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Eugene/Spring/Rose/Alb/Corv News Releases for Wed. Apr. 24 - 9:45 am
Police & Fire
DEA and partners hold 17th National Prescription Drug Take Back Day
DEA Seattle - 04/24/19 9:32 AM

230 sites through-out the Pacific Northwest

SEATTLE – This Saturday, April 27, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. local time the federal Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and its local law enforcement, community and tribal partners in the Pacific Northwest will collect expired, unused, and unwanted prescription medications at one of 230 collection sites. There are 19 collection sites in Alaska, 45 in Idaho, 61 in Oregon, and 105 in Washington State.   The service is free of charge, no questions asked.  

DEA Special Agent in Charge Keith Weis of the Pacific Northwest Region emphasized, “All of our Northwest communities need to take this opportunity of disposing unused prescription medications in a safe and simple process. This consciousness effort may be lifesaving.”   

Last October, residents of Washington, Idaho, Oregon and Alaska turned in 35,017 pounds (17 tons) of prescription medications.  The following are the results broken down by state:

·       Washington – 98 collection sites which resulted in 15,279 pounds (7.6 tons) removed from circulation.

·       Idaho – 34 collection sites which resulted in 3,269 pounds (1.6 tons) removed from circulation.

·       Oregon – 60 collection sites which resulted in 12,492 pounds (6.2 tons) removed from circulation.

·       Alaska – 19 collection sites which resulted in 3,977 pounds (2 tons) removed from circulation.

 

The National Prescription Drug Take Back Day Initiative addresses a critical public safety and public health issue. Rates of prescription drug abuse in the United States continue to be alarmingly high, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs. Because the Environmental Protection Agency and the Food and Drug Administration have advised the public that flushing their prescription drugs down the toilet or throwing them in the trash pose potential safety and health hazards, DEA launched its prescription drug take back program to encourage the safe disposal of medications.

Now in its ninth year, DEA has collected a total of nearly 11 million pounds (more than 5,400 tons) of expired, unused and unwanted prescription medications through its Take Back Day events. This weekend, approximately 6,000 collection sites manned by nearly 5,000 partner law enforcement agencies will be open 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. local time. The public can find a nearby collection site atwww.DEATakeBack.com or by calling 800-882-9539. (DEA cannot accept liquids, needles or sharps.)

 


Sheriff's Office Hosts Drug Take Back Event (Photo)
Benton Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/22/19 10:52 AM
2019-04/1505/123868/drug_take_back.jpg
2019-04/1505/123868/drug_take_back.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/1505/123868/thumb_drug_take_back.jpg

Corvallis, Ore. - The Benton County Sheriff’s Office is hosting a Drug Take Back Event on Saturday, April 27, 2019 from 10:00am - 2:00pm. This event allows the public to safely dispose of expired or unused medications.

This is a one-day, drive-thru event. There are two drop-off locations. A new location this year is the parking lot of Bi-Mart at 1555 SW 53rd Street, in Corvallis. Those interested in dropping off at this location are asked to enter the parking lot off of 53rd Street and follow the signs and directions of the volunteers. Medications can also be dropped off at the Philomath Police Department at 1010 Applegate St., Philomath.

Some items are not allowed at the event. For safety reasons, these include thermometers, intra-venous solutions, needles, EpiPens®, or medical waste of any kind. Illegal drugs are also not accepted. Medications can only be accepted from individual households, not from businesses such as nursing homes, doctor’s offices, or veterinary clinics. A complete list of restricted items is posted on the Sheriff’s Office website.

This event is offered as a public safety service to help keep prescription drugs out of the hands of kids or others who might abuse them. Misuse of prescription drugs is a serious problem, especially with teens and young adults.

Additionally, improperly disposing of medications, by flushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash, can lead to contamination of our drinking water. While most drugs can be treated at wastewater treatment plants, some cannot.

Community partners Philomath Police Department, Bi-Mart, Covanta, City of Corvallis Public Works and Benton County Health Services are helping support this event. It is sanctioned by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) as part of their National Take-Back Initiative. The Sheriff’s Office is able to offer this service due to the volunteer support of their Reserve Deputies, Auxiliary Team, CERT, and Search and Rescue volunteers. For more information, visit https://www.co.benton.or.us/sheriff/page/special-event-2019-drug-take-back .

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Attached Media Files: 2019-04/1505/123868/2019.04.08_BCSO_Drug_Take_BackV2.pdf , 2019-04/1505/123868/drug_take_back.jpg

Corvallis Police Arrest Suspect near Corvallis High School Prompting Lock Down
Corvallis Police - 04/23/19 3:11 PM

On 04/23/19 at approximately 10:36 AM, the Corvallis Police Department received a report of a theft from Fred Meyer (777 NW Kings Blvd). A Loss Prevention Officer reported that during the commission of the theft, a male later identified as 37-year-old Robert Miller of Corvallis, struck him and displayed a knife. Miller left the area of Fred Meyer eastbound on NW Buchanan Ave.

Officers arrived in the area, contacting Miller across the street from the Corvallis High School main doors. Officers requested a “Lock Out” procedure to be conducted by staff at Corvallis High School as a precaution, due to the nature of the report. The request for “Lock Out” was inadvertently communicated to the high school as a request for a “Lock Down.”  At no time was Miller on the property of Corvallis High School.

Miller was taken into custody without incident and the “Lock Out” was lifted within 6 minutes. Miller was transported to the Benton County Jail and booked on the following charges: Robbery 3, Attempted Assault 4, Menacing, Criminal Mischief 2, Disorderly Conduct 2, and Theft 3. In addition, Miller had an active warrant for his arrest.

As with all incidents of this nature, the Corvallis Police Department and Corvallis School District will work collaboratively to review the procedures utilized. The Corvallis Police Department regrets any undue concern this has caused the community, but remains dedicated to the current procedures in place that ensure the safety of district staff, students and the community. 

 


Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Elder Fraud (Part 4) (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 04/23/19 10:00 AM
Graphic
Graphic
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/3585/123302/thumb_TT_-_Elder_-_part_4_-_April_23_2019_-_Graphic.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: we continue our series on building a digital defense against frauds targeting senior citizens.

For the past month, we have looked at all kinds of elder fraud – including tech support, money mule and real estate scams. This week, as we wrap up our series we are going to hit on two more schemes that criminals are known to use to target seniors 60 and older: sweepstakes and telemarketing frauds.

Sweepstakes scams may make you think you are a big winner when, in fact, you could end up losing everything. The FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center says that more than 2,600 senior victims reported losses of $47 million to it in 2018.

In a sweepstakes or lottery scam, the bad guy convinces the senior that she has won money in a sweepstakes or foreign lottery. The fraudsters often claim to be attorneys, customs officials or lottery representatives. They make an effort to appear official and reputable. The scammers tell the victim that she has to pay some kind of fee before receiving a prize… a fee for shipping or insurance costs, customs duties or taxes. 

Through the course of this scam, the criminal will often find and use personal information about the victim in an effort to gain her trust. The scammer knows that older victims are more likely to be polite, trusting and willing to believe those in a position of authority. 

The second kind of elder fraud we are talking about today involves telemarketing scams… scams where the bad guy convinces the victim he can make money fast or avoid some legal or tax problem. These kinds of scams have been around forever, but evolving technology makes them even harder to spot. Criminals buy and sell marketing lists and personal information so they can have as many details as possible about their victims before they make contact. In some cases, they take the time to build a relationship with the senior so the senior is less likely to look for outside guidance before sending money to the scammer.

Technology also makes it easy for the criminal to make authentic-looking documents so he looks official. As with lottery scams, the fraudster often tries to portray himself as a reputable figure at a federal agency or perhaps an insurance company or bank. Again, he hopes to prey upon a senior’s tendency to trust those in positions of authority. 

Here’s how you can protect yourself and family members:

  • Do not give out personal info by phone, mail or the internet unless you initiate the contact. 
  • Always use publicly available sources to confirm you are using legitimate contact numbers and addresses for a business or agency.
  • Do not pay for fees or services with a gift card. Legitimate services will not request payment in this manner.
  • Be wary if someone tells you that you have to pay immediately or the offer will disappear.
  • Be wary if you have to pay any fee or provide bank account information for a “free” gift, vacation or prize.

As the old adage goes – if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

If you have been victimized by an online scam, report your suspicious contacts to the FBI. You can file an online report at the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.




Attached Media Files: Audio , Graphic

Homicide Investigation in Shady Cove *Update* (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/22/19 1:19 PM
Wilkins booking photo, 4/22/19
Wilkins booking photo, 4/22/19
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/6186/123855/thumb_19-7804_Wilkins.jpg

Update, 4/22/19 at 1:15 p.m.:

SHADY COVE – Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) detectives are releasing the names of the persons involved in a homicide in Shady Cove over Easter weekend.  Two women were found dead at a residence in the 500-block of Sarma Drive on the morning of Sunday, April 21, 2019.  One man was taken into custody at the scene and lodged in jail.

Deputies responded to the home following a 911 call from the residence on April 21 at 10:13 a.m.  The victims, Shirley Kay Gann, 62, and her daughter, Judy Mae Gann, 43, both had apparent gunshot wounds.  The Jackson County Medical Examiner’s Office will conduct autopsies to complete the identification process and to determine the official cause and manner of death. 

Responding deputies arrested Kit Warren Wilkins, 59, at the scene.  Wilkins is currently lodged in the Jackson County jail, charged with two counts of aggravated murder.  Detectives served a search warrant at the residence on Sunday. 

Investigators say Wilkins and Shirley Gann were reportedly involved in a long-term relationship and living together at the residence.  Judy Gann, the daughter of Shirley Gann, was temporarily staying at the home at the time of the incident. 

The investigation by the Major Assault and Death Investigation Unit (MADIU) is ongoing.  JCSO detectives are leading the investigation, assisted by personnel from Oregon State Police, Medford Police Department, and the Ashland Police Department.  Further details are not yet available for release. 

Detectives would like to speak with anyone who had contact with the victims or Wilkins on Saturday, April 20, as well as anyone who has information that may be relevant to the case.  Call Detective David Seese at (541) 774-6800.  Refer to case #19-7804.

 

Update, 4/22/19 at 10:10 a.m.:

The Jackson County Sheriff's Office will host a press conference at 1 p.m. today to provide an update regarding this case.  Media representatives are asked to arrive at JCSO (5179 Crater Lake Highway) at 12:45 p.m. to set up.

Original release: 4/21/19 at 3:15 p.m.:

SHADY COVE, Ore. - Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) detectives are investigating a homicide in Shady Cove.  Detectives say one person of interest is currently in custody; there is no known threat to the public regarding this incident. 

On Sunday, April 21, 2019, at 10:13 a.m., dispatch received a 911 call from a residence in the 500-block of Sarma Drive.  Deputies arrived on scene at 10:39 a.m.  

An investigator with the Jackson County Medical Examiner’s Office responded to the scene.  Detectives believe they have identified the deceased; however, the next-of-kin have not yet been notified. 

JCSO officials activated the Major Assault and Death Investigation Unit (MADIU).  JCSO investigators are assisted by personnel from the following agencies:  Oregon State Police, Medford Police Department, Ashland Police Department.  

Additional information regarding the incident will be released at a later time.  Anyone who has relevant information about the case is asked to call detectives at (541) 774-6800.  Refer to case #19-7804.

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Attached Media Files: Wilkins booking photo, 4/22/19

Missing Man Last Seen on Highway 227 Located *UPDATE* (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/19/19 10:40 AM
Dale Westrom, DMV photo
Dale Westrom, DMV photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/6186/123789/thumb_19-07390_Westrom.png

UPDATE, 4/19/19 at 10:30 a.m.: 

Jackson County Sheriff's Office (JCSO) search and rescue (SAR) officials say Dale Westrom has been located safe in Douglas County.  He was transported to receive medical care, but is in good condition.  SAR officials wish to thank those who kept an eye out for Westrom and called with tips of possible sightings. 

___

Original release, 4/18/19 at 3:00 p.m.:

TRAIL, Ore. – Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) search and rescue personnel are attempting to locate a missing Trail man.  Dale Westrom, 43, was last seen on Saturday, April 13, 2019, at around 6:00 a.m.  He was walking along Highway 227 at the 44-mile marker, near the intersection with National Forest Road 32.

On Monday, April 15, 2019, a friend reported Westrom missing.  Westrom was reportedly going mushroom hunting, but he may have become confused and walked west in an attempt to get to Sutherlin. 

Westrom is described as a white male with brown hair, hazel eyes, and a goatee.  He is five-feet, nine-inches tall and weighs approximately 195 pounds.  He was last seen wearing a black baseball cap, an orange hooded sweatshirt, a green or blue raincoat, blue jeans, and brown boots. He was carrying a black backpack.  Westrom has difficulty communicating verbally due to a medical condition.

If you have information about Westrom’s whereabouts, please call Sergeant Shawn Richards through dispatch at (541) 776-7206.  Refer to case #19-07390. 

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Attached Media Files: Dale Westrom, DMV photo

Lebanon Fire District Responds To Grass Fire (Photo)
Lebanon Fire District - 04/23/19 9:15 PM
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Just before 7:30PM Tuesday evening the Lebanon Fire District was dispatched to a smoke investigation near the intersection of Payne Dr. and Brewster Rd.  Upon arrival crews discovered two separate fires burning approximately 300 yards apart from one another along the train tracks that run parallel to Brewster Rd.  A 1st Alarm was struck to bring additional resources to the scene due to the difficult access to the marshy fields surrounding the fire. 

Fire crews split into two groups and worked simultaneously to extinguish both fires.  In all approximately ½ an acre of grass was burned.  There were no injuries to civilians or fire crews and no equipment or buildings sustained damage.  The cause of the fire is under investigation.  Crews responded with five apparatus, 11 personnel, and spent approximately one hour on scene.  Although this grass fire was not started due to a burn pile that got out of control, it stands as a good reminder that fire season is quickly approaching and to be extra vigilant with your burn piles.  Grass is often quick to ignite, especially when we have had a few days of sunny weather.  Always call the Linn County Burn Line before you burn (541-451-1904), have a water source on hand that can extinguish a fire if necessary, and never leave a burn pile unattended. 




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/1191/123934/4-23-19_grass_fire_Brewster-Payne.png

Subject At Transient Camp Arrested After Trying Escape Officers
Lincoln City Police - 04/17/19 11:58 PM

On Wednesday, 04-17-2019, Lincoln City Police arrested 26 year-old Alan Michael Shane Gates of Lincoln City on a misdemeanor warrant for Failure to Appear on a Theft charge. He was also charged with Escape after he tried to flee from the officers as they tried to arrest him.

At about 3:20 AM, officers began checking a transient camp site located in the wooded area at the gravel turn out on the east side of Highway 101 at about the North 4300 block. While checking the woods they located two subjects at a camp site. The female subject identified herself and it was determined she did not have any warrants issued for her arrest. The male subject advised the officers he did not have any identification and gave the officers false information about his identity. Officers continued investigating and where able to determine the subject’s true identity to be Alan Michael Shane Gates. A computer check on Gates indicated there was an active misdemeanor warrant issued for his arrest out of the Lincoln County Circuit Court for failure to appear on a theft charge. The officers advised Gates that he was under arrest and as they moved in to put him in handcuffs, he bolted and tried to flee the location. Officers chased Gates and were able to tackle him to the ground at which time they were able to take him into custody. Gates was not injured during the arrest, but one officer sustained a minor injury to his face.

Gates was transported to the Lincoln City Police Department and secured in a holding cell while officers completed the necessary booking paperwork. He was then transported to the Lincoln County Jail and lodged there on the warrant and the listed Escape charge.      

Submitted By:

Sergeant Jeffrey Winn


Lincoln County Search and Rescue Finds Missing Individuals (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/23/19 12:33 PM
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/5490/123911/thumb_SAR4.jpg

On April 20th, at approximately 7:30 PM, Lincoln County Search and Rescue (SAR) had just finished successfully locating a missing subject in the Yachats area when they were re-deployed to find a missing 83 year-old male in the South Beach area.  SAR personnel began searching the area on foot and via ATV, but were unsuccessful during the first day.

Search efforts continued on April 21st and lasted the entire day.  Two K9 teams from Lane County Search and Rescue arrived to assist the Lincoln County teams.  As darkness began to fall, an ATV team was retrieving a K9 search team from their mission area and noticed a human form on a clear cut about 500 meters away.  The subject did not respond to yelling or signalling.  The nearby ground search team was re-tasked to make contact with the subject, but had difficulty reaching him due to hazardous terrain.

The ground search team reached the subject and confirmed he was the missing 83 year-old.  On-site personnel determined the man was unable to walk out due to medical and terrain considerations.  A US Coast Guard helicopter was dispatched to the location to airlift the man to the hospital.  SAR personnel and the Coast Guard rescue swimmer packaged the man in a folding stretcher in preparation to be hoisted by the helicopter.

Darkness, close proximity to trees, and updrafts from the steep terrain made the hoisting operating difficult.  The Coast Guard helicopter burned significant fuel while expertly hovering above the responders.  After hoisting the man, the aircrew advised SAR personnel they did not have enough fuel for another hoisting operation for the rescue swimmer.  The rescue swimmer hiked out with the SAR personnel and was expedited back to the Coast Guard facility.

During the mission, SAR personnel traveled over 60 miles either on foot or searching via ATV.  Two new ATVs purchased through a grant from the Siletz Tribe were instrumental in the successful resolution of this search.

Sheriff Curtis Landers said of the operation: "Steadfast dedication from our Search and Rescue volunteers and strong community partnerships are what saved this individual's life.  Thank you to the US Coast Guard, Lane County Sheriff's Office, Pacific West Ambulance, and our amazing volunteers." 




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/5490/123911/SAR4.jpg , 2019-04/5490/123911/SAR2.jpg , 2019-04/5490/123911/SAR1.jpg

Tip of the Week for April 22 - Sharing the Road: Cyclists and Motorists
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/18/19 7:35 AM

SHARING THE ROAD: CYCLISTS AND MOTORISTS

There are many bicycles on today's roads.  More people are using bicycles as a means to commute for entertainment and for exercise.  Some of the more common reasons include low cost to operate, reducing the consumption of fossil fuels, and exercise.

Motorists should remember these tips when sharing the road with a cyclist:

  • A bicycle is considered by law to be a vehicle.  When a cyclist has stopped and remains astride their bicycle at an intersection and/or for a traffic signal, they are to be treated as a vehicle waiting for their turn to proceed.
  • Many children riding bicycles on the street may lack the necessary training and skills for safe cycling.  They may not be aware of all dangers.
  • Be alert for small children on oversized bicycles.  This may increase the likelihood for loss of control.
  • When passing a cyclist, go around them like you would any other vehicle.  Leave lots of room.
  • When you are preparing to make a right turn, watch for cyclists who may pull up alongside your vehicle. Remember to shoulder-check your blind spots.
  • When you are about to make a right turn, do not pull up beside a cyclist and then turn directly in front of them and cut them off.
  • When pulling away from the curb, always check for cyclists who may be trying to pass you.
  • When parked at the curb, always check for cyclists before you open your vehicle door.  It’s the driver's responsibility not to open the vehicle door into traffic.
  • Do not follow too close behind cyclists.  They do not have brake lights to warn you when they are stopping.
  • Cyclists are entitled to make left turns in the same manner as motorists.  Since they are more exposed to traffic on left turns, they will need extra consideration, especially on multi-lane roads.
  • Cyclists are required to ride as close as practicable to the curb, however they may need to ride further out when they have to steer away from drainage grates, pot holes, debris, loose gravel or sand, wet or slippery surfaces, rutted or grooved pavement and even dogs.  Be aware of the roadway conditions that may affect a cyclist.
  • Do not sound your horn unnecessarily when you are overtaking a cyclist.  It may startle them and cause them to lose control.  If you feel that you must use your horn, tap it quickly and lightly while you are still some distance away from the cyclist.
  • Cyclists should also remember that, when they are riding their bicycles on streets and highways, they are considered by law to be a vehicle.  Therefore they are required to obey all the rules of the road, which apply to other (motorized) vehicles, plus those that apply only to bicycle operators.

 

Cyclists using the streets and highways should:

  • Never ride against traffic. It is one of the leading causes of crashes, accounting for 15% to 20% of all crashes with cars.
  • Keep both hands on the handlebars except when making a hand signal.
  • Keep both feet on the pedals.
  • Not carry more people at one time than the bicycle was designed for.
  • Not hold onto, attach themselves, or attach the bicycle to any other moving vehicle.
  • Only ride side by side on the road with another cyclist when it does not impede other traffic.  If traffic doesn’t have enough room to pass you safely, ride single file.
  • Ensure the bicycle is equipped with at least one white light to the front and a red light and or red reflector mounted on the rear of the bicycle when riding between sunset and sunrise.
  • Ensure the bicycle has effective brakes.

For more information and tips, visit our web site at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/5490/123766/042219_Sharing_the_Road_-_Motorists_and_Cyclists.pdf

Deputies Investigating Suspicious Death (Photo) ***Update - Final***
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/22/19 5:40 PM
2019-04/1294/123850/Twin_Creeks_Lane.jpeg
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On April 20th at 11:09 pm, deputies responded to the report of a possible in progress assault in the 12000 block of Twin Creeks Lane SE, located in the Jefferson area of Marion County.  When they arrived on scene, they located a 55 year-old female who was deceased.  Detectives continued their investigation into the death throughout the weekend.

This morning, April 22nd, an autopsy was conducted by the State Medical Examiner’s Office.  They have determined the death to be a homicide as a result of asphyxiation and blunt force trauma.  The female victim has been identified as Robin Stender of Jefferson.  The victim’s next of kin have been notified and are requesting no contact from media.

Detectives have arrested Derek Johnson, a 39 year-old Portland man, in connection to the death.  He is currently lodged at the Marion County Jail on the charge of Murder.

This is still an active investigation; the Sheriff’s Office will not be releasing additional information.  All future media releases for this investigation will come from the Marion County District Attorney’s Office.

The Marion County Sheriff’s Office is being assisted by the Marion County District Attorney’s Office, Marion County Medical Examiner’s Office, Salem Police Department, Oregon State Police, Keizer Police Department and other local agencies during this investigation.

Mr. Johnson will be arraigned on Tuesday, April 23rd at 3:00 at the Marion County Circuit Court Annex.

The Sheriff’s Office is continuing to investigate a suspicious death which occurred overnight in the 12000 block of Twin Creeks Lane SE.  Deputies initially responded to the residence after receiving reports of a possible assault occurring at the location.

When deputies arrived on scene, they located a 55 year-old female who was deceased.  The cause of death has not yet been determined.  An autopsy to determine the cause of death will be conducted tomorrow by the State Medical Examiner’s Office.

We are being assisted by the Marion County District Attorney’s Office, Marion County Medical Examiner’s Office, Salem Police Department, Oregon State Police, Keizer Police Department and other local agencies.

 

Deputies are currently on scene of a suspicious death at a residence in the 12000 block of Twin Creeks Lane SE in rural Marion County. The Sheriff's Office was originally called to the location at 11:09 pm last night and have remained on scene investigating. At this time, detectives do not believe there is any danger to the public. This is still an active investigation; there is no additional information available at this time.




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/1294/123850/Twin_Creeks_Lane.jpeg , Derek Johnson

Fatal crash on Hwy 126E - Lane County
Oregon State Police - 04/22/19 10:31 AM

On Sunday, April 21, 2019 at approximately 4:25 P.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a vehicle crash on Highway 126E near milepost 37.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a 2017 Toyota Corolla, operated by Samuel Smith (26) of Eugene,  was traveling westbound on 126E near milepost 37.  A bicycle, operated by Michael Greenbaum (79) of Vida, was also westbound when for unknown reasons entered the lane of travel in front of the westbound Toyota.

Greenbaum sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.  

Highway 126E was closed for two hours following the crash. 

OSP was assisted by McKenzie Fire Rescue and ODOT.

 

 


Lake County Sheriff's Office requesting assistance in locating missing/endangered person - Lake County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 04/21/19 9:40 AM
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The Lake County Sheriff's Office is requesting the public's assistance in locating Glenda Cormie (59) of Paisley, OR.

Cormie was last seen in Paisley, OR on Monday, April 15, 2019.  She is described as 5 foot 3 inches tall with short gray hair. 

If anyone has any information regarding the location of Cormie or has seen her since April 15, you are asked to contact the Lake County Sheriff's Office Dispatch at 541-947-2504 and reference case #19-0154




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/1002/123852/Cormie_Photo.jpg

Oregon State Police still requesting any information regarding March 21 fatal crash on Hwy 97 - Deschutes County
Oregon State Police - 04/21/19 9:27 AM

Oregon State Police is requesting anyone that witnessed the crash or has any information to please contact the Oregon State Police Dispatch Center at 1-800-442-0776 or OSP -  refer to case #SP19-099917 .

TWO VEHICLE FATAL CRASH ON HWY 97 NEAR REDMOND - DESCHUTES COUNTY


News Release from Oregon State Police
Posted on FlashAlert: March 21st, 2019 4:13 PM

On Thursday, March 21, 2019 at approximately 6:46 A.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a two vehicle crash on Hwy 97 near milepost 125, just south of Redmond in Deschutes County.

Preliminary investigation determined that a silver Honda Pilot, operated by Sara Edwards (19) of Redmond, was traveling southbound on Hwy 97 when she attempted to avoid a vehicle that was entering Hwy 97 from the Desert Terrace Mobile Estates.  Edwards lost control of her vehicle and slid into the northbound lanes and collided with a Mack Concrete Pumping Truck, operated by Michael Cucera IV (36) from Redmond.

Edwards sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.

Cucera sustained minor injuries.

OSP was assisted by the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Redmond Police Department, Bend Police Department, Redmond Fire Department, Bend Fire Department, and ODOT.

Contact Info:
Captain Tim Fox
Public Information Officer
Oregon State Police

Media Email: OSPPIO@state.or.us


### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial


Two vehicle fatal crash on Hwy 201 - Malheur County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 04/18/19 10:43 AM
2019-04/1002/123777/211.jpg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/1002/123777/thumb_211.jpg

On Wednesday, April 17, 2019, at approximately 6:19 P.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle collision on Highway 201N near milepost 21.

Preliminary investigation reveals a Pontiac Sunfire, operated by Roberta Chandler (41) of Ontario, was southbound on Highway 201N when for unknown reasons drifted into the northbound lane and collided with a northbound Chevy Impala, operated by Sergio Sandoval (58) of Weiser, ID.

Chandler sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.  Her passenger, Tira Zacarias (29) of New Plymouth, ID, was transported by helicopter to a hospital in Boise, ID.

Sandoval and his passenger, Marina Navarette-Hernandez (57) of Weiser, ID. were transported by ground to the hospital.

OSP was assisted by Treasure Valley Paramedics, Ontario Fire and Rescue, and ODOT




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/1002/123777/211.jpg , 2019-04/1002/123777/147.jpg

UPDATE -Washington County Deputy injured in car crash at the intersection of Glencoe Rd & Wren Rd - Washington County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 04/17/19 9:03 PM
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Preliminary investigation revealed that Jordan Cutts (24) of Forest Grove was northbound on Glencoe Rd. operating a silver Mazda Protege. He crossed into the southbound lane to make a turn onto Wren Rd. and struck a Washington County Sheriff's car being operated by Deputy Frank Ward head on.

Both drivers were transported to Legacy Emmanuel Hospital with serious injuries. 

The intersection was closed for approximately 3.5 hours.

OSP was assisted by North Plains Police Department, Hillsboro Police Department, Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue, Washington County Sheriff's Office, Washington County Land Use and Transportation, and Oregon Department of Transportation

Oregon State Police and emergency personnel are on scene of a two vehicle crash at the intersection of Glencoe Rd / Wren Rd in Washington County.

The crash occurred at approximately 3:00 PM.

Operators of both involved vehicles have been transported to area hospital with injuries.

Investigation is continuing.




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/1002/123756/20190417_154953.jpg , 2019-04/1002/123756/20190417_154929.jpg , 2019-04/1002/123756/20190417_154915.jpg , 2019-04/1002/123756/20190417_152722.jpg

Roseburg Fire Department to Conduct Training at Old Safeway Site - 4-22-19 (Photo)
Roseburg Fire Department - 04/22/19 4:53 PM
Image 1
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The City of Roseburg Fire Department will be conducting training exercises at the site of the Old Safeway, located at 406 SE Rose Street, from April 22 to May 1, 2019. The training site is currently a vacant building located in Downtown Roseburg.  The training objectives will include Roof Operations and Defensive Fire Operations. 

This training opportunity will allow local firefighters the ability to train together, in addition to continuing the development of their firefighting skills.  Firefighters from Douglas County Fire District #2 will also be participating in the training.  As always, safety will be the number one priority for personnel participating in the training

Roof Operations training will be held on April 23-25, 2019.  Firefighters will work through different scenarios that require them to make access to the roof for various emergency operations.  These operations will include roof top firefighting, vertical ventilation for interior fires, and roof top rescues.

Defensive Operations training will be held on April 29-May 1, 2019.  Training will allow firefighters to work through simulated large fire scenarios that will require them to use large volumes of water.  Crews will utilize large hose lines, ground monitors and elevated master streams that will require them to maximize their water supply to achieve needed water delivery for fire extinguishment. 

 




Attached Media Files: Image 1

Medical
Leading Northwest health systems partner to increase access to health care (Photo)
Kaiser Permanente Northwest - 04/18/19 8:31 AM
Clinicians at Clackamas Volunteers in Medicine volunteer their time to care for uninsured, low-income community members.
Clinicians at Clackamas Volunteers in Medicine volunteer their time to care for uninsured, low-income community members.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/5557/123760/thumb_CVIM_Blood_Pressure.JPG

Leading Northwest health systems partner to increase access to health care

New initiative supports community clinics that care for uninsured, underinsured and low-income residents

PORTLAND, Ore., April 18, 2019 -- Kaiser Permanente Northwest, Legacy Health, PeaceHealth and Providence Health & Services have partnered to create the “Health Systems Access to Care Fund” for community-supported clinics in Oregon and Southwest Washington.

While the Affordable Care Act helped provide more access to insurance, it didn’t alleviate the need for community-supported or free clinics. The $1.2 million, multiyear fund is held by the Oregon Community Foundation. By providing both funding and technical assistance, these investments will strengthen the clinics’ capacity and infrastructure as they adapt to the evolving needs of their patients. Factors such as ongoing health care reform, Medicaid transformation and increasing pressure on the health care safety net all have an impact on the clinics.

Community-supported clinics provide a variety of primary care services, often through volunteer physicians and nurses working at evening clinics to serve low-income, uninsured people. While each clinic is unique, they all have one thing in common — they exist because of the support they get from the local community.

“The most typical patient profile for our clinic is a low-wage worker with no health insurance, often working two or more jobs to support their families,” said Martha Spiers, LCSW, executive director of Clackamas Volunteers in Medicine. “They defer their own care in order to maintain housing and other essentials for their families and are often just one medical bill away from homelessness, and months away from disability or the need for emergency room care.”

Spiers adds that “Like our patients, CVIM is often unsure of how we will pay the bills from month to month. This initiative is providing us with critical technical and financial support to create a business plan and ongoing stability for our organization, so we can focus on the needs of our patients.”

The clinics below will be the first to receive grants from the fund; they’ll each receive a $100,000 grant over a two-year period:

  • Battle Ground Health Care in Battle Ground, Washington, will develop a sustainable business plan that allows for increased access to health care for uninsured and underinsured people in Clark and Cowlitz counties.
  • Borland Free Clinic in Tualatin, Oregon, will hire a part-time clinic manager and a bilingual lifestyle coach to support the medical director and increase the number of medical clinics and bilingual education opportunities provided to low-income people in Clackamas and Washington counties.   
  • Clackamas Volunteers in Medicine in Oregon City, Oregon, will hire a development director to cultivate support to implement and maintain clinic operations and no-cost patient services in Clackamas County.
  • Free Clinic of Southwest Washington in Vancouver, Washington, will improve its volunteer program and expand its volunteer base, increase awareness to broaden its funding base, and implement a needs assessment of focus populations in Clark County.
  • North by Northeast Community Health Center in Portland, Oregon, aims to grow its patient population by 30%, expand Medicaid contracts and secure funding commitments from key partners.
  • Portland Adventist Community Services in Portland, Oregon, will use the grant to build capacity for business planning, market analysis and partnership outreach and expand the impact of the newly renovated dental clinic for adults living on low or moderate incomes in Multnomah County.
  • Salem Free Clinics in Salem, Oregon, will increase awareness of the clinic’s services to low-income populations in Marion and Polk counties, expand strategic partnerships, and improve the clinic’s newly established Patient Navigation Services.
  • Volunteers in Medicine Clinic in Springfield, Oregon, will use the grant to support delivery of primary and behavioral health services to low-income, uninsured or underinsured Lane County adults, with a specific focus on increasing oversight of diabetic patients, instituting a vision services program, outreaching to the Latino community, and improving intra-clinic operations and communication.   



Attached Media Files: Clinicians at Clackamas Volunteers in Medicine volunteer their time to care for uninsured, low-income community members.

Military
Oregon National Guard participates in the University of Oregon Military Appreciation Spring Game (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 04/19/19 11:40 AM
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EUGENE, Oregon – The Oregon National Guard is scheduled to display military equipment at Autzen Stadium Saturday, April 20 for the annual University of Oregon Military Appreciation Spring Game.  The Spring game allows the Ducks to scrimmage with each other to practice their skills before the fall season, while also paying tribute to military service members.

Military members are scheduled to greet fans in front of the stadium before the game and veterans from every branch of service will participate in Military Appreciation Day activities during the game.

Oregon Army National Guard’s Staff Sgt. Duane Reno from the 234th Army Band is scheduled to sing the National Anthem. This will be followed by an F-15 flyover by the Oregon Air National Guard’s 173 Fighter Wing at 2:05 p.m. prior to game kick off. The half-time show is scheduled to have an honors presentation and recognition along with a helicopter flyover by the United States Coast Guard.

The half time honors presentation includes a flag folding ceremony directly involving Coach Mario Cristobal.  Coach Cristobal has ties to Oregon’s Historic 41 Infantry Division, and the local 162 Infantry Regiment based in Springfield.  Coach Cristobal’s wife, Jessica, had a grandfather, Harry Anicich, who served with the 41st Infantry Division throughout World War II.  The 41st was the longest deployed division in the Pacific serving all four years.

Accepting the flag from Coach Cristobal is Army Vietnam Veteran, the former Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Training, Readiness and Mobilization, the second longest serving Adjutant General and Commander of the Oregon National Guard, and also University of Oregon Alum, Maj. Gen. Mr. Raymond F. Rees (Retired).

Fans are encouraged to make a three can food donation to FOOD for Lane County at the admission gate, which is part of one of the largest food donations operations in the county.

The gates open at noon for attendees to view military static displays.  The gates to Autzen Stadium are scheduled to open at 1:00 p.m. and the game officially start at 2:00 p.m.  

 

Captions:

180421-A-VK948-002

University of Oregon ROTC cadets present the U.S. flag during a pre-game ceremony for the University of Oregon Ducks Football Spring Game at Autzen Stadium, April 21, in Eugene, Oregon. Veterans from every branch of service participated in Military Appreciation Day activities during the game. (Photo by 1st Lt Jessica Clarke, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/962/123821/bio-Rees.pdf , 2019-04/962/123821/180421-A-VK948-002.jpg

State
114th Class of 9-1-1 Professionals to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 04/23/19 6:05 PM

The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 114th Basic Telecommunications Class.

The three-week course includes emergency call handling techniques, assisting individuals in crisis, stress management, civil liability, ethics, criminal law, overview of fire-rescue and law enforcement operations, and a number of other topics. Upon completion of the course, students will return to their employing agency to continue their training for a number of months with a field training officer. 

This is the first class to successfully complete the new three-week course which was increased from two-weeks earlier this year to meet the needs of the state's 9-1-1 professionals and the communities they serve.

The 9-1-1 training program began in 1993 when the Oregon Legislative Assembly enacted legislation which requires that individuals who receive emergency calls for assistance from the public, meet professional standards for training and certification. There are approximately 950 men and women across the state who work in this profession in city, county, tribal, regional, and state public safety communications centers.

Basic Telecommunications #BT114 Graduation will be held at 11:00 a.m. on Friday, May 3, 2019 at the Oregon Public Safety Academy, 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. Telephone: 503-378-2100.  The guest speaker for the graduation is Cathy Orcutt, Communications Director, Linn County Sheriff’s Office.

The graduating students appreciate the family, friends and guests who make graduation an appropriate conclusion to their basic training at the Oregon Public Safety Academy.

Reception immediately following.

Graduation Roster Basic Telecommunications BT114       

Class Coordinator: Tamara Atkinson

Dispatcher Melissa Brown Baker County Sheriff's Office

Dispatcher Lydina Cop W.C.C.C.A.

Dispatcher Dahnrae Duran Columbia 9-1-1 Communications District

Dispatcher Michelle Eaton Deschutes County 9-1-1

Dispatcher Hannah Foster Umatilla County Sheriff's Office

Dispatcher Stephanie Fowler W.C.C.C.A.

Dispatcher Samuel Franconi Lakeview Police Department

Dispatcher Emily Gardner Newberg-Dundee Police Department

Dispatcher Kevin Krallman Central Lane Communications Center

Dispatcher Timothy Kutschera Linn County Sheriff's Office

Dispatcher Cody Mark Central Lane Communications Center

Dispatcher Robert Marvin Central Lane Communications Center

Manager David McDonald Harney County Sheriff's Office

Dispatcher Chloe Mleynek-Craft Central Lane Communications Center

Dispatcher Nina Naftzger Coos County Sheriff's Office

Dispatcher Cynthia Negrete Linn County Sheriff's Office

Dispatcher Meagan Opel Linn County Sheriff's Office

Dispatcher David Otterman Lakeview Police Department

Dispatcher Wendy Pickell Toledo Police Department

Dispatcher Krista Sheppard Oregon State Police

Dispatcher Emily Smith Central Lane Communications Center

Dispatcher Rachael Vandenberg Oregon State Police

Dispatcher Molly Vaughn Toledo Police Department

Telecommunicator Rachel Warren Sweet Home Police Department

 

## Background Information on the BPSST and DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 


BPSST Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting Notice
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 04/23/19 4:06 PM

The Telecommunications Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training (BPSST) will hold a regular meeting at 9:00 a.m. on May 1, 2019.  The meeting will be held in the Governor Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards & Training.  The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling Mona Riester at 503-378-2100

Dial-in number: 888-273-3658 and Participant code: 47119

If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group.  Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.

Agenda Items

Introductions

Approve Minutes of February 6, 2019 Meeting

Review of Public Comment for Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-008-0060: FA & CPR Replacements for Obtaining DPSST Certifications / Presented by Jennifer Howald

Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-008-0015: Background Investigations / Presented by Jennifer Howald

Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-008-0010, 259-008-0011, 259-008-0060 and 259-008-0067: Establishing the Expiration of DPSST Public Safety Professional Certifications / Presented by Jennifer Howald  

Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-008-0070: Criminal Justice Moral Fitness Workgroup Recommendations, Part Two / Presented by Jennifer Howald

Morse, Timothy DPSST #55073 – Basic and Supervisory Telecommunicator Certifications; Oregon State Police /        Presented by Kristen Hibberds

Butler, Bridgett DPSST #58692 – Application for Training and Subsequent Certifications; American Medical Response (AMR) / Presented by Kristen Hibberds

Elliott, Heidi DPSST #59214 – Application for Training and Subsequent Certification: American Medical Response (AMR) / Presented by Kristen Hibberds

Amlin, Bonnie (AKA Jenson) DPSST #59640 – Application for training and Subsequent Certification: Portland State University Department of Public Safety (PSU) / Presented by Kristen Hibberds

Staff Update

Next Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting August 7, 2019  at 9:00 a.m.

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


DPSST Moves Forward with Phase III of Basic Police Course Revision
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 04/23/19 12:58 PM

The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is conducting a comprehensive review and update of the 16-week Basic Police Academy in a series of phases.  There are no plans to expand beyond 16 weeks, but the content is getting a complete overhaul to ensure that material is current, reflective of your agency and community needs, and is an effective and efficient use of the 640 training hours available.  

So far, the following has been completed:

  • The Phase 1 Advisory Panel met from May to October 2017, and developed about four weeks of new curriculum.  Phase 1 focused on the new officer/deputy/trooper themselves (Emotional Intelligence, Resiliency, Ethics, Communication, etc.) as well as introduced them to concepts related their relationship with the community (Legitimacy and Procedural Justice, Implicit Bias, Community Competency, etc.).  Phase 1 provides the foundation for a new officer to interact with citizens in a “simple” encounter.  The Phase 1 product was approved by the DPSST board in January 2018, and implemented in February 2018.
  • The Phase 2 Advisory Panel met from March to October 2018, and developed about ten weeks of new curriculum. Phase 2 focused on skills to “close a call”, including the legal foundation (Procedural and Criminal Law), Behavioral Health, Use of Force, Defensive Tactics, and Firearms. At this same time, a parallel group was revising the opportunities for recruits to practice these skills by developing an entirely new scenario training program. The Phase 2 product was approved by the DPSST Board in January 2019, and will be implemented in July.

Now it is time to convene the Phase 3 Advisory Panel. This panel will consist of two sub-groups each working on different topic areas.

  • One group will work on traffic related topics (Vehicle Stops, Emergency Vehicle Operations, Motor Vehicle Code, Crash Investigations) as well as DUII related topics (Drugs that Impair Driving, DMV Implied Consent, DUII Report Writing, Standardized Field Sobriety Tests, and Intoxilyzer).
  • The second group will work on basic investigations topics (specialized investigations such as domestic violence and child abuse, report writing, court proceedings, etc.).

The time commitment for Phase 3 is one meeting (about 4 hours) per month and some work outside of the monthly meetings to pull together and review content. Meetings will begin in June and conclude in November.

We want to make sure that we have good representation from agencies statewide.  This includes city, county, state, university and tribal agencies, but also geographic, agency-size, rank, etc.  We are looking for participants from every size agency and also different backgrounds such as command staff, trainers (skills, classroom, etc.), field training officers, community members, and others. To encourage statewide participation we offer free meals and lodging at DPSST, and reimbursement of personal vehicle mileage, to anyone traveling over 75 miles.  We will also make participation possible via teleconference.

The first meeting will be held on June 6, 2019 from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM. The meeting will be held in the DPSST Boardroom located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem. This will be a working meeting and lunch will be provided to panel participants. This will be a public meeting, so others who are interested, but not participating on the panel, may sit in and observe.

If you, or members of your agency, would like to participate in one of the Phase 3 sub-groups (Traffic/DUII or Investigations), please send me the following by May 8, 2019:

  • Name
  • Agency
  • Position/Assignment
  • Phone Number
  • Email
  • Sub-Group Interest: Traffic/DUII or Basic Investigations
  • Any Specialty Topic(s) of Interest

If too many names are received, we may need to limit participation, but that is a problem we are glad to work through!

Thank you for your consideration,

Staci Yutzie

Program Development Coordinator

DPSST

staci.yutzie@state.or.us

503-378-2426

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 


Private Security Armed Subcommittee Meeting Notice
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 04/23/19 12:43 PM

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Armed Subcommittee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training's Private Security Committee will hold a regular meeting at 10:00 a.m. on April 30, 2019.

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling Mona Riesterer by phone at 503-378-2431

Dial-in number: 888-808-6929 and Participant code: 8917117 - If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group.  Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.

Agenda Items:

Announcement of new memberships and introduction of all voting members.

Approval of Minutes of October 9, 2018 Armed Subcommittee

The future for armed security in Oregon  discussion – law changes, embracing changes in the industry, bring solutions vs. legislation / Presented by William McKnight

Identifying changes needed in development of more in-depth private security firearms instructor course discussion - focusing on instructorship, how to teach marksmanship skills, running a line, use of force and ultimate result which effects the way we teach the armed professional courses. Presented by Rob Meeks and William McKnight

Department Update

Roundtable

Next Meeting July 9, 2019 @ 10:00 a.m.

Administrative Announcement - This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by DPSST Armed subcommittee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

The Private Security Committee is one of five discipline-specific policy committees of the Board, established through Oregon Revised Statute, to provide input and guidance on issues related to the private security and private investigator professions.

 


Statement from DHS Director Fariborz Pakseresht on Governor Kate Brown's Executive Order
Oregon Department of Human Services - 04/18/19 11:37 AM

The foundation of all the work done at the Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) is safety for the children and adults we serve across our five major programs. Our vision for children who cannot live with their families safely is to enter a foster care system where they are protected; get the services and supports they need to heal in a stable, caring environment in their communities, and grow to thrive in adulthood.

 

Oregon’s child safety system, particularly its Child Welfare program within DHS, has been extremely strained for several decades. During the past two years, there have been multiple internal and independent assessments and audits of the agency and its Child Welfare program that all point to the same list of solutions. We have a clear picture of what must be done, we have defined the strategies to correct the problems, we have been building the foundation for the corrective work and we are making progress.

 

Transforming a statewide child safety system into a robust child well-being system will take time. It requires meeting the demands of today while building the system for the future. We appreciate Governor Kate Brown continuing to prioritize the safety of our children and families. We welcome the additional support her Executive Order provides to increase our capacity and capabilities to improve Oregon’s Child Welfare system today and for the future. Keeping Oregon’s foster children safe and helping our families heal and thrive takes all of us working together. We look forward to working productively and cooperatively with the Governor’s designees.

We have built the foundation for the corrective work and we are making progress by:

  • Putting the structure and systems in place to right-size the foster care system by safely reducing the number of children entering the system through community-based supports for at-risk families and reducing disproportionality.
     
  • Stabilizing the Child Welfare workforce by reducing turnover and bringing caseloads closer to the national average so caseworkers have more time to work face-to-face with families, and improving staff training and supports.

 

  • Ensuring the safety and wellbeing of children through a series of improvements ranging from consistent screening of child abuse reports to in-home nursing visits.
     
     
  • Expanding community-based placement options so every foster child is safe and in the care settings that meets their unique needs in Oregon, whether it be family foster care or a therapeutic setting.
     
  • Basing our decisions in research and data, coupled with the professional experience of our staff, to ensure we get to the root causes of problems and take actions that are child-centered and effective.

 

  • Expanding our allies because the Child Welfare program cannot address the factors that bring families to our attention or resolve the capacity crisis alone.

The support from the Governor will provide the necessary resources to help the Department continue and accelerate progress to ensure the Child Welfare program in Oregon achieves the goals we all share.


Parkrose High School students win safety video contest (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 04/22/19 11:44 AM
Parkrose - 1st place winners - photo
Parkrose - 1st place winners - photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/1073/123872/thumb_Parkrose_High_School_contest_winners_photo.jpg

(Salem) – Students at Parkrose High School in Portland won $500 for their first-place video titled “The Safety Bros” in an annual safety video contest that promotes young worker safety and the importance of speaking up.

Bouncing with music, energy, and humor, the video features a duo of workplace safety and health bros who rally a group of workers to the cause of speaking up and working safe by spurring them to join “a most excellent song and dance number.”

The hip-hop-infused bros, clad in leather jackets and shades, lead the dancing, clapping, and singing while rapping about on-the-job hazards, including old equipment, faulty wires, messy floors, and a lack of training.

Parkrose High School also won a matching amount of prize money.

Chad McAdams, a senior at Parkrose who plays one of the safety bros, said the first-place win “was just really a big and awesome accomplishment for all of us to do.” And he and his video-producing teammates learned a lot along the way. “There’s no reason you shouldn’t say something if you don’t think what you’re doing is safe,” he said. “If you don’t say something, you can really get hurt.”

This year’s contest was McAdams’ second time participating in the safety video contest. He directed 2018’s “Welcome to Recyc Corp,” for which the Parkrose team tied for third place. McAdams hopes to become a filmmaker. “I’m thinking more of like a director who makes original films based off their own writing,” he said. “I have big plans for film.”

The other members of the winning Parkrose High School team are:

Shanahan Sweet

Jason Taylor

Nayely Interian

Mason Swinehart

Hunter Fields

Waymond Crowder

Austin Audette

Zack Tudor

Julia Bardocz

Mary Dinh

Clayton Espenel

Adrian Phanh

Phong Ta

Jonathan Hawes

Sam Adjibogoun

Ryan Vacano

Kim Townsend

Kaley Easton

Kayla Sanders

Aida Najafabadi

Anthony Xiong

Veshawn Saechao

Ryan Matthews

Ashley Moua

Shade Courtney

Alex Viegas Dias

James Jasso-Commack

Julius Hardman

Hunter Osborn

Denis Ramic

Fue Chee Vang

Calvin Haynes

Alexis Budar

Griffin Clover

Daniel Rodriguez Sanchez

Jet Vang

Timothy Vu

Aallan McKenzie

Ashley Jackson

Oscar Sieber

Sam Madden

Tayquaan Jackson

Carson Schafer

Matthew Silver

Ryan Nguyen

Giezi Tenorio-Robledo

Second- and third-place prizes also were awarded. They are as follows:

Second place ($400)

“Safety Joe”

Crescent Valley High School, Corvallis

Created by:

Danny Mason

Alex Vartanov

Third place ($300)

“Anytime, Anyplace”

Summit High School, Bend

Created by:

Marvin Walder

Ryan Walker

Olivia McGean

Amberly Schreinerwood

The creators of the top videos were presented their awards on Saturday during a special screening at Northern Lights Theatre and Pub in Salem. Sponsored by the Oregon Young Employee Safety Coalition (O[yes]), the annual video contest focuses on teen workers, who are twice as likely to be injured on the job, according to federal studies.

The contest is designed to increase awareness about safety for young workers, with the theme of “Speak up. Work safe.” Students were asked to create a 90-second or less video with a teen job safety and health message. The videos were judged on creativity, production value, youth appeal, and the overall safety and health message.

All of the winning videos, as well as the other finalists, are available for viewing on YouTube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z5_HsiPb_rc&list=PLM75uPd4sBhx05JwZDmjYieJiG49qjsDx

The Oregon Young Employee Safety Coalition (O[yes]) organizes the contest. The sponsors are Oregon OSHA, SAIF Corporation, local Oregon chapters of the American Society of Safety Professionals, the Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences at OHSU, Hoffman Construction, Central Oregon Safety & Health Association, the Oregon SHARP Alliance, the Construction Safety Summit, Northern Lights Theatre and Pub, SafeBuild Alliance, and the Pacific Northwest Section of the American Industrial Hygiene Association.

###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit www.osha.oregon.gov.

The Oregon Young Employee Safety Coalition (O[yes]) is a nonprofit dedicated to preventing young worker injuries and fatalities. O[yes] members include safety and health professionals, educators, employers, labor and trade associations, and regulators. For more information, go to http://youngemployeesafety.org/.

 

 




Attached Media Files: Parkrose - 1st place winners - photo

Snake River Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 04/18/19 3:59 PM
Kenneth D. McDonald
Kenneth D. McDonald
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/1070/123795/thumb_McDonald.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Kenneth D. McDonald, died April 18, 2019. McDonald was incarcerated at Snake River Correctional Institution (SRCI) in Ontario and passed away in the infirmary while on hospice. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified.

McDonald entered DOC custody on February 4, 2016, from Lane County with an earliest release date of July 2, 2024. McDonald was 69 years old. Next of kin has been notified.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,700 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

SRCI is a multi-custody prison in Ontario that houses approximately 3,000 adults in custody. SRCI has multiple special housing units including disciplinary segregation, intensive management, infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care, and an administrative segregation unit. SRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including a contact center, laundry, and sign shop. SRCI specializes in incentive housing, specialized housing, individuals with mental health/medical vulnerabilities, education and trades programs, cognitive and parenting programs, and institution work programs. SRCI opened in 1991 and is the largest correctional institution in the state.

####




Attached Media Files: Kenneth D. McDonald

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Core Leadership Team meets April 30 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 04/24/19 8:37 AM

April 24, 2019

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Core Leadership Team meets April 30 in Portland

What: The third meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Core Leadership Team.

Agenda: Reaffirm the role of the team; highlight common system-level challenges regarding substance use disorders and peer-delivered services; engage with the collaborative's workgroups to identify opportunities to build momentum, alignment and impact.

When: April 30, 1:30-3:30 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland.

The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges with a focus on peer delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, see the RBHC website at https://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HSD/BHP/Pages/Regional-Collaboratives.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

•         Sign language and spoken language interpreters

•         Written materials in other languages

•         Braille

•         Large print

•         Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2XF6CGc


CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group meets April 25
Oregon Health Authority - 04/24/19 8:13 AM

April 24, 2019

Contact: Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group meets April 25

What: An additional public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group.

When: April 25, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Five Oak Building, Suite 850, Mary Conference Room, 421 SW Oak St, Portland. Space is limited. The public also may join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3255183736506546957 and conference line at 415-655-0060, listen-only access code 302-601-317.

Agenda: Welcome and introductions; abbreviated updates; TAG feedback on equity measure specifications (meaningful access to culturally responsive health care services); adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at http://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Technical-Advisory-Group.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2UReN5s


OHA announces applicants for 2020-2024 coordinated care contracts
Oregon Health Authority - 04/23/19 3:34 PM

April 23, 2019

Contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA announces applicants for 2020-2024 coordinated care contracts

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has received nineteen applications from organizations seeking contracts to serve as coordinated care organizations (CCOs) for the Oregon Health Plan’s nearly 1 million members. The contracts start January 1, 2020, and go through December 31, 2024. Awards for the CCO contracts are expected to be announced in July 2019

"OHA’s goal is to transform health care for every Oregonian by reducing costs, improving access to mental health services, rewarding providers for improving health outcomes, and addressing issues outside the doctor’s office that impact health," said OHA Director Patrick Allen. "OHA will be evaluating the applicants based on their ability to deliver on these goals."

Oregon first established CCOs in 2012 to transform health care delivery in the state. CCOs bring together physical, behavioral, and oral health providers to coordinate care for people on the Oregon Health Plan. They improve health and reduce costs by providing more coordinated, flexible and innovative services. CCOs are rewarded for achieving specific health outcomes and quality measures. Nearly 87 percent of Oregon’s 1 million OHP members are enrolled in CCOs.

In October the Oregon Health Policy Board approved a comprehensive set of policies to improve the health of Oregon Health Plan members, address health disparities, control program costs, and continue to transform health care delivery in our state. This next phase of health care transformation is known as "CCO 2.0."

The four priority areas for improvement identified by Governor Kate Brown and advanced by the Oregon Health Policy Board’s policy recommendations are:

  • Improve the behavioral health system and address barriers to access to and integration of care.
  • Increase value and pay for performance.
  • Focus on social determinants of health and health equity.
  • Maintain sustainable cost growth and ensure financial transparency.

OHA’s request for applications (RFA) criteria asks applicants to demonstrate their capacity to achieve the objectives of CCO 2.0. Applications will be evaluated in the following areas:

  • Care coordination and integration: Ability to coordinate with outside entities (including public and community-based organizations), between levels of care, for special populations of members and to integrate behavioral and oral health services.
  • Delivery system transformation: Innovating to improve care delivery and quality (including primary care), access to culturally and linguistically appropriate care, measurement of value and efficiency of services.
  • Community engagement: Strength of the Community Engagement Plan and of community engagement in developing the application.
  • Clinical and service delivery: Utilization monitoring, ensuring appropriate access to services, clinical review and prior authorization, and approach to addressing complaints and grievances.
  • Business administration: CCO business processes, member engagement and outreach, adoption of electronic health records, data systems, and supporting members during transition.
  • Finance: Applicant solvency, ownership and affiliations, National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) reporting, arrangements with pharmacy benefit managers, plans for increasing value-based payments, tracking and reporting of social determinants of health investments and outcomes, managing within the global budget, and cost containment.

Applications will be reviewed by teams with expertise in the areas under review.

Based on the applications, Oregon Health Plan members in every county in Oregon would have at least one CCO to coordinate their health care. In many parts of the state, multiple organizations submitted applications to operate in the same counties, giving Oregon Health Plan members more than one CCO choice.

Applications received by OHA and proposed service areas

Applicant

Proposed Service Area

AllCare CCO, Inc.

Josephine, Jackson, Curry and partial Douglas

Cascade Health Alliance, LLC

Partial Klamath

Columbia Pacific CCO, LLC

Clatsop, Columbia and Tillamook

Eastern Oregon Coordinated Care Organization, LLC

Baker, Gilliam, Grant, Harney, Lake, Malheur, Morrow, Sherman, Umatilla, Union, Wallowa, and Wheeler

Health Share of Oregon

Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington

InterCommunity Health Plans dba InterCommunity Health Network Coordinated Care Organization

Linn, Benton and Lincoln

Jackson County CCO dba Jackson Care Connect

Jackson

Marion Polk Coordinated Care

Marion, Polk, partial Benton, Linn, Clackamas and Yamhill

Northwest Coordinated Care Organization LLC (Moda Health Plan Inc.)

Clatsop, Columbia and Tillamook

West Central Coordinated Care Organization LLC (Moda Health Plan Inc.)

Lane

PacificSource Community Solutions - Central Oregon

Deschutes, Jefferson, Crook and partial Klamath

PacificSource Community Solutions - Columbia Gorge

Hood River and Wasco

PacificSource Community Solutions - Lane County

Lane

PacificSource Community Solutions - Marion and Polk Counties

Marion and Polk

Primary Health

Josephine, Jackson and partial Douglas

Trillium Community Health Plan, Inc.

Lane, Washington, Multnomah, Clackamas, partial Douglas and Linn

Umpqua Health Alliance, LLC

Douglas

Western Oregon Advanced Health, LLC abn Advanced Health

Coos and Curry

Yamhill County Care Organization

Yamhill and partial Clackamas, Marion, Polk, Tillamook and Washington

Additional information about the CCO 2.0 RFA process can be found on the CCO 2.0 page on the OHA website.

# # #


Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Medical Community meets April 25
Oregon Health Authority - 04/22/19 2:53 PM

April 22, 2019

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Medical Community meets April 25

What: A public meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Medical Community.

Agenda: Developing an outline for peers in medical settings toolkit, which will be the final product of this workgroup. The goal is to identify the target audience, draft an outline and identify experts to invite each month to advise on best practices.

When: April 25, 9-11 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building Room 1D, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland.

Details: The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges. Its focus is on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, see the RBHC website at https://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HSD/BHP/Pages/Regional-Collaboratives.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2GAkPyx


Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Medical Community Collaboration Workgroup April 25 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 04/18/19 4:06 PM

What: The second meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Medical Community Collaboration Workgroup

Agenda: Learn from existing integrated medical models; begin to develop a context for a toolkit; establish audience, purpose and messaging for a toolkit.

When: April 25, 2019, 9-11 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1D, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland

The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges. The collaborative is focused on peer delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, see the RBHC website at (https://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HSD/BHP/Pages/Regional-Collaboratives.aspx

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup meets April 25 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 04/18/19 4:03 PM

April 18, 2019

Media contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us">saerom.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup meets April 25 in Portland

What: The second public meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup.

Agenda: Continue visioning process; identify possible outcomes.

When: Thursday, April 25, 2-4 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1D, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland.

Details: The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges. Its focus is on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, see the RBHC website at https://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HSD/BHP/Pages/Regional-Collaboratives.aspx

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Stayton Market celebrating Win for Life win (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 04/19/19 10:00 AM
2019-04/4939/123805/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
2019-04/4939/123805/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/4939/123805/thumb_OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg

April 18, 2019 - Salem, Ore. – When Saleem Hakimi, owner of the Stayton Market and Deli found out that his store sold a winning Win for Life ticket, he couldn’t believe it.

“This just shows that you can win anywhere, even a small town like Stayton,” Hakimi said.

Hakimi sold the winning ticket to Brian Schachtsick of Stayton. Schachtsick claimed his prize last week and opted to take the annual payments of $52,000 before taxes, each year for the rest of his life. The winning numbers were 11-19-50-52.

Hakimi said that he hasn’t had a big win like this in the past and is excited to receive the $13,000 selling bonus for selling the winning Win for Life ticket.

“I will put some back into the business, because you have to invest to make money,” Hakimi said. “I am also moving to a new house, so this will come in very handy.”

The Oregon Lottery will be at the Stayton Market and Deli on Thursday, April 25 at noon, to help him celebrate selling the winning ticket by providing him an oversized ceremonial check and handing out free Oregon Lottery Scratch-its to customers.

“When I share the story with friends and customers about selling the ticket, they all stop by and buy Lottery tickets,” he said. “When someone wins from a small town, people get excited. It makes people more optimistic that it could happen to them!”

This is the fourth Win for Life top prize Oregon Lottery players have won this year – all this Spring. The top prize for Win for Life is $1,000 per week for the rest of the life of the winner. Drawings are held on Monday, Wednesday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m.

Prior to these most recent top prize winners, there was a three-year drought from 2014-2017 with no Win for Life top prize winner.

The current streak of Win for Life luck started on February 12, when Robert East of Fairview won the top prize. East took the prize as a weekly $1,000 payment. He said he will use the prize for retirement and purchased the ticket at CJs Pub in Fairview.

Then in March it was an incredibly lucky month for Win for Life players, with two top prizes being awarded within three days of each other. On March 5, Sondra Lundy of Springfield claimed her top prize from a ticket she purchased at The Pour House Tavern.

Three days later, on March 8, Steven Henning of Eugene hit the third Win for Life prize. He purchased his ticket from Dari Mart in Eugene. All three winners opted to take their jackpots as weekly, $1,000 prizes, for the rest of their lives.

“If this keeps up, Win for Life is going to be the game to play in 2019,” said Patrick Johnson, Lottery spokesperson. “Normally there is a Win for Life top prize winner that comes every now and then, but sometimes the random nature of the Lottery will surprise you, just ask our winners!”
The Oregon Lottery reminds players to always sign the back of their Lottery tickets, regardless of the game. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 are advised to contact the Lottery office and schedule an appointment to claim their prize.
Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned nearly $12 billion for economic development, public education, state parks, Veterans services and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/4939/123805/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg , 2019-04/4939/123805/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg

Real-Time Assessment and Planning Tool for Oregon (RAPTOR) Goes 3-D
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 04/24/19 9:45 AM

Salem, OR - April 23, 2019 – Oregon’s Office of Emergency Management’s RAPTOR (Real-time Assessment and Planning Tool for Oregon) program is a vital tool for statewide emergency managers, allowing access to live data in map layers. It’s also a handy resource for anyone interested in what’s happening weather-wise and traffic-wise around the state. Today, RAPTOR has been updated and now offers visuals in 3-dimensions.  

According to OEM GIS Program Coordinator Daniel Stoelb, presenting information in a 3D view is going to match more closely with what you can see when you walk outside your door, providing an “in person” view, and an exciting way to visualize the landscape, landmarks and current incidents.

Originally developed in 2010 to share information on a common operating picture as part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Virtual USA Northwest Pilot Project program, RAPTOR is a web-mapping application that allows users to display data from various resources onto a single map. The program supports OEM’s Emergency Operations Plan by sharing information before, during and after an event and enhances our overall readiness throughout the state.

In addition to 3D capabilities, the updated RAPTOR site allows users to share maps, and save or “bookmark” geographic locations. In addition, the site displays the OEM Twitter feed, offers a full-screen option and works on a variety of platforms: PC, Android, IOS.

To view a short video showing how to use 3D capability, go to https://youtu.be/boGirCF_SwQ. To view the new public version of RAPTOR, go to https://arcg.is/08TCuO.


May events at Champoeg include Founders' Day, lecture about historic flood
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 04/23/19 8:00 AM

The annual Founders’ Day celebration and a lecture about the infamous 1861 Champoeg flood are set to kick off the summer season at Champoeg State Heritage Area.

Founders’ Day, celebrating the 1843 vote held in Champoeg that established the first provisional government west of the Mississippi River, will be 1 – 2:30 p.m. May 4 at the park. The annual event is free and will feature living history actors, a fur trapper rifle volley salute and a ceremony to honor the men who participated in the 1843 vote.

The flood lecture, delivered by Willamette University Visiting Professor Cayla Hill, will be 1 p.m. May 18 at the park’s visitor center. Hill will expand on the history and current archeological evidence of the 1861 flood, which decimated the modest river town.

Founders’ Day celebrates a vote held in Champoeg by local settlers on May 2, 1843. A large group gathered that day to decide the future of the Oregon territory. After a spirited debate, a slim majority voted “aye” to form Oregon’s first provisional government, laying the groundwork for Oregon’s statehood in 1859. Founders’ Day has been held annually at Champoeg since 1901.

Cayla Hill has been a visiting professor with Willamette University since 2016. She is an Applied Anthropology doctorate candidate with Oregon State University (OSU), and holds a master’s in Applied Anthropology from OSU.

For more information about the events, contact ranger Dan Klug at 503-678-1251. Information about the park, including maps, is on oregonstateparks.org.


Courts/District Attorneys
Two More Plead Guilty for Roles in Interstate Marijuana Trafficking Conspiracy
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 04/22/19 11:31 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—In related criminal cases, Cole Williams Griffiths and Raleigh Dragon Lau pleaded guilty today for their roles in a conspiracy to traffic marijuana grown in Hood River, Oregon and Portland to Virginia, Texas, and Florida.

Drug proceeds, in the form of bulk U.S. currency, were returned to Oregon via U.S. mail and passenger luggage on commercial airlines. As part of this investigation, federal authorities have seized approximately 11,000 marijuana plants, 546 pounds of processed marijuana, more than $2.8 million in cash, 51 firearms, 26 vehicles, trailers, pieces of heavy equipment, a yacht, and three houses used as marijuana grow sites, all since August 2017.

Griffiths, 30, of Hood River, and Lau, 33, of Portland, both pleaded guilty to conspiring to manufacture, possess with intent to distribute, and distribute marijuana, maintaining drug-involved premises, and money laundering.

Conspiring to manufacture, possess with intent to distribute, and distribute marijuana and maintaining drug involved premises carries a maximum sentence of life in prison, a mandatory minimum sentence of 10 years in prison, a $10 million fine, and a lifetime of supervised release. Money laundering carries a max sentence of 20 years in prison, a $250,000 fine, and three years’ supervised release.

Griffiths and Lau will be sentenced on August 5 and 7, 2019, respectively, before U.S. District Court Judge Robert E. Jones.

As part of their plea agreements, Griffiths and Lau have agreed to forfeit any criminally-derived proceeds and property used to facilitate his crimes identified by the government prior to sentencing.

Co-defendants Brittany Lesanta Kizzee, 28, of Houston, Texas and Paul Eugene Thomas, 38, of Portland, pleaded guilty on November 27, 2018 and April 10, 2019, respectively. Thomas will be sentenced on August 6, 2019, and Kizzee will be sentenced on August 7, 2019. Co-defendant Trent Lamar Knight, 30, of Houston, is scheduled to plead guilty on May 8, 2019. Finally, co-defendant Jody Tremayne Wafer, 29, of Houston, is scheduled for trial on June 18, 2019.

This case was investigated by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, IRS Criminal Investigation, Homeland Security Investigations and the FBI. It is being prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon.

This case was brought as part of the Justice Department’s Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF) program, the centerpiece of the department’s strategy for reducing the availability of drugs in the U.S. OCDETF was established in 1982 to mount a comprehensive attack on drug trafficking by disrupting and dismantling major drug trafficking and money laundering organizations. Today, OCDETF combines the resources and expertise of its member federal agencies in coordination with state and local law enforcement.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/6325/123871/CHANGE_OF_PLEA-Griffiths-Lau-Final.pdf

Washington State Man Accused of Marketing Fraudulent Tax Avoidance Schemes Disguised as Churches, Other Entities
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 04/19/19 2:02 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A federal grand jury in Portland has returned a seven-count indictment charging Glen Stoll, 68, a resident of Washington State, with multiple crimes stemming from a scheme whereby he organized, promoted, and marketed fraudulent tax avoidance strategies. Stoll made his initial appearance in the District of Oregon today before U.S. Magistrate Judge Stacie F. Beckerman.

Stoll is charged with one count each of conspiracy to defraud the U.S., conspiracy to commit bank fraud, bank fraud, and making a false statement on a loan application and three counts of tax evasion.

As alleged in the indictment, Stoll served as the director of an entity called Remedies at Law. Stoll used Remedies at Law and other related entities, including the Oregon-based Embassy of Heaven, to promote schemes designed to assist people in evading the assessment and collection of federal income taxes. Stoll advised clients that they could avoid paying taxes by creating a church or ministry and placing their assets and income in so-called ministerial trusts.  Stoll referred to himself as a “general counsel” with legal experience when, in reality, he held no license to practice law.

Beginning in September 2007, Stoll assisted former Oregon couple Karl and Laurie Brady with the creation of two “ministerial trusts” called Progeny Services and Progeny Foundation. At Stoll’s direction, Karl Brady opened bank accounts for the nominee entities, issued checks from his business payable to Progeny Services or Progeny Foundation, and deposited the checks into the nominee accounts. This enabled the Brady’s to avoid the assessment of federal income tax while maintaining full access to the money for personal and family expenses.

From 2008 through 2015, at Stoll’s direction, Karl Brady filed no personal income tax returns despite receiving more than $3 million and ignored repeated letters from the IRS notifying him of his failure to file. This scheme allowed Brady to evade in excess of $1.2 million dollars in income taxes.

Separately, in 2015, Stoll assisted Brady in defrauding two of Brady’s mortgage lenders.  Stoll assisted Brady in submitting a false short sale application and other fraudulent documents to avoid repayment on a vacation rental in Hawaii. At Stoll’s direction, Brady’s short sale application included a letter claiming he and his wife were under the complete care of a church ministry, had no income, no assets, and were completely dependent on a church. Relying on this false information, the lenders authorized the short sale and suffered combines losses of approximately $120,000.

This case was investigated by IRS Criminal Investigation and is being prosecuted by Donna Brecker Maddux, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/6325/123827/INDICTMENT-Stoll-Final.pdf

Former Aequitas Owner and Executive Vice President Pleads Guilty in Fraud and Money Laundering Conspiracy
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 04/19/19 12:37 PM

Criminal conspiracy could have cost investors more than $600 million

PORTLAND, Ore.—U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams announced today that Brian A. Oliver, a former owner and executive vice president of Aequitas Management, LLC and several other Aequitas-related companies has pleaded guilty to conspiring to commit mail and wire fraud and money laundering.

According to court documents, Oliver, 54, of Aurora, Oregon, and unnamed co-conspirators used the Lake Oswego, Oregon, based company to solicit investments in a variety of notes and funds, many of which were purportedly backed by trade receivables in education, health care, transportation, and other consumer credit areas. Oliver was the company’s primary fundraiser and shared responsibility for the operation and management of Aequitas-affiliated companies and investment products as well as for the use of investor money.

From June 2014 through February 2016, Oliver and others solicited investors by misrepresenting the company’s use of investor money, the financial health and strength of Aequitas and its related companies, and the risks associated with its investments and investment strategies. Oliver and his co-conspirators also failed to disclose other critical facts about the company, including its near-constant liquidity and cash-flow crises, the use investor money to repay other investors and to defray operating expenses, and the lack of collateral to secure funds.

Oliver faces a maximum sentence of 30 years in prison, a $250,000 fine or twice the gross monetary gains or losses resulting from his crimes, and three years’ supervised release. He will be sentenced on August 5, 2019 before U.S. District Court Judge Michael W. Mosman.

As part of the plea agreement, Oliver has agreed to pay restitution in full to each of victim’s as determined and ordered by the court.

This case is being investigated by the FBI, IRS Criminal Investigation, and the U.S. Department of Labor Employee Benefits Security Administration. It is being prosecuted by Scott E. Bradford and Ryan W. Bounds, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/6325/123818/CHANGE_OF_PLEA-Oliver-Final.pdf

Jackson County Man Sentenced to 10 Years in Prison for Distributing Cocaine and Trading Cocaine for Firearms
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 04/19/19 8:47 AM

MEDFORD, Ore.—On Thursday, April 18, 2019, Jonathan Alan Ochoa, 31, of Talent, Oregon, was sentenced to 120 months in federal prison and five years’ supervised release for conspiring to distribute and possess with intent to distribute cocaine and possessing a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

“Mr. Ochoa’s actions show a blatant disregard for the law and public safety. The lengthy prison sentences ordered in this case reflect the seriousness of mixing firearms and drug trafficking,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “I thank the ATF agents involved in bringing Mr. Ochoa and Mr. Manzer to justice. Our communities are safer thanks to their efforts.”

“Mr. Ochoa compounded his drug dealing by accepting firearms in trade for illicit drugs,” said ATF Seattle Field Division Special Agent in Charge Darek Pleasants. “His willingness to engage in this lawless behavior undermines the safety and security of his community and contributes to other related criminal activities. His sentence is appropriate and serves to send a message to the community that actions like this will not be tolerated.”

According to court documents, between July and August 2017, Ochoa agreed and conspired with co-defendants Gonzalo Manzo, Jr. and Rodolfo Quevedo to send more than 500 grams of cocaine from California to Oregon to sell and distribute to others. During this time, Ochoa and Manzo negotiated a sale of cocaine with an undercover agent from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF) in exchange for multiple firearms.

On August 17, 2017, at Manzo’s request, Quevedo transported approximately 1000 grams of cocaine from California and delivered it to Ochoa in the Medford area. The firearms and cash were intended to be transported back to California but agents arrested Ochoa and his co-conspirators and the firearms were seized by law enforcement.

Manzo pleaded guilty to the same charges in August 2018 and was sentenced to 188 months in prison and three years’ supervised release on December 11, 2018. Quevedo pleaded guilty in September 2018 to a single count of conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute cocaine and was sentenced to one year and one day in prison and five years’ supervised release on December 20, 2018.

Ochoa previously pleaded guilty to one count each of conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute cocaine and possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime on October 29, 2018.

This case was investigated by ATF and is being prosecuted by Nathan J. Lichvarcik and Adam E. Delph, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

The case is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN). PSN is the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction efforts. PSN is an evidence-based program proven to be effective at reducing violent crime. Through PSN, a broad spectrum of stakeholders work together to identify the most pressing violent crime problems in the community and develop comprehensive solutions to address them. As part of this strategy, PSN focuses enforcement efforts on the most violent offenders and partners with locally based prevention and reentry programs for lasting reductions in crime.

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Attached Media Files: 2019-04/6325/123811/SENTENCING-Ochoa-Final.pdf

Bend Police Department Featured in Justice Department Report on Improving Safety and Wellness of Law Enforcement
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 04/18/19 3:16 PM

WASHINGTON – On April 17, 2019, the Department of Justice released two complementary reports focusing on the mental health and safety of the nation’s federal, state, local and tribal police officers. The Bend Police Department in Bend, Oregon was featured in the report as one of eleven law enforcement agencies demonstrating a range of innovative approaches to safeguarding the mental health of both sworn and nonsworn employees.

The reports, Law Enforcement Mental Health and Wellness Act: Report to Congress and Law Enforcement Mental Health and Wellness Programs: Eleven Case Studies, were published by the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office) as required by the Law Enforcement Mental Health and Wellness Act (LEMHWA) of 2017.

The LEMHWA passed both chambers unanimously and without amendment and was signed by the President shortly thereafter. These actions show that its purpose and intended effects are uncontroversial among policymakers – law enforcement agencies need and deserve support in their ongoing efforts to protect the mental health and well-being of their employees. Congress took the important step in improving the delivery of and access to mental health and wellness services that will help our nation’s more than 800,000 federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement officers.

“Serving as a law enforcement officer requires courage, strength, and dedication,” Attorney General William P. Barr said. “The demands of this work, day in and day out, can take a toll on the health and well-being of our officers, but the Department of Justice is committed to doing our part to help. I want to thank the men and women of our COPS office for their hard work to support our officers every day, and specifically for these thoughtful and insightful reports, which detail both the challenges facing our officers and some specific ways we can give them the support that they deserve.”

“We are incredibly proud of everyone at the Bend Police Department for the innovative steps taken to protect the mental health of all employees. Not only does this protect officer and staff wellbeing, but it also bolsters public safety. I am grateful to Chief of Police Jim Porter for his leadership and commitment to supporting the men and women under his command.” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “I hope that Bend PD’s example will mark the beginning of a new era in policing where protecting the mental health of officers and staff is universally viewed as an essential element of effective law enforcement.”

“A damaging national narrative has emerged in which law enforcement officers – whether federal, state, local, or tribal – are seen not as protectors of communities but as oppressors,” said COPS Office Director Phil Keith. “In this environment, where an inherently stressful job is made more so by a constant undercurrent of distrust and negative public opinion, the risks to officer wellness are exacerbated. This report is an important measure and reflection in our ongoing commitment to protect those who protect us.”

Under the Law Enforcement Mental Health and Wellness Act, the COPS Office was required to submit reports to Congress that addressed:

  1. Recommendations to Congress on effectiveness of crisis lines for law enforcement officers, efficacy of annual mental health checks for law enforcement officers, expansion of peer mentoring programs, and ensuring privacy considerations for these types of programs;
  2. Mental health practices and services in the U.S. Departments of Defense (DoD) and Veterans Affairs (VA) that could be adopted by federal, state, local, or tribal law enforcement agencies; and
  3. Case studies of programs designed primarily to address officer psychological health and well-being.

The first report, Law Enforcement Mental Health and Wellness Act: Report to Congress, includes 22 recommendations to Congress ranging from supporting programs to embed mental health professionals in law enforcement agencies to supporting the development of model policies and implementation guidance for law enforcement agencies to make substantial efforts to reduce suicide.

The case studies report, Law Enforcement Mental Health and Wellness Programs: Eleven Case Studies, is designed to provide an overview of multiple successful and promising law enforcement mental health and wellness strategies with the joint aims of informing Congress, state and local government officials, and the law enforcement field. The report includes 11 case studies from a diverse group of sites across the United States.

The Department of Justice is pleased to respond to the LEMHWA as officer safety, health, and wellness is a longstanding priority of the agency. The reports released today address some of the most pressing issues currently facing our law enforcement community.

The COPS Office has a near 25-year history of supporting the efforts of state, local and tribal law enforcement, including the management of the National Blue Alert Network. The agency awards grants to hire community policing officers, develop and test innovative policing strategies, and provide training and technical assistance to community members, local government leaders, and all levels of law enforcement. Since 1994, the COPS Office has invested more than $14 billion to help advance community policing.

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Attached Media Files: 2019-04/6325/123790/ANNOUNCEMENT-LEMHWA-Report-Final.pdf

Colleges & Universities - Public
Western Oregon University Board of Trustees Approves Undergrad Resident Tuition Increase of 2.33% (Photo)
Western Oregon University - 04/19/19 3:36 PM
Western Oregon University in Monmouth, Ore.
Western Oregon University in Monmouth, Ore.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/1107/123833/thumb_Iwou0641-Edit_copy_copy.jpg

The Western Oregon University Board of Trustees approved an increase of 2.33%, or $4 per credit, for Oregon resident undergraduate students in the 2019-20 academic year at its quarterly meeting Wednesday.

WOU is one of the first state public universities to finalize its new tuition rate in advance of the Oregon Legislature’s budget decision for the 2019-21 biennium.

“WOU students cannot wait until lawmakers set the budget for higher education, so we decided to move forward,” said WOU President Rex Fuller. “We know that tuition rates are a primary consideration for Oregon students as they make their college decisions, so we wanted to give them the information they needed to make the best choice for their families without delay.”

WOU students took part in the tuition rate recommendation process as part of the long-standing Tuition and Fee Advisory Committee. The university was able to keep its rate increase low by redesigning its tuition framework, continuing its budget-conscience operations and being prepared to tap reserves. WOU strives to be the most affordable Oregon public university while still offering a high-quality, career-focused education that can be completed in four years with minimal student debt.

“High on our list of priorities is keeping a degree within reach of Oregon families,” Fuller said. “Our lower tuition rate supports our mission of accessibility to higher education, equity and inclusion for all families seeking upward mobility.”

WOU also has joined with the other six public universities in seeking a $120 million increase in the Public University Support Fund in order to match the current service level for those universities.

In other action Wednesday, the board:

  • Heard a report from the April 4-5 visit from the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities, WOU’s accrediting body.
  • Learned that the NWCCU had approved WOU’s new Master of Arts in Organizational Leadership program, which will launch in fall 2019.
  • Got an update on WOU’s status change to a doctoral-granting institution and the inaugural program, Doctorate of Physical Therapy.
  • Heard a progress report for capital projects happening on campus. The Natural Sciences building renovations are in the final phase, and the Oregon Military Academy building’s transition to the new Welcome Center is under way. The seismic upgrades and renovations to the Instructional Technology Center have not begun.
  • Approved the additions of a new undergraduate certificate in Bilingual/English as a Second Language; a new undergraduate certificate in Early Childhood Education; a new minor in Early Childhood; a new minor program in English Studies; and a new minor program English for Speakers of Other Languages and Bilingual Education.

For more information about the board meeting, visit wou.edu/board

About Western Oregon University

Western Oregon University, founded in 1856 and located in Monmouth, is the state’s oldest public university. Serving approximately 5,100 students, WOU is a mid-sized, NCAA Division II institution with nearly 75 percent of the student population being from Oregon. A significant portion of attendees are members of under-represented groups, veterans or non-traditional students. WOU is Oregon’s campus of choice for those seeking a transformative education in a supportive, student-centered learning community where classes are taught by faculty. Together we succeed.

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Attached Media Files: Western Oregon University in Monmouth, Ore.

Private & Charter Schools
A true underdog: tiny Eugene school captures state championship (Photo)
Oak Hill School - 04/22/19 2:15 PM
2019-04/1713/123881/IMG_0301.jpg
2019-04/1713/123881/IMG_0301.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/1713/123881/thumb_IMG_0301.jpg

Oak Hill Policy Debaters Share State Crown,

School Earns OSAA 4A/3A/2A/1A Championship

 Two Oak Hill School two-person teams were named co-champions in Policy Debate at the OSAA State Speech & Debate Tournament, which took place April 18-20 at Western Oregon University in Monmouth.  Oak Hill also earned the overall state team championship for OSAA class 4A/3A/2A/1A schools.

 The Oak Hill team of senior Julian Bellavita and junior McKenzie Carrier and the team of junior Daisy Hagen and junior Katrina Carrier each won their semifinal rounds against competitors from the Portland area, thus setting up an Oak Hill vs. Oak Hill final round.  The two Oak Hill teams were thus declared Policy Debate co-champions, as teams from the same school do not debate each other in final rounds.  Oak Hill's third Policy Debate entry – sophomore Jordan Kasitz and freshman Leila Sanghvi -- reached the quarterfinal round at the state tournament.  Oak Hill teams thus represented three of the eight quarterfinalists in Policy Debate. In addition, junior Aubra Scott-Hinkle reached semifinals in Extemporaneous Speaking, and sophomore Aiden Turpin advanced to finals in Student Congress.

 The combined performance of the Oak Hill competitors earned the school the overall OSAA state championship for class 4A/3A/2A/1A schools.  While entries from all six OSAA classifications compete against each other in the various speech and debate events, separate team awards are given for class 6A, for class 5A, and for the combined class 4A/3A/2A/1A schools. This was Oak Hill's second such state team championship, along with two second-place finishes, since 2015.  At this year’s state tournament, there were a total of 547 entries, representing 68 Oregon high schools; Oak Hill School was one of – if not the – smallest schools competing at the state tournament

 Other Oak Hill competitors at the state championships were junior Kat Antunes in Humorous Interpretation, and freshmen Samantha Mattox and Clara Kaufman in Duo Interpretation.  Mattox also participated in Original Oratory, Scott-Hinkle also competed in Lincoln-Douglas Debate, and Sanghvi also took part in Impromptu Speaking.

 Oak Hill School’s debate program will wrap up its 2018-2019 season in mid-June, as Bellavita, both Carriers, Hagen, and Scott-Hinkle travel to Dallas, Texas, to compete in the National Speech and Debate Championships.

 For additional information and/or photos of the team, you can contact debate coach Keith Eddins at 541-543-5508 (or at keith.eddins@oakhillschool.net).




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/1713/123881/IMG_0301.jpg

A true underdog: tiny Eugene school captures state championship (Photo)
Oak Hill School - 04/22/19 10:29 AM
2019-04/1713/123866/IMG_0301.jpg
2019-04/1713/123866/IMG_0301.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/1713/123866/thumb_IMG_0301.jpg

Oak Hill Policy Debaters Share State Crown,

School Earns OSAA 4A/3A/2A/1A Championship

 Two Oak Hill School two-person teams were named co-champions in Policy Debate at the OSAA State Speech & Debate Tournament, which took place April 18-20 at Western Oregon University in Monmouth.  Oak Hill also earned the overall state team championship for OSAA class 4A/3A/2A/1A schools.

 The Oak Hill team of senior Julian Bellavita and junior McKenzie Carrier and the team of junior Daisy Hagen and junior Katrina Carrier each won their semifinal rounds against competitors from the Portland area, thus setting up an Oak Hill vs. Oak Hill final round.  The two Oak Hill teams were thus declared Policy Debate co-champions, as teams from the same school do not debate each other in final rounds.  Oak Hill's third Policy Debate entry – sophomore Jordan Kasitz and freshman Leila Sanghvi -- reached the quarterfinal round at the state tournament.  Oak Hill teams thus represented three of the eight quarterfinalists in Policy Debate. In addition, junior Aubra Scott-Hinkle reached semifinals in Extemporaneous Speaking, and sophomore Aiden Turpin advanced to finals in Student Congress.

 The combined performance of the Oak Hill competitors earned the school the overall OSAA state championship for class 4A/3A/2A/1A schools.  While entries from all six OSAA classifications compete against each other in the various speech and debate events, separate team awards are given for class 6A, for class 5A, and for the combined class 4A/3A/2A/1A schools. This was Oak Hill's second such state team championship, along with two second-place finishes, since 2015.  At this year’s state tournament, there were a total of 547 entries, representing 68 Oregon high schools; Oak Hill School was one of – if not the – smallest schools competing at the state tournament

 Other Oak Hill competitors at the state championships were junior Kat Antunes in Humorous Interpretation, and freshmen Samantha Mattox and Clara Kaufman in Duo Interpretation.  Mattox also participated in Original Oratory, Scott-Hinkle also competed in Lincoln-Douglas Debate, and Sanghvi also took part in Impromptu Speaking.

 Oak Hill School’s debate program will wrap up its 2018-2019 season in mid-June, as Bellavita, both Carriers, Hagen, and Scott-Hinkle travel to Dallas, Texas, to compete in the National Speech and Debate Championships.

 For additional information and/or photos of the team, you can contact debate coach Keith Eddins at 541-543-5508 (or at keith.eddins@oakhillschool.net).




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/1713/123866/IMG_0301.jpg

A true underdog: tiny Eugene school captures state championship (Photo)
Oak Hill School - 04/22/19 8:44 AM
2019-04/1713/123859/IMG_0301.jpg
2019-04/1713/123859/IMG_0301.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-04/1713/123859/thumb_IMG_0301.jpg

Oak Hill Policy Debaters Share State Crown,

School Earns OSAA 4A/3A/2A/1A Championship

 Two Oak Hill School two-person teams were named co-champions in Policy Debate at the OSAA State Speech & Debate Tournament, which took place April 18-20 at Western Oregon University in Monmouth.  Oak Hill also earned the overall state team championship for OSAA class 4A/3A/2A/1A schools.

 The Oak Hill team of senior Julian Bellavita and junior McKenzie Carrier and the team of junior Daisy Hagen and junior Katrina Carrier each won their semifinal rounds against competitors from the Portland area, thus setting up an Oak Hill vs. Oak Hill final round.  The two Oak Hill teams were thus declared Policy Debate co-champions, as teams from the same school do not debate each other in final rounds.  Oak Hill's third Policy Debate entry – sophomore Jordan Kasitz and freshman Leila Sanghvi -- reached the quarterfinal round at the state tournament.  Oak Hill teams thus represented three of the eight quarterfinalists in Policy Debate. In addition, junior Aubra Scott-Hinkle reached semifinals in Extemporaneous Speaking, and sophomore Aiden Turpin advanced to finals in Student Congress.

 The combined performance of the Oak Hill competitors earned the school the overall OSAA state championship for class 4A/3A/2A/1A schools.  While entries from all six OSAA classifications compete against each other in the various speech and debate events, separate team awards are given for class 6A, for class 5A, and for the combined class 4A/3A/2A/1A schools. This was Oak Hill's second such state team championship, along with two second-place finishes, since 2015.  At this year’s state tournament, there were a total of 547 entries, representing 68 Oregon high schools; Oak Hill School was one of – if not the – smallest schools competing at the state tournament

 Other Oak Hill competitors at the state championships were junior Kat Antunes in Humorous Interpretation, and freshmen Samantha Mattox and Clara Kaufman in Duo Interpretation.  Mattox also participated in Original Oratory, Scott-Hinkle also competed in Lincoln-Douglas Debate, and Sanghvi also took part in Impromptu Speaking.

 Oak Hill School’s debate program will wrap up its 2018-2019 season in mid-June, as Bellavita, both Carriers, Hagen, and Scott-Hinkle travel to Dallas, Texas, to compete in the National Speech and Debate Championships.

 For additional information and/or photos of the team, you can contact debate coach Keith Eddins at 541-543-5508 (or at keith.eddins@oakhillschool.net).




Attached Media Files: 2019-04/1713/123859/IMG_0301.jpg