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Eugene/Spring/Rose/Alb/Corv News Releases for Thu. Aug. 17 - 11:43 pm
Police & Fire
Search warrant and investigation at 915 NE 12th Street (Photo)
Bend Police Dept. - 08/15/17 12:29 PM
Search warrant service
Search warrant service
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/5593/106986/thumb_Search_warrant_picture.jpg
Date: Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Case # 2017-242679/250973

Date & Time of Incident: August 7 and August 14

Type of Incident: Drug related crimes with a subsequent search warrant

Location of Incident: 915 NE 12th Street

Suspect:

(Case 2017-250973)

Micaela Krista Estrada Zacarias 31 year old female Bend resident

Leah Maribeth Atkins 38 year old female Bend resident

Rachel Arlene Mahoney 42 year old female Bend resident

Ryan Paul Atkins 45 year old female Bend resident

(Case 2017-242679)

Klint Edwards Wise 34 year old male Mill City resident

Randy Iowa Resch 61 year old male Mill City resident

Jesse Rene Gust 21 year old female Mill City resident

Janene Lynn Gust 57 year old female Mill City resident

Narrative:

On Sunday August 13th, Officers with the Bend Police Department and members of the Central Oregon Emergency Response Team (CERT) served a search warrant at 915 NE 12th Street as part of an ongoing investigation regarding criminal activity, specifically drug related crimes. This search warrant was a culmination of several different events recently. The Bend Police Department has received complaints regarding multiple short term visits at this residence.

On August 7th, Bend Police Officers conducted surveillance on 915 NE 12th Street. During the surveillance on the house, officers saw a white Ford F150 stop, stay for a short time and leave. Officers were able to stop the vehicle for a violation and conducted a drug investigation. A Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Narcotic K9 Team responded and helped with the investigation.

During this investigation, it was found that Jesse Rene Gust, Klint Edward Wise, Randy Iowa Resch and Janene Lynn Guest, all of Mill City Oregon, were in possession of methamphetamine. This included over 97 grams of methamphetamine, of which over 39 grams was packaged for sales. Wise was found to be in possession of a Springfield XD 9mm handgun. Based on Wise's criminal history, he is unable to possess a firearm

Randy Resch was lodged at the Deschutes County Jail for Manufacture/Delivery/Possession of methamphetamine. Jessie Gust and Janene Gust were lodged at the Deschutes County Jail for Possession of methamphetamine.

During the attempted arrest of Wise, he attempted to escape custody and actively resisted the arrest attempts of the officers. He was located and taken into custody. Wise was lodged at the Deschutes County Jail for Manufacture/Delivery/Possession of methamphetamine, Resisting Arrest, Theft by Receiving, Felon in Possession of a Firearm and he had an active warrant for his arrest from another state.

This case, along with other information led to the issuance of a search warrant for 915 NE 12th Street. During the service of the warrant, Micaela Zacarias, Leah Atkins, Rachel Mahoney and Ryan Atkins were all contacted. At the time of the search warrant service, there were five juveniles at the residence, all under the age of 18. Several items of evidence were recovered, to include methamphetamine and items that are consistent with sales of methamphetamine.

All four of the adults were lodged at the Deschutes County Jail. Zacarias was lodged for Frequenting a Place Where Drugs are Used/Kept/Sold and (2) counts of Endangering the Welfare of a Minor. Leah Atkins was lodged for Manufacture/Delivery of methamphetamine and (5) counts of Endangering the Welfare of a Minor. Rachel Mahoney was lodged for Possession of methamphetamine, (5) counts of Reckless Endangering and Frequenting a Place where Drugs are Used/Kept/Sold. Ryan Atkins was lodged for Manufacture/Delivery of methamphetamine and (5) counts of Endangering the Welfare of a Minor.

The Bend Police Department understands the importance of safe neighborhoods and this is an example of working on a neighborhood problem. Our goal is to help neighborhoods become safer so our citizens can enjoy everything Bend has to offer.

### End of Release###


Attached Media Files: Search warrant service
Benton County Fair and Rodeo Patrol Statistics
Benton Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/17/17 2:09 PM
Corvallis, Ore. -- The Benton County Sheriff's Office participated in extra DUII patrol August 2-5, 2017, to coincide with the Benton County Fair and Rodeo.

Deputies responded to regular calls for service and stopped 84 vehicles for traffic violations. Deputies issued at total of 31 citations and responded to three injury traffic crashes, including one fatality.

During those days, two drivers were arrested for Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants. Of those, one was arrested for DUII alcohol, and one for DUII drugs.

Other arrests include one for the Attempt to Elude, one for Possession of a Controlled Substance, one for Driving While Suspended, and nine outstanding arrest warrants were served.

Benton County Sheriff's Office's next DUII Saturation Patrol is scheduled for August 18 -- September 4, 2017, to coincide with Labor Day Weekend. Our office will be targeting drivers under the influence of alcohol, controlled substances, and inhalants.

Oregon's DUII enforcement program is committed to reducing the amount of crashes and impaired drivers on our roadways by keeping them off the roadway and arresting them when they choose to drive. For more info on impaired driving, visit www.StopImpairedDriving.com.
END


Attached Media Files: 2017-08/1505/107069/DUII_saturation_8.17.17.pdf
Benton County Investigates Fatal Crash (Photo)
Benton Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/11/17 5:27 PM
2017-08/1505/106905/Walnut_2.JPG
2017-08/1505/106905/Walnut_2.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/1505/106905/thumb_Walnut_2.JPG
On 8/11/2017 at 1231 pm, Deputies were dispatched to a head-on collision on Walnut Boulevard, just west of Corvallis City limits.
The driver of a 1999 Pontiac Grand Am was northbound on Walnut Boulevard at 5500 NW when it veered across the center line and struck a 2010 Ford Escape that was traveling southbound.
The driver of the Pontiac, Bradford J Hickswa, 28 years old, of Corvallis was taken by Corvallis Fire Department Ambulance to Good Samaritan Hospital in serious condition.
The driver of the Ford, Douglas Lee Stewart, 75 years old, of Philomath died of his injuries at Good Samaritan.
The investigation of the crash is continuing, but it does not appear that drugs or alcohol are contributing factors.
It is unknown at this time as to what caused the Pontiac Grand Am to veer out of its lane into the Ford Escape.
Walnut Boulevard was shut down for 4 hours to complete the diagram and preliminary investigation.
Witnesses to the crash are asked to contact Deputy Brent Iverson of the Benton County Sheriff's Office at 541.766.6858
The Crash was investigated with assistance of the Corvallis and Philomath Police Departments as well as Benton County Public Works.
"Since July 31, 2017, Benton County Sheriff's Office has investigated 4 crashes that have resulted in 5 deaths. This abnormal amount of fatal crashes are not attributable to a single cause, but the Sheriff's Office would like to remind the public to concentrate and focus on driving safely and without distractions." Undersheriff Greg Ridler


Attached Media Files: 2017-08/1505/106905/Walnut_2.JPG , 2017-08/1505/106905/Walnut_1.JPG
DRY CREEK LEVEL 3 EVACUATION NOW! - UMPQUA NORTH COMPLEX FIRES (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/16/17 7:16 PM
Closure Map JPG
Closure Map JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/5204/106892/thumb_20170812_CLOSURE_MAP_Umpqua_North_Complex.jpg
UPDATE #6 08/16/2017 7:00 PM

The Dry Creek Community including the Last Chance RV Park and residence on Illahee Road are now under a Level 3 or "GO" evacuation notice by the Sheriff's Office and Fire Managers.

A Red Cross shelter is available to displaced residents at the Glide Seventh Day Adventist Church located at 19085 North Umpqua Highway in Glide.

LEVEL 3: A Level 3 or "GO" Evacuation means to Evacuate NOW. LEAVE IMMEDIATELY!

Danger to your area is current or imminent, and you should evacuate immediately. If you choose to ignore this advisement, you must understand that emergency services may not be available to assist you further. DO NOT delay leaving to gather any belongings or make efforts to protect your home.

Entry to evacuated areas may be denied until conditions are safe.

Area radio and TV stations have been asked to broadcast periodic updates.

For additional information the media may call 541-378-6944.

END UPDATE #7

UPDATE #5 08/15/2017 12:00 pm

Fire Information Line (541) 378-6944
UmpquaNorthComplex17@gmail.com
Douglas County Sheriff's Office Recorded Information: (855) 419-2349

Inciweb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5505/

Incident: During the week of August 9th, lightning started dozens of fires across the northern Umpqua National Forest along both sides of State Route 138 east of Roseburg in Douglas County, Oregon.

Incident Command: Alaska Interagency Incident Management Team, Tom Kurth, Incident Commander.

Current Size: 1,410 acres
Containment: 0%
Current Resources: Crews: 6, Engines: 6, Dozers: 1, Total Personnel: 191

Current Situation:
Dry Creek Level 3 Evacuation Dropped to Level 2, Effective August 15, 2017
The Douglas County Sherriff's Office, in coordination with the Umpqua North Complex Fire Managers, lowered the Level 3 Evacuation Notice for the Dry Creek area effective today.

Changes in the closure of the North Umpqua River
Floating on and fishing along the North Umpqua River between Steamboat/Gravel Bin take-out and Susan Creek remains closed due to rolling debris and falling trees. The section of the river between Boulder Creek and Steamboat/Gravel Bin take-out has been reopened, effective today, August 15, 2017.

Road shoulder and pullout closures along Highway 138
The road shoulders and pullouts between Mile Posts 31 to 35 and Mile Posts 45 to 50.5 of the State Highway 138 East, also known as the North Umpqua Highway, are being closed to protect public and firefighter safety. The road remains open to through traffic. Please drive with extra care on this highway.

A Community Meeting will be held Tuesday, August 15, at 7 p.m. at the Glide Community Center, 20062 N. Umpqua Highway, Glide. Agency representatives and the Alaska Team will provide an update on the fires and answer questions.

The Umpqua National Forest has announced the following closures in the Umpqua North and Diamond Lake Ranger Districts.
Umpqua North Complex Closure Area: See attached map.
National Forest System (NFS) Roads:
NFS Road No. 4750 and all roads with in the area closure listed above. NFS Road No. 2800-620
Trails: Trail No. 1414- The North Umpqua Trail, from the Forest Service boundary to the Mott & Panther Trailheads on NFS Road No. 4712, Trail No. 1502 - Fall Creek Falls Trail, Trail No. 1513 - Williams Creek Trail, Trail No. 1530 - Riverview Trail, Trail No. 1510 - Deception Trail, Trail No. 1521, Twin Lakes Loop, Trail No. 1500, Twin Lakes Trail.
Recreation Sites: Steamboat Falls Campground, Wright Creek Campground, and Horseshoe Bend Campground.

Social Media Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UmpquaNationalForest/

END UPDATE #5


UPDATE #4 08/13/2017 3:45pm

In the interest of public safety, the Douglas County Sheriff's Office has closed a section of the North Umpqua River to boaters/rafters due to the Umpqua North Complex fires. The closure is in effect from the Boulder Creek take-out to the Susan Creek take-out.

The public is urged to adhere to the closure due to the hazards posed by the fires.

All other areas of the North Umpqua River remain open at this time.

END UPDATE #4

UPDATE #3 08/12/17 8:00pm

A LEVEL 3 evacuation is now in effect for the Community of Dry Creek including Illahee Flats. Residents may relocate to the American Red Cross evacuation shelter at the Glide Seventh Day Adventist Church (19085 North umpqua Highway, Glide)

LEVEL 3 or "GO!": LEAVE IMMEDIATELY! - Danger to your area is current or imminent, and you should evacuate immediately. If you choose to ignore this advisement, you must understand that emergency services may not be available to assist you further.

END UPDATE #3

UPDATE #2 08/12/2017

The Douglas County Sheriff's Office has been notified the United States Forest Service has issued a Level 3 evacuation notice for all campers at the Horseshoe Bend Campground. Evacuation and closure of the campground is currently in progress.

The community of Dry Creek has been upgraded to a LEVEL 2 evacuation notice.

At this time there is no change to the LEVEL 2 evacuation notice for More Hill Lane.

There are three levels of evacuation Level 1, 2, and 3 or "Ready", "Set", "GO!"

Level 1 or "Ready": BE PREPARED - Residents should be aware of the danger that exists in their area, monitor emergency services websites and local media outlets for information.

Level 2 or "Set": YOU MUST PREPARE TO LEAVE AT A MOMENT'S NOTICE.- This level indicates there is significant danger to your area, and residents should either voluntarily relocate to a shelter or with family/friends outside of the affected area, or if choosing to remain, to be ready to evacuate at a moment's notice. Residents MAY have time to gather necessary items, but doing so is at their own risk.

LEVEL 3 or "GO!": LEAVE IMMEDIATELY! - Danger to your area is current or imminent, and you should evacuate immediately. If you choose to ignore this advisement, you must understand that emergency services may not be available to assist you further.

END UPDATE #2

UPDATE #1 08/11/2017

Residents on Moore Hill Lane are being upgraded to a Level 2 or "Set" evacuation notice.

Level 2 or "Set": YOU MUST PREPARE TO LEAVE AT A MOMENT'S NOTICE.- This level indicates there is significant danger to your area, and residents should either voluntarily relocate to a shelter or with family/friends outside of the affected area, or if choosing to remain, to be ready to evacuate at a moment's notice. Residents MAY have time to gather necessary items, but doing so is at their own risk.

See attachment regarding "Ready", "Set", "Go" below.

The Umpqua National Forest has established an information line for fires within national forest boundaries. That telephone number is 541-670-5289.

ORIGINAL RELEASE

The Douglas County Sheriff's Office has been notified by the Umpqua National Forest of a Level 1 evacuation notice for residences starting at Moore Hill Lane to the community of Dry Creek along Highway 138 East due to wildfires in the area.

There are three levels of evacuation Level 1, 2, and 3 or "Ready", "Set", "GO!"

Level 1 or "Ready": BE PREPARED - Residents should be aware of the danger that exists in their area, monitor emergency services websites and local media outlets for information.

Level 2 or "Set": YOU MUST PREPARE TO LEAVE AT A MOMENT'S NOTICE.- This level indicates there is significant danger to your area, and residents should either voluntarily relocate to a shelter or with family/friends outside of the affected area, or if choosing to remain, to be ready to evacuate at a moment's notice. Residents MAY have time to gather necessary items, but doing so is at their own risk.

LEVEL 3 or "GO!": LEAVE IMMEDIATELY! - Danger to your area is current or imminent, and you should evacuate immediately. If you choose to ignore this advisement, you must understand that emergency services may not be available to assist you further.

Residents may sign up to receive EMERGENCY ALERTS about emergencies near their homes, workplaces or other important locations by registering at: http://www.dcso.com/dccens/dccens_main.asp

The Umpqua National Forest has established an information line for fires within national forest boundaries. That telephone number is 541-670-5289.

There is no further information available at this time.


Attached Media Files: 2017-08/5204/106892/Ready_Set_Go_(2).pdf , Public Info Closures Land , Public Info Umpqua North Complex Land , North Umpqua Update 1200 Final , Closure Map PDF , Closure Map JPG
Man Arrested for Pointing Firearm During Disturbance (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/14/17 9:02 AM
William Douglas Watkins
William Douglas Watkins
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On Sunday, August 13, 2017, at 5:50 pm, the Douglas County Sheriff's Office received a report of a disturbance involving a firearm in the 24000-block of North Umpqua Highway in Idleyld Park.

Deputies arrived on scene and determined 47 year-old William Douglas Watkins of Idlelyd Park had engaged in a disturbance with neighbors during which time he pointed a rifle at a female.

Watkins was arrested and taken into custody for Menacing and Unlawful Use of a Weapon. He was lodged at the Douglas County Jail.


Attached Media Files: William Douglas Watkins
Fatal Structure Fire (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/14/17 8:57 AM
DCSO
DCSO
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/5204/106933/thumb_Sheriff_Badge-medium.jpg
On Monday, August 14, 2017, at 1:33 am, the Douglas County 9-1-1 Center received multiple reports of a structure fire in the 300-block of Jordan Creek Road in Canyonville.

When responding units arrived on scene they found a single family residence fully-involved which also ignited a grass fire that threatened other structures.

At 3:17 am, the dispatch center was notified that the fire was knocked down. It was discovered that 89 year-old Donald Olsen was unable to leave his home and perished in the fire. Next of kin has been notified.

The Douglas County Medical Examiner's Office is working closely with the Oregon State Fire Marshal's Office on a joint investigation.

Canyonville-South Umpqua, Tri-City, Myrtle Creek and Riddle Fire Departments along with DFPA, Bay Cities, Pacific Power and Light and Avista Utilities responded to the scene.


Attached Media Files: DCSO
FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Virtual Kidnapping Scams
FBI - Oregon - 08/15/17 3:48 PM
Welcome to the Oregon FBI's Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against virtual kidnapping scams.

So what is a virtual kidnapping scam? It starts with a phone call, text or email. The scammer tells you that he has abducted your child, grandchild or maybe a spouse - and he demands money in exchange for their safe return. Sound familiar? It is the opening scene of a lot of movies and TV shows. However, there is a key difference between kidnapping with intent to ransom -- which is very rare - and virtual kidnapping -- which happens a lot. In a virtual kidnapping, the bad guy hasn't actually abducted anyone. He just wants you to think that he has.

The scammer's goal is to stress you out so much that you don't take time to consider that the kidnapping is fake. He might try to intimidate you by pretending to be a gang member or a corrupt police officer. He might tell you that your loved one owes him money for a car accident, drug debt, or something similar that could discourage you from calling law enforcement. In some cases, scammers have even had an accomplice scream in the background. In almost all cases, the bad guy will threaten violence against his "victim" if you disobey him. He often has the ability to spoof -- or copy -- the alleged victim's number. He wants to cause panic, fear, and a sense of urgency, because those feelings stop you from thinking clearly.

So how do you protect yourself?

Be cautious about what you post on social media. In particular, consider waiting to post about foreign travel until after you return. Some scammers call every number with a certain area code, but others research their targets.
Let the people close to you know when you will be travelling to places without cell service or internet connection.
Know the red flags: Did the call come from a phone other than the victim's? Was the call from an area code far from where your loved one lives? Did the caller insist that the ransom had to be paid by wire transfer? Did he try to keep you on the phone?
If you do receive a ransom call, try to stay calm. Slow the situation down by writing things down or telling the caller that you need time to do what he's asking. Request to speak to the victim. Try to contact your loved one by other means, such as text or social media.
Remember -- stranger-to-stranger kidnappings are very rare. However, if you believe a real kidnapping has occurred or if you are not sure, call 911.

Overall, when it comes to online scams -- if you feel as though a fraudster has victimized you, report your suspicions to law enforcement. You can file an online report at the FBI's Internet Crime Compliant Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.


Attached Media Files: TT - Virtual Kidnapping - ENGLISH Audio , TT - Virtual Kidnapping - RUSSIAN Written , TT - Virtual Kidnapping - RUSSIAN Audio , TT - Virtual Kidnapping - SPANISH Audio , TT - Virtual Kidnapping - SPANISH Written
Sheriff's Office Seeks Public's Help Identifying Robbery Suspect (Photo)
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/15/17 10:51 AM
Suspect Rob #2
Suspect Rob #2
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/6111/106983/thumb_Suspect_Rob_#2.JPG
The Lane County Sheriff's Office is investigating two robberies that occurred in the Alvadore area over the past three days. The first robbery occurred on 8/13/2017 at the Fern Ridge Market. The suspect entered the store with a firearm, demanded money, and fled with an undisclosed amount of cash in a blue SUV, similar to a Chevrolet Trailblazer. Video surveillance of the suspect and the vehicle is attached.

On 8/15/2017 shortly after 7:00 am, the Sheriff's Office received a report of an armed robbery at the Alvadore Market. The suspect, described as a white male, approximately 20-30 years old with light colored hair, fled the market with cash. The vehicle involved in this incident was sky blue, and similar to the photo attached (the pictured vehicle is NOT the suspect vehicle, but a similar vehicle). A suspect photo is also attached.

The Sheriff's Office believes that these robberies were committed by the same person and is seeking the public's help in identifying him. Anyone who knows the identity of the suspect pictured below, or has information on either of these incidents is asked to call 541-682-4141.


Attached Media Files: Suspect Rob #2 , Suspect from Robbery #1 , Vehicle from Robbery #1 , Vehicle similar to one used in Robbery #2
Tip of the Week - August 21, 2017 Outdoor Grilling Safety
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/17/17 5:10 PM
OFFICE OF THE SHERIFF
Sheriff Curtis L. Landers
225 W. Olive Street
Newport, Oregon 97365
(541) 265-4277
Fax (541) 265-4926

TIP OF THE WEEK

Date: August 21, 2017 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Sheriff Curtis Landers
541-265-0652
clanders@co.lincoln.or.us

OUTDOOR GRILLING SAFETY

There's nothing better on a summer day than cooking out on the grill! Since there are many different types of grills, we would like to share some safety tips for whatever you're planning to cook on whatever grill you will be using. These helpful tips come from the National Fire Protection Association at www.nfpa.org/education.

Proprane and charcoal grills should ONLY be used outdoors. They should be placed well away from the home, deck railings and overhanging tree branches.
Keep children and pets at least three feet away from the grilling area.
Keep your grill clean by removing grease or fat buildup from the grills and trays below the grill.
Always make sure your gas grill lid is open before lighting it.
Check the gas tank hose for leaks before using your gas grill each year. You can do this by applying a light soap and water solution to the hose. If there is a leak, the gas will cause it to release bubbles.
If your grill has a gas leak, turn off the grill. If the leak does not stop, get it serviced by a professional before using it again.
If you smell gas while you're cooking, immediately get away from the grill and call the fire department. Do NOT move the grill.
If you use starter fluid with your charcoal grill, use only charcoal starter fluid; always keep it out of the reach of children and away from heat sources.
When you are finished grilling, let the charcoals cool completely before disposing of them in a metal container.
Most importantly: NEVER leave your grill unattended.

For more information and tips, visit our website at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff's Office -- Oregon.

###
Submitted by:
Kathy Manning, Administrative Assistant
kmanning@co.lincoln.or.us
Ph: 541-265-0652


Attached Media Files: 2017-08/5490/107089/082117-Outdoor_Grilling.pdf
Corrections Deputy Assaulted by Inmate
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/17/17 3:05 PM
Amber Hicks was arrested and lodged in the Lincoln County Jail on July 28, 2017 by the Lincoln City Police Department on the charge of Harassment. While in custody, on August 7, 2017 Amber Marie Hicks threw a cup containing urine and feces on a Corrections Deputy.

Amber Hicks covered the window of her cell, obstructing the deputy's view. When the deputy opened the door to communicate with Amber Hicks, she threw a cup of urine and feces at the deputy, despite taking evasive measures, the deputy was struck in the face and chest.

After a criminal investigation, Amber Hicks was charged with Aggravated Harassment; Criminal Mischief III; Obstructing of Governmental or Judicial Administration; and Assault on a Public Safety Officer with bail set $122,500.

Exposure to blood borne pathogens through bodily fluids is a risk that corrections staff face on a daily basis. Throwing bodily fluids is a method of assaulting corrections staff and unfortunately, is commonly used in jail and prison systems.

###

Prepared by:

Sergeant Josh McDowall
Lincoln County Jail
Welfare check leads to discovery of deceased suspect of hit-and-run investigation
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/17/17 11:12 AM
On Monday, August 14th, 2017 at approximately 12:45 PM, Lincoln County Sheriff's Deputies were dispatched to a vehicle versus pedestrian hit-and-run traffic collision in the 1400 block of NE Yaquina Heights Drive in Newport. The pedestrian sustained serious but non-life-threatening injuries after being struck by the suspect vehicle. The suspect vehicle fled the scene eastbound on NE Yaquina Heights Drive. Through the victim's statements and surveillance footage, Lincoln County Sheriff's Office and Newport Police Department investigators were able to determine the vehicle involved was a silver 2011-2016 Ford F-250 or F-350 with an extended cab, canopy, and "Oregon Veteran" license plates.
On Wednesday, August 18th, 2017 at approximately 6:00 PM, a citizen requested a welfare check on a neighbor; 61 year old Bend, OR resident David Lee Black. Mr. Black had not been heard from since Monday evening when he left a phone message for the caller of the welfare check. Lincoln County Sheriff's Deputies responded to the rural residence east of Siletz and observed a vehicle matching the suspect vehicle from the hit and run. Deputies entered a camp trailer on the property and found Mr. Black deceased inside. Mr. Black's death was determined to be an apparent suicide. No foul play is suspected.

Sheriff's Office collision reconstructionists were summoned to the scene to examine the vehicle. The silver 2015 Ford F-250 was processed by the collision reconstructionists and forensic evidence was obtained. The damage profile present on the vehicle was consistent with both the events of the pedestrian collision on Yaquina Heights Drive and the victim's injuries. The victim identified Mr. Black as the driver of the vehicle that hit him from a photograph of Mr. Black's driver license.

The Lincoln County Sheriff's Office thanks the Newport Police Department, the Oregon Department of Motor Vehicle Services, and the public for their assistance in this investigation.
###

Respectfully submitted by:

Mark Meister, Administrative Patrol Sergeant
Lincoln County Sheriff's Office
225 W. Olive St.
Newport, Oregon 97365
Phone: 541-265-0684
Fax: 541-265-4917
mmeister@co.lincoln.or.us
Eclipse Reminder (Photo)
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 08/17/17 8:05 AM
2017-08/2993/107052/Glasses.jpg
2017-08/2993/107052/Glasses.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/2993/107052/thumb_Glasses.jpg
Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley would like to remind Linn County residents to be prepared for the Eclipse that will occur this Monday, August 21. Our County is expecting thousands of visitors from all over the world to view the eclipse; campgrounds and hotels have been booked for months.

Although the eclipse does not occur until Monday, the influx of visitors is expected to impact our area throughout the weekend starting on Friday, August 18. Linn County could see traffic congestion to the point of gridlock on many of the major roads.

Sheriff Riley cautions residents to take some proactive measures to minimize the impact. Use common sense. Do not travel over the weekend and especially Monday if you do not have to. If it is necessary, allow yourself plenty of extra time to get to your destination.

Remember deputies and other first responders may also have trouble traveling to calls for service due to roadway congestion. Linn County Sheriff's Office will make efforts to respond to every call for service from the public; however, there may be some delays in response time. Sheriff Riley asks for the public's patience while his Office works hard to maintain public safety throughout the county.

Lastly, you may have heard some eclipse glasses are counterfeit, please be assured if you received a pair from our office, they are approved and safe to use for viewing.


Attached Media Files: 2017-08/2993/107052/Glasses.jpg
brother and sister being rescued off of three-fingered jack area. (Photo)
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 08/14/17 11:39 AM
2017-08/2993/106952/IMG951569.jpg
2017-08/2993/106952/IMG951569.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/2993/106952/thumb_IMG951569.jpg
Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley reports his deputies are attempting a rescue of two hikers from the Three Fingered Jack area.

On Sunday August 13, 2017, at 4:57 p.m., Linn County Sheriff's Office dispatch received a 9-1-1 call from two climbers saying they lost their way in the fog and was stuck on a rock face, unable to get out on their own. The two climbers were identified as 21 year-old Mikayla Jean Duvenik of Sisters, and her brother, 25 year-old Charles "Justin" Duvenik of Ashland.
Mikayla and Justin, both experienced climbers, were summiting Three Fingered Jack, when conditions became foggy. They got disoriented and became stuck on a rock face, unable to descend on their own any further. Visibility was near zero.

The two were able to get cell service at their location which allowed them to call for help. As Linn County Search and Rescue members responded, deputies were able to contact the two hikers several times by phone through the night. The hikers were cold and concerned about hypothermia. With the assistance of the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center, the deputies were able to pinpoint their location through their cell phone.

At 11:26 p.m., Search and Rescue teams located the climbers flashing light. At 1:25 a.m. this morning, Corvallis Mountain Rescue was able to make contact with the hikers and worked on getting blankets, food and water into them.

Linn County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue coordinated with the Oregon Army National Guard to air lift Mikayla off the mountain, as she may have sustained an injury to her shoulder. She was evaluated by medics and was not transported to the hospital. Search and rescue teams are currently guiding Justin, who is uninjured, out on foot and should be out of the area in a few hours.

Linn County Sheriff's Office would like to thank Corvallis Mountain Rescue, Eugene Mountain Rescue, the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center and the Oregon Army National Guard, Sister Fire Department and Deschutes County Mounted Posse for their assistance in rescuing Mikayla Duvenik and her brother, Justin Duvenik.


Attached Media Files: 2017-08/2993/106952/IMG951569.jpg , 2017-08/2993/106952/0813171756.jpg
Additional Help In Search
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 08/12/17 12:03 PM
We failed to list a critical partner in our first press release. The Marion County Sheriff's Office played a vital role in our Incident Command. We would be remiss if we did not include them and thank them for their help.
Missing Person Found (Photo)
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 08/12/17 11:11 AM
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Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley is pleased to report that after four days of extensive and exhaustive searching, Jerry Thomas has been found alive and well. He was found by ground crews this morning at approximately 8:55 a.m., near Daly Lake which is about three miles from the Parish Lake Trail head.

Thomas was wet and hungry but overall, in good spirits and health. Upon taking a hot shower and being reunited with his wife, who is a registered nurse, Thomas declined medical treatment.

Sheriff Riley would like to personally thank his staff, all volunteers and the listed agencies who helped in this search. Riley said, "This is a testament to the teamwork, dedication and tenacity of all involved. Being part of a life-saving mission such as this, is one of the most satisfying rewards we can experience in law enforcement. The successful outcome of this search would not have been possible if not for the services and dedication of numerous volunteers and agencies."

Today's searching alone included over 80 SAR members from numerous agencies.

The following is a list of all the agencies who assisted in the search; Linn, Marion, Lane, Jefferson, Deschutes, Benton, Yamhill, Polk, Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington County Sheriff's Offices; Linn County Sheriff's Office Mounted Posse, Oregon Army National Guard, Corvallis Mountain Rescue, Mt. Jefferson Snowmobile Club, Pacific NW Search and Rescue, Linn County Amateur Radio Emergency Services, North Oregon Regional Search and Rescue, and the Sweet Home District of the USFS. Also, the Washoe County Sheriff's Office of Nevada flew in an expert in man-tracking to the scene.

Sheriff Riley would like to give a special thanks to all the Oregon Sheriffs who volunteered their staff and assets to assist in the search. Riley said, "In time of need, fellow Sheriff's ban together and Linn County citizens should be proud and appreciative of all their dedicated support."

The family has requested no media contact at this time.


Attached Media Files: 2017-08/2993/106913/sar.thomas.2.png , 2017-08/2993/106913/sar.thomas.1.png , 2017-08/2993/106913/LT.Larsen.sar.briefing.2.jpeg , LT. Larsen conducts morning briefing
Linn Detectives Investigate Death Of Baby
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 08/11/17 6:47 PM
Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley reports that his detectives, in conjunction with investigators from the Sweet Home Police Department, are currently investigating the suspicious death of a 10-month-old girl from the Sweet Home area.

The death occurred at 8:45 this morning, at Doernbecher Children's Hospital in Portland. More information will be available after detectives finish conducting interviews. An autopsy is scheduled for this weekend.

At this time, names of all parties involved are being withheld pending further investigation.
Update: Missing Person
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 08/11/17 9:53 AM
Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley reports his office is continuing their search for Jerry Walter Thomas, of Prineville. Thomas was reported missing on August 9, 2017, in the Parish lake area.

Yesterday, over 30 searchers to include ground, ATV, Posse, K-9 and air assets, scoured the area of point last seen.

Today, approximately 45 searchers will continue their efforts and expand the search area, as well as the Oregon National Guard with their Lakota helicopter. At the time of this release no clues or evidence has been found. Searchers are faced with thick, dense brush covering all their search areas.

Linn County SAR have been assisted by the Lane, Jefferson, Benton, and Deschutes County Sheriff's Offices, Corvallis Mountain Rescue and the Oregon Army National Guard.


Attached Media Files: 2017-08/2993/106882/Microsoft_Word_-_MISSING_PERSON.docx.pdf
Linn County Deputies Investigate Fatal Crash in Scio (Photo)
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 08/11/17 8:25 AM
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Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley reports his deputies investigated a single vehicle, fatal motor vehicle crash that occurred yesterday at 4:31 p.m. The crash occurred on Stayton Scio Road near the intersection of Brock Drive, approximately 1.5 miles northwest from Scio.

The driver of the 1990 Chevrolet pickup, who was identified as Taylor Michael Whitney-Leigh, 26, of Albany, died at the scene. The two passengers were identified as Ernesto Jazmin, 37, from Corvallis, was transported to Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center in Corvallis with serious injuries. The second passenger and nephew to Jazmin, is Benjamin Jazmin, 18, from Corvallis, was transported with significant injuries to the Albany General Hospital.

The investigation reveals Whitney-Leigh was traveling south on Stayton-Scio Road. The Chevrolet pickup was towing a dual axle trailer filled with miscellaneous concrete and construction debris. As he crested the hill there were several vehicles traveling at approximately five miles per hour, according to witnesses, due to a combine on the roadway. The combine was not involved in the crash.

Whitney-Leigh took evasive action to avoid colliding with the vehicle in front of him. The pickup went into a skid and went off of the roadway on the west side of Stayton-Scio Road rolling down the embankment, striking a tree and coming to rest on its side.

Detective Lovik and Deputy Bebeau happened to come upon the crash moments after it happened. As they approached the vehicle to render aid, the vehicle caught on fire. Detective Lovik used a fire extinguisher to keep the flames at bay while Deputy Bebeau pulled Benjamin Jazmin from the burning vehicle. Scio Fire Department personnel arrived on scene and took over efforts to extract the remaining occupants.

Linn County Deputies were assisted by members of the Stayton, Jefferson, Scio, and Albany Fire Departments. In addition the Linn County Multi-Agency Investigation Team members from the Linn County Sheriff's Office and Lebanon Police Department responded to assist with the processing of the scene.

The investigation is continuing as to the cause of the crash.


Attached Media Files: 2017-08/2993/106879/scio.fatal.JPG
Deputies Investigating Fatal Motor Vehicle Crash
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/11/17 3:20 PM
Deputies are currently on scene and investigating why a vehicle left the roadway and struck a power pole killing the driver in the 11000 block of River Road NE. Traffic on River Road should expect delays as the road is currently down to a single lane. There were no other vehicles or people involved in the crash and traffic will be affected in the area for the next several hours. An update with additional details will be provided but that time frame is not yet known.
Marion County Sheriff's Office Makes Wish Come True For 9-year old boy. (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/11/17 1:42 PM
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On Friday, August 3rd, Undersheriff Troy Clausen swore in Nate Samoylich as a Special Deputy for the day. 9 year old, Nate has Leukemia and his dream job has always been to become a Police Officer. Once we heard his wish, we wanted to make him a part of our team.

Special Deputy Samoylich was issued a uniform, badge, and gear bag containing sheriff's office goodies. Nate started his workday enjoying hot chocolate and donuts. The break was quickly over when Marion County Circuit Court Judge Channing Bennett summoned the young deputy to his courtroom to provide security.

Leaving the courthouse Deputy Samoylich and Sergeant Jason Hickam got on the police radio notifying the dispatcher that they were in service to protect the residents and visitors of Marion County. Inside their Marion County Sheriff's Office Ford Mustang Deputy Samoylich and Sergeant Jason Hickam patrolled the streets on their way to our Central District Office.

At the office, Nate processed a crime scene, hung out with the SWAT Team and played with K9's. After a full day Nate patrolled his way home where he signed off at his house, leaving the streets of Marion County for the loving arms of his family.

Sergeant Jason Hickam, stated, "Today we made a dream come true and there is no better feeling." "Thank you Nate for choosing the Marion County Sheriff's Office and allowing us to be a part of your special day."

Media Public Information Officer Deputy Ethan Griffith is available for details and interviews. The Samoylich family is very thankful for Nates opportunity and has agreed to allow us to share his story. The family however does not wish to conduct media interviews.


Contact Info:
Primary PIO Phone: 503. 584. MCSO (6276)
Public Information Officer Dep. Ethan Griffith
Cell Phone: 503.932.7575
Email: egriffith@co.marion.or.us
On Twitter: @MCSOInTheKnow
www.Facebook.com/MCSOInTheKnow


Attached Media Files: 2017-08/1294/106891/IMG_7986.JPG , 2017-08/1294/106891/IMG_7946.jpg , 2017-08/1294/106891/IMG_7956.JPG , 2017-08/1294/106891/IMG_7936.JPG , 2017-08/1294/106891/IMG_7896.JPG , 2017-08/1294/106891/IMG_7882.JPG , 2017-08/1294/106891/IMG_7878.JPG
Structural resources return to the Nena Springs Fire
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/17/17 9:56 PM
The Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal's Red Incident Management Team and three task forces are being redeployed to assist with the Nena Springs Fire, burning on the Warm Springs Reservation, after this afternoon an ember from the fire blew out of containment lines near Kishwalk.

A Level 1 evacuation is in place for residents in Charlie Canyon.

Two helicopters, hand crews and at least 10 engines are on scene working to contain the fire.

No road closures are currently in effect, although responders ask the public to stay away from the area to allow fire traffic to move safely.
Firefighters near Completion on the Nena Springs Wildfire
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/16/17 8:46 AM
Warm Springs OR - With the solar eclipse less than a week away, the nearly 300 firefighters still working on the Nena Springs Fire see an end in sight now that it is 90 % contained. More accurate mapping shows a reduction in acres. The final size of the fire is 39,526 acres.

Cool evenings with high humidity effectively killed most of the remaining fire behavior. A small interior pocket of heat near Simnasho is visible to that community. Firefighters have worked hard to remove any threats this heat may have created. Above the northeastern finger of the fire, a spot of heat outside the main fire body was contained yesterday. Firefighters are cold trailing and ensuring this area does not pose a threat.

Over the next several shifts, local firefighters will be patrolling the fire area looking for hot spots. As the days become warmer, pockets of smoke will become visible, allowing firefighters to find and extinguish the remaining heat. It will remain uncontained for the next few shifts. Firefighters are keeping close eyes on the area to ensure the fire does not undo the hard work firefighters have accomplished.

With the threat to communities extinguished, firefighters will also be focusing their efforts on cutting and piling juniper trees along Hwy 3 to increase visibility along the roadway. This work reduces the amount of standing dead trees that would otherwise add fuel to the next fire if it is not removed.

A transfer of command from both the Northwest Incident Management Team 12 and the Oregon State Fire Marshal Office Incident Management Teams occurred at 6am this morning. A smaller incident management organization made of firefighters from the Warm Springs Indian Reservation will complete the detailed work of identifying burnt fences and guard rails destroyed in the 62 square mile fire. When needs have been assessed, firefighters will begin replacing the infrastructure.

The 2017 Eclipse is an opportunity to see one of the world's greatest natural wonders. Lodging and camp sites are fully booked in Warm Springs and surrounding communities while day use options are limited. Please make sure you are well-prepared for the increase in population.

This preparation starts with understanding risks. We ask the public visiting the Reservation to respect signs and barriers. Bring sun and eye protection. Cell service may not be available in remote areas or could be limited due to heavy demand. Consider turning off your phone to help keep lines open for emergencies.

Due to the expected influx of people beginning to travel across the Warm Springs Indian Reservation, a Fire Prevention Team is in Warm Springs. Team members are talking to the public and youth about ways to prevent wildland fires and increase awareness of activities they can do to keep fire away from the home ignition zone.

This will be the last update on the Nena Springs Fire unless significant activity occurs.

# FIRE MANAGEMENT #
Nena Springs Fire Update 15 August 2017
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/15/17 10:40 AM
The Nena Springs Fire is now 80% contained and covers about 40,000 acres. Incident Commanders Richy Harrod and Scott Magers are rapidly turning their attention from containing this fire to demobilizing their organizations and sending people home or to other fires. A smaller force is on the fire today finishing some areas that still have some heat and need attention.

But the work is not finished. On Wednesday, the NW Incident Management Team 12 and the State Fire Marshal's Blue Team will be handing management of the fire back to the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Fire Management Division.

Although the Incident Management teams will be leaving, a number of resources will remain assigned to the incident.

The Fire Management Division is putting together a local Incident Management Team (IMT) that will be taking over responsibility for the further management of the Nena Springs Fire. Many of those team members have been working on the fire for the past week. Today the new team members are "shadowing" their counterparts on the existing IMT and finalizing plans for the next steps.

The transition to the local team is being done carefully to assure that the investments made by the hundreds of local, state and federal firefighters to contain this fire, are followed through to completion. The new team will be patrolling the area, mopping up where necessary, and rehabilitating areas disturbed by fire suppression activities.

Yesterday (Monday), firefighters made excellent progress in mopping up and patrolling the northeastern area of the fire that burned all the way to the Deschutes River. Last night a crew was camped out on this section of the fire and will be completing that work today. One small area on the west side of the Mutton Mountains was burned out yesterday and is looking very good this morning.
Nena Springs Fire Update Aug. 14 (Photo)
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/14/17 10:04 AM
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August 14, 2017
A little bit of rain and a lot of hard work kept the Nena Springs Fire from growing on Sunday. The cooler and damp weather prevented firefighters from doing any burnout operations, but the conditions allowed them to safely address significant parts of the uncontained perimeter. Structure protection resources are making good progress around the communities of Simnasho, Mutton Mountain and Indian Head Canyon to assure that no more structures are lost.

Firefighters made good progress around the southern edge of the recent growth of the fire into the Deschutes River Canyon. In some areas crews put in fire line and in other areas a technique called cold trailing was used. Cold-trailing involves using bare hands to feel along the edge of the fire to assure that no heat remains.

With the change in weather and strong westerly winds on Sunday, air quality has greatly improved in the area.

Today's Operations:
Overnight, crews mopped-up areas near the fire's perimeter, especially near homes and structures. That work will continue today. Several crews are spiked-out near the northern edge of the fire to secure the line along the fire's edge from Nena Creek east to the Deschutes River.

If conditions are right, firefighters may decide to carefully burnout some small areas near the perimeter on the eastern side of the fire today. This may create new visible smoke for a short period of time.
As progress continues toward containment, some of the crews, engines, and heavy equipment are being released from this incident and being made available for other fires in the region.

Evacuations
All Level 3 evacuation notices have been canceled. The Kah-Nee-Ta Resort, the Fish Hatchery Grade area, the Charlie Canyon Subdivision and Wolf Point remain at a Level 1 evacuation notice. The Schoolie Flat, Simnasho, and S-300 subdivisions are all at Level 2, however only residents will be allowed in at this time. Due to lack of need, the Red Cross shelter at the Warm Springs Community Center has closed.

Road Closures
The S-300 Road and Highway 3 remain closed to non-residents to allow fire traffic to safely patrol the area.

Travel Safely
Public schools open today. The public and fire personnel are being asked to please drive cautiously, especially on Hwy 3 between Warm Springs and the Kah-Nee-Tah Resort.

Preventing New Fires
Even with the recent showers and cooler temperatures, vegetation in the area remains extremely flammable. Please be careful with activities that could create a spark starting a new fire. Avoid driving vehicles in areas with tall grass or brush.

PDF Update
PIO Map





Photo Caption
Mike Leecy, Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Supervisory Timber Presale Technician,uses a drip torch to burn black line; a containment line created to burn/remove the short grasses from the path of the fire.
Photo by: Edward Heath
Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Forest Engineer Technician


Attached Media Files: 2017-08/1062/106937/Mike_Leecy.jpg
Nena Springs Fire Update 13 August 2017
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/13/17 9:14 AM
NORTHWEST INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM 12 &
Oregon State Fire Marshal's Blue Incident Management Team
Richy Harrod, and Scott Magers, Incident Commanders
August 13, 2017

The north end of the Nena Springs Fire continued to expand to the east Saturday reaching the Deschutes River near the Dant area, but did not cross the river. Light rain showers fell overnight and into Sunday morning as a weak cold front moved through. The rains and cooler temperatures have temporarily slowed the progression of the fire. Firefighters are taking advantage of the weather change to assess the recent growth and develop strategies to minimize further spread.

Structure protection resources have made good progress around the communities of Simnasho, Mutton Mountain and Indian Head Canyon prompting some changes in evacuation levels.

Today's Operations:
With increasing resources available, efforts are being made to further mop up around structures and developed control lines as well as work the eastern edge of the fire. The Warm Springs Hotshots will be positioned on the east side of the Deschutes River to prevent the expected westerly winds from spotting the fire across the river. They will be supported by air resources as needed.

Where safe to do so, firefighters are engaging the eastern edge of the fire and developing containment strategies to address some of the more difficult areas in the Nena Creek drainage and Deschutes River Canyon.

Air tankers and helicopters will continue dropping retardant and water to slow the fire's growth. Firefighters can then safely construct dozer and hand lines, and use roads for control lines where available. Weather permitting, burnout operations may also be employed to remove grass and brush ahead of the fire's front.

Evacuations
Some evacuation levels have changed. The Kah-Nee-Ta Resort, the Charlie Canyon Subdivision and Wolf Point remain at a Level 1 evacuation notice. This lets them know a fire is in the area and they should be ready to leave if necessary. The Fish Hatchery Grade area remains under a Level 2 evacuation notice. They should be set to evacuate when notified. Evacuation levels of the Schoolie Flat, Simnasho, and S-300 subdivisions have been reduced from Level 3 to a Level 2, however residents only will be allowed in at this time.

A Red Cross shelter is established at the Warm Springs Community Center to support people displaced by the fire.

Road Closures
The S-300 Road and Highway 3 remain closed, except for local residents.

Caution Needed
Heavy fire traffic is on the roads. The public is asked to please drive cautiously when in the area. If possible, please avoid areas where evacuation notices are issued.

FIRE INFORMATION
Office: (541) 460-7525
Email: NenaFire2017@gmail.com
InciWeb: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5489
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CTWSFireMgt/

SIZE: 40,000 acres
CONTAINMENT: 25%
PERSONNEL: 443
CAUSE: HUMAN
RESOURCES
3 Helicopters
9 HAND CREWS
5 DOZERS
32 ENGINES
Nena Springs Fire Update 12 Aug 2017
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/12/17 9:39 AM
August 12, 2017
An Oregon State Fire Marshal Office Incident Management Team arrived Friday with over 100 firefighters to assist with managing the Nena Springs Wildfire. This organization will be assisting with structural protection and building upon the quality work firefighters have already established.

Structure Protection resources are assigned to the communities of Simnasho, Mutton Mountain and Indian Head Canyon where structures are concentrated. They are developing structure protection plans, re-enforcing containment lines and patrolling neighborhoods to ensure fire does not threaten them again.

Yesterday, several structures were destroyed in the Simnasho area, however, none of them were primary homes; the hard work of firefighters kept the structural damage as low as possible. No new structures were lost overnight since the additional resources arrived. One unoccupied residence was burned the second day when the fire grew over 20,000 acres. Several historic unoccupied outbuildings, considered 50 years or older, and other outbuildings were also destroyed in the first three days.

Today's Operations:
Very dry grass, brush and slash, combined with steep terrain on the northern flank of the fire, are contributing to extreme fire behavior and fire growth. Where safe to do so, firefighters are engaging the fire, now established in the Nena Creek drainage.

As additional resources arrive, they will be given assignments. Their focus is to limit the fire's spread onto private lands, prevent damage to structures and infrastructure and to reduce damage to natural and cultural resources. Firefighters are working to keep the fire east of Bear Springs Cutoff, north of Hwy. 26 and Warm Springs rural zone, west of the Deschutes River and the ridge above Eagle Creek, and south of U.S. 216 and Walters Road.

To accomplish this, air tankers and helicopters have been dropping retardant and water to slow the fire's growth. This is giving firefighters the opportunity to safely construct dozer and hand lines, and use roads for control lines where available. Other firefighters have been conducting burnout operations to remove grass and brush ahead of the fire's front. This key tactic assists firefighters with protecting structures and developing containment areas.

Firefighters have contained a small segment of the northwest flank of the fire. They will re-enforce this line today.
Evacuations

The Kah-Nee-Ta Resort, the Charlie Canyon Subdivision and Wolf Point are not directly affected by the fire at this time, but are under a Level 1 evacuation notice. This lets them know a fire is in the area and they should be aware of current and possible future conditions so that they can be ready to leave if necessary. The Fish Hatchery Grade area is under a Level 2 evacuation notice. They should be set to evacuate when notified. The Schoolie Flat, Simnasho, and S-300 subdivisions are under a Level 3 Evacuation Notice and have been requested to leave the area immediately.

A Red Cross shelter is established at the Warm Springs Community Center to support people displaced by the fire.

Road Closures
The S-300 Road is closed. Highway 3 is also closed, except for local residents.
Caution Needed

Heavy fire traffic is on the roads. The public is asked to please drive cautiously when in the area. If possible, please avoid areas where evacuation notices are issued.
Oregon State Police Seeks Public Assistance in Douglas County Poaching Case (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/17/17 2:58 PM
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The Oregon State Police Fish & Wildlife Division is asking for the public's help to identify the person(s) responsible for the unlawful killing of a cow elk in Douglas County.

On the morning of August 12th, 2017, OSP was notified of a dead cow elk southeast of the Dean Creek Elk Viewing Area. The animal was located near the intersection of Deans Creek Road and Johanneson Creek Road. An OSP Fish and Wildlife Trooper responded and found the dead elk in an open field approximately 75 feet from Deans Creek Road. The animal had been shot and the majority of it was left to waste. Investigation revealed the elk was most likely shot on or around Friday, August 12th, 2017 during the late evening hours.

A reward of up to $500 is offered for information leading to an arrest and conviction in this case. The reward is comprised of $500 from the Oregon Hunters Association Turn-In-Poacher program.

Anyone with information regarding this case is asked to contact OSP Trooper Jay Evans through the Turn in Poachers (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888 or 541-900-0447. (Case # SP17288134) (Email - JEvans@osp.state.or.us). Information may be kept anonymous.



Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators

Poaching wildlife and damaging habitats affects present and future generations of wildlife, impacts communities and the economy, and creates enforcement challenges.

The Turn-In-Poachers (TIP) reward is paid for information leading to the arrest/conviction of person(s) for the illegal possession, killing, taking, and/or waste of deer, elk, antelope, bear, cougar, wolf, bighorn sheep, mountain goat, moose, furbearers and/or game birds.

TIP rewards can also be given for the illegal taking, netting, snagging, and/or dynamiting of salmon, steelhead, sturgeon, and/or large numbers of any fish listed in Oregon statute as a game fish.

In addition, a reward may be issued for information that results in an arrest/conviction of a person who has illegally obtained Oregon hunting/angling license or tags. People who "work" the system and falsely apply for resident licenses and/or tags are not legally hunting and/or angling and are considered poachers.

Increasing damage to wildlife habitat by off-road vehicles prompted the Oregon Hunters

Association (OHA) in 2009 to create the Natural Resources Reward Program that offers a $300 reward for information leading to the arrest of anyone causing natural resources damage by the illegal use of motorized vehicles and is similar to its highly successful TIP program.

$1,000 Bighorn Sheep, Mountain Goat and Moose

$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope

$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf

$300 Habitat Destruction

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish

$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl

$100 Furbearers

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity:

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 (24/7)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)

(Please use the TIP Hotline for Weekend and Evening Reporting)


Attached Media Files: 2017-08/1002/107072/douglas.elk2.jpg , 2017-08/1002/107072/douglas.elk.jpg
OSP, partner agencies pursue suspect vehicle south of Wilsonville following rest-stop contact; two flee, one escapes after crash; tips sought (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/17/17 9:58 AM
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At approximately 3:12 a.m. on Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017, an Oregon State Police Trooper made contact with a 2003 Mitsubishi Eclipse at the Baldock rest area just south of Wilsonville suspicious activity. The trooper was investigating alleged public indecency.

During contact, the female driver exited the vehicle. Then the male suspect -- later identified as Joshua R. Blackwood, 22, of Shoreline, WA -- moved to the suspect vehicle's driver seat. The female then reportedly jumped back in the car, and the two suspects fled the scene.

Oregon State Police pursued, and were soon joined in the chase by the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office (CCSO) patrol deputies and deputies contracted to the Wilsonville Police Department.

At approximately 3:23 a.m., Blackwood crashed the vehicle near milepost 276 on Interstate 5 southbound. Blackwood then fled the vehicle on foot, heading westbound. The female passenger also bailed out of the vehicle and fled to the southwest.

At 3:51 a.m., police captured the female subject: identified as Ashley M Cochrane, 21, from Lake Stevens, Washington. Her case will be presented to a grand jury at a future date. However, police were unable to locate Blackwood. The Oregon State Police is seeking tips from the public. Cochrane is a known girlfriend of Blackwood and they are likely together.

Blackwood is wanted in Washington but the warrants are not serviceable in Oregon. Reportedly, Blackwood spent several months on Washington's most wanted list. He is known to steal vehicles is Washington. Attached are photos obtained from both Blackwood and Cochrane's Facebook pages.

Joshua R. Blackwood is identified as follows:
- White male
- 22 years old
- 5'7"
- 140 lbs.
- Blue eyes
- Blond hair
- Last seen wearing shorts with no shirt or shoes
- Tattoo of seattle Syline on R. Forearm
- Tattoo "Family" on left side of neck under ear

If anyone sees Blackwood they are urged to call the Oregon State Police Northern Command Center at 800-452-7888 or 911 DO NOT Approach Blackwood

The following charges are pending aganst Blackwood and this morning events:
- Assualt on a public safety officer
- Hit and Run
- Attempt to Elude
- Reckless Drive
- PCS
- Crminal Mischief

CCSO deputies searched the area the help of the CCSO Aviation Unit and K9 units from Clackamas and Tigard PD. Marion County Sheriff's Office deputies also responded to assist in the search.


Attached Media Files: 2017-08/1002/107056/Screen_Shot_2017-08-17_at_9.20.07_AM.png , 2017-08/1002/107056/Screen_Shot_2017-08-17_at_9.39.33_AM_(1).png
Death Investigation- Grand Ronde- ** Update #2 on Investigation Status *** (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/16/17 3:40 PM
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UPDATE #2
Based on the investigation conducted the information the Oregon State Police received Dayleen Crowder's death showed no evidence of foul play. The Oregon State Police is continuing to ask anyone who had seen or spoken to Crowder since the end of July to call the Northern Command Center at the below listed number.
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Update#1

On August 15, 2017 at approximately 2:00 PM, Oregon State Police and emergency workers responded to report of a deceased female off highway 18 near the exit 25 overpass (Fort Hill). The female has been identified as Dayleen Kay Crowder (age 52) from Grand Ronde.

Crowder's last known residence was in Grand Ronde at the end of July. The Oregon State Police is asking anyone who might have information or who had seen Crowder after the end of July to call the Oregon State Police Northern Command Center. Please call (800) 452-7888 and refer to case number SP17-292529. Detective Moisan is the lead detective on the case.

Oregon State Police was assisted by Polk County Sheriff's Office, Yamhill County Sheriff's Office, ODOT, Polk County Animal Control, and Polk County District Attorney's Office.

###

The Oregon State Police and local Polk County agencies are conducting a death investigation off highway 18 near milepost 25 (Fort Hill area). The overpass 25 is closed at this time to help investigtors. There is no known threat to public safety. We will release information as it becomes available.

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Attached Media Files: 2017-08/1002/107003/[NCIC]29851981LEMSlsbo1502839292018.jpg
***Name Released*** OSP Investigating Fatal Crash Involving Vehicle versus Bicyclist - Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/15/17 3:34 PM
Photo
Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/1002/106940/thumb_20170813_235604.jpg
UPDATE

The bicyclist has been identified as John Carter REDMOND, age 53, of Oakridge. The investigation is continuing and more information will be released when it is available.

###

Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a passenger car versus bicycle collision on State Route 58, at milepost 34 in Oakridge.

On August 13, 2017, at about 9:38 p.m., a black 1984 Pontiac Fiero, operated by Stephen Bradley HERRICK, age 57, of Westfir, was traveling eastbound on State Route 58 at milepost 34, when a male bicyclist crossed the roadway in a southbound direction and in the path of the Fiero. The bicyclist sustained major injuries and was transported to River Bend Hospital by Oakridge Fire and EMS. He was pronounced deceased shortly after arrival.

One of the eastbound lanes of the highway was blocked for approximately four hours while the on-scene investigation was being conducted.

Preliminary information indicates that the bicyclist was not wearing a helmet and the bicycle did not have any lighting.

Efforts are still ongoing to notify next of kin of the deceased. The Oregon State Police is the lead investigating agency and is being assisted by Oakridge Fire and EMS, Oakridge Police Department and the Oregon Department of Transportation. This in an ongoing investigation and more information will be released when it becomes available.


Attached Media Files: Photo
***Name Released*** Single Vehicle Fatal Crash on Highway 126E near Milepost 30 - Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/15/17 3:23 PM
Photo
Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/1002/106851/thumb_IMG_1392.JPG
UPDATE

The driver of the Ford Explorer has been identified as Elizabeth Lee BARTLETT, age 22, of Portland. The investigation is continuing and more information will be released when it is available.

###

On August 9, 2017, at about 4:25 p.m., Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers responded to a report of a single vehicle crash on Highway 126E, east of Vida in Lane County.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a 2001 Ford Explorer was eastbound when for unknown reasons, left the roadway and struck a large boulder off the south shoulder. The vehicle caught fire after impact and was fully engulfed prior to emergency personnel arrival.

The driver and sole occupant of the Ford Explorer was pronounced deceased at the scene and the identity has yet to be confirmed.

Both lanes of Highway 126E were closed for approximately one hour before one lane was opened for commuting vehicles. OSP was assisted by Oregon Department of Transportation Incident Response, McKenzie Fire and Rescue, US Forest Service, and Lane County Medical Examiner's Office.

The investigation is ongoing and additional information will be released when available.


Attached Media Files: Photo
Traffic Stop Leads to Seizure of 45 Pounds of Methamphetamine - Douglas County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/14/17 11:37 AM
Photo1
Photo1
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/1002/106949/thumb_20170811_231415.jpg
On August 11, 2017, at about 8:16 p.m., an Oregon State Police (OSP) Trooper stopped a 2011 Nissan passenger car for a traffic violation on Interstate 5 near MP 85 northbound, in Douglas County. During the traffic stop, a drug detection K-9 was applied to the exterior of the vehicle. The K-9 alerted to the odor of a controlled substance and a vehicle search revealed approximately 45 pounds of suspected methamphetamine within the vehicle.

The two occupants of the vehicle Rafael VALENCIA, age 24, and Malori NELSON, age 23, both from California, were lodged at the Douglas County Jail for unlawful possession of methamphetamine and unlawful delivery of methamphetamine. This in an ongoing investigation and more information will be released when it becomes available.


Attached Media Files: Photo1 , Photo2 , Photo3
Triple Fatality on Hwy 20 in Lincoln County (Photo)** UPDATE Names Added**
Oregon State Police - 08/14/17 10:14 AM
2017-08/1002/106624/3_CAR_CRASH_ON_20.jpg
2017-08/1002/106624/3_CAR_CRASH_ON_20.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/1002/106624/thumb_3_CAR_CRASH_ON_20.jpg
UPDATE NAMES ADDED TO DODGE DAKOTA
The driver of the Dodge Dakota has been identified as Gerald Bennett (age 74) and passenger as Gloria English Bennett (age 70). Both were from Dallas and were pronounced deceased at the scene.


Correction

The correct spelling for the female passenger of the Chevy Equinox is Kathleen OLIVER

End Update


On Wednesday, August 02, 2017 at approximately 5:00 PM, OSP responded to a report of a 3 vehicle head on collision on HWY 20 around MP 31 in Lincoln County. Preliminary investigation revealed that a 2015 Chevy Equinox SUV was westbound with a 2005 Honda Odyssey van traveling in the same direction a short distance behind the Chevy. For unknown reasons, an eastbound 2003 Dodge Dakota pickup crossed the center line and crashed head on into the Chevy. The Honda was unable to stop and crashed into the other 2 vehicles and the Dodge caught fire and quickly became fully engulfed.

The two occupants of the Dodge were pronounced deceased at the scene and positive identification is still pending. The driver of the Chevy has been identified as 52 year old Michael STEENKOLK and his passenger, 48 year old Kathleen OLIVER, both from Toledo. STEENKOLK was pronounced deceased at the scene and OLIVER was airlifted to Emanuel Hospital with life-threatening injuries. Her current condition is not known. The driver of the Honda was identified as 17 year old Lucy JAEGER and her passenger as 20 year old Joseph SCHMIDT both from Corvallis. They received minor injuries and were transported by ambulance to Samaritan Hospital in Newport for evaluation.

Hwy 20 was closed completely for approximately 3 hours and reopened after 6 hours. The Oregon State Police was assisted by Lincoln County Sheriff's Department, Toledo PD, Toledo Fire, Newport Fire, ODF Fire, Pac West Ambulance, Life Flight, Lincoln County DA's Office, Lincoln County Medical Examiner's Office, AA Rowley's Towing, Bateman's Mortuary, and ODOT.


Attached Media Files: 2017-08/1002/106624/3_CAR_CRASH_ON_20.jpg
Motor Vehicle Accident - Interstate 5, Milepost 125 Southbound - 8-11-17 (Photo)
Roseburg Fire Dept. - 08/11/17 11:15 PM
Image 9
Image 9
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/5568/106909/thumb_IMG950081.jpg
At 7:03 p.m. on August 11, 2017, the Roseburg Fire Department was dispatched to a two vehicle motor vehicle accident with a semi-truck on fire at Milepost 125 Southbound on Interstate 5.

Firefighters arrived on scene to find a semi-truck over turned and on fire as well as a second vehicle that was involved in the accident. The semi-truck driver was transported with serious injuries to Mercy Medical Center. The occupants of the passenger vehicle were not injured. The truck was a total loss and the trailer suffered significant damage. The passenger vehicle suffered moderate damage as well.

Other agencies assisting with the incident included Bay Cities Ambulance, Roseburg Police Department, Oregon State Police, and Oregon Department of Transportation.

For the latest information regarding the City of Roseburg Fire Department, please visit our website at www.cityofroseburg.org or like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/roseburgfire.


Attached Media Files: Image 9 , Image 8 , Image 7 , Image 6 , Image 5 , Image 4 , Image 3 , Image 2 , Image 1
Medical
Kaiser Permanente Eclipse Glasses Safe
Kaiser Permanente Northwest - 08/17/17 4:19 PM
The eclipse glasses Kaiser Permanente has been giving to its members and the community are safe, and not part of any recall. They are CE certified, meet the necessary ISO requirements, and were manufactured in California by Rainbow Symphony, Inc., an approved supplier. Kaiser Permanente has distributed 40,000 glasses in Oregon and Southwest Washington.
Oregon Heart and Vascular Institute at RiverBend earns five vascular reaccreditations and echocardiography reaccreditation
PeaceHealth - 08/16/17 1:55 PM
SPRINGFIELD, Ore. - Lane County residents seeking heart health care can rest easy. PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend's Oregon Heart and Vascular Institute (OHVI) is one of only three vascular labs in the state of Oregon to earn all five vascular lab accreditations from the Intersocietal Accreditation Commission (IAC) in all areas of testing.

"This latest accreditation awarded to OHVI demonstrates the team's ongoing commitment to providing quality patient care," said Rick Padgett, MD, Cardiology. "IAC accreditation is something patients can rely on as an indicator of consistent quality care and a dedication to continuous improvement."

Comprised of a detailed self-evaluation process followed by a thorough review by a panel of medical experts, the IAC accreditation process assesses both the critical operational and technical components a facility.

OHVI has been granted a three-year term of Vascular Testing reaccreditation by the IAC in the areas of Extracranial Cerebrovascular Testing, Peripheral Venous Testing, Peripheral Arterial Testing, Intracranial Cerebrovascular Testing and Visceral Vascular Testing.

OHVI has also been granted a three-year term of echocardiography reaccreditation by the IAC in the areas of adult stress, adult transesophageal and adult transthoracic. OHVI caregivers also serve patients at PeaceHealth Peace Harbor Medical Center in Florence, Cottage Grove Community Medical Center in Cottage Grove and PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center, University District in Eugene. IAC granted the OHVI team echocardiography reaccreditation for each location in the area of adult transthoracic.

OHVI is also accredited by the IAC for General Nuclear Medicine and Nuclear Cardiology.

OHVI serves patients with heart and vascular disorders, from prevention and diagnosis to treatment and rehabilitation. The team is comprised of cardiologists, cardiac surgeons, interventional radiologists, and vascular surgeons. For more information, call (541) 222-7218.

About PeaceHealth: Based in Vancouver, Wash., PeaceHealth is a not-for-profit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon and Alaska. In 1890, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace founded what has become PeaceHealth. PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend is one of Oregon's busiest hospitals located in Springfield, Ore., 110 miles south of Portland. This 347-bed facility is one of the largest hospitals between Portland and San Francisco, serving as a Level II Trauma Center for an eight-county region. Key services for the not-for-profit hospital include cardiology and cardiovascular surgery, oncology, orthopedics, neonatal intensive care, neurosurgery and other specialized surgical services. Visit us online at peacehealth.org

About IAC: IAC provides accreditation programs for vascular testing, echocardiography, nuclear/PET, MRI, diagnostic CT, dental CT, carotid stenting, vein treatment and management and cardiac electrophysiology. The IAC programs for accreditation are dedicated to ensuring quality patient care and promoting health care and all support one common mission: Improving health care through accreditation(R). IAC accreditation is widely respected in the medical community, as illustrated by the support of the national medical societies related to echocardiography, which include physicians and sonographers. To date, the IAC accrediting divisions have granted accreditation to more than 14,000 sites throughout the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico.

# # #
PeaceHealth Peace Harbor prepares for potential eclipse 'surge'
PeaceHealth - 08/16/17 1:52 PM
FLORENCE, Ore. - The highly anticipated Aug. 21 total solar eclipse is right around the corner.

Astronomy experts and amateurs alike have been busy planning where they'll go to get the best views, which solar viewers to purchase, and how they'll document the historic event.

But with portions of northern Oregon sitting smack-dab within the prime viewing area known as the "path of totality," and more than 1 million visitors predicted to flood the area between Aug. 16 and 23, officials at PeaceHealth Peace Harbor Medical Center and local agencies have other issues on their minds. Their focus has been on preparing for a potential influx of patients, disruptions in supply deliveries and cell phone service, and surges in prescription orders and clinic visits as citizens work to get ahead of predicted traffic congestion.

According to Jim Cole, injury prevention/emergency medical services coordinator for PeaceHealth Oregon, officials have been working to make sure its facilities and employees are on alert, prepared and ready, no matter what happens. Several months ago, the hospital participated in Western Lane Emergency Operations Group's disaster drill which simulated a sudden influx of patients to the facility.

Preparations have also included making sure there are enough staff, supplies and other necessary resources for a potential patient capacity surge, and communicating and collaborating with public health and safety agencies across the region.

Many of the prime total eclipse viewing areas are in rural towns, where access to high-level medical care is limited. This means that PeaceHealth medical centers in Oregon and Southwest Washington will be on alert to potentially receive patients from a variety of locations.

"PeaceHealth is focusing on providing safe, high-quality care to patients and being ready, if necessary, to handle a surge of sick or injured people at its hospitals in Springfield, Eugene, Cottage Grove and Florence," said Cole. "Patient care is our top concern, and we've been preparing for it."

View the eclipse safely

Citizens need to take steps to make sure they are fully prepared as well. Watching the solar eclipse without proper eye protection can cause long-term vision damage.

Dr. Lee Azpiroz, optometrist at PeaceHealth Medical Group, points out that the eyes are not designed to withstand the intensity of viewing the sun directly, even for a brief period of time.

"There is no known safe duration for directly viewing the sun," Azpiroz said. "As Eye Physicians, we want you to enjoy the eclipse safely. Pay attention to the advice below. If you are concerned that you may have developed a problem after viewing the eclipse, you should be evaluated soon afterward by an optometrist or an ophthalmologist."

American Academy of Ophthalmology and NASA recommendations for viewing the eclipse safely include:

?,? Do not look directly at the sun without certified solar glasses or viewers, except during the brief total phase of a solar eclipse -- when the moon entirely blocks the sun and it is completely dark.
?,? Only look at an uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun through certified solar glasses or viewers. Certified glasses will have the international safety standard mark: ISO 12312-2, and come from an approved seller. Traditional sunglasses (even very dark ones) and homemade filters are unsafe to use and offer no eye protection.
?,? Never look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun through an unfiltered camera, telescope, binoculars or similar devices, even if you are wearing eclipse glasses or holding a solar viewer at the same time. The intense solar rays coming through these devices will damage the solar filter and your eyes.
?,? Consider watching the eclipse indirectly. You can make your own pinhole viewer. For simple instructions, visit https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/learn/project/how-to-make-a-pinhole-camera/. Or you can let NASA do the work for you and watch as they live stream the eclipse by visiting https://www.nasa.gov/eclipselive.
For more information about eye safety precautions, visit www.aao.org/eye-health/tips-prevention/solar-eclipse-eye-safety.
For more information about the Aug. 21 eclipse, visit https://eclipse.aas.org or https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov.

About PeaceHealth: PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Wash., is a not-for-profit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon and Alaska. PeaceHealth has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a medical group practice with more than 900 providers and 10 medical centers serving both urban and rural communities throughout the Northwest. In 1890, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace founded what has become PeaceHealth. The Sisters shared expertise and transferred wisdom from one medical center to another, always finding the best way to serve the unmet need for healthcare in their communities. Today, PeaceHealth is the legacy of the founding Sisters and continues with a spirit of respect, stewardship, collaboration and social justice in fulfilling its Mission. Visit us online at peacehealth.org.

# # #
PeaceHealth Cottage Grove prepares for potential eclipse 'surge'
PeaceHealth - 08/16/17 1:47 PM
COTTAGE GROVE, Ore. - The highly anticipated Aug. 21 total solar eclipse is right around the corner.

Astronomy experts and amateurs alike have been busy planning where they'll go to get the best views, which solar viewers to purchase, and how they'll document the historic event.

But with portions of northern Oregon sitting smack-dab within the prime viewing area known as the "path of totality," and more than 1 million visitors predicted to flood the area between Aug. 16 and 23, officials at PeaceHealth Cottage Grove Community Medical Center and local agencies have other issues on their minds. Their focus has been on preparing for a potential influx of patients, disruptions in supply deliveries and cell phone service, and surges in prescription orders and clinic visits as citizens work to get ahead of predicted traffic congestion.

According to Jim Cole, injury prevention/emergency medical services coordinator for PeaceHealth Oregon, officials have been working since May to make sure its facilities and employees are on alert, prepared and ready, no matter what happens.

These preparations include making sure there are enough staff, supplies and other necessary resources if there is a patient capacity surge, and also communicating and collaborating with public health and safety agencies across the region.

Many of the prime total eclipse viewing areas are in rural towns, where access to high-level medical care is limited. This means that PeaceHealth medical centers in Oregon and Southwest Washington will be on alert to potentially receive patients from a variety of locations.

"PeaceHealth is focusing on providing safe, high-quality care to patients and being ready, if necessary, to handle a surge of sick or injured people at its hospitals in Springfield, Eugene, Cottage Grove and Florence," said Cole. "Patient care is our top concern, and we've been preparing for it."

View the eclipse safely

Citizens need to take steps to make sure they are fully prepared as well. Watching the solar eclipse without proper eye protection can cause long-term vision damage.

Dr. Lee Azpiroz, optometrist at PeaceHealth Medical Group, points out that the eyes are not designed to withstand the intensity of viewing the sun directly, even for a brief period of time.

"There is no known safe duration for directly viewing the sun," Azpiroz said. "As Eye Physicians, we want you to enjoy the eclipse safely. Pay attention to the advice below. If you are concerned that you may have developed a problem after viewing the eclipse, you should be evaluated soon afterward by an optometrist or an ophthalmologist."

American Academy of Ophthalmology and NASA recommendations for viewing the eclipse safely include:

?,? Do not look directly at the sun without certified solar glasses or viewers, except during the brief total phase of a solar eclipse -- when the moon entirely blocks the sun and it is completely dark.
?,? Only look at an uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun through certified solar glasses or viewers. Certified glasses will have the international safety standard mark: ISO 12312-2, and come from an approved seller. Traditional sunglasses (even very dark ones) and homemade filters are unsafe to use and offer no eye protection.
?,? Never look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun through an unfiltered camera, telescope, binoculars or similar devices, even if you are wearing eclipse glasses or holding a solar viewer at the same time. The intense solar rays coming through these devices will damage the solar filter and your eyes.
?,? Consider watching the eclipse indirectly. You can make your own pinhole viewer. For simple instructions, visit https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/learn/project/how-to-make-a-pinhole-camera/. Or you can let NASA do the work for you and watch as they live stream the eclipse by visiting https://www.nasa.gov/eclipselive.
For more information about eye safety precautions, visit www.aao.org/eye-health/tips-prevention/solar-eclipse-eye-safety.
For more information about the Aug. 21 eclipse, visit https://eclipse.aas.org or https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov.

About PeaceHealth: PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Wash., is a not-for-profit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon and Alaska. PeaceHealth has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a medical group practice with more than 900 providers and 10 medical centers serving both urban and rural communities throughout the Northwest. In 1890, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace founded what has become PeaceHealth. The Sisters shared expertise and transferred wisdom from one medical center to another, always finding the best way to serve the unmet need for healthcare in their communities. Today, PeaceHealth is the legacy of the founding Sisters and continues with a spirit of respect, stewardship, collaboration and social justice in fulfilling its Mission. Visit us online at peacehealth.org.

# # #
PeaceHealth prepares for potential eclipse 'surge'
PeaceHealth - 08/16/17 1:44 PM
SPRINGFIELD, Ore. - The highly anticipated Aug. 21 total solar eclipse is right around the corner.

Astronomy experts and amateurs alike have been busy planning where they'll go to get the best views, which solar viewers to purchase, and how they'll document the historic event.

But with portions of northern Oregon sitting smack-dab within the prime viewing area known as the "path of totality," and more than 1 million visitors predicted to flood the area between Aug. 16 and 23, officials at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend and University District and local agencies have other issues on their minds. Their focus has been on preparing for a potential influx of patients, disruptions in supply deliveries and cell phone service, and surges in prescription orders and clinic visits as citizens work to get ahead of predicted traffic congestion.

According to Jim Cole, injury prevention/emergency medical services coordinator for PeaceHealth Oregon, officials have been working since May to make sure its facilities and employees are on alert, prepared and ready, no matter what happens.

These preparations include making sure there are enough staff, supplies and other necessary resources if there is a patient capacity surge, and also communicating and collaborating with public health and safety agencies across the region.

Many of the prime total eclipse viewing areas are in rural towns, where access to high-level medical care is limited. This means that PeaceHealth medical centers in Oregon and Southwest Washington will be on alert to potentially receive patients from a variety of locations.

"PeaceHealth is focusing on providing safe, high-quality care to patients and being ready, if necessary, to handle a surge of sick or injured people at its hospitals in Springfield, Eugene, Cottage Grove and Florence," said Cole. "Patient care is our top concern, and we've been preparing for it."

View the eclipse safely

Citizens need to take steps to make sure they are fully prepared as well. Watching the solar eclipse without proper eye protection can cause long-term vision damage.

Dr. Lee Azpiroz, optometrist at PeaceHealth Medical Group, points out that the eyes are not designed to withstand the intensity of viewing the sun directly, even for a brief period of time.

"There is no known safe duration for directly viewing the sun," Azpiroz said. "As Eye Physicians, we want you to enjoy the eclipse safely. Pay attention to the advice below. If you are concerned that you may have developed a problem after viewing the eclipse, you should be evaluated soon afterward by an optometrist or an ophthalmologist."

American Academy of Ophthalmology and NASA recommendations for viewing the eclipse safely include:

?,? Do not look directly at the sun without certified solar glasses or viewers, except during the brief total phase of a solar eclipse -- when the moon entirely blocks the sun and it is completely dark.
?,? Only look at an uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun through certified solar glasses or viewers. Certified glasses will have the international safety standard mark: ISO 12312-2, and come from an approved seller. Traditional sunglasses (even very dark ones) and homemade filters are unsafe to use and offer no eye protection.
?,? Never look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun through an unfiltered camera, telescope, binoculars or similar devices, even if you are wearing eclipse glasses or holding a solar viewer at the same time. The intense solar rays coming through these devices will damage the solar filter and your eyes.
?,? Consider watching the eclipse indirectly. You can make your own pinhole viewer. For simple instructions, visit https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/learn/project/how-to-make-a-pinhole-camera/. Or you can let NASA do the work for you and watch as they live stream the eclipse by visiting https://www.nasa.gov/eclipselive.
For more information about eye safety precautions, visit www.aao.org/eye-health/tips-prevention/solar-eclipse-eye-safety.
For more information about the Aug. 21 eclipse, visit https://eclipse.aas.org or https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov.

About PeaceHealth: PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Wash., is a not-for-profit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon and Alaska. PeaceHealth has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a medical group practice with more than 900 providers and 10 medical centers serving both urban and rural communities throughout the Northwest. In 1890, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace founded what has become PeaceHealth. The Sisters shared expertise and transferred wisdom from one medical center to another, always finding the best way to serve the unmet need for healthcare in their communities. Today, PeaceHealth is the legacy of the founding Sisters and continues with a spirit of respect, stewardship, collaboration and social justice in fulfilling its Mission. Visit us online at peacehealth.org.

# # #
Utilities
National 811 Day Serves as a Reminder to Call Before Digging (Photo)
NW Natural - 08/11/17 9:25 AM
Call Before You Dig
Call Before You Dig
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/3843/106881/thumb_811.png
PORTLAND, Ore. -- Today, August 11 or 8/11 is "National 811 Day" and a chance for NW Natural (NYSE:NWN) to remind homeowners and contractors to call before you dig. Data collected by the Common Ground Alliance shows that every six minutes a line is damaged because someone decided to dig without first calling 811.

"Today and throughout the year, we remind homeowners to call 811 to have underground utility lines marked. It's not only important, it's the law," said Scott Gallegos, NW Natural damage prevention supervisor. "This free and easy phone call can lead to steps that prevent property loss, fines, inconvenient outages and serious injuries or worse."

When a call to 811 is made, the homeowner or contractor is connected to the local one-call center, which notifies the appropriate utilities of their intent to dig. Professional locators are then sent to the site to mark the locations of underground lines.

Contractors and homeowners should do the following:
- Call 811 or make an online request at http://call811.com/before-you-dig/how-811works at least two business days before
work begins.
- Wait the required amount of time for utility operators to respond to the request.
- Confirm that all underground utility lines are marked.
- Respect the marks. Dig around the marks with care.

If you accidentally hit a natural gas line, remember to Smell, Go, Let Us Know. If you smell natural gas, leave the area immediately, and then call us at 800-882-3377. No accidental damage is too small to report; even a gouge or dent could lead to future problems. To learn more about this important safety topic, visit nwnatural.com/Residential/Safety.

About NW Natural
NW Natural (NYSE:NWN) is headquartered in Portland, Ore., and provides natural gas service to about 730,000 residential, commercial and industrial customers in Oregon and Southwest Washington. It is the largest independent natural gas utility in the Pacific Northwest. Additional information is available at www.nwnatural.com.

###


Attached Media Files: Call Before You Dig
Keep spotlight on safety and preparation as eclipse looms for customers, visitors
Pacific Power - 08/16/17 9:19 AM
Contact: Media Hotline, 800-570-5838 Aug. 16, 2017
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Keep spotlight on safety and preparation as eclipse looms for customers, visitors
Pacific Power will deploy crews and equipment strategically to maintain a strong, flexible response should outages occur

PATH OF TOTALITY, Ore.-- Rare as they are, solar eclipses are more predictable and easier to prepare for than rogue Pacific storms, events Pacific Power plans for several times a year.

Leading up to the eclipse the morning of Aug. 21, Pacific Power is taking an all hands on deck approach. Nonessential work on the grid has been postponed and employees have been put on call. Equipment and material are prepositioned and ready for use as needed

"We work with local emergency management groups year around, planning for events that have the potential to disrupt power to our customers," said Curtis Mansfield, vice president of operations. "Wind storms, silver thaws, heat waves all have the potential to cause outages. Our crews are on standby and stationed strategically for the eclipse to make repairs should they become necessary."

Mansfield continued: "Our main concern is being able to get to an outage. Roads may be congested. We are working with local authorities to assure access. Other emergency vehicles will also need to navigate traffic jams and special safety passages will be maintained in many areas."

Pacific Power does not anticipate outage problems due to overcapacity. Full hotel rooms and campgrounds are something the company plans for and there is no reason to believe power supply or equipment issues will surface

Electricity serving Pacific Power's customers comes from a diverse array of resources, so the minor down tick in solar generation will be offset by hydro, wind, and thermal generation -- all capable of providing quick increases in output over the course of the event.

Safety however is top of mind. In the path of totality, many residents are having visitors camped out on their properties over the weekend in preparation for the big event on Monday. Pacific Power urges customers to stay safe:

If extension cords are being used to supply visitor recreational vehicles, make sure that they are in good repair (no frays) and of sufficient capacity.
Check your electrical service box to make sure it has the capacity to serve your visitors.
Make sure that cords run safely to the RV so that they are not tripping or clothes-lining hazards.
Be aware that the extra usage could cause an increase in your power bill next month. Look for ways to economize before and after.
Be careful with fire. Use only well maintained fire pits. Obey local fire bans that may be imposed and have water hoses and shovels available.
For more eclipse safety tips go to; www.oregon.gov/oem/hazardsprep

Call toll free any time to report a power outage or a downed line, 1-877-508-5088. To learn more about electrical safety or to order free electrical safety materials, visit pacificpower.net/safety.

-30-


About Pacific Power
Pacific Power is headquartered in Portland and provides electric service to almost 750,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. As part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, Pacific Power and Rocky Mountain Power provide approximately 1.7 million customers in six western states with reliable, efficient energy. The company works to meet growing energy demand while protecting and enhancing the environment.
Transportation
Photo: tanker drop on I-5 MP 53 fire (Photo)
ODOT: SW Oregon - 08/17/17 4:31 PM
2017-08/1202/107085/I_5MP53_tankerdrop_Aug172017.jpg
2017-08/1202/107085/I_5MP53_tankerdrop_Aug172017.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/1202/107085/thumb_I_5MP53_tankerdrop_Aug172017.jpg
ODOT: SW Oregon: I-5 MP 53, between Rogue River and Grants Pass: Due to wildfire, expect extreme delays both NB/SB. NB traffic is backed up nearly 10 miles. Use alternate routes and expect delays. Medford-Grants commuters should consider alternate routes or delaying travel. Watch for emergency crews. UPDATE


Attached Media Files: 2017-08/1202/107085/I_5MP53_tankerdrop_Aug172017.jpg
Photos_I-5 Fire MP 53 (Photo)
ODOT: SW Oregon - 08/17/17 3:32 PM
2017-08/1202/107079/I-5_MP53_Fire_2-_ODFDozer.jpg
2017-08/1202/107079/I-5_MP53_Fire_2-_ODFDozer.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/1202/107079/thumb_I-5_MP53_Fire_2-_ODFDozer.jpg
GRANTS PASS: Photos of Oregon Department of Forestry crews arriving and fight wildfire fire on Interstate 5 MP 53, between Rogue River and Grants Pass. Northbound slow lane is closed. Expect delays and congestion. Watch for and yield to emergency crews.


Attached Media Files: 2017-08/1202/107079/I-5_MP53_Fire_2-_ODFDozer.jpg , 2017-08/1202/107079/I-5_MP_53_Fire_1.jpg
Military
Oregon National Guard Soldiers, Airmen complete firefighting refresher training (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 08/15/17 6:35 PM
2017-08/962/107004/170815-Z-OT568-008.JPG
2017-08/962/107004/170815-Z-OT568-008.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/962/107004/thumb_170815-Z-OT568-008.JPG
SALEM, Oregon (August 15, 2017) -- More than 100 Oregon National Guard Soldiers and Airmen completed refresher firefighting training at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST), in Salem, Oregon, on Tuesday, August 15, 2017. The Guard was activated by Oregon Governor Kate Brown to assist Oregon Department of Forestry with firefighting efforts in southern Oregon.

The group, comprised of Citizen-Airmen and Citizen-Soldiers from Oregon Air and Army National Guard units across the state, are scheduled to deploy to the High Cascade Complex in southern Oregon on Wednesday, August 16, 2017.

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy, which spans more than 235 acres in Salem, Oregon. The academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. DPSST implements minimum standards established by the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training for recruitment and training of city, county and state police, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, emergency telecommunicators and private security providers. DPSST conducts public safety training throughout Oregon and at the central academy in Salem; certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and inspects and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the board.

The Oregon National Guard has an ongoing agreement with the Oregon Department of Forestry known as Operation Plan Smokey, which stipulates the details of how Oregon National Guard members will be utilized to assist in annual firefighting efforts. This agreement is reviewed annually by leadership of both agencies.

PHOTOS:
170815-Z-OT568-001: Maj. Gen. Michael Stencel, The Adjutant General, Oregon, addresses Oregon Army and Air National Guard members at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) in Salem, Oregon, August 15, 2017, as they complete firefighting refresher training. More than 100 Oregon National Guardsmen are being deployed to support the High Cascade Complex Fire near Crater Lake, Oregon. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class April Davis, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

170815-Z-OT568-003: Command Sgt. Maj. Robert Foesch, Command Senior Enlisted Leader for the Oregon National Guard, addresses Soldiers and Airmen at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) in Salem, Oregon, August 15, 2017, as they complete firefighting refresher training. More than 100 Oregon National Guardsmen are being deployed to support the High Cascade Complex Fire near Crater Lake, Oregon. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class April Davis, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

170815-Z-OT568-008: Oregon National Guard Soldiers and Airmen practice digging fire lines during firefighting refresher training at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) in Salem, Oregon, August 15, 2017, before deploying to support the High Cascade Complex Fire near Crater Lake, Oregon. The Oregon National Guardsmen already received the 40-hour training course at DPSST when they were called up for wildfire support in the summer of 2015. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class April Davis, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

170815-Z-CH590-003: Oregon National Guard Soldiers and Airmen hike their way uphill to a training area at the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training academy, in Salem, Oregon, August 15, 2017, during a day of firefighting refresher training, as they prepare to deploy to support the High Cascade Complex Fire near Crater Lake, Oregon. (Photo by Master Sgt. John Hughel, 142nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs, Oregon National Guard)

170815-Z-CH590-006: Oregon National Guard Soldiers and Airmen conduct refresher training on how to use an emergency fire shelter at the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training academy, in Salem, Oregon, August 15, 2017. More than 100 Oregon National Guardsmen are being deployed to support the High Cascade Complex Fire near Crater Lake, Oregon. (Photo by Master Sgt. John Hughel, 142nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs, Oregon National Guard)

170815-Z-CH590-018: Oregon Air National Guard Chief Master Sgt. Larry Keller (left), and Lt. Col. Martin Balakas, observe Soldiers and Airmen training together at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) in Salem, Oregon, August 15, 2017. They will lead more than 100 Oregon National Guardsmen as they deploy to support the High Cascade Complex Fire near Crater Lake, Oregon. (Photo by Master Sgt. John Hughel, 142nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs, Oregon National Guard)

170815-Z-CH590-019: A fire instructor with the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training explains how to conduct wildfire mop-up operations to Oregon National Guard Soldiers and Airmen during firefighting refresher training at the DPSST academy, in Salem, Oregon, August 15, 2017. More than 100 Oregon National Guardsmen are being deployed to support the High Cascade Complex Fire near Crater Lake, Oregon. (Photo by Master Sgt. John Hughel, 142nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs, Oregon National Guard)


Attached Media Files: 2017-08/962/107004/170815-Z-OT568-008.JPG , 2017-08/962/107004/170815-Z-OT568-003.JPG , 2017-08/962/107004/170815-Z-OT568-001.JPG , 2017-08/962/107004/170815-Z-CH590-019.JPG , 2017-08/962/107004/170815-Z-CH590-018.JPG , 2017-08/962/107004/170815-Z-CH590-006.JPG , 2017-08/962/107004/170815-Z-CH590-003.JPG
Oregon National Guard Soldiers, Airmen scheduled to complete fire training, deploy to fire base (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 08/14/17 5:35 PM
2017-08/962/106968/170814-Z-YJ247-002.jpg
2017-08/962/106968/170814-Z-YJ247-002.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/962/106968/thumb_170814-Z-YJ247-002.jpg
SALEM, Oregon (August 14, 2017) -- More than 100 Oregon National Guard members, activated by Oregon Governor Kate Brown to assist with ongoing firefighting efforts in southern Oregon, are scheduled to complete their refresher firefighting training at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST), in Salem, Oregon on Tuesday, August 15, 2017.

The group, comprised of Citizen-Airmen and Citizen-Soldiers from Oregon Air and Army National Guard units across the state are scheduled to deploy to the High Cascade Complex in southern Oregon on Wednesday, August 16, 2017.

The media is invited to view their field training on Tuesday, August 15 at 3:00 p.m., at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training, located at 4190 Aumsville Highway, Salem, Oregon 97317.

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy, which spans more than 235 acres in Salem, Oregon. The academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. DPSST implements minimum standards established by the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training for recruitment and training of city, county and state police, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, emergency telecommunicators and private security providers. DPSST conducts public safety training throughout Oregon and at the central academy in Salem; certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and inspects and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the board.

The Oregon National Guard has an ongoing agreement with the Oregon Department of Forestry known as Operation Plan Smokey, which stipulates the details of how Oregon National Guard members will be utilized to assist in annual firefighting efforts. This agreement is reviewed annually by leadership of both agencies.

For more information on Oregon Department of Forestry Fire prevention seek: http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Fire/pages/FirePrevention.aspx, or contact Mr. Ken Armstrong, at 503-945-7420.

For more information on their training, or to visit the DPSST, contact Mr. Eriks Gabliks, Director of the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training, at 503-378-2332.

For more information on the Oregon National Guard's participation in this year's wildfire fighting efforts, contact Capt. Heather Bashor, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs, at 503-779-9889.

PHOTOS:
170814-Z-YJ247-001
Oregon National Guardsmen arrive at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) in Salem, Oregon, Monday, August 14, 2017, to attend the refresher firefighter course. More than 100 Airmen and Soldiers will attend the course before deploying to the High Cascade Complex in southern Oregon to assist Oregon Department of Forestry with firefighting efforts. (Photo by Capt. Heather Bashor, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

170814-Z-YJ247-002
Soldiers from Oregon National Guard units throughout the state arrive and unpack their gear at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) for firefighter training. More than 100 Airmen and Soldiers are set to attend the course before deploying to the High Cascade Complex in southern Oregon to assist Oregon Department of Forestry with firefighting efforts. (Photo by Capt. Heather Bashor, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)


Attached Media Files: 2017-08/962/106968/170814-Z-YJ247-002.jpg , 2017-08/962/106968/170814-Z-YJ247-001.jpg
Flyovers Honor WWII Air Power & Doolittle Raiders on National Spirit of '45 Day in Portland Aug 13 (Photo)
Oregon Spirit of '45 - 08/12/17 12:16 AM
Doolittle USS Hornet Takeoff 1942
Doolittle USS Hornet Takeoff 1942
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PORTLAND: This year's Oregon Spirit of '45 hosts Jonna Doolittle Hoppes in the amphitheater at Willamette National Cemetery on Sunday, Aug 13, 11 AM. This event marks the 75th Anniversary of the Doolittle Raid and honors Air Power of the US Army Air Corps of the "Greatest Generation.' Flyovers and citizens will honor, be grateful for and remember the incredible contributions of the World War II Generation on their Congressionally-endorsed and state-legislated Spirit of '45 Day, the 2nd Sunday of every August.

JOIN US TO KEEP THE SPIRIT OF 45 ALIVE and salute 16.1 million Americans who served and saved our country and the 400,000+ who made the ultimate sacrifice, 1941-1945. Oregon Air Guard F-15s (as approved) plans to prompt the tribute; West Coast Ravens will fly a "missing man" formation as TAPS is played. WWII 'hero' life-size posters and 20' banners will surround the amphitheater so as to 'REMEMBER AND BE INSPIRED' by this brave and courageous generation.

The Doolittle Raiders, most famous for flying 16 B-25 Mitchell bombers over Tokyo on April 18, 1942, made the 1st American attack on the Japanese mainland just four months after Pearl Harbor. The mission served notice that, indeed, 'a sleeping giant had been awakened.' While all 80 men believed it was a one way mission, only seven lost their lives that day. Most made it through WWII and the last surviving Raider, Dick Cole age 101, resides in Texas. While most people are familiar with the 'Raid', many are unaware of the Oregon connection. The crews that flew on the Raid were part of the 17th Bombardment Group based in Pendleton, giving Oregon Aviation a unique connection to this important event; five raiders were Oregonians.

Jonna Doolittle Hoppes, granddaughter of Commander Doolittle, will share stories about her WWII 'daredevil' pilot, combat leader and military strategist grandfather who achieved numerous aviation firsts, of the scientist driven to expand the horizons of aviation and a general who asked only of his men what he himself was willing to give. Her stories are firsthand of his insatiable thirst for knowledge and self-discipline, his sense of humor and his charm, his keen observations and his honesty and fairness. Doolittle was eventually promoted to Lieutenant General and commanded the 12th Air Force over North Africa, the 15th Air Force over the Mediterranean, and the 8th Air Force in Europe with its 42,000-combat aircraft. In 1985, Ronald Reagan promoted Doolittle to a full four-star general.

Ben Berry, son of Tuskegee Airman Benny Lee 'Flaps' Berry, will tell the humble account of his father a member of the first African-American pilots in the US Army Air Corps. Flaps flew a B-25 bomber in WWII, part of the 332nd Fighter Group and the 477th Bombardment Group. Flaps graduated with a degree in aeronautical engineering, the 1st African American to do so at USC and had a distinguished career working for the Apollo, Space Shuttle and Space Station programs. Flaps was an International Consulting Engineer and worked in Nigeria and Saudi Arabia; he authored three books and two screenplays including Tuskegee Airmen: To the Moon, Mars and Beyond.

U.S. Senator Ron Wyden will be represented and Cameron Smith, Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs director will lay the wreath with our WWII Veterans. The Civil Air Patrol, Columbia Composite Squadron will serve as honor guard. The ceremony will include presentation of the colors, patriotic music, the traditional military honors (21-gun salute) with taps to recognize the contributions made by the "Greatest Generation.' The ceremony will be held in the Assembly Area near the flagpole; all military branches will be honored for the 16.1 million men and women who served including 152,000 Oregonians, of which about 4,000 made the ultimate sacrifice.

HELP US BUILD THE WWII WALL OF HONOR. We enlist all families, friends and communities to submit their WWII Veteran's military photo to our website and add to the wall of men and women 'WWII heroes'; all service branches from any state welcome. Your WWII hero's service branch, hometown and other optional data can be uploaded to www.orspiritof45.org.

In 2020, during the WWII 75th Anniversary Spirit of '45 Commemorative Week of Aug 9-15, the nation will honor the achievements and virtues of men and women of this incredible generation by displaying their photos collected by all states ... stretching from The Nation's Capital steps to the Lincoln Memorial and back to the reflecting pool of the National World War II Memorial.
__________________________________
The Oregon Spirit of '45, Inc. is a 501(c)3 non-profit dedicated to commemorating the achievements and virtues of the World War II generation, on the 2nd Sunday of every August, so as to inspire future generations.

KEEP THE SPIRIT OF '45 ALIVE! is a non-profit, non-partisan initiative to preserve the legacy of the men and women of the Greatest Generation so that their example of courage, self-sacrifice, "can-do" attitude and commitment to community can help inspire a renewal of national unity in America at a time when our country once again must come together to meet historic challenges. Its goal is to establish an annual day of remembrance and national renewal to remind America of the values and accomplishments of the generation who endured the hard times of the Great Depression, fought to defeat the greatest tyranny in history, and then went on to rebuild their shattered world in an unprecedented effort to help assure a better future for both friend and former foe alike.


Attached Media Files: 2017 Air Power Bios , 2017 Spirit of '45 Day Air Power Program , Doolittle Banner Tour Schedule , Doolittle USS Hornet Takeoff 1942
Federal
BPA focuses on safety and reliability during total eclipse
Bonneville Power Administration - 08/17/17 2:32 PM
PR 12-17
BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Thursday, August 17, 2017
CONTACT: Kevin Wingert, 503-230-4140 or 503-230-5131

BPA focuses on safety and reliability during total eclipse

Public's cooperation requested in interacting with crews on or near transmission lines and facilities

Portland, Ore. -- While the pending total eclipse may capture the nation's attention and turn eyes skyward, Bonneville Power Administration remains focused on the region's high-voltage transmission lines directly overhead.

Between Aug. 16 and Aug. 23, officials from the state of Oregon expect an influx of more than one million visitors, many of whom may be camping in areas near BPA facilities and critical infrastructure. Likewise, the state of Idaho anticipates significant travel in and out of the state. BPA is keenly aware that its high-voltage corridors may appear an attractive vantage point for the public even as the lines may pose potential hazards.

These pop-up populations may put additional strain on BPA as it seeks to deliver power reliably and safely throughout the Northwest. BPA's Security and Continuity of Operations Office has been analyzing the path and timing of the eclipse relative to BPA facilities and interests, and working both within BPA and with external agencies to identify and mitigate those potential impacts to our operations.

"We're expecting significant traffic congestion, which could create challenges in responding to any potential power outages. We're also concerned about the possibility of trespassing and vandalism on BPA property, as well as an elevated risk for wildfires," says Sarah Laylo, chief security and continuity officer for BPA.

One concern for the agency is the interaction between the public and our transmission field crews who may be responding to a power outage or performing needed maintenance on the high-voltage transmission system.

"If you encounter a BPA field crew in or near a BPA right-of-way or facility, please remember they have a job to do and that job is directly tied to providing reliable power to the people of the Northwest," said Robin Furrer, vice president of Transmission Services for BPA. "And if they give you instructions or request that you leave an area, it is for your safety. High voltage cannot be taken lightly."

As a way of introduction to visitors and a reminder to residents of the northwest, BPA operates three-fourths of the region's high-voltage transmission system. That system includes more than 15,000 circuit miles of lines that move vast amounts of power from hydroelectric projects and other power plants to urban centers hundreds of miles away.

Here are some key safety facts to remember with power lines or substations:

BPA's high-voltage transmission lines range from 69,000 volts to 500,000 volts -- that's 50 to 100 times the amount of electricity that flows through the distribution lines delivering power to your home;

Unlike the wiring in your home, overhead power lines are not enclosed by electrical insulating material;

Electricity can "arc" or "flashover" from wires, through the air, to trees, other vegetation or equipment up to 15 feet away, where it can cause fires, injuries or even fatalities to anyone nearby;

When power lines carry more electric load, they normally heat up, which causes the wire to expand and sag. In summer, for example, when the air is hot and customers demand lots of electricity, lines can sag up to 14 feet;

Under some high-voltage lines, vehicles can collect induced voltage, particularly if on a nonconductive surface such as asphalt or dry rock. BPA crews use specific restrictions for parking and roads within the right-of-way to keep potential shocks at a low level.

Additionally, wildfires are an ever-present danger, particularly during a dry, hot summer. While BPA's right of ways are used on occasion as fire breaks by firefighters, they are not immune to fire. Something as simple as the heat from an idling vehicle's exhaust pipe can result in combustion of grasses or low vegetation.

BPA is asking the public to report any suspicious activity in the vicinity of the high-voltage transmission system. Damage to lines or substations or other related facilities and equipment is a crime. BPA incurs direct costs to replace stolen or damaged equipment. But those costs, along with lost revenues and economic losses due to power interruptions, are ultimately passed on to electric ratepayers in the Northwest.

Crime Witness Program

BPA offers up to $25,000 for information that leads to the arrest and conviction of individuals committing crimes against BPA facilities and infrastructure. If you have information about illegal or suspicious activity on BPA property, please call BPA's 24-hour, toll-free, confidential Crime Witness hotline at 800-437-2744. If you see illegal or suspicious activity happening in real time, please first contact local law enforcement. For more details about the program, go to www.bpa.gov/goto/CrimeWitness.

About BPA

The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Ore., is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale electricity from 31 federal dams and one nuclear plant to 142 Northwest electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA delivers power via more than 15,000 circuit miles of lines and 260 substations to 511 transmission customers. In all, BPA markets about a third of the electricity consumed in the Northwest and operates three-quarters of the region's high-voltage transmission grid. BPA also funds one of the largest fish and wildlife programs in the world, and, with its partners, pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain affordable, reliable and carbon-free electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov

###
Fall Creek Dam getting new fish facility (Photo)
US Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District - 08/16/17 11:20 AM
Portland District is rebuilding the adult fish collection facility at Fall Creek Dam and Reservoir, located southeast of Eugene, Oregon. The rebuilt facility will make it safer to collect and transport wild spring chinook and winter steelhead upstream of
Portland District is rebuilding the adult fish collection facility at Fall Creek Dam and Reservoir, located southeast of Eugene, Oregon. The rebuilt facility will make it safer to collect and transport wild spring chinook and winter steelhead upstream of
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/982/107020/thumb_170804-A-EZ675-0002.JPG
Release No: PA 17-029
For Immediate Release
August 16, 2017

PORTLAND, Ore. -- Construction crews are rebuilding Fall Creek Dam's Adult Fish Collection Facility southeast of Eugene, Oregon.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is doing this to meet requirements of the 2008 Willamette Project biological opinions to support the safe collection and transport of wild spring Chinook and winter steelhead upstream of the dam.

The Fall Creek site is an active construction site and Corps employees are still collecting fish at that facility. The older fish collection facility can be problematic for the fish and the facility can be precarious for the fish handlers.

This rebuild is similar to ones conducted at Foster Dam and Minto, on the South Santiam and North Santiam rivers, respectively. Construction began October 2016, is scheduled to be completed May 2018 and will cost an estimated $25 million.

The Corps is rebuilding these structures because it is committed to actions included in the 2008 Willamette Project biological opinions that avoid jeopardizing wild spring Chinook and winter steelhead. The Corps' actions at Fall Creek play into a larger regional effort supporting endangered species recovery in the Upper Willamette River Basin.

Completed in 1966, Fall Creek Dam is a rockfill structure with a gated concrete spillway and outlet works for regulating reservoir levels. It is located at river mile 7.2 on Fall Creek, a tributary of the Middle Fork Willamette River, about 20 miles southeast of Eugene.

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Editor's note: Media are invited to view construction efforts, Wednesday, Aug. 23, from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Fall Creek Adult Fish Collection Facility. Please RSVP with names of all attendees to Tom Conning no later than 3 p.m., Aug. 22 to confirm attendance. Attendees should wear sturdy shoes, and bring a hard hat and reflective vest, if available.


Attached Media Files: Portland District is rebuilding the adult fish collection facility at Fall Creek Dam and Reservoir, located southeast of Eugene, Oregon. The rebuilt facility will make it safer to collect and transport wild spring chinook and winter steelhead upstream of
State
Oregon National Guard Departs Oregon Public Safety Academy for Fire Lines at Crater Lake (Photo)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/16/17 12:55 PM
Op Plan Smokey
Op Plan Smokey
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/1187/107025/thumb_2017_Op_Plan_Smokey_C.jpg
More than 100 Oregon National Guard members, activated by Oregon Governor Kate Brown at the request of the Oregon Department of Forestry, to assist with ongoing firefighting efforts in Oregon, departed the Oregon Public Safety Academy a short time ago to join the fire lines at the High Cascade Complex near Crater Lake National Park.

The group, comprised of Citizen-Airmen and Citizen-Soldiers from Oregon Air and Army National Guard units across the state, completed their refresher training in Salem yesterday. The soldiers and airmen were among 375 trained to assist with wildfire suppression efforts in 2015 in John Day and Enterprise during which they received 40 hours of initial training. The training provided to the Oregon National Guard is the same training required of all public and private wildland firefighters.

Director Eriks Gabliks of the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) said he was "impressed with the dedication and hard work of the men and women of the Oregon National Guard who volunteered to support the state's coordinated wildfire suppression efforts. It was our organization's honor and privilege to train these citizen-soldiers and citizen-airmen who have served us both around the state and around the world."

The Oregon National Guard has an ongoing agreement with the Oregon Department of Forestry known as Operation Plan Smokey, which stipulates the details of how Oregon National Guard members will be utilized to assist in annual firefighting efforts. This agreement is reviewed annually by leadership of both agencies with training provided by DPSST at the Oregon Public Safety Academy once the Governor approves the activation of citizen-soldiers and citizen-airmen.

For more information on Oregon Department of Forestry Fire prevention seek: http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Fire/pages/FirePrevention.aspx, or contact Mr. Ken Armstrong, at 503-945-7420.

For more information on the Oregon National Guard's participation in this year's wildfire fighting efforts, contact Capt. Heather Bashor, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs, at 503-779-9889.

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy, which spans more than 235 acres in Salem, Oregon. The academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. DPSST implements minimum standards established by the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training for recruitment and training of city, county and state police, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, emergency telecommunicators and private security providers. DPSST conducts public safety training throughout Oregon and at the central academy in Salem; certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and inspects and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the board.


Attached Media Files: Op Plan Smokey , Op Plan Smokey , Op Plan Smokey , Op Plan Smokey
Oregon National Guard Airmen and Soldiers Complete Training - Ready for Fire Lines (Photo)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/15/17 5:03 PM
Op Plan Smokey
Op Plan Smokey
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/1187/107000/thumb_2017_Op_Plan_Smokey_F.jpg
More than 100 Oregon National Guard members, activated by Oregon Governor Kate Brown at the request of the Oregon Department of Forestry, to assist with ongoing firefighting efforts in Oregon, have successfully completed eight hours of wildland firefighting refresher training this afternoon at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST), in Salem, Oregon on Tuesday, August 15, 2017.

The group, comprised of Citizen-Airmen and Citizen-Soldiers from Oregon Air and Army National Guard units across the state are scheduled to deploy to the High Cascade Complex in southern Oregon (Crater Lake) on Wednesday, August 16, 2017.

The soldiers and airmen were among 375 trained to assist with wildfire suppression efforts in 2015 in John Day and Enterprise during which they received 40 hours of initial training. The training provided to the Oregon National Guard is the same training required of all public and private wildland firefighters.

Today's training consisted of four-hours of classroom training which focused on safety considerations and fire behavior. The afternoon's hands-on training included six stations that focused on fire shelter deployment, hand lines, gridding, hand tool work, and related skills which will allow the personnel to be safe and effective in their work.

The Oregon National Guard has an ongoing agreement with the Oregon Department of Forestry known as Operation Plan Smokey, which stipulates the details of how Oregon National Guard members will be utilized to assist in annual firefighting efforts. This agreement is reviewed annually by leadership of both agencies with training provided by DPSST at the Oregon Public Safety Academy once the Governor approves the activation of citizen-soldiers and citizen-airmen.

For more information on Oregon Department of Forestry Fire prevention seek: http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Fire/pages/FirePrevention.aspx, or contact Mr. Ken Armstrong, at 503-945-7420.

For more information on the Oregon National Guard's participation in this year's wildfire fighting efforts, contact Capt. Heather Bashor, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs, at 503-779-9889.

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy, which spans more than 235 acres in Salem, Oregon. The academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. DPSST implements minimum standards established by the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training for recruitment and training of city, county and state police, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, emergency telecommunicators and private security providers. DPSST conducts public safety training throughout Oregon and at the central academy in Salem; certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and inspects and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the board.


Attached Media Files: Op Plan Smokey , Op Plan Smokey , Op Plan Smokey , Op Plan Smokey
DPSST Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/15/17 9:40 AM
For Immediate Release
August 15, 2017
Contact: Staci Yutzie
503-932-0865

Notice of Regular Meeting
The Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel will hold a regular meeting on August 24, 2017 from 11:00a-2:00p. The meeting will be held in Conference Room # A145 at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above.

Agenda Items:

1. Core Concepts
Decision Making/Problem Solving Discussion
Implicit Bias Discussion

2. Identification of Instructional Goals and Learning Outcomes
What is the overall purpose or intent of each topic?
To what level?
What does the student need to know, do or be after instruction?

3. Reminder- personal vehicle travel reimbursement

Administrative Announcement
This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff's Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.
Oregon National Guard Training for Wildfire Deployment - Media Opportunity Today at 3 PM
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/15/17 9:07 AM
More than 100 Oregon National Guard members, activated by Oregon Governor Kate Brown at the request of the Oregon Department of Forestry, to assist with ongoing firefighting efforts in southern Oregon, are receiving refresher wildland firefighting training at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST), in Salem, Oregon on Tuesday, August 15, 2017.

The group, comprised of Citizen-Airmen and Citizen-Soldiers from Oregon Air and Army National Guard units across the state are scheduled to deploy to the High Cascade Complex in southern Oregon on Wednesday, August 16, 2017.

The media is invited to view their field training on Tuesday, August 15 at 3:00 p.m., at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training, located at 4190 Aumsville Highway, Salem, Oregon 97317.

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy, which spans more than 235 acres in Salem, Oregon. The academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. DPSST implements minimum standards established by the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training for recruitment and training of city, county and state police, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, emergency telecommunicators and private security providers. DPSST conducts public safety training throughout Oregon and at the central academy in Salem; certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and inspects and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the board.

The Oregon National Guard has an ongoing agreement with the Oregon Department of Forestry known as Operation Plan Smokey, which stipulates the details of how Oregon National Guard members will be utilized to assist in annual firefighting efforts. This agreement is reviewed annually by leadership of both agencies.

For more information on Oregon Department of Forestry Fire prevention seek: http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Fire/pages/FirePrevention.aspx, or contact Mr. Ken Armstrong, at 503-945-7420.

For more information on their training, or to visit the DPSST, contact Mr. Eriks Gabliks, Director of the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training, at 503-378-2332.

For more information on the Oregon National Guard's participation in this year's wildfire fighting efforts, contact Capt. Heather Bashor, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs, at 503-779-9889.
Corrections Deputies and Officers to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/11/17 8:09 AM
The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of Basic Corrections Local #BCL028 on Friday August 18, 2017 at the Oregon Public Safety Academy, 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon.

We would like to invite you to join us in observing the ceremony and congratulating Basic Corrections #BCL028 on their successful completion of basic training.
The event will begin at 11 am with a reception to follow after the ceremony. Sheriff Eric Zanni of the Coos County Sheriff's Office will be the guest speaker.

The graduating students appreciate the family, friends and guests who make graduation an appropriate conclusion to their basic training at the Oregon Public Safety Academy.

Members of Graduating Class BCL028:

Deputy Sheriff Dominic Barbers
Lincoln County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Jason Blaesing
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Douglas Bloomster
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Jessica Bridgeman
Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Beau Brosseau
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Rex Campbell
Coos County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Tristan Cox
Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Michael Dunn
Baker County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Simeon Elbrader
Lincoln County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Timothy Engel
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Christopher Felmey
Clackamas County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Patrick Flanders
Lane County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Trevor Frieze
Douglas County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Jordan Gragg
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Kristy Harvey
Coos County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Gage Jacobson
Jackson County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Bradly Kerrigan
Clackamas County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Epikopu King
Northern Oregon Correctional Facility

Civilian Employee Crea Lancaster
Bend Police Department

Corrections Officer Dylan Mekulich McArthur
Washington County Community Corrections

Deputy Sheriff Mani Morrell
Clackamas County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff David Morrison
Umatilla County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Amy Nixon
Lane County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Garrett Noffsinger
Tillamook County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Jose Palomera
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Robert Panko
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Adam Raethke
Columbia County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff James Starkweather
Curry County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Luke Stonebreaker
Union County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Corey Stroming
Lane County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Joshua Sullivan
Yamhill County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Stephen Thompson
Klamath County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Julio Warner
Lane County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Justin Wilson
Lane County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Allen Yourn
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

## Background Information on the BPSST and DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff's Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.
New web pages make progress on child and youth safety visible
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/16/17 3:43 PM
The Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) has launched "10 Priority Projects "web pages for the Unified Child and Youth Safety Implementation Plan. The web pages are designed to promote safety for Oregon's children and youth and to transparently share information on the Unified Child and Youth Safety Implementation Plan. The web pages can be found here: http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/ABOUTDHS/Child-Safety-Plan/Pages/projects.aspx

New web pages will make it easier for people to learn about the work DHS is doing around child and youth safety in Oregon. The pages include status reports on projects, timelines and more. The pages will be regularly updated. To receive notifications of updates please subscribe to our Child Safety listserv and follow us on twitter @OregonDHS.

For more information about the Unified Child and Youth Safety Implementation Plan, please contact Nathan Rix, Executive Projects Director, 503-302-5212 or nathan.k.rix@state.or.us.
Two Rivers Correctional Institution reports inmate death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 08/13/17 3:26 PM
Benjamin Yzaguirre
Benjamin Yzaguirre
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/1070/106928/thumb_Ag.jpg
An Oregon Department of Corrections inmate died unexpectedly late Saturday night at Two Rivers Correctional Institution in Umatilla. As with all unanticipated deaths in state prisons, the Oregon State Police Criminal Investigation Division is conducting an investigation.

At approximately 9:39 p.m. on Saturday, August 12, 2017, Benjamin Yzaguirre, 64, was found unresponsive in his cell. Security and medical staff immediately began life-saving efforts, which continued by Umatilla Emergency Medical Technicians, to no avail. Yzaguirre was transported to a local hospital where he was pronounced deceased at 10:55 p.m.

Yzagiurre entered DOC custody on July 2, 2015, on one count of rape and one count of sodomy out of Marion County. His expected release date was June 11, 2021.

Next of kin has been notified. No other details are available at this time.

TRCI is a multi-custody prison in Umatilla that houses approximately 1,800 male inmates. TRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including institution and industrial laundry, mattress manufacturing, and sewing. Other institutional work programs include reparation and cleaning of irrigation ditches, maintenance of local baseball fields, and work with local cities and the Hermiston School District. The facility provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, religious services and behavioral health services. TRCI opened in 2000.

####


Attached Media Files: Benjamin Yzaguirre
Keep Oregon Green During the Eclipse
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/15/17 2:07 PM
Here in Oregon, we are counting down the days to an amazing celestial event. The United States is the only country which will experience the total solar eclipse and Oregon will be the first state where it can be viewed.
Federal, state, and county agencies have spent a great deal of time in recent months preparing for the challenges associated with this event -- traffic congestion, food and fuel availability, and cell phone reception to name a few. But the one overwhelming concern that all agencies involved share is wildfire. The eclipse is occurring at the peak of Oregon's fire season. As many as a million visitors are coming here to watch it. Thousands will be camping in open fields, forests and campgrounds hoping to get a good view under clear skies. Everyday activities already cause the majority of Oregon wildfires, and the risk will sharply increase when these additional visitors head onto the landscape all at the same time.
"Oregon residents have high expectations that tourists coming to view the eclipse will be respectful and leave our landscapes as beautiful as they found them," says Kristin Babbs, president of the Keep Oregon Green Association, a wildfire prevention organization. "That said, it's a tall order for visitors to fill; our own residents are having a hard time preventing wildfire starts themselves." To date, Oregonians have been responsible for starting 636 fires. "Last week alone, the Oregon Department of Forestry reported 32 fire starts that burned over 450 acres. They were caused by equipment, illegal debris burning, smoking and the dumping of hot coals," she said.
August is always a dangerous month for wildfire starts in Oregon because fuels are at their driest. The fire danger level is high or extreme in many areas of the state. Any accidental spark or stray ember can start a fire and spread rapidly.
Two-thirds of the wildfires in Oregon are started by people, so it is extremely important to check the fire restrictions where you plan to work or play, and be sure that you are prepared to put a fire out should one get started. Any careless act can get traction: a campfire left smoldering; the whirling metal blades of a lawnmower striking a rock; a cigarette tossed from a vehicle; or a hot car idling over tall, dry grass. If you are traveling the roads, carry the essentials: a shovel and a gallon of water or a charged and operational fire extinguisher in case you need to be your own firefighter. In fact, these items are required in your vehicle in many areas. If traffic comes to a standstill during the eclipse, fire engine response time may be delayed.
One careless act can destroy thousands of acres -- not to mention your bank account. Anyone responsible for starting a fire, accidental or not, may be liable for fire suppression costs as well as the cost of damage to neighboring property owners. "Our everyday actions impact the landscape and the lives of the firefighters who work tirelessly to protect them. Predict the outcome of your behaviors. Predictable is preventable," said Babbs.

The Keep Oregon Green Association offers common-sense advice and important information on how to prevent fires when traveling through, camping and recreating in Oregon's scenic areas. Go to www.keeporegongreen.org or @keeporegongreen on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.


Attached Media Files: 2017-08/1072/106991/stickersmokeyOR_eclipse.pdf
Eclipse visitors asked to be familiar with restrictions to prevent wildfires
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/15/17 1:11 PM
PHILOMATH, Ore. -- Hot and dry weather has heightened the chances of wildfire starting in the Oregon Department of Forestry's West Oregon District. So district fire officials are asking for the public's help to prevent wildfires, especially during next week's solar eclipse when thousands of visitors to the area are expected.
"We are excited to be the first place where the 2017 eclipse will be visible. The path of totality will pass directly over our area, starting on the coast and traveling east toward the Cascades. However, there is a lot of forest and grasslands in our region. August is one of our driest months, so wildfire is a big concern," said Community Wildfire Forester Pat MacMeekin with the West Oregon District.
"It's really important visitors know the local fire restrictions, especially out-of-town visitors who may not be familiar with our restrictions," said MacMeekin.
In Benton, Polk, Lincoln, and Yamhill counties, some of those fire restrictions include:
No campfires
No smoking
No motorized vehicles off roads
No fireworks
Additionally, visitors may be required to carry a shovel and 1 gallon of water or one 2 ?1/2 lb. ABC-rated fire extinguisher in their vehicle for fire suppression.
"We want the public to enjoy our state, and have fun during the eclipse, but be smart when it comes to fire. Parking a vehicle in dry grass, or discarding a cigarette out of a window can easily start a wildfire," said MacMeekin
For further information and a complete list of public fire restrictions, please call the Oregon Department of Forestry weekdays during regular business hours or visit ODF's Fire Restrictions and Closures web page at http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Fire/Pages/Restrictions.aspx
Benton County -- Philomath Office 541-929-3266
Lincoln County -- Toledo Office 541-336-2273
Polk or Yamhill counties -- Dallas Office 503-934-8146
# # #
FIRE CREWS BATTLING MULTIPLE WILDFIRES | Thursday's lightning storm ignited almost 30 new fires
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/11/17 4:47 PM
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 11, 2017

Contact: Marcus Kauffman, Oregon Department of Forestry
541-726-3588 or 541-580-7480 cell



At about 5:00pm Thursday, August 10, 2017 a small but powerful storm cell passed over the Leaburg and Vida areas, peppering the forest with lightning and igniting multiple new wildland fires. Crews from the Oregon Dept. of Forestry responded and were able to quickly contain two of the new starts. A third start, the Goat Point Fire, has already burned five acres and is uncontained, burning in steep inaccessible terrain.

Due to the high volume fire starts and relative scarcity of resources, the ODF's South Cascade District is managing the three new fires and the existing McGowan Powerline 2 Fire, as a complex--which will improve access to resources and accountability.

"It's times like these that the complete and coordinated system really shines," said Chris Cline, ODF's South Cascade District Forester. "When these lighting busts come through it is crucial that we act fast and that means relying on our neighbors and cooperators for help. Firefighters from ODF's South Cascade have been working side by side with crews from ODF Western Lane, Coos and Douglas Forest Protective Associations, the Willamette National Forest, and multiple private landowners," Cline noted.

Current resources dedicated to battling the small complex include:

2 10-person hand crews
5 engines
5 fallers
1 medium helicopter
2 tenders
A total of about 35 people are currently assigned to the fires.

Weather forecasters predict cool moist marine air will move into the area by Sunday which may provide more favorable conditions for fire suppression.

Fifteen large fires are currently burning in Oregon. The latest series of lightning strikes has again raised the importance of fire prevention. Fire managers are urging the public to be diligent and vigilant with anything that may emit a spark. Fire season is in effect and fire managers have raised the fire danger level to high. Normal summer weather has dried forests, brush, and grasses. The ongoing heat poses a significant fire weather threat and any fire start could spread rapidly.

Cline says, "When it's this hot and dry, everyone needs to think twice before using anything that might emit a spark."

Remember: One less spark equals one less wildfire.

####

ODF has provided a few images and some short videos which accessible at the link below. Please attribute to Oregon Department of Forestry.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/s57qk11xqy3hgk1/AACq1cXawXWmjpY0mAW09pCza?dl=0
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Employment in Oregon July 2017 News Release
Oregon Employment Dept. - 08/15/17 10:00 AM
July's Strong Job Growth in Oregon Eclipses the Unemployment Rate

In July, Oregon's nonfarm payroll employment grew by 5,900 jobs, following a gain of 8,700 in June. Four of the major industries added more than 1,000 jobs. Leisure and hospitality added the most, increasing by 2,400 jobs. In addition, strong hiring occurred in construction (+1,200 jobs), health care and social assistance (+1,200), and retail trade (+1,200). Professional and business services was the only major industry to cut more than 1,000, as it shed 1,400 jobs.

Job growth was faster than it was at the beginning of the year. Over the past 12 months, Oregon's payroll employment rose 56,200, or 3.1 percent, as was reflected in the quarterly revisions to the data. Earlier in the year, annual job growth had slowed to 2.0 percent, but by July was back above 3.0 percent for the first time since April 2016 when the growth rate was 3.2 percent. Several large industry sectors led the expansion in the 12 months ending with July 2017, including construction (+10,300 jobs, or 11.4%), leisure and hospitality (+9,900 jobs, or 5.0%), and health care and social assistance (+8,600 jobs, or 3.7%).

Oregon's unemployment rate was little changed at 3.8 percent in July. The rate remained near its all time low of 3.6 percent reached in May. Oregon's rate was significantly below its year-ago rate of 5.1 percent in July 2016. The U.S. unemployment rate was 4.3 percent in July 2017.

Another sign of a tight labor market in Oregon is fewer workers employed part time for economic reasons. In July, 68,000 Oregonians would have preferred full-time employment but were working part time because their hours had been cut or because they could not find a full-time job. This was the lowest total on record dating back to 2002, when comparable records began. In contrast, these involuntary part-time workers reached a peak of 160,000 in 2009, during the Great Recession.

Next Press Releases
The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the July county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, August 22nd, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for August on Tuesday, September 12th.

Notes:
All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted.

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources.

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this Official Oregon Series data unless noted otherwise. This month's release incorporates the January, February and March 2017 tax records data. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS.

The pdf version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon Centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program -- auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For the Deaf and Hard of Hearing population, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.


Attached Media Files: Employment in Oregon July 2017 News Release
Oregon Employer Council to hold Conference for Businesses
Oregon Employment Dept. - 08/11/17 10:37 AM
SPIRIT MOUNTAIN CASINO -- The Oregon Employer Council Fall Conference, an annual event, will be held on Monday and Tuesday, October 16th and 17th, 2017 at Spirit Mountain Casino in Grand Ronde, west of Salem.

The Fall Conference offers keynote speakers and breakout sessions on human resources, labor law, and business topics, as well as opportunities to network with businesses from around the state. HRCI and SHRM credits will be available.

Early bird registration for the state conference is $299 per person, or $349 after September 8th. To register or for more information, contact Greg Ivers at 503-947-1305 gregory.e.ivers@state.or.us. Agenda and more information are available at www.oec.org.

The Oregon Employer Council is a nonprofit organization with chapters throughout Oregon. OEC chapters create bridges between business and government, and provide low cost, local training for businesses. Membership is open to all Oregon businesses.


Attached Media Files: 2017-08/930/106884/OEC_Press_Release.pdf
West Nile virus, other mosquito-borne diseases are reminder to protect yourself during eclipse watching
Oregon Health Authority - 08/17/17 3:22 PM
August 17, 2017

Health officials say people can reduce risk by covering up, using repellent

New cases of West Nile virus and Saint Louis encephalitis have been discovered in mosquitoes collected in several eastern Oregon counties. That is a good reminder for eclipse watchers of the importance of protecting yourself from mosquito bites, public health officials say.

West Nile virus and Saint Louis encephalitis, which usually present as flu-like diseases, are spread by mosquito bites. The diseases have been found in Harney, Morrow and Malheur counties, according to officials at the Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division.

The Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at Oregon State University's College of Veterinary Medicine found West Nile late Wednesday in nine mosquito pools--a sample of about 50 mosquitoes collected by vector control district personnel--and Saint Louis encephalitis in two pools. Two human cases of West Nile have been reported so far in 2017, both in Malheur County.

Emilio DeBess, DVM, OHA public health veterinarian, says that as about 1 million people converge on or near the path of the total eclipse, they should prepare now to protect themselves from mosquito bites.

"As people camp out in areas where mosquitoes are active, we want to remind people that the insects are biting and have the ability to spread these diseases," DeBess said. "Please take some simple steps to protect yourselves and your families from bug bites."

DeBess offers these tips:
-- When outdoors at dusk and dawn when mosquitoes are most active, protect yourself by using mosquito repellents containing: At least 20 percent DEET but no more than 50 percent DEET; picaridin (known as KBR 3023 and icaridin outside the U.S.A.); IR3535; oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE) or para-menthane-diol (PMD); 2-undecanone.
-- Avoid sources of standing water. These are breeding grounds for mosquitoes.
-- Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants in mosquito-infested areas.
-- Make sure screen doors and windows are in good repair and fit tightly.

DeBess recommends protecting animals against mosquito bites. Pet owners should contact their veterinarian about topical mosquito repellents. Horse owners should consult their veterinarian about vaccinating horses for West Nile virus.

Most people who get West Nile virus and Saint Louis encephalitis have mild symptoms such as fever, headaches and nausea. Signs of illness typically last from three to six days. In a few cases, more severe signs of illness occur. Severe signs of illness include tremors or confusion. The central nervous system also may be affected. This can result in a headache combined with fever, infection of brain fluids and fluids around the spine, or brain swelling. Consult your health care provider if you have these symptoms. Health care providers can contact their county health departments for information on disease testing services offered by the Oregon State Public Health Laboratory.

For more information about West Nile virus, visit the Public Health Division website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/DISEASESCONDITIONS/DISEASESAZ/WESTNILEVIRUS/Pages/wnile.aspx.

For information about Saint Louis encephalitis, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website at https://www.cdc.gov/sle/index.html

# # #
Be aware of harmful algae blooms, water quality during eclipse
Oregon Health Authority - 08/16/17 11:19 AM
August 16, 2017

Water bodies affected with blue-green algae could be harmful

The Oregon Health Authority is advising the public about the potential for harmful blue-green algae blooms and toxins associated with these blooms on water bodies in areas people are visiting to watch the Aug. 21 eclipse.

Any water body under the right conditions can develop a harmful algae bloom. Although not all blooms produce toxins at levels that are harmful to people, there is no way to know if a bloom is producing toxins, or the level of toxins being produced, without laboratory analysis of a water sample.

Because only a fraction of Oregon's fresh waters are visually monitored and sampled when blooms occur, people shouldn't count on being notified about all harmful algae blooms, especially on water bodies not considered high-use for recreation, or those not used for public drinking water.

When visiting a lake in Oregon for camping or other recreation, there are certain conditions to look for stay safe and healthy. If the water smells bad or looks foamy, scummy, thick like paint and pea-green, blue-green or brownish-red, stay out and don't use the water for drinking or cooking. Algae toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treatment with camping filters. Only public drinking water systems can reduce algae toxins through proper filtration and disinfection. Potable water at established campgrounds should be fine.

Exposure to toxins occurs by ingesting or drinking affected water. Although these toxins are not absorbed through the skin, a puffy red rash may occur where skin comes into contact with a bloom. Toxins can cause a variety of symptoms including numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems, and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of skin irritation, weakness, diarrhea, nausea, cramps and fainting should also receive medical attention if they persist or worsen. Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. Special precaution should be taken with pets to keep them from drinking from or swimming in areas identified as having a potential bloom. The exposure level for dogs is much lower than that for people.

Oregon health officials recommend that those who choose to eat fish from waters where algae blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, as toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water. Public health officials also advise people to not eat freshwater clams or mussels from a water body with a potential bloom, and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations do not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

With proper precautions to avoid activities during which affected water can be ingested, people are encouraged to enjoy their visit to Oregon for the eclipse.

For health information or to report an illness, contact OHA at 971-673-0400. For campground or lake information, call the local management agency, and heed all warning signs and educational materials regarding harmful algae blooms.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website. To learn if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body being sampled, visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://www.healthoregon.org/hab and select "algae bloom advisories," or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 877-290-6767. You can also find lots of additional facts and information on the website to help you enjoy your visit while staying safe.

# # #
Public Health Advisory Board Accountability Metrics Subcommittee meets August 23 by webinar
Oregon Health Authority - 08/15/17 4:34 PM
August 15, 2017

What: A public meeting of the Accountability Metrics Subcommittee of the Public Health Advisory Board

Agenda: Approve May meeting minutes; make recommendation for active transportation measure; receive update on opioid overdose and oral health measures; receive update on the Coalition of Local Health Officials committee work to develop local public health process measures.

When: Wednesday, Aug. 23, 10-11 a.m. A public comment period will take place at the end of the meeting.

Where: By webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5150607625475124481. The public can also join by conference call line at 877-873-8017, access code 767068#.

Oregon's Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon's governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon's State Health Improvement Plan. The Accountability Metrics Subcommittee develops recommendations about public health quality measures for consideration by board.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:
Sign language and spoken language interpreters
Written materials in other languages
Braille
Large print
Audio and other formats
If you need help or have questions, please contact: Sara Beaudrault at 971-645-5766, 711 TTY, or sara.beaudrault@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.
Public Health Advisory Board meets September 5 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 08/15/17 4:12 PM
August 15, 2017

What: The monthly public meeting of the Public Health Advisory Board

Agenda: Discuss a new charter template and bylaws; discuss tobacco prevention funding and evaluation findings; discuss agenda for joint meeting with the Oregon Transportation Commission; adopt guiding principles for public health and health care collaboration.

When: Tuesday, Sept. 5, 1-4 p.m. The meeting is open to the public. A public comment period will take place at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1A, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. A conference call line is available at 877-873-8017, access code 767068. The public also can join the meeting by live-stream at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kEkw3Y4dGPI

Oregon's Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon's governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon's State Health Improvement Plan.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:
Sign language and spoken language interpreters
Written materials in other languages
Braille
Large print
Audio and other formats
If you need help or have questions, please contact Cara Biddlecom at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY or cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.
Nursery manager sows new type of green -- $1 million Powerball win!
Oregon Lottery - 08/11/17 2:40 PM
Aug. 11, 2017 - Salem, Ore. -- A Forest Grove nursery manager won a $1 million Powerball prize after her ticket was one number away from winning the more than $300 million jackpot.

Teresa Avalos Gomez claimed her prize Friday morning after returning to the Mini Mart where she purchased the ticket, to check it.

"I scanned it and it said to talk to the clerk," she said through an interpreter. "When I checked it with the clerk, it said I needed to go to Salem. We were both shocked and excited!"

Avalos Gomez took the ticket home and checked the numbers online several times with her family on the Oregon Lottery's website before she would believe her ticket was not worth $100, but $1 million.

"I was pretty sure it was only $100," she said. "Now I can pay off my mortgage. I am still wrapping my head around winning that much money."

Wednesday night's winning numbers were 12-30-36-47-62 with a Powerball of 9. Avalos Gomez's quick pick Powerball ticket missed the Powerball number.

Jimmie Musselwhite, who owns the Mini Mart where Avalos Gomez purchased her ticket, said he was happy to learn he had sold a $1 million ticket.

"I am sure we are going to sell a bunch of Powerball tickets tomorrow," he said. "Selling a million dollar ticket, and having the jackpot still be so high, I think people will come here to get their tickets."

Musselwhite has owned the convenience store for 14 years with his wife Sherri, and said that his daughter was the clerk who sold the winning ticket. The store, located at 2705 Pacific Avenue in Forest Grove, will receive a $10,000 selling bonus for selling the ticket. Musselwhite said he was going to use the money for bonuses to his staff and will give some to a local homeless shelter.

Meanwhile, the Powerball jackpot continues to grow. The estimated jackpot for Saturday night's drawing is $356 million.

Altogether, 14,283 Powerball players won more than $1,064,000 in Oregon after Wednesday night's drawing. Prizes ranged from the $1 million ticket to $4 winning tickets.

The top Powerball prize ever won by an Oregonian was $340 million.

Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. The Oregon Lottery reminds players to always sign the back of their Lottery tickets, regardless of the game. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org


###
Did you win $1 million?
Oregon Lottery - 08/11/17 10:00 AM
Aug. 10, 2017 - Salem, Ore. -- If you purchased a Powerball ticket in Forest Grove, you may want to check your ticket. You might be the $1 million winner.

Wednesday night's winning numbers were 12-30-36-47-62 with a Powerball of 9. The PowerPlay multiplier was 4.

As Oregon Lottery jackpots for Powerball, Mega Millions and Oregon's Game Megabucks continue to grow, players are seeing more and more prizes across the state. The top prize so far is a $1 million Powerball ticket--and the Powerball jackpot continues to grow. The estimated jackpot for Saturday night's drawing is $356 million.

Altogether, 14,283 Powerball players won more than $1,064,000 in Oregon after Wednesday night's drawing. Prizes ranged from the $1 million ticket -- where the player hit five numbers but missed the Powerball -- to $4 winning tickets.

The last $1 million Powerball winner in Oregon was Steven Dery of Coquille in July 2106. The top Powerball prize ever won by an Oregonian was $340 million.

Oregonians have multiple opportunities to win this week. Wednesday night 8,400 people won more than $52,700 playing Oregon's Game Megabucks. The Megabuck's jackpot continues to climb. The estimated jackpot for Saturday's drawing is $5.8 million.

Meanwhile, the Mega Millions jackpot also continues to rise, reaching $393 million for Friday's drawing!

"With three jackpots continuing to grow, it's a great time to purchase a Jackpot Trio ticket, which gives you numbers for Oregon's Game Megabucks, Powerball and Mega Millions," said Patrick Johnson, Lottery spokesman. "If you purchased a Powerball ticket this week in Forest Grove, check that ticket!"

Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. The Oregon Lottery reminds players to always sign the back of their Lottery tickets, regardless of the game. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org
As eclipse nears official information is available statewide (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 08/17/17 3:12 PM
2017-08/3986/107075/Eclipse_Image.jpg
2017-08/3986/107075/Eclipse_Image.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/3986/107075/thumb_Eclipse_Image.jpg
Salem OR -- With the total solar eclipse coming through Oregon on Monday, the state is already seeing higher-than-normal levels of traffic in Central and Eastern Oregon. The state, as well as cities and counties in the Path of Totality, have established a Joint Information System to get information to the public and media.

If you are anywhere in Oregon and would like information about the eclipse you can call 211 or go to 211info.org. You can also follow @OregonOEM and other official sources on Twitter using #OReclipse.

Tomorrow, Aug. 18, from 10 to 11 a.m. join us for a TweetChat using #OReclipse. State agency partners from Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, Travel Oregon, Oregon Department of Transportation, Oregon Department of Forestry, Oregon Health Authority, and the Oregon Office of Emergency Management will be available to answer your questions about the eclipse.

Information centers throughout Oregon will continue to update the media and public throughout the event.


Attached Media Files: 2017-08/3986/107075/Eclipse_Image.jpg
OEM and partners offer resources for 2017 Eclipse Visitors and Viewers (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 08/15/17 1:12 PM
2017-08/3986/106989/DSC_9993.jpg
2017-08/3986/106989/DSC_9993.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/3986/106989/thumb_DSC_9993.jpg
With just five days to go until the 2017 total solar eclipse, state agencies in Oregon are working together to provide information on traffic, health and safety, wildfire danger, camping, and weather, among other things to residents and tourists eager to view the once-in-a-lifetime celestial phenomenon.

A wide variety of information about the eclipse can be found on Facebook and Twitter by using #OReclipse and #Eclipse2017.

Up-to-the-minute information will be available through a wide variety of resources:

211 Info -- This non-emergency eclipse hotline will operate Aug. 16 to Aug. 23, between 7 a.m. and 10 p.m. Dial 2-1-1, visit http://211info.org, or text ECLIPSE to 898211.
TripCheck.com -- Real-time traffic information, along with weather, restrictions and travel times make this interactive website one of the most useful tools available for anyone looking to navigate roadways between now and the days following the eclipse.
ODF Public Fire Restrictions Map -- A clickable map from Oregon's Department of Forestry allows users to pinpoint their location and learn about (low to extreme) fire danger risk, campfire limitations and other public fire restrictions. Necessary fire mitigation information and equipment is also noted.
RAPTOR -- Also known as Real-Time Assessment and Planning Tool for Oregon, Oregon Office of Emergency Management's RAPTOR site offers a public version for people to track what's happening where in the eclipse path of totality and around the state, including events, wildfires, road closures and weather.
National Weather Service -- Weather is everyone's number one concern. Visitors to the National Weather Service website can get all the information they need to be prepared for rain or shine, clouds or clear skies, with a click on a keyboard.

Oregon Office of Emergency Management Website provides tips for residents, visitors and businesses. A Frequently Asked Questions document delves into answers to common questions.


PHOTO CAPTIONS:

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Oregon Office of Emergency Management Director Andrew Phelps answers questions from the media about state coordination for the 2017 Eclipse at this morning's press conference at the Oregon State Fairgrounds. The public can get information about the eclipse using #OReclipse or #Eclipse2017, or calling 211.
(Oregon Office of Emergency Management Photo by Cory E. Grogan)

DSC_9984
Oregon Governor Kate Brown talks about how Oregon's statewide governmental, preparedness, and travel organizations have been working together to ensure Oregon is ready to accommodate an unprecedented number of Oregonians and visitors who are expected view the 2017 solar eclipse at today's press conference at the Oregon State Fairgrounds. The public can get information about the eclipse using #OReclipse or #Eclipse2017, or calling 211.
(Oregon Office of Emergency Management Photo by Cory E. Grogan)

DSC_9993
The Adjutant General, Oregon, Maj. Gen. Michael Stencel, talks about Oregon National Guard support for the 2017 Eclipse at today's press conference at the Oregon State Fairgrounds. The public can get information about the eclipse using #OReclipse or #Eclipse2017, or calling 211.
(Oregon Office of Emergency Management Photo by Cory E. Grogan)

DSC_9973
Linea Gagliano, Travel Oregon director, Global Communications, discusses tourism and economic opportunity related to the 2017 Eclipse in Oregon at today's press conference at the Oregon State Fairgrounds. The public can get information about the eclipse using #OReclipse or #Eclipse2017, or calling 211.
(Oregon Office of Emergency Management Photo by Cory E. Grogan)


Attached Media Files: 2017-08/3986/106989/DSC_9993.jpg , 2017-08/3986/106989/DSC_9984.jpg , 2017-08/3986/106989/DSC_9973.jpg , 2017-08/3986/106989/DSC_0001.jpg
Campfires prohibited in Oregon State Parks and on beaches
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/16/17 2:30 PM
Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is prohibiting all campfires and open flames in Oregon State Parks and other properties owned and managed by the department beginning Aug. 16 until further notice. These restrictions extend to all Oregon beaches. Charcoal briquettes, tiki-style torches and candles are also prohibited until further notice. Only fuel sources that can be turned off instantly, such as propane stoves, will be allowed. Some parks will also allow propane fire pits; campers are advised to check directly with the park.

"Most state parks are already under a fire restriction due to hot, dry conditions," said MG Devereux, OPRD Deputy Director. "We are expanding these restrictions to prevent any unintentional fires in state parks that would add an unnecessary burden to firefighting efforts."

"We understand this is an inconvenience for campers, especially those who might not see an immediate local need for fire restrictions. We appreciate your patience and understanding," Devereux added.

Fireworks are also prohibited year-round in Oregon state parks and on beaches.

The ban will remain in effect through the Aug. 21 total solar eclipse and will be reevaluated based on fire status, weather and guidance from state and local fire officials. Visitors planning a trip should check with park staff for the most current information. Information will also be posted at oregonstateparks.org, or call the state parks information line at 800-551-6949.
OPRD seeks feedback on proposal to add a section of Nehalem River to the State Scenic Waterways Program
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/16/17 10:30 AM
Nehalem OR -- The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department is asking for feedback on an important study evaluating a 17-mile section of the Nehalem River for possible inclusion in the State Scenic Waterways Program. The feedback will be used to write a report that will either recommend for or against designating a portion of the river as a state scenic waterway.

A public meeting and hearing will be held 5:30 -- 7 p.m. Sept. 12 at the North County Recreation District, 36155 9th Street in Nehalem.

The Nehalem River study area starts at Henry Rierson Spruce Run Campground and ends at the boundary of Cougar Valley State Park, near Cook Creek Road. A scenic waterway designation would help protect the scenic, natural and recreation value of this section of river by subjecting some activities within ?1/4 mile of the bank to a review.

No decisions have been made yet about whether or not to recommend this part of the river as a scenic waterway. As part of the designation process, scenic waterways staff involve the local community, evaluate public support, and objectively study the river to determine if it meets specific criteria.

The meeting will begin with a presentation to explain the scenic waterways program and the criteria the river segment must meet to be included in the program, followed by a question and answer session. The second half of the meeting will be a public hearing, when attendees can comment orally or in writing.

Comments can also be sent to oprd.publiccomment@oregon.gov or to OPRD Scenic Waterway Study, 725 Summer St NE Suite C, Salem, OR 97301. The comment period closes Oct. 13, 2017.

Comments will help scenic waterways staff to develop a report that explains whether this waterway would make a good addition to the system. Findings will be included in a report that will go to the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission, Water Resources Commission and eventually to the Governor's Office.

More information on the program is at bit.ly/scenicwaterways.
A map of the specific study area can be found at oregon.gov/oprd/NATRES/scenicwaterways/Documents/NehalemStudysegmentJuly2017.pdf.

For more information about the meeting, contact Alexandra Phillips, Bikeways and Waterways Coordinator, at 503 986-0631 or alex.phillips@oregon.gov.
Oregon Parks and Recreation Seeks Wolf Creek Inn Operator
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/15/17 8:20 AM
Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is issuing a request for proposals (RFP) to operate Wolf Creek Inn, an historic bed-and-breakfast property near Grants Pass, in southern Oregon. The RFP opens August 15, 2017 and closes October 10, 2017. More info is here: http://bit.ly/WolfCreekInnRFP

The Inn has been operated in many different ways in its long history. Since 1975, when OPRD took ownership of the 4?1/2 acre property, the facility has functioned as a restaurant, an overnight hotel, or both together. OPRD has run the operation with its own staff, or as an adjunct to a concessionaire. Right now, OPRD is operating the property as a museum and as an overnight hotel. The agency hopes to have a contract awarded later this fall for 2018 operation.

"It is a unique opportunity," said Nathan Seable, who manages state parks in the area, including Wolf Creek Inn State Historic Site. "For the right individuals, this is a once-in-a-lifetime chance to run a business in a great community." Seable will conduct site visits for any interested parties until mid-September.

Wolf Creek Inn was built sometime around 1883, and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The 11,000 sq. ft. facility has been remodeled, and today boasts upgraded HVAC systems and electrical service, an efficient commercial kitchen, and modern fire suppression. Its 9 guest rooms, appointed in period décor, have seen the likes of Clark Gable and Jack London walk through their doors. The Inn has always been a strong venue for special events, and its restaurant and hospitality services have been regionally famous for decades.

Wolf Creek Inn is located just off the I-5, about 20 miles north of Grants Pass, Oregon. The Inn is an easy drive to the many tourism destinations of southern Oregon, including Crater Lake National Park, the wild and scenic Rogue River, the Oregon Caves, the renowned Oregon Shakespeare Festival in Ashland, and the Britt Music Festival in Jacksonville.
Volunteers sought for statewide cemetery cleanup
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/14/17 11:35 AM
Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries is partnering with SOLVE to bring cemetery cleanups into the statewide Beach & Riverside Cleanup, presented by the Oregon Lottery. Many of these cemeteries were established in the 1800s and are in need of helping hands to remove invasive weeds and woody debris, clean headstones, and assist in other tasks. Cemeteries all over the state, Canby to Coos Bay to Gold Hill are sprucing before Veterans Day and the onset of winter. All cleanups will take place on September 23 unless noted otherwise. To see a complete list of cemeteries and sign up visit the SOLVE website, http://www.solveoregon.org/historic-cemetery-cleanups.

State law established the seven-member Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances. For information about the commission, contact coordinator Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail: Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov.

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Grants available for Oregon heritage and history projects
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/14/17 11:33 AM
The Oregon Heritage Commission is offering grants for qualified projects for the conservation, development and interpretation of Oregon's cultural heritage. Awards typically range between $5,000 and $20,000. Projects can include anything related to Oregon heritage, and priority will be given to projects that preserve, develop or interpret threatened heritage resources or heritage resources of statewide significance. The grant application deadline is October 2, 2017.

Projects may include theatrical performances, collections preservation and access, exhibits, oral history projects, public education events, organizational archives projects, films and more. Previously funded projects included a variety of projects around the state. Linn County Museum partnered with Oregon Black Pioneers to incorporate African American history in the permanent exhibit. Cascade AIDS Project collected oral histories and made them accessible. Southern Oregon University completed oral histories and made them available online. Concordia University helped present the Vanport Mosaic Festival. Four Rivers Cultural Center scanned a photo collection.

"We hope to see a variety of projects that engage Oregonians in heritage," states Kuri Gill, heritage grants program coordinator. "We encourage the documentation, preservation and exploration of all aspects of Oregon's heritage."

Applications are submitted online. There is plenty of support for preparing them.

"Our goal is to support organizations of all sizes all over the state in their valuable work. We provide assistance in the application process," notes Gill. Oregon Heritage grants programs staff is happy to discuss projects and review applications in advance.

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The commission's mission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity.

To learn more about the grants, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.

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Counties/Regional
211info Oregon Eclipse Hotline
Central Oregon Emergency Information Network - 08/16/17 4:55 PM
To help residents with information about the August 21 eclipse, 211info of Oregon and southwest Washington is providing updates and answering questions about where and how to view the eclipse, safety concerns, emergency preparedness, traffic, road closures and more.

211info is collaborating with the Central Oregon Emergency Information Network, along with the Oregon Office of Emergency Management (OEM), Oregon Parks and Recreation, Oregon Health Authority, Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) and other local and state agencies.

211info operators are available with statewide and localized information, from Wednesday, August 16, through Wednesday, August 23, 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.

"211info is excited to partner with local communities to assist with providing accurate statewide information in real time so community members can be safe and informed, said Emily Berndt, 211info Director of Partnerships. "We can provide information specific to each region and the services that are being offered."

The public can call, text and view information on the website for any eclipse related information. Residents can call 211 and press one for general eclipse Information; text 'eclipse' to 898211; or visit www.211info.org/eclipse.

About the Multi-Agency Coordination Center (MACC)
Agency partners from Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties have come together as a Multi-Agency Coordination Center (MACC) to work across jurisdictional lines. This includes ensuring agencies have timely information and that resources are allocated appropriately to mitigate the impacts of the large influx in population.

About the Central Oregon Eclipse Joint Information Center
The JIC is staffed by public information officers from MACC agencies to provide consistent, coordinated information to Central Oregon visitors and residents. The JIC helps travelers and the general public with timely access to information that will allow them to make decisions in support of a safe and enjoyable experience.
Courts/District Attorneys
Kroeker Deaths/Hubbard Fire Investigation Concluded
Marion Co. Dist. Attorney's Office - 08/11/17 2:19 PM
Investigators have concluded the investigation regarding the January 3, 2017, homicides of Erin, Luke, Braeden and Leia Kroeker, and the January 3, 2017, shooting death of Keith Kroeker. With the assistance of multiple agencies, the Marion County Sheriff's Office conducted a thorough investigation, examined all available evidence, and submitted that investigation to the Marion County District Attorney's Office for review. In consultation with investigators, the Marion County District Attorney's Office has determined that Keith Kroeker is solely responsible for the murders of his wife, Erin Kroeker, and three children, Luke, Braedon, and Leia.

On January 3, 2017, at 03:03 AM, Marion County Sheriff's Office responded to a report of a barn and house fire at 18950 Fobert Road NE, outside the city limits of Hubbard, Marion County. Upon arriving on scene, which is a 3 acre lot, deputies saw that the entire north end of the residence as well as a detached barn located on the northwest corner of the property were both completely engulfed by fire. The Woodburn Fire Department and numerous other fire agencies were already on scene trying to extinguish the fires. The Kroeker family Honda Odyssey van was parked in the residence's attached garage, and the front door was locked. While walking the property deputies discovered cut up pieces of hose between the barn and the residence.

Additionally, a third building on the property- a detached garage- had smoke and fire damage but was not actively burning. Upon entry, deputies found a Ford Mustang parked inside. The Mustang's gas cover was open and a fire had been started directly beneath the open gas cap, which caused the gas cap and the blinds in the garage to melt. Beyond that damage, however, that fire did not spread. Investigators could smell an odor of a flammable liquid, such as gasoline or ethanol when they entered the building.

Due to the three separate ignition points each in a separate building on the property, the cut hose sections, and odors consistent with flammable liquid, investigators determined that the fire was intentionally set.

At approximately 04:36 AM, Woodburn Fire Department advised that they located a body inside the residence. They told deputies that the top floor of the residence was completely burned, and that part of the main floor had fallen into the daylight basement of the residence. Firefighters also informed deputies that there was an additional car parked in the basement, which added to the intensity of the fire. The investigation ultimately showed that the car had been purposefully driven through a set of double doors into the Kroeker family's daylight basement.

The fires burned for the next several hours as firefighters worked around the clock to extinguish the blaze. Suppression efforts were complicated due to downed electrical wires, unstable structures, and severe cold weather. During the suppression efforts, Marion County Sheriff's Office detectives obtained search warrants for the residence, buildings, and vehicles on the property. On January 4, 2017, once the structures were determined to be safe, investigators entered the residence and buildings and began meticulously sifting through severely burned debris in order to collect any and all available evidence.

Four bodies were recovered from the residence on January 4, 2017. Those were the bodies of Luke Kroeker, age 10; Braedon Kroeker, age 10; Keith Kroeker, age 43, and Leia Kroeker, age 7. The locations of the bodies of all three children were consistent with being killed in their respective bedrooms. Keith Kroeker's body was found at the top of the stairs. The body of Erin Kroeker, age 39, was discovered on January 5, 2017. The location of Erin Kroeker's body was consistent with being killed in her bedroom. Additionally, on January 5, 2017, Marion County Sheriff's Office K9 division and Mountain Wave K9 division, a search and rescue organization out of Portland, conducted a search of the premises and did not find any additional bodies or remains.

In the following days, investigators worked long hours continuing their search of the residence. They found a Mossberg Maverick 12-gauge, slide-action shotgun located at the bottom of the stairs. The shotgun was found with the barrel pointing towards the top of the stairs, where Keith Kroeker's body was found. The shotgun held an expended but melted shotgun shell.

On January 5, 2017, Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office conducted autopsies on all five members of the Kroeker family. All bodies were severely burned by the fire.

Dr. Karen Gunson performed the autopsy on Luke Kroeker. His cause of death was a shotgun wound of the head. The autopsy showed no signs of smoke inhalation prior to his death. When Luke's body was recovered, he appeared to be wearing bed clothes.

Dr. Christopher Young performed the autopsy on Braeden Kroeker. His cause of death was a shotgun wound of the head, and manner of death was homicide. The autopsy showed no signs of smoke inhalation prior to his death. When Braeden's body was recovered, he was dressed in bed clothes.

Dr. Christopher Young also performed the autopsy on Leia Kroeker. Her cause of death was homicidal violence including strangulation and shotgun wound of the head, and the manner of death was homicide. The autopsy showed no signs of smoke inhalation prior to her death. When Leia's body was recovered, she was dressed in bed clothes.

Dr. Clifford Nelson performed the autopsy on Erin Kroeker. Her cause of death was blunt force head trauma, and the manner of death was homicide. The autopsy and blood results showed signs of smoke inhalation prior to her death. When Erin's body was recovered, she was dressed in bed clothes.

Dr. Larry Lewman performed the autopsy on Keith Kroeker. His cause of death was determined to be shotgun wound of the brain, and the manner of death was suicide. The autopsy and blood results showed signs of smoke inhalation prior to his death. When Keith's body was recovered, he was dressed in blue jeans, a belt, a thermal shirt, and work boots.

Over the subsequent months, Detectives continued to investigate the incident. They obtained and served multiple search warrants and subpoenas, interviewed numerous friends, family members, co-workers, and neighbors. Detectives were also able to track Keith and Erin Kroeker's cell phones, and follow up on the tips and information provided by the community.

After reviewing that entire seven-month investigation, the Marion County District Attorney's Office has concluded that Keith Kroeker is solely responsible for the deaths of Erin Kroeker and their three children.

This investigation involved extensive efforts by the Marion County Sheriff's Office, assisted by the Woodburn Fire Department, Oregon State Police, Oregon State Police Crime Lab, Oregon State Medical Examiner, Oregon State Fire Marshal, and the Marion County District Attorney's Office. The investigation into these crimes is now closed. No grand jury will be convened nor any charges filed as the potential defendant is deceased.
Coos Co. Schools
Coos Bay Public Schools Public Meeting for August
Coos Bay Sch. Dist. - 08/14/17 3:04 PM
Coos Bay Public Schools Public Meetings - August update. All meetings are held at Milner Crest Education Center, 1255 Hemlock Ave., Coos Bay, unless otherwise noted. The schedule and agenda are subject to change.

Special School Board Meeting -- August 16th at 5:30 PM. Agenda and packet is posted at http://cbd9.net/schoolboard/agendas

For a list of all public meetings scheduled, go to http://cbd9.net/public-meetings-schedule

All Coos Bay School District Board Meetings are subject to the Public Meetings Law (ORS 192.610-192.710). The public is welcome to attend. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. Request for other accommodations should be made to Peggy Ahlgrim at 541-267-1310, 541-269-5366 (fax) or peggya@coos-bay.k12.or.us
PR Agencies
Oregon Ace Hardware Store Competes Nationally for Funds for Doernbecher Children's Hospital - Public Can Help Vote (Photo)
VanNatta Public Relations - 08/11/17 5:50 PM
structure with Paul Evans and Mya
structure with Paul Evans and Mya
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/1853/106907/thumb_Ace_Hardware_22_(1).jpg
Salem, OR - (August 11, 2017) Just as Oregon legislators left the Capitol in Salem, South Salem Ace Hardware made sure it wouldn't be forgotten by building a replica made entirely out of 5-gallon buckets. Ace stores around the national were challenged to build structures to compete for a donation to their local Children's Miracle Network Hospital. For Oregon, that is Doernbecher Children's Hospital. Oregon's South Salem Ace won the state a spot in the finals. Now the real competition begins.

The display, located at 706 Madrona AV SE in Salem features the Oregon Capitol Building, complete with a gold man, borrowed from Travel Salem. A ribbon cutting event was held last week featuring their child ambassador, Mya (a Doernbecher patient who had brain cancer and is now cancer free) Rep. Paul Evans (Oregon District 20) and officials from Doernbecher hospital.

As finalists, Oregon will now compete with 9 other stores. The picture with the highest number of votes by Tuesday, August 15, before 10 p.m. wins a $7,500 donation to the store's local Children's Miracle Network Hospital. Voting links are found on the Ace Hardware Facebook page or at http://woobox.com/qd2uo5.

For information call Donna at 503-763-6323.

(At press time Oregon trails behind Virginia, Nebraska, South Carolina and Georgia.)

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About our national partnership: Since becoming a Children's Miracle Network Hospitals partner in 1991, Ace Hardware has raised more than $64 million for local Children' s Miracle Network Hospitals across the country. This success stems from the creative fundraising efforts of the Ace Hardware Foundation and the generous contributions of Ace retailers, Ace customers, vendor partners and Ace team members. www.AceSouthSalem.com


Attached Media Files: structure with Paul Evans and Mya , structure
Organizations & Associations
Red Cross Wildfire Evacuation Shelter Opened in Sisters, OR
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/17/17 10:48 AM
The Red Cross has opened a shelter for wildfire evacuees in Sisters, Oregon due to the Milli Fire. The shelter is located at Sisters Middle School, 15200 Hwy 242 (McKenzie Highway), Sisters, OR 97759.

Individuals and families affected by the wildfire and in need of shelter assistance are encouraged to simply show up at the shelter for help.

The Red Cross is partnering with the Pet Evacuation Team of Central Oregon to provide accommodations for evacuated pets. A representative from the Pet Evacuation Team will be on-site at the Red Cross shelter to answer questions and assist people coming to the shelter.


The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org/Cascades or find us on Facebook at Facebook.com/RedCrossCascades, Twitter at @RedCrossCasc and find us on Instagram at @RedCrossCascades.


Attached Media Files: Wildfire Checklist
Red Cross Urges Community to Take Preparedness Actions Pre-Eclipse
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/15/17 8:32 AM
With potential traffic back-ups and possible supply and fuel shortages, the Red Cross is encouraging community members to assemble emergency preparedness kits and providing specific guidance on must-have emergency preparedness kit items.

PORTLAND, EUGENE, BEND & MEDFORD, Ore., August 15, 2017 -- The American Red Cross is urging community members who live in, near or plan to travel into the path of totality during the eclipse to stock up on emergency preparedness supplies now. Specifically, the Red Cross is recommending assembling an emergency preparedness kit for your car and your home.

With one million visitors expected to come to Oregon to view the eclipse on August 21, travelers could be stuck in traffic for hours and people who live in the path of totality may face a supply shortage with the influx of people. It is essential to have emergency supplies on hand and ready now, days ahead of the eclipse event.

The Red Cross recommends having the following items in your car:
Ensure your vehicle has a full tank of gas
Bottled water -- one gallon, per person, per day. Use heavy plastic bottles made for water storage.
Non-perishable food items (power bars, canned food, a manual can opener)
A flashlight
A battery-powered radio
A first aid kit
Daily vital medications
Supplies for an infant or children if applicable
A multi-purpose tool
Personal hygiene items including toilet paper
Cell phone chargers
Extra cash in small denominations ($1 or $5)
Comfort items like toys, games, coloring books for kids, etc. to pass the time if there are delays
Blankets or a sleeping bag
Maps of the area (printed copies)
Jumper cables
Emergency contact information written out on a card to keep in your wallet

The Red Cross recommends having the following items at home:
Water -- one gallon, per person, per day for a minimum of three days
The supplies included in your car kit in greater quantities (for a minimum of three days):
Supplies for your pets if applicable

View a full Red Cross kit list here: www.redcross.org/PrepareGuide.

How the Red Cross is preparing:
The Red Cross is coordinating with local emergency agencies along the eclipse viewing path to ensure collective preparedness for any contingency. This planning is a standard part of our regular collaborations with local emergency management officials with regard to large-scale, public events. If requested by local authorities, the Red Cross is prepared to shelter and feed those who might be displaced by disasters, residential fires, wildfires, or other events.

As part of normal Red Cross readiness posture, supplies such as cots, blankets and water are already pre-positioned across this area and the country. In addition, more volunteers and resources are on standby in case they are needed. Cellular service could be impacted by the large number of people visiting the region. If networks go down, the Red Cross will use ham radio or top-priority emergency cell channels to communicate.
About the American Red Cross


The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org/Cascades or find us on Facebook at RedCrossCascades, Twitter at @RedCrossCasc and find us on Instagram at @RedCrossCascades.


Attached Media Files: News Release - Red Cross Urges Community to Take Preparedness Actions Pre-Eclipse
Red Cross Responds to Home Fire Affecting 5 People in Reedsport
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/14/17 3:36 PM
Disaster responders with the local American Red Cross responded to a home fire disaster on Monday, August 14, 2017 at approximately 13:00p.m. in the 2000 block of Fir Ave. in Reedsport, OR. This single family fire affected two adults, three children, and three pets. The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.
Red Cross Wildfire Evacuation Shelter Opened in Glide, OR
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/12/17 9:56 PM
The Red Cross has opened a shelter for wildfire evacuees in Glide, Oregon. The shelter is located at the Seventh Day Adventist Church, 19085 N Umpqua Hwy, Glide, OR 97443.

Individuals and families affected by the wildfire and in need of shelter assistance are encouraged to simply show up at the shelter for help.

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org/Cascades or find us on Facebook at Facebook.com/RedCrossCascades, Twitter at @RedCrossCasc and find us on Instagram at @RedCrossCascades.


Attached Media Files: Wildfire Checklist
Red Cross Issues Wildfire Safety Tips
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/11/17 4:11 PM
As wildfires burn across the Northwest, the Red Cross is urging community members to know what steps they should take to stay safe and prepare for wildfires.

PORTLAND, EUGENE, BEND & MEDFORD, Ore., August 11, 2017 -- With more than a dozen large fires burning across Oregon and Southwest Washington, the local Red Cross is sharing tips to help residents be prepared in the event that a wildfire occurs near their home. The Nena Springs Fire is currently burning near Warm Springs in Wasco County, and the residents of 70 homes have been forced to evacuate because of the fire. The Red Cross is operating a shelter for wildfire evacuees, providing food, shelter and comfort to people who have been displaced. The Red Cross shelter housed 14 people overnight Thursday night.

Residents in other areas of the region are urged to take these wildfire safety precautions to make sure you and your family are prepared.

Before a wildfire:
Build an emergency preparedness kit.
Make a household evacuation plan that includes your pets.
Stay informed about your community's response plans.

Right before a wildfire -- As the fire approaches your area:
Be ready to evacuate at a moment's notice.
Listen to local radio and television stations for updated emergency information including your safest escape route.
Check your emergency kit and replenish any items missing or in short supply, especially medications and medical supplies. Keep it in the car.
Arrange for temporary housing at a friend or relative's home outside the threatened area. Identify nearby shelter sites and know your routes to get there.

Know when to go: Level 1, Level 2 and Level 3 Evacuations:
A Level 1 evacuation means "BE READY" for potential evacuation. Residents should be aware of the danger that exists in their area, monitor emergency services websites and local media outlets for information. This is the time for preparation and precautionary movement of persons with special needs, mobile property and (under certain circumstances) pets and livestock.
A Level 2 evacuation means "BE SET" to evacuate. YOU MUST PREPARE TO LEAVE AT A MOMENTS NOTICE This level indicates there is significant danger to your area, and residents should either voluntarily relocate to a shelter or with family/friends outside of the affected area, or if choosing to remain, to be ready to evacuate at a moment's notice. Residents MAY have time to gather necessary items, but doing so is at their own risk.
A Level 3 evacuation means "GO". EVACUATE NOW; LEAVE IMMEDIATELY! Danger to your area is current or imminent, and you should evacuate immediately.
After a wildfire -- returning home:
Do not enter your home until fire officials say it is safe.
Use caution when entering burned areas, as hazards may still exist, including hot spots, which can flare up without warning.
Avoid damaged or fallen power lines, poles and downed wires.
Follow public health guidance on safe cleanup of fire ash and safe use of masks.

SIGN UP FOR EMERGENCY ALERTS: Check with your local emergency management office to sign up for emergency notifications. These notifications provide information on when evacuation orders are in place.

EMERGENCY APP: Download the free Red Cross Emergency App to receive emergency alerts and information about what to do in case of wildfires, flooding and other disasters, as well as locations of shelters. The App also includes emergency first aid information and a Family Safe feature which allows people to instantly see if loved ones are okay. The free Emergency App is available in app stores by searching for the American Red Cross or going to redcross.org/apps.

About the American Red Cross
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org/Cascades or find us on Facebook at RedCrossCascades, Twitter at @RedCrossCasc and find us on Instagram at @RedCrossCascades.


Attached Media Files: News Release: Red Cross Issues Wildfire Safety Tips
Addressing media coverage on the recent sale of two aircraft on loan to the Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum
Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum - 08/11/17 4:47 PM
Addressing media coverage on the recent sale of two aircraft, the North American P-51D "Mustang" and the Goodyear FG-1D "Corsair":
 
The Mustang and the Corsair were owned by the Michael King Smith Foundation (Foundation) and were among the Foundation assets that The Falls Event Center, LLC (The Falls) acquired in the 2016 Foundation bankruptcy case.  The Foundation and The Falls are separate organizations from the Museum. 
 
The aircraft were among the artifacts identified in a Letter of Intent submitted to the court during the 2016 Foundation bankruptcy case. The Falls acquired nine aircraft from the Foundation, including the Mustang and Corsair.  At no time did the Museum own these aircraft. The aircraft remained on loan to the Museum after The Falls acquired the aircraft.
 
The Letter of Intent was used to memorialize the parties' intentions in the interim, which would then be addressed more comprehensively in operating agreements. We have agreements that are reduced to writing, are consistent with the Letter of Intent, are enforceable, and under which both parties are performing.
 
The Museum owns 82 of the 140 aircraft and artifacts in the collection. Other aircraft are on loan from various entities, specifically, 35 from the United States Government, 15 from corporations, 6 from individuals, and 2 from private museums. If an owner decides to remove its aircraft from the Museum's display, it can do so.
 
The recent departure of the Boeing B-17G Flying Fortress, owned by the Collings Foundation (unrelated to The Falls), was coincidental and had been planned since their purchase of this aircraft in 2015 as part of the Evergreen Vintage bankruptcy (a separate for profit corporation previously owned by Delford Smith). No other aircraft are scheduled to leave in the near future. In 2020, the loan on the Messerschmitt Me-262a expires; at this point it is unclear if the loan will be renewed.
 
The Museum is not standing still. It is working to add new exhibits to its collection. Just last year, the Museum added a Fairchild Republic A-10 "Thunderbolt II" (Warthog) to its collection and we are extremely excited for the delivery of our newest acquisitions this fall: a General Dynamics F-16 "Fighting Falcon," a General Dynamics F-111 "Aardvark," and a Panavia "Tornado."  Other new acquisitions are in the works.
 
Unfortunately, the Museum is still sometimes confused with--and is thought to be a part of--Delford Smith's Evergreen family of for profit companies. That is not the case. The Museum is a nonprofit, public organization registered in the State of Oregon and is led by a volunteer Board of Directors. As a nonprofit organization, the Museum is not owned by any one person or corporation. The Museum cannot be bought, sold, or owned. The Falls is not the Museum's owner. The Falls is simply the Museum's landlord on the Space Museum building, which is one of the three buildings the Museum occupies and uses.  The Museum has leased the Space Building since its completion in 2008 and will continue to do so.
 
The Museum is here for the long term and will continue to operate as we have always done. We look forward to continued growth and our upcoming events, such as our Eclipse Viewing Party on August 21st and our 3rd Annual Gala on November 4th.
 
We hope this clears up any confusion caused by recent media coverage, and look forward to seeing you at the Museum.

About the Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum
The Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum is best known as the home of the world's largest wooden aircraft, the Hughes Flying Boat "Spruce Goose." The Museum collection also includes a rare SR-71 "Blackbird," and the Titan II SLV Missile--with its original launch room. Discover more than 200 historic aircraft, spacecraft, and exhibits on display, along with artwork and traveling exhibits. The Museum values its educational partnerships, which include the Academy of Model Aeronautics, the NASA Jet Propulsion Lab, the Oregon Space Consortium and the Civil Air Patrol Cadet Program. The Museum is located at 500 NE Captain Michael King Smith Way, across the highway from the McMinnville Airport and about three miles southeast of McMinnville, Ore., on Highway 18. The Museum is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Regular admission required. Call 503-434-4180 or visit www.evergreenmuseum.org for more information.

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Oregon Farm Bureau announces scholarship recipients (Photo)
Oregon Farm Bureau - 08/14/17 11:35 AM
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 14, 2017
Contact: Andréa Kuenzi, OFBMS Scholarship Coordinator, at andrea@oregonfb.org

The Oregon Farm Bureau Foundation for Education is pleased to announce the following (12) twelve recipients of the Oregon Farm Bureau Memorial Scholarship, and (1) one recipient of the Associate Award.

This scholarship program is open to new and continuing full-time students (12 or more hours per quarter or the semester equivalent). Applicants must be an Oregon high school graduate or an Oregon home school graduate with a full year, 24 semester or 36 quarter hours, of completed college coursework documented by a transcript. Homeschool graduates must also provide proof of parents Oregon residency. Applicants must be preparing for a career in agriculture or forestry except in the case of the Associate award where any major is considered. Additionally, children and grandchildren of voting members of Farm Bureau are eligible regardless of major. Students attending institutions outside of Oregon are eligible.

The goal of the OFB Memorial Scholarship is to: "Support students that will have a positive impact on production agriculture and other agricultural related fields."

The following students have been identified to receive a $1500 scholarship (2)

Jessica Carter
Agribusiness Management
Oregon State University
Grant County

Ryan Holmes
Agricultural Sciences
Klamath Community College
Klamath County

The following students have been identified to receive a $1,000 scholarship: (10)

Sarah Michaels
Food, Nutrition, & Wellness
University of Idaho
Douglas County

Jacob White
Agricultural Communications & Education
University of Florida
Harney County

Emily Iverson
Agribusiness
Eastern Oregon University
Clackamas County

Maria Grossen
Mechanical Engineering
University of Portland
Washington County

Amy Swenson
Pre-Veterinary Medicine/Science
Northwest Nazarene University
Umatilla County

Conor McCabe
Animal Science
Cornell University
Clackamas County

Claire Hammond
Business
Oregon State University
Harney County

Stormy Scharzenberger
Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine
Oregon State University
Multnomah County

Elizabeth Brentano
Animal Science/Pre-Vet
Oregon State University
Marion County

Carlee Morton
Animal Science & Ranch Management
Treasure Valley Community College
Malhuer County

The following student has been identified to receive the OFB Associate Scholarship Funded by COUNTRY Financial:

Kelley Duggan
Animal Science
California State University, Chico
Deschutes County

These awards are made possible through the continuing support of our scholarship sponsors, fund donors, and volunteer advisory committee members.

For more information, contact Andréa Kuenzi, OFBMS Scholarship Coordinator, at andrea@oregonfb.org.

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Attached Media Files: 2017-08/5507/106951/OFBFoundationForEducationLogo.jpg
Farm Bureau calendar seeks pics of Oregon agriculture through 9/15 (Photo)
Oregon Farm Bureau - 08/11/17 12:23 PM
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Through Sept. 15, Oregon Farm Bureau invites the public to submit their best photos of Oregon agriculture for a chance to be featured in the 2018 Oregon's Bounty Calendar.

The award-winning calendar celebrates all aspects of Oregon agriculture: the products, the people, the crops, the cultivation, the landscape, anything that depicts the beauty, culture, enjoyment, technology, or tradition of family farming and ranching.

"What makes the Oregon's Bounty Calendar so special is that the images are sourced from the public," said OFB Communications Director Anne Marie Moss. "Oregon agriculture is an interesting, visual, and inspiring subject for photographers.

"We're looking for what I call 'gaze-worthy' images, photos that you can enjoy for a month as the calendar hangs on the wall," said Moss. "The Oregon's Bounty Calendar is mailed to over 66,000 Farm Bureau members around the state and thousands more are distributed throughout the year. It's truly an exceptional opportunity for both amateur and professional photographers to get their work shown."

Horizontal-layout, high-resolution images -- both close-ups and panoramic shots -- are needed of all types of agriculture in all seasons. Subject ideas include rural scenery; portraits of farmers and ranchers; planting or harvest shots; scenes from farm stands, on-farm events, farmers markets, or county fairs; and close-ups of fruits, vegetables, flowers, crops in the field, or farm animals.

The deadline for entries is Sept. 15, and there's no limit to the number of photos that can be submitted.

As thanks for participating, everyone who submits photos with their mailing address will receive a complimentary copy of the Oregon's Bounty Calendar. Photographers with images selected for month pages in Oregon's Bounty, along with six runners up, will receive a photo credit in the calendar and numerous copies.

Submission instructions, photo specifications, and contest rules are available at www.oregonfb.org/calendar.

Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit, general farm organization representing the interests of farming and ranching families in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon in 1919, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties.

For more information, contact Anne Marie Moss, OFB Communications Director, at annemarie@oregonfb.org, 503.399.1701.

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Note to Editors: "Farm Bureau" is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit, general farm organization representing the interests of farming and ranching families in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon in 1919, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties.

Oregon Farm Bureau President Barry Bushue is a third-generation farmer raising a variety of vegetables and berries at a nearly century-old farm near Boring, Oregon. He is OFB's 15th president.


Attached Media Files: 2017-08/5507/106889/2017_cover.JPG
Governor Kate Brown Signs Reproductive Health Equity Act
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon - 08/15/17 10:03 AM
PRO-CHOICE COALITION OF OREGON PRESS RELEASE

Governor Kate Brown today signed the nation's most progressive reproductive health policy into law. The Reproductive Health Equity Act (House Bill 3391) is the first legislation in the United States to comprehensively address systemic barriers to accessing reproductive health care, expanding coverage to thousands of Oregonians throughout the state - regardless of income, citizenship status or gender identity.

Developed by the Pro-Choice Coalition of Oregon with input from legislative champions, the new law makes Oregon the first state to establish comprehensive, state-funded reproductive health coverage for women categorically excluded from Medicaid based on citizenship status; the first to codify no-cost abortion coverage in state statute; and the first to stand up to the Trump administration and congressional Republicans by putting the entire list of women's health services covered without cost-sharing under the Affordable Care Act into state statute. The legislation also bans discrimination against those who identify as transgender or gender-nonconforming so that all people who can become pregnant have access to reproductive health care.

The Reproductive Health Equity Act, which goes into effect immediately, will significantly benefit thousands of Oregonians:

900,000: Oregonians covered by private insurance who now have expanded reproductive health coverage.

360,000: Oregon women who now have protected access to copay-free preventive healthcare services under the Affordable Care Act.

48,000: Low-income mothers in Oregon whose coverage now extends past delivery to include follow-up visits during the postpartum period.

43,000: Oregon women of reproductive age with high-deductible policies who now have abortion coverage at no out-of-pocket cost.

18,600: Oregon women of reproductive age whose insurance plans now cannot charge them a co-pay or other out-of-pocket costs for preventive health services, including contraception.

Laurel Swerdlow, Advocacy Director for Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon, said: "We are so grateful for the bold leadership of Governor Brown and legislative champions who understand that Oregonians don't want reproductive health care attacked. Women, transgender and gender-nonconforming individuals, people of color, immigrants and people of faith are not going to silently stand around while politicians in Washington D.C. try to take away our health care."

Amy Casso, Gender Justice Program Director for Western States Center, said: "This is an amazing victory, and it's all the more significant given the current political landscape. In the face of relentless rollbacks and attacks at the federal level, Oregonians are showing the rest of the country what it means to be resilient and visionary. This groundbreaking legislation is the result of a forward-thinking, inclusive campaign that uplifted the leadership of people of color. There is still work to be done, but today we celebrate that more Oregonians have the freedom to decide if and when they have children based on what's best for them and their family's circumstances."

Kimberly McCullough, Legislative Director for American Civil Liberties Union of Oregon, said: "Individual rights and freedom go to the heart of who we are as Oregonians, including the right to access safe and legal abortion. For too many Oregonians today, those legal rights do not translate into access, especially for young people, people of color, rural people, people with low incomes, and transgender and gender-nonconforming people. The vast majority of Oregonians support access to safe and legal abortion, which is now safeguarded by the Reproductive Health Equity Act."

Reproductive Health Equity Act summary: https://reprohealthequity.org/about/about-the-bill/

Reproductive Health Equity Act fact sheet: https://reprohealthequity.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/hb-3391-fact-sheet.pdf

Reproductive Health Equity Act stories from impacted Oregonians: https://reprohealthequity.org/stories/

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The Pro-Choice Coalition of Oregon is a diverse, statewide coalition that is working to create a world where access to reproductive health care doesn't depend on who you are, where you live or how much you earn - where every Oregonian who can become pregnant has the opportunity to choose their own path to a healthy and meaningful life. The coalition consists of American Civil Liberties Union of Oregon, Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon, Family Forward Oregon, NARAL Pro-Choice Oregon, Oregon Latino Health Coalition, Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon and Western States Center.