who tested positive on Nov. 17 and died on Nov. 27 at Rogue Valley Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,659th COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Nov. 14 and died on Jan. 2 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,660th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Coos County who tested positive on Jan. 4 and died on Jan. 9 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,661st COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old man in Columbia County who tested positive on Dec. 18 and died on Dec. 29 at Legacy Meridian Park. Presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,662nd COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old man in Clatsop County who tested positive on Dec. 3 and died on Dec. 31 at Legacy Meridian Park. Presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,663rd COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Dec. 28 and died on Dec. 29 at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,664th COVID-19 death is a 49-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Dec. 13 and died on Jan. 4 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,665th COVID-19 death is a 65-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Dec. 26 and died on Dec. 30 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,666th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Dec. 12 and died on Dec. 30 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,667th COVID-19 death is a 100-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Dec. 9 and died on Dec. 30 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution and other useful information, including this graphic on vaccine sequencing.