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Eugene/Spring/Rose/Alb/Corv News Releases for Sat. Feb. 17 - 2:53 pm
Police & Fire
Albany Police Investigate Bank Robbery at Willamette Community Bank (Photo)
Albany Police - 02/12/18 3:23 PM
2018-02/1192/111960/WCB_Robbery.jpg
2018-02/1192/111960/WCB_Robbery.jpg
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At about 1000 am this morning (02-12-18) an unidentified white male displayed a handgun and robbed the Willamette Community Bank of an undisclosed amount of money. No one was injured in the incident, and the Albany Police Detectives, working in conjunction with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, are continuing to investigate this incident. Anyone with information can contact the Albany Police Detectives at (541)917-7686.



Attached Media Files: 2018-02/1192/111960/WCB_Robbery.jpg

Public Notice
Douglas Co. Fire Dist. No.2 - 02/15/18 8:28 AM
The Board of Directors of Douglas County Fire District No 2 will hold its Regular Board meeting at DCFD#2 Fire Station 655 at 6000 Garden Valley Rd., Roseburg, OR on Tuesday, February 20, 2018 at 5:30 p.m.


The Board of Directors of Winston-Dillard Fire District No. 5 will hold its Regular Board meeting at their fire station, 250 SE Main St., Winston, OR on Monday, February 19, 2018 at 5:30 p.m.


Please see attached documents for listed agenda items.



Attached Media Files: DCFD Public Notice , WDFD Public Notice

Deputies Continue Click It or Ticket Campaign (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/13/18 8:01 AM
Safety Belt
Safety Belt
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The Douglas County Sheriff's Office is continuing it's participation in the national "Click it or Ticket" campaign.

The enforcement campaign began on February 5th and continues through February 18th. Deputies are specifically working to increase proper safety belt and child car seat use during this course of the campaign. In addition, deputies are watching for violations of using a cell phone while driving and speed.

Funding for this event is provided by the Oregon Department of Transportation - Traffic Safety Administration.

In 2015, the use of safety belts in passenger vehicles saved an estimated 13,941 lives of occupants ages 5 and older. The purpose of the Click It or Ticket campaign is to to increase safety, education, strong laws and law enforcement officers saving lives.

The base fine for a safety belt or child car seat violation in Oregon is $115.00.



Attached Media Files: Safety Belt

Telephone Service Affect in Milo/Tiller Due to Power Outage
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/11/18 9:24 PM
The Douglas County Sheriff's Office has been notified of a power outage in the communities of Milo and Tiller. As a result of the power outage, some residents are also experiencing a telephone service outage. Affected residents may not be able to summon emergency services by telephone, but may go to the Milo Fire Department which is manned with personnel.

According to Pacific Power's website, the current estimate for restoration of service is approximately 2:00 am. The cause of the outage is unknown to the Sheriff's Office.

Residents wishing to check the status of the outage, may visit Pacific Power's website at https://www.pacificpower.net/ed/po/oom.html

Meth Arrest (Photo)
Douglas Interagency Narcotics Team (DINT) - 02/14/18 9:58 AM
2018-02/6255/112012/Lay.jpeg
2018-02/6255/112012/Lay.jpeg
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On Tuesday, February 13th, members of DINT arrested 20 year old Matthew Lay of Roseburg. The arrest took place in the 1500 block of NE Stephens Street in Roseburg at approximately 1:00 PM.

Lay was charged with Unlawful Possession and Unlawful Delivery of Methamphetamine, as well as a Parole Violation.

Lay was in possession of a high quality guitar he was trying to trade for methamphetamine. DINT detectives believe the guitar to be stolen. If anyone has any information about a stolen guitar they are asked to contact DINT at 541-440-4474.

Update:

DINT has located the owner of the guitar and no longer needs the public's help in this case. The guitar was in fact stolen. The investigation is continuing.



Attached Media Files: 2018-02/6255/112012/Lay.jpeg

*Update* Suspect Arrested - FBI and Curry County Sheriff's Office Ask Public's Help in Finding Attempted Aggravated Murder Fugitive (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 02/16/18 12:14 PM
DeYoung photo
DeYoung photo
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From the Curry County Sheriff's Office:


On 02-15-18 at about 9:38pm Pacific Time, Lucas DeYoung was taken into custody by the Nevada State Highway Patrol on the Curry County and FBI warrants for his arrest. DeYoung was lodged in the Humboldt County Jail in Winnemucca, Nevada.

On 02-15-18 at about 12:15pm, the Curry County Sheriff's Office received information from a concerned citizen that DeYoung was calling and harassing them, and, through some investigative leads, it was determined that DeYoung was either in Utah or Nevada. Dispatch started notifying all law enforcement agencies in those areas to attempt to locate DeYoung.

The Nevada Highway Patrol saw a vehicle with Virginia plates parked alongside the road on I-80 near milepost 164 in Nevada with a male sleeping in the driver's seat. The NHP contacted the person inside who fit the description provided by the FBI warrants as DeYoung. The driver initially gave a different name but it was determined that the driver was in fact Lucas DeYoung, and he was taken into custody without incident. The NHP also charged DeYoung with being a felon in possession of firearms.

The Curry County District Attorney's Office will work with the State of Nevada to return DeYoung to Oregon.



The FBI is now offering a reward of up to $5,000 for information leading to the arrest of Lucas Randall DeYoung. Anyone with information about DeYoung's location should contact their local FBI office or submit a tip via https://tips.fbi.gov. In Oregon, call the FBI in Medford at (541) 773-2942, the FBI in Portland at (503) 224-4181 or the Curry County Sheriff's Office at (541) 247-3243.



The FBI and the Curry County Sheriff's Office are asking for the public's help in locating Lucas Randall DeYoung of Brookings, Oregon. On February 1, 2018, the FBI obtained a federal fugitive warrant charging DeYoung, age 36, with unlawful flight to avoid prosecution. The Curry County Sheriff's Office had previously charged DeYoung with attempted aggravated murder, attempted murder, delivery of a controlled substance and unlawful manufacture of marijuana in relation to the shooting of a Curry County man on December 28, 2017.

The FBI has posted DeYoung's FBI Wanted flyer at https://www.fbi.gov/wanted/additional/lucas-randall-deyoung. The FBI is also running Facebook ads featuring the fugitive hunt for DeYoung in Oregon, Washington, Virginia and Nevada. (Both the flyer and the Facebook ad are attached.)

DeYoung is described as:

White man
Eyes: Brown
Hair: Brown
Height: 6'1"
Weight: 190 pounds
Other: Scar on his left finger and tattoos on his back and right shoulder

DeYoung is a known to use illegal drugs and carry firearms. He is also a known gambler. DeYoung may have travelled to the Mason County/Thurston County areas of Washington State, Virginia or Las Vegas, Nevada.

He should be considered armed and dangerous.

Anyone with information about DeYoung's location should contact their local FBI office or submit a tip via https://tips.fbi.gov. In Oregon, call the FBI in Medford at (541) 773-2942, the FBI in Portland at (503) 224-4181 or the Curry County Sheriff's Office at (541) 247-3243.

###



Attached Media Files: DeYoung Wanted Flyer w/reward , DeYoung photo , DeĽoung Facebook ad w/reward

FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Romance Scams (Photo) + audio file
FBI - Oregon - 02/13/18 10:52 AM
Tech Tuesday Tips
Tech Tuesday Tips
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Welcome to the Oregon FBI's Tech Tuesday segment. This week, building a digital defense against romance scams.

Valentines Day can bring dreams of red roses and romantic dinners, but for those looking for love, this day can also bring a new round of angst and heartache. This sets up the perfect opportunity for fraudsters to play Cupid.

Anyone can fall victim to this scammer, but most commonly he is going to target women over 40 who are widowed, divorced or disabled. It usually starts with an innocent-enough-sounding contact online. He's likely been watching your social media accounts or gleaned info out of an online dating profile. Amazingly, he likes what you like -- whether that's books, music, sports or whatever. Over time, he starts communicating with you by email or text. He starts calling, and you have long conversations about your life, your future, your love.

And then comes the kicker -- he asks you for money. It may take weeks or months to get to this point -- but just know that he needs the money desperately. He needs it to finish a job so he can come see you. He needs to buy a plane ticket. He is in the military and getting ready to retire or relocate, but he needs cash for moving expenses. Business partners are trying to steal his company, and he must hire a lawyer. There's always some urgent need -- and then another and another. He promises to pay you back soon, but he never does.

It's hard to give up on the love of your life and the future he promised you, but this fraudster won't stop until you do. So what are some warning signs? Be wary if:

He presses you to leave a dating website where you met to communicate solely through email or instant messaging.

He sends you a photo that looks like a glamour shot out of a magazine.

He professes love quickly and tries to isolate you from friends and family.

He claims to be working and living far away -- whether that's on the other side of the country or overseas.

Makes plans to visit you but then always has to cancel because of some emergency.

He asks for money or your help moving money.

And it's the money that's really at the heart of all this. If you are diving into an online relationship, the most important thing you should know is to never, ever send money to someone you met online. Likewise, never send compromising photos or videos with which he can later use to blackmail you. As added protection, only use dating websites with nationally-known reputations and make sure to research this new love's pictures and profile using online search tools. You want to make sure he didn't spoof someone else's profile -- or be using the same pitch with multiple victims at once.

Bottom line: online dating can lead to life-long relationships, but make sure you go into virtual relationships with two feet firmly planted in reality.

If you have been victimized by an online scam, be sure to report it to the FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.



Attached Media Files: TT - Romance Scams - Audio , Tech Tuesday Tips

Two Arrested for Burglary in Vacant Home (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/16/18 12:52 PM
Exterior
Exterior
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CENTRAL POINT -- A man and woman are in jail after deputies found them inside a vacant home in the 2600-block of Old Stage Road on Thursday. Deputies say the two suspects -- along with other squatters -- have ransacked the property over the last year.

On February 15, 2018, at 1:33 p.m., deputies responded to an alarm at the residence and found two people trespassing in the house. The suspects were identified as Alonso Miguel Ramirez, 37, and Kristine Lucille Stone, 39, both transient in the Medford area.

Ramirez and Stone were lodged in jail on burglary and trespass charges. Additionally, Ramirez had two warrants for his arrest for possession of meth and failure to appear on a theft charge; Stone was held for a probation violation. Jackson County Animal Control took custody of a dog found at the property.

Deputies have responded to the same residence numerous times in the past year due to problems with trespassers. They have also responded for two alarms at the residence since the first of the year; this is the first time trespassers were present when deputies arrived to investigate.

Deputies say owners of vacant homes must be vigilant. For those who live out of the area, it's a good idea to have a local caretaker or property management company to keep an eye on the property. Security systems and surveillance cameras are also valuable tools for prevention and investigation.

Case #18-03301



Attached Media Files: Exterior , Ramirez mug , Stone mug

Car Full of Teens Crashes in South Medford (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/15/18 2:07 PM
Vehicle and tow
Vehicle and tow
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MEDFORD, Ore. -- A car full of students on lunch break crashed about a mile from South Medford High School Thursday. Three of the teens were not wearing seat belts and were transported to the hospital with injuries.

On February 15, 2018, at 11:57 a.m., dispatch received a report that a 1995 Toyota Camry had crashed in the 2700-block of Georgia Street, a residential area one block south of South Stage Road. Jackson County Sheriff's Office deputies estimate the vehicle was traveling about 35-40 miles per hour when the driver lost control in a bend in the road and crashed into an embankment.

Some of the occupants initially fled from the crash, but were brought back to the scene by parents. Deputies identified six teens in the vehicle, ranging from 15 to 17 years of age.

Only three occupants were wearing seat belts during the crash. One of the unrestrained passengers was sitting on the lap of another when the crash occurred. All of the occupants were conscious and breathing when Medford Fire and Rescue crews arrived.

One passenger received a head injury and was transported by Mercy Flights ambulance to Providence Medford Medical Center. Two others were transported to Rogue Regional Medical Center with injuries believed to be less severe.

The driver, a 17-year-old female, was cited for traffic violations including careless driving, endangering a child passenger, and violation of provisional license restrictions.

Deputies say this case underscores the importance of buckling up and following the provisional license restrictions. Oregon law (ORS 807.122) allows licensed drivers under the age of 18 to drive unsupervised, but they must abide by specific rules. For the first six months, a newly licensed driver cannot have any passengers under the age of 20 unless they are immediate family members. During the second six months, drivers are limited to three passengers under the age of 20 unless they are immediate family members. The law also sets other curfew hours and restrictions for young drivers.


Case #18-03297



Attached Media Files: Vehicle and tow , Vehicle

Woman Arrested for DUII, Deputies Seek Witnesses (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/13/18 2:41 PM
Scene, Pioneer Road
Scene, Pioneer Road
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MEDFORD, Ore. -- A Jackson County Sheriff's Office deputy arrested a Medford woman Tuesday for several crimes after she nearly struck two pedestrians and continued to drive recklessly for miles. Her blood alcohol content was found to be nearly seven times the legal limit for drivers in Oregon.

On February 13, 2018, at 9:37 a.m., dispatch received a call from a driver on South Stage Road near South Columbus Avenue who was following a vehicle that had struck garbage cans on the side of the road. The caller reported the silver 2012 Mercedes Benz SUV nearly struck two people walking on Kings Highway near Garfield Street. The caller followed the vehicle and provided updates to dispatch.

The driver of the vehicle, later identified as Diane Marie Wilcox, 39, continued toward her home in the 4900-block of Pioneer Road. Witnesses told deputies she passed her driveway and drove into the ditch. She backed out into the roadway, around her driveway entrance, and struck garbage cans on the roadside. Passersby were then able to stop Wilcox from driving until deputies arrived.

Deputies found Wilcox to be extremely intoxicated. Wilcox was not injured in the crash; she was transported to Rogue Regional Medical Center by Mercy Flights ambulance due to her level of intoxication. At the hospital, her blood alcohol content was measured at 0.55%.

Deputies cited and released Wilcox to appear in court at a later date so she could receive medical treatment. Charges include DUII-alcohol, driving while suspended (misdemeanor), reckless driving, and recklessly endangering another person (two counts). She also received traffic citations for driving uninsured, failure to drive within a lane, and driving with an open container of alcohol. Her vehicle was impounded and towed from the scene.

Deputies learned Wilcox drove from her home to the Taco Bell on Center Drive (near Fred Meyer), and then returned. They would like to hear from anyone who witnessed Wilcox driving.

Deputies also need to identify the pedestrians who were nearly struck. The pedestrians were described as an older couple wearing dark clothing and walking two medium-sized dogs along the northbound lane of Kings Highway, approximately 100 yards south of Garfield Street. Those with information can call the JCSO tip line at (541) 774-8333.

Case #18-3137

Note: Attached mug shot of Wilcox is from a jail lodging in November 2017.



Attached Media Files: Scene, Pioneer Road , Diane Wilcox 11/17 mug

Elude Suspect Crashes Stolen Pickup (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/12/18 2:38 PM
Scene 2
Scene 2
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CENTRAL POINT, Ore. -- A man believed to be under the influence of drugs stole a pickup in Medford and eluded deputies early Sunday morning. The pursuit ended in a muddy field in the 4000-block of Corey Road after the vehicle crashed into a pasture and struck two young bulls. The animals had to be put down.

On February 11, 2018, at 4:40 a.m., dispatch received a report of a 2004 Ford F-350 pickup stolen from a driveway in the 1900-block of Patrick Street, Medford. Medford Police responded to investigate.

At 4:48 a.m., a Jackson County Sheriff's Office deputy located the vehicle northbound on North Foothill Road. The driver was later identified as Corey James Elmore, 28, a Medford transient.

The deputy attempted to stop the vehicle. Elmore fled east on Dodson Road, and then doubled back to Foothill Road, continuing northbound at high speeds.

Elmore didn't slow enough to make the turn onto Corey Road. He drove through the intersection, crashing through a fence and into a pasture. The vehicle struck two yearling bulls before driving back onto the roadway and crashing through another fence. Vehicle damage and muddy terrain ended Elmore's flight moments later. Deputies took him into custody without further incident.

The owner of the bulls requested that they be dispatched due to the severity of their injuries. The stolen vehicle was towed from the scene due to extensive damage. The total damage to the vehicle, property, and livestock is estimated at several thousand dollars.

Elmore was transported to Providence Medford Medical Center for evaluation. He was then lodged in the Jackson County Jail on a warrant, a probation violation detention warrant, and the following new charges: unauthorized use of a motor vehicle, attempting to elude police in a vehicle, reckless driving, two counts of second degree criminal mischief, two counts of aggravated animal abuse, and driving under the influence of intoxicants (controlled substance).

Case #18-02989



Attached Media Files: Scene 2 , Scene 1 , Elmore mug

Suspicious Male Tries to Lure Female Student into Van
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/13/18 9:21 AM
On 2/12/2018 at 8:19 am, the Lane County Sheriff's Office received a report of a suspicious man in a white van in the area of Wildwood and Ellmaker Road. The male driver waved to a female student who was waiting at a bus stop, then got out of the van and started walking towards her and asked her if she wanted a ride to school. The student fled the area and contacted her parents who called the Sheriff's Office. Deputies responded and searched the area but were unable to locate the vehicle or the driver.

The driver is described as a white male between 30 and 50 years old with a brown and gray beard. He is described as wearing a dark colored shirt, possibly black or brown. He had a small, white dog with him, and the dog had curly hair. The white cargo van that the man was driving had a sliding side door and a ladder on top. The van had some type of blue lettering on the side, an aftermarket bumper, and possibly a brush guard. The van is further described as having a lot of trash on the dashboard.

The Sheriff's Office would like to remind community members that staying aware of your surroundings may increase the time you have to respond to unexpected people or events. In this case, the student was able to run to safety because she maintained an awareness of her surroundings and was able to react appropriately when she felt threatened. When possible, walk in well lit, populated areas, especially after dark. The buddy system is recommended, as is carrying a way signal that you need help (a cell phone or whistle, for example).

The Sheriff's Office is asking anyone who has any additional information about this incident to call 541-682-4141.

Community Presentations: Cascadia Earthquake Subduction Zone and Distant Tsunami Preparedness
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/15/18 3:20 PM
Lincoln County Sheriff's Office and Office of Oregon Emergency Management are coordinating community presentations focusing on what you need to know and how to prepare for distant tsunamis and the Cascadia subduction zone earthquake.

This March marks the 7th anniversary of the Great Tohoku, Japan Earthquake and Tsunami (more information on this event at the end of media release.) Local public safety officials encourage community members to use this anniversary as a reminder to learn about Cascadia and how a distant tsunami may affect our communities.

Office of Oregon Emergency Management will work with local community leaders on tsunami ready programs, tsunami evacuation drill planning and distant tsunami response plans as well as provide a focused "Tsunami Preparedness Chat" for the public in Gleneden Beach, details below.

Lincoln County Sheriff's Office -- Emergency Management Division will host six public presentations for community members to learn about the history of Cascadia, what to expect, and how to prepare for the immediate aftermath of such an event.

The events are open to the public and free; contact Lincoln County Emergency Manager, Jenny Demaris for more information. Presentation announcements for these events can be found on our County website at: www.co.lincoln.or.us/emergencymanagement .

See attached media release with dates, times of scheduled presentations.

Respectfully submitted,

Virginia "Jenny" Demaris
Emergency Manager
Lincoln County Sheriff's Office
Emergency Management
vdemaris@co.lincoln.or.us
(541) 265-4199 Office



Attached Media Files: Media Release Word File , Media Release PDF with Announcements

Tip of the Week February 19, 2018 - Avoiding Crashes in Parking Lots
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/15/18 2:18 PM
OFFICE OF THE SHERIFF
Sheriff Curtis L. Landers
225 W. Olive Street
Newport, Oregon 97365
Phone..(541) 265-4277
Fax....(541) 265-4926

TIP OF THE WEEK - - - - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: February 19, 2018

Contact: Sheriff Curtis Landers
541-265-0652
clanders@co.lincoln.or.us


AVOIDING CRASHES IN PARKING LOTS

According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, about 14 percent of all vehicle collisions that result in damage happen in parking lots. AAA offers the following tips for safe parking.

Stay Alert. Watch for cars cutting across parking lots and speeding through aisles. Take it slow and always use your turn signal. Avoid two-way lanes whenever possible.

Mind Your Manners. Don't take up two spots by parking over the lines.

Protect Your Car: Parking in congested areas increases the likelihood of scratches and dents from car doors or shopping carts. Park away from buildings during the day, but avoid secluded areas at night. If you can find a spot at the end of the row next to an island, take it - this is the best place to park your car.

However, if there is no island, don't park in an end space because this will leave your car vulnerable to turning traffic. Park in front of a light pole, if possible. The pole will protect your car from a driver who might pull too far forward and bash its front end, and the light will give you added security at night.

Walk Back Safely: When leaving or returning to your car, don't dart between parked cars. Listen for cars and look for the illuminated brake lights of cars backing up. Pedestrians can be just as guilty as drivers when it comes to disobeying posted signs or not paying close enough attention to their surroundings. Protect yourself on foot, as well as when you're driving.

Be Observant: When backing out, make sure you scan a full 360 degrees - there may be shoppers to your left and right or other cars backing out at the same time. If it's possible and legal in your area, pull through if there are two open nose-to-nose spaces. Being able to pull out head first instead of backing out of a spot will keep you safe.

Mail With Caution: If you have packages to send, keep in mind that post office parking lots have the highest frequency of accidents.

For more information and tips, visit our website at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff's Office -- Oregon.

###
Submitted by:
Kathy Manning, Administrative Assistant
kmanning@co.lincoln.or.us
Ph: 541-265-0652



Attached Media Files: 2018-02/5490/112078/021918-Avoiding_Crashes_in_Parking_Lots.pdf

State Fire Marshal invites nominations for annual Sparky awards (Photo)
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 02/13/18 8:32 AM
The OSFM Silver Sparky award
The OSFM Silver Sparky award
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The Office of State Fire Marshal (OSFM) is accepting nominations for the 2018 Golden
and Silver Sparky awards. Nomination forms are available online on the OSFM website at http://www.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/pages/index.aspx or by calling Sally Cravinho at 503-934-8205 or emailing sally.cravinho@state.or.us.

The Golden Sparky award recognizes a member of the fire service for outstanding achievement in fire prevention or public fire safety education. The Silver Sparky award recognizes a civilian for outstanding achievement in fire prevention or public fire safety education.

"Oregon has a great history of public service in fire safety," said Oregon State Fire Marshal Jim Walker. "We always want to recognize not only the importance of fire prevention and education, but also those who are committed to making a difference. While I know this is a busy time of year for everyone, this is a great opportunity to highlight the quality work being done in fire prevention."

You don't have to be a member of the fire service to nominate any person or agency. Nominations may be submitted by any member of the public.

The nomination deadline is February 23, 2018. Submit completed forms with an explanation and examples of your nominee's achievements and contributions to preventing fires and fire losses in Oregon. Send nominations via email or standard mail to sally.cravinho@state.or.us or Sally Cravinho, 3565 Trelstad Ave. SE, Salem, OR, 97317-9614. Awards will be presented at the 2018 Oregon Fire Marshal Conference in March.



Attached Media Files: The OSFM Silver Sparky award

Fatal Crash Highway 126W near Walton -- Lane County (Photo) Update Time Correction
Oregon State Police - 02/16/18 8:01 PM
2018-02/1002/112123/Fatal_057.jpg
2018-02/1002/112123/Fatal_057.jpg
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Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into this afternoon's single vehicle fatal crash on Highway 126W near Walton.

On February 16, 2018 at approximately 2:26 PM, OSP troopers and first responders were dispatched to a single vehicle crash on Highway 126W at milepost 33, near Walton. Preliminary investigation revealed that a white 2013 Dodge Van, operated by Sharon Lee MILLER, age 76, from Mt. Angel, was traveling eastbound on 126W navigating a small left hand corner when it left the roadway for unknown reasons. The Dodge hit a tree on the passenger side before coming to rest.

The passenger Charles Eugene MILLER, age 83, from Mt. Angel, suffered fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene after lifesaving measures were performed by EMS.
Sharon was transported by ambulance to the Riverbend Hospital with non-life threating injuries.

OSP was assisted by Lane County Sherriff's Office, Lane County Fire Authority and Oregon Department of Transportation. The highway was closed for approximately 35minutes.

This is an on-going investigation and more information will be released when available.

Photograph Courtesy of OSP

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial



Attached Media Files: 2018-02/1002/112123/Fatal_057.jpg

Salem Couple and Others Arrested In Felony Wildlife Crimes -- Lake County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 02/16/18 2:37 PM
2018-02/1002/112109/fulfer_pic.JPG
2018-02/1002/112109/fulfer_pic.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-02/1002/112109/thumb_fulfer_pic.JPG
On February 14, 2018, the LaPine Office of the Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division completed a four month investigation into the unlawful killing of several Winter Range Trophy Class Mule Deer Bucks. They were assisted by Fish and Wildlife Troopers from both the Klamath Falls and Salem offices.

The investigation originated when a trooper located a trophy class buck deer shot near Cabin Lake Road in Lake County with the assistance from the OSP Fish and Wildlife Aircraft during winter range patrol. That incident led to a search warrant being executed at the residence of G.W. Todd FULFER, age 40, and his wife Samantha GERMAN-FULFER, age 27, in Salem, on January 31, 2018. Evidence at the residence, along with additional information, led Fish and Wildlife Troopers to the Albany home of Scott Allan HARRIS, age 55. Upon the service of a second search warrant, additional evidence was seized including several trophy class antlers.

A fourth suspect, Jacen Todd FULFER, age 19, was contacted at his residence in Lebanon, as officers conducted their investigations in Salem and Albany.

All four suspects were cited into Lake County Circuit Court on a variety of charges ranging from Take/Possession-Buck Deer (Felony), Felon in Possession of a Firearm, Waste of Game Mammal, and Hunting Game Mammal Prohibited Method.

The investigation produced evidence indicating both Samantha GERMAN-FULFER and her husband, GW Todd FULFER, committed wildlife crimes in Lake, Jefferson, Benton, Linn, and Marion Counties. In addition to the multiple deer suspected to have been poached by the FULFERS in 2017, evidence at the residence suggested that a wild turkey and pheasant were also harvested illegally. The suspects were also cited into the other counties for Felon in Possession of a Firearm and various Wildlife Crimes.

Anyone with any information is encouraged to contact either the TIP hotline at 1-800-452-7888, OSP (677) or by calling Oregon State Police Dispatch at 541-776-6111.

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators
Poaching wildlife and damaging habitats affects present and future generations of wildlife, impacts communities and the economy, and creates enforcement challenges.

The Turn-In-Poachers (TIP) reward is paid for information leading to the arrest/conviction of person(s) for the illegal possession, killing, taking, and/or waste of deer, elk, antelope, bear, cougar, wolf, bighorn sheep, mountain goat, moose, furbearers and/or game birds.
TIP rewards can also be given for the illegal taking, netting, snagging, and/or dynamiting of salmon, steelhead, sturgeon, and/or large numbers of any fish listed in Oregon statute as a game fish.
$1,000 Bighorn Sheep, Mountain Goat and Moose

$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope

$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf

$300 Habitat Destruction

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish

$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl

$100 Furbearers

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity:

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 (24/7)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)



Attached Media Files: 2018-02/1002/112109/fulfer_pic.JPG

***Update Additional Reward***Illegal killing of a Bull Elk -- Jackson County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 02/16/18 10:53 AM
2018-02/1002/111678/elk12718.jpg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-02/1002/111678/thumb_elk12718.jpg
The Rogue Valley Chapter of Oregon Hunters Association had added an additional $500.00 for information leading to the arrest of the suspect(s)in the illegal killing of a bull elk. The total reward is now $1,000.
End Update

PREVIOUS
On January 27 at approximately 9:00 am, Central Point Fish and Wildlife Troopers were called to the Sam's Valley area near Agate Road to investigate the possible shooting of a bull elk. This is in Jackson County and is approximately one mile south of Highway 234.

When Troopers arrived they found a four point bull elk standing in a pasture with what appeared to be a bullet wound just behind his left shoulder blade. Shortly after their arrival, the bull succumbed to his injury. A witness in the area said that two hours prior to the Troopers arrival, he had observed a newer, white, full size truck that had stopped in the roadway just east of where the bull was located. The witness reported the passenger of that vehicle fired the shot. The vehicle then left the area.

Anyone with any information is encouraged to contact either the TIP hotline at 1-800-452-7888 or by calling Oregon State Police Dispatch at 541-776-6111.

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators

Poaching wildlife and damaging habitats affects present and future generations of wildlife, impacts communities and the economy, and creates enforcement challenges.

The Turn-In-Poachers (TIP) reward is paid for information leading to the arrest/conviction of person(s) for the illegal possession, killing, taking, and/or waste of deer, elk, antelope, bear, cougar, wolf, bighorn sheep, mountain goat, moose, furbearers and/or game birds.

TIP rewards can also be given for the illegal taking, netting, snagging, and/or dynamiting of salmon, steelhead, sturgeon, and/or large numbers of any fish listed in Oregon statute as a game fish.

$1,000 Bighorn Sheep, Mountain Goat and Moose

$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope

$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf

$300 Habitat Destruction

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish

$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl

$100 Furbearers

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity:

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 (24/7)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)



Attached Media Files: 2018-02/1002/111678/elk12718.jpg

Death Investigation Interstate 5 at Center Street Overpass -- Salem (Update Name Added)
Oregon State Police - 02/16/18 6:44 AM
Oregon State Police (OSP) troopers are continuing the investigation into the death of a Salem man that occurred on Wednesday afternoon on Interstate 5 near the Center Street Overpass in Salem.

On February 15, 2018, at about 3:40 P.M., OSP troopers and first responders were dispatched to an adult male that had jumped from the Center Street Overpass and onto the southbound lanes of Interstate 5. Preliminary investigation revealed that witnesses observed an adult male, identified as Salvador RIOS-CERVANTES, age 18, from Salem, climb the fence on the side of the Center Street Overpass and jump off and onto the southbound lanes of Interstate 5. A 2008 Chevrolet pickup, operated by James LOWRANCE, age 75, from Salem, collided with RIOS-CERVANTES after he jumped from the overpass. RIOS-CERVANTES suffered fatal injuries and died at the scene. LOWRANCE did not sustain any injuries and is cooperating with investigators.

Two of the three southbound lanes of Interstate 5 were closed for about 2 hours during the investigation. OSP was assisted by Salem Police Department, Salem Fire Department and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

OSP is requesting any witnesses that have not already been contacted by Law Enforcement to please call the OSP Northern Command Center at 503-375-3555. Witnesses can reference OSP Case # SP18-058516 when calling with information.

This is an ongoing investigation and more information will be released when available.

Photograph provided by OSP

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial

Death Investigation Interstate 5 at Center Street Overpass -- Salem (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 02/15/18 9:19 PM
2018-02/1002/112090/Center_Street_Overpass.JPG
2018-02/1002/112090/Center_Street_Overpass.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-02/1002/112090/thumb_Center_Street_Overpass.JPG
Oregon State Police (OSP) troopers are continuing the investigation into the death of a Salem man that occurred on Wednesday afternoon on Interstate 5 near the Center Street Overpass in Salem.

On February 15, 2018, at about 3:40 P.M., OSP troopers and first responders were dispatched to an adult male that had jumped from the Center Street Overpass and onto the southbound lanes of Interstate 5. Preliminary investigation revealed that witnesses observed an adult male climb the fence on the side of the Center Street Overpass and jump off and onto the southbound lanes of Interstate 5. A 2008 Chevrolet pickup, operated by James LOWRANCE, age 75, from Salem, collided with the adult male after he jumped from the overpass. The adult male suffered fatal injuries and died at the scene. LOWRANCE did not sustain any injuries and is cooperating with investigators. The name of the deceased adult male is being withheld pending next of kin notification.

Two of the three southbound lanes of Interstate 5 were closed for about 2 hours during the investigation. OSP was assisted by Salem Police Department, Salem Fire Department and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

OSP is requesting any witnesses that have not already been contacted by Law Enforcement to please call the OSP Northern Command Center at 503-375-3555. Witnesses can reference OSP Case # SP18-058516 when calling with information.

This is an ongoing investigation and more information will be released when available.

Photograph provided by OSP

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial



Attached Media Files: 2018-02/1002/112090/Center_Street_Overpass.JPG

Reminder to use SafeOregon the statewide School Safety Tip Line for concerns about safety
Oregon State Police - 02/15/18 1:23 PM
The Oregon State Police (OSP) reminds students and families to learn more about SafeOregon, the statewide school safety tip line. The tip line is a safe, confidential and anonymous way for students to alert authorities to information that may be useful in preventing school attacks, bullying, and suicidal behaviors.

SafeOregon can be accessed through a phone call, text message, mobile application or the internet by students and other members of the public. Trained staff are available 24-hours-a-day, 365-days-a-year to review, analyze and route tips for the most appropriate follow-up and urgency. Tip line staff make sure follow-up is noted and recorded.

Superintendent Travis Hampton, "We know the tip line works. We've seen other students report concerns about their friends and we've gotten their friends help. We've been able to get in front of safety concerns. Sometimes students might see or hear something that might be confusing or they are unsure what to do with the information but they do know something isn't right. That's where the tip line can help. Students have the opportunity to provide information to a trusted adult that can look into the situation and take it from there."

The Oregon State Police also encourages students to have conversations with adults around them about anything they are concerned about. Students have an important voice in their own safety, and the safety of their fellow students and school. But, the tip line gives a voice to those students who don't feel comfortable going to an adult for whatever reason or they might be anxious or afraid.

Since the tip line began in January, 2017 -- over 525 tips have been received. The top five types of tips include bullying or harassment, possession or distribution of drugs, concerns about safety issues, cyberullying and sexual harassment.

Today, 813 Oregon schools in the PK-12 grades are signed up to use the statewide tip line. It's open to private and public schools in those grade ranges. To find out if your school is using the system visit SafeOregon.com and click on report a tip. Here you'll see all the different methods of reporting. By clicking on web report form you will see a box for "school name" begin entering your school name. If the school name appears, they are using SafeOregon. You should also talk to your school about how the system works and what you can do to help promote the statewide tip line in your school.

It is against the Oregon Law to misuse the tip line and report false tips. ORS 165.570

For more information visit SafeOregon.com.

Background: SafeOregon became Law through HB 4075 (2016), as a result of recommendations from the Oregon Task Force on School Safety. During the 2014 session, the Oregon State Legislature passed House Bill 4087, to establish a Task Force on School Safety. The bill, created a working group to examine steps to improve safety and security at schools across the state. As specified in HB 4087, the task force is made up of representatives from the legislature, the governor's office, as well as the education and public safety communities. A complete roster of the task force members appears at the left side of this page. For more information on the task force visit the Oregon State Police website at www.oregon.gov/osp

As a reminder OSP personnel will be available for on-camera/media interviews today, February 15, 2018 between 2:00-3:00 p.m.

The location will be at Oregon State Police General Headquarters, 3565 Trelstad Ave SE, Salem Oregon. OSP asks any media to check in at the front reception area.


### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial

Media Interviews Regarding SafeOregon School Safety Tip Line-
Oregon State Police - 02/15/18 11:38 AM
Due to interest in the school safety tip line, SafeOregon, managed by OSP, OSP personnel will be available for on-camera/media interviews today, February 15, 2018 between 2:00-3:00 p.m.

The location will be at the Oregon State Police General Headquarters, 3565 Trelstad Ave SE, Salem Oregon. OSP asks any media to check in at the front reception area.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial

Fatal Crash Highway 101 near Wheeler -- Tillamook County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 02/15/18 10:22 AM
2018-02/1002/112067/HWY_101_Crash_A.JPG
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-02/1002/112067/thumb_HWY_101_Crash_A.JPG
Oregon State Police (OSP) troopers are continuing Wednesday evening's fatal crash on Highway 101 near Wheeler in Tillamook County.

On February 14, 2018, at about 5:45 p.m., OSP troopers and first responders were dispatched to a two vehicle fatal crash on Highway 101 at milepost 46Z south of Wheeler. Preliminary investigation revealed that a black 2008 Nissan Altima, operated by Philip MEIER, age 29, from Tillamook, was southbound negotiating a leftward sweeping curve when it lost control. Witnesses said that the Nissan Altima was sideways in the northbound lane when a northbound grey 2018 GMC SUV, operated by Talbot BETHELL, age 75, from Netarts, collided with the Nissan Altima on the passenger side.

MEIER died from injuries sustained in the crash. BETHELL and his passenger, Anne BETHELL, age 75, from Netarts, were transported by ground ambulance to Tillamook Medical Center with unknown injuries.

Investigators are looking at speed and wet roadways as possible contributing factors in the crash.

Highway 101 was reduced to one lane through the area of the crash for about 4 to 5 hours. Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) assisted with traffic control. OSP was assisted by Tillamook County Sheriff's Office, Tillamook Police Department, Tillamook Ambulance, Nahalem Bay Fire and Rescue and ODOT.

This is an ongoing investigation and more information will be released when available.

Photographs courtesy of OSP

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial



Attached Media Files: 2018-02/1002/112067/HWY_101_Crash_A.JPG

Missing and Endangered 4-Year Old Boy from Washington Located
Oregon State Police - 02/14/18 9:46 PM
On Wednesday February 14, 2018 at about 7:45p.m., Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers were alerted to kidnapping out of Battle Ground, Washington, involving a 4-year old boy taken by an estranged relative suffering from a mental health crisis.

The vehicle was located on Interstate 5 near mile post 244 in Marion County by an OSP -- Salem Sergeant and a Linn County Deputy.

OSP Troopers, Linn County Deputies and Marion County Deputies were able to safely remove the child from the car and the female was taken into custody without incident. The investigation is ongoing and the child has been returned to family.

Further inquiries regarding the Kidnapping case should contact the Battle Ground Police Department. Contact Info: Bonnie Gilberti at 360-342-5342 or by email Bonnie.gilberti@cityofbg.org

Previous Press Releases from Battle Ground Police Department:
BATTLE GROUND POLICE DEPARTMENT SEEKING PUBLIC'S HELP TO LOCATE MISSING AND ENDANGERED 4-YEAR OLD BOY (PHOTO)

News Release from City of Battle Ground
Posted on FlashAlert: February 14th, 2018 8:36 PM
Downloadable file: Similar Car
Downloadable file: Aziel
Downloadable file: Bilyk
Update: The child has been found, is safe, and in custody of the Oregon State Police. His family has been notified and plans to reunite with the child are being arranged.

The Battle Ground Police Department thanks the public for the tips
that led to a quick resolution and the safe return of the child.

The investigation is ongoing.

###



Battle Ground, WA - An Endangered Missing Person Advisory has been issued at the request of the Battle Ground Police Department to locate a missing 4-year old boy, Aziel Belza of Battle Ground.

Aziel was taken from his Battle Ground home by family relative, Lyubob Bilyk, at approximately 2:04 pm this afternoon. The boy was sitting in an unattended car when Bylik took the vehicle without permission. Bilyk did not have authority or permission from the boy's mother to take him, or the car, from the residence. Police have reason to believe the child may be in danger.

Police officers also believe Bilyk has traveled south into Oregon and may be in the Eugene, OR area. She is driving a taupe/gold 2002 Toyota Camry 4-door with WA plates 652XVU. The car has damage on the driver's side back door. (Picture of a similar car -- not the suspect car - is attached).

Bilyk is a 34-year old female, , is 5'7" tall, 125 pounds, with brown hair and green eyes. 4-year old Aziel is 3'6" tall, weighs 32 pounds with brown hair and blue eyes.

Anyone with information as to the whereabouts of Lyubob Bilyk, Aziel Belza,or the described vehicle are asked to contact the Battle Ground Police Department at 360-342-5345.

Contact Info:
Bonnie Gilberti
Contact: 360-342-5342
bonnie.gilberti@cityofbg.org

Critical Injury Pedestrian Crash Highway 26 near Sandy -- Clackamas County - Corrected Date
Oregon State Police - 02/14/18 4:30 PM
Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing this morning's investigation into a critical injury crash involving a pedestrian on Highway 26 near Sandy.

On February 14, 2018 at about 12:35 a.m., OSP troopers and first responders were dispatched at a motor vehicle crash involving a pedestrian on Highway 26 at milepost 22. Preliminary investigation revealed a pedestrian identified as Raphael Frederick CALDERA, age 51, from Warm Springs, was attempting to cross the highway when he was struck by a westbound 2007 Nissan Sentra, operated by Sarah WALL, age 33, from Boring. CALDERA sustained life-threatening injuries and was transported by ground ambulance to a Portland area hospital. WALL remained at the scene and is cooperating with the investigation.

CALDERA was wearing dark clothes at the time of the crash and the section of highway is not lit by ambient lighting.

The westbound lanes of Highway 26 were closed for about three hours. Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) assisted with traffic control at the scene.

OSP was assisted by ODOT, Sandy Police Department, Sandy Fire Department and Warm Springs Police Department.

This is an ongoing investigation and more information will be released when available.

No photographs available for release.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial

Oregon State Police seeking the public's help in locating Felon- Josephine County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 02/14/18 2:31 PM
2018-02/1002/112034/Williams2.jpg
2018-02/1002/112034/Williams2.jpg
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The Oregon State Police is asking for the public's help in locating Christopher WILLIAMS. WILLIAMS has an active Felony Warrant for Parole Violation. WILLIAMS is 33 years old, is 5' 11" and weighs approximately 185 pounds; with brown eyes and dark brown hair. He has a prominent tattoo on the front of his neck, "DANIELLE".

WILLIAMS is known to frequent Cave Junction and Grants Pass, Oregon and Happy Camp, California. If you have any information regarding the whereabouts of WILLIAMS, please contact the Oregon State Police Dispatch Center or 911. Do not contact WILLIAMS. The photo with the red scarf is a very recent picture of WILLIAMS.



Attached Media Files: 2018-02/1002/112034/Williams2.jpg , 2018-02/1002/112034/Williams.jpg

Fatal Crash Highway 126W near Veneta -- Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 02/13/18 3:48 PM
2018-02/1002/112003/126W_Crash_2.JPG
2018-02/1002/112003/126W_Crash_2.JPG
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Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into this morning's fatal crash on Highway 126W near Veneta.

On February 13, 2018, at approximately 9:10 AM, Oregon State Police Troopers from the Springfield Patrol office responded to a three vehicle crash on Highway 126W near milepost 51 in Lane County.

Preliminary Investigation revealed that a 2001 Dodge Pickup, operated by Christopher SHERIDAN, age 32, from Springfield, was westbound when for unknown reasons failed to react to slowing traffic and struck the back of a 2006 Pontiac Vibe, forcing the white Dodge Pickup into the eastbound travel lane where it struck an eastbound 2006 Chrysler minivan nearly head-on. The driver of the minivan, Jeannie SAEBURN, age 51, from Veneta sustained fatal injuries as a result of the collision. The male juvenile passenger of the minivan was transported to the local hospital with minor injuries.

The driver of the Pontiac Vibe, Kenneth SHEMEL, age 25 and his passenger Rachel WILSON, age 26, both from Eugene, were transported to the local hospital with minor injuries. SHERIDAN was also transported to a local hospital with minor injuries.

The highway was closed for about three hours. Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) was able to set up a detour around the crash scene.

OSP was assisted by Lane Rural Fire Department, Eugene Fire Department, ODOT and the Lane County Medical Examiner's Office.

This is an ongoing investigation and more information will be released when available.

Photographs courtesy of OSP.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial



Attached Media Files: 2018-02/1002/112003/126W_Crash_2.JPG , 2018-02/1002/112003/126W_Crash.JPG

***Update-Name Released*** Fatal Crash Highway 199 - Josephine County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 02/13/18 10:22 AM
2018-02/1002/111889/199_fatal.jpg
2018-02/1002/111889/199_fatal.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-02/1002/111889/thumb_199_fatal.jpg
UPDATE The operator of the Honda has been identified 35 year old Paul Garcia VIDALES of Josephine County.

End Release



Previous
On February 8, 2018 at approximately 3:30pm, the Oregon State Police responded to a 3 vehicle crash on Highway 199, near milepost 25. The incident location is several miles north of Cave Junction, in Josephine County.

The preliminary investigation has determined that a green Chevy van, operated by 46 year old Joseph PYGMAN, of Medford, was southbound on Highway 199 and for an unknown reason, crossed into the northbound lane of travel, hitting a Honda SUV. The vehicles collided head-on in the northbound lanes. The driver of the Honda was flown to a trauma center where they were pronounced deceased. The driver of the Chevy van was transported by ground ambulance to TRCH with non-life threatening injuries. A third vehicle, a white Mercedes , operated by 37 year old Sang Coa Tran, of Crescent City, ran into the back of the Chevy van after the head on collision occurred. The driver of the Mercedes was not injured.

The Oregon State Police was assisted by Illinois Valley Fire, AMR and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

The name of the deceased will be released after the family has been notified.



Attached Media Files: 2018-02/1002/111889/199_fatal.jpg

Oregon State Police Launches Interactive Monthly Patrol Activity Map (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 02/12/18 2:28 PM
2018-02/1002/111951/Main_WebPage.JPG
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On February 12, 2018, the Oregon State Police is launching an interactive patrol activity map on our webpage http://www.oregon.gov/OSP/pages/index.aspx. This interactive map displays the patrol activities undertaken by OSP across Oregon. This information is searchable by county, activity type, and violation type. The patrol activities are classified as Charges or Events. Charges are citations or warnings issued for a violation of an Oregon Revised Statute, and an Event is an incident reported to the Department's dispatch centers.

Event type category descriptions are:

Calls for Service -- Requests for Oregon State Police personnel to respond to incidents reported to the Department's dispatch centers

Crashes -- Motor vehicle accidents reported to the Department's dispatch centers

Routine Contact -- Contact with an individual initiated by Oregon State Police personnel

Speed -- Citations or warnings issued to motorists for violations of Oregon Revised Statutes related to vehicle speed

Occupant Safety - Citations or warnings issued to motorists for violations of Oregon Revised Statutes related to the safety of occupants in vehicles (e.g., no seatbelt)

Lane Safety - Citations or warnings issued to motorists for violations of Oregon Revised Statutes related to roadway standards (devices, markers, signals, signs, etc.)

Impaired Driving - Citations or warnings issued to motorists for violations of Oregon Revised Statutes related to operating a vehicle under the influence of intoxicants

Distracted Driving - Citations or warnings issued to motorists for violations of Oregon Revised Statutes related to operating a vehicle while distracted (e.g., using a cellphone)

All Other -- All other citations or warnings issued to individuals for violations of Oregon Revised Statutes not related to speed, occupant safety, lane safety, impaired driving, or distracted driving


We are still in the early stages of this project and will be making improvements along the way. The goal of this page is to connect the public with useful information pertaining to the great work done by the Oregon State Police. We value the publics feedback and want to know what they think. Any suggestions, comments or questions can be emailed to ask.osp@state.or.us.



Attached Media Files: 2018-02/1002/111951/Main_WebPage.JPG , 2018-02/1002/111951/Activity_Map_screenshot.JPG

Springfield Woman Loses Life Several Days After Crash - Lane County
Oregon State Police - 02/12/18 9:36 AM
On February 7, 2018 at approximately 7:00 PM, the Oregon State Police investigated a single vehicle crash on Highway 126 near milepost 13, east of Springfield in Lane County.

On February 10, 2108, at approximately 9:40 AM, Troopers were informed the operator of the vehicle, 25 year old Reynee CICERO of Springfield, had passed due to the injuries sustained in the crash.

Based on preliminary information learned in this investigation, Troopers determined CICERO, who was operating a 1994 Mazda pickup, was eastbound on Hwy 126, crossing a small bridge over the Waterville Canal. CICERO drove upon the curb of the bridge, losing control and traveling down the gravel shoulder where the car rolled, pinning CICERO in the vehicle. Emergency personnel were able to extricate her from the vehicle and she was transported to an area hospital. She was the only occupant in the vehicle.

The Oregon State Police was assisted by McKenzie Fire and Rescue, and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

Sutherlin Woman Dies in early morning Crash on I-5 - Douglas County
Oregon State Police - 02/11/18 6:33 PM
On February 11, 2018, at approximately 3:30 AM, Oregon State Police Troopers from the Roseburg office responded to a two vehicle crash on Interstate 5 near milepost 131 (north bound), which is approximately two miles north of Roseburg, in Douglas County.

Based on preliminary information learned in this investigation, Troopers determined a semi tractor-trailer, operated by 43 year old Kerry KIPPES, of Roseburg was northbound on Interstate 5 when a 2008 Chrysler minivan, operated by 29 year old Brandy HAGA of Sutherlin, failed to see the semi in the slow lane in front of her and drove into the back of the trailer. KIPPES was not injured and is cooperating with the investigation.

HAGA and her three passengers were transported to an area hospital. One passenger, 34 year old Jennifer CRUZ died at the hospital from her injuries sustained in the crash. CRUZ was not wearing her seatbelt. The other passengers, 30 year old Desiree URENA and Amanda CASTRO, both from Sutherlin are being treated at an area hospital for unknown injuries. HAGA's injuries are unknown at this time.

At this time this investigation is open, but does not appear any criminal charges will be filed. No photos are available at this time.

Roseburg Police Investigate Threat of School Violence.
Roseburg Police Dept. - 02/15/18 5:30 PM
On February 15, 2018 at about 2:20 PM, Roseburg Police investigated a written threat on a girl's bathroom stall wall at Roseburg High School. The written message referenced a threat of school violence. The subsequent investigation led to the identification of a 17 year old female student as the person suspected of being responsible for writing the threat. The student was arrested and lodged at the Douglas County Juvenile Detention Center. She was charged with two counts of Disorderly Conduct in the First Degree and two counts of Criminal Mischief in the Second Degree for her alleged involvement in this case and a similar case at the school in November of 2017. The Roseburg Police Department was assisted by Roseburg High School staff during this investigation. There is no known ongoing threat related to this case at this time.

Utilities
Solar, low-impact hydro projects in NW communities to receive $1.1 million boost from Pacific Power Blue Sky customers
Pacific Power - 02/15/18 11:06 AM
Contact: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tom Gauntt, Pacific Power, Feb. 15, 2018
503-813-7291
Tom.Gauntt@pacificorp.com

Solar, low-impact hydro projects in NW communities to receive $1.1 million boost from Pacific Power Blue Sky customers
Renewable energy program making sustainable investments in communities for more than a decade

PORTLAND, Ore.--Several solar projects and one low-impact hydro project will soon help reduce energy costs for community organizations in 10 communities across the Northwest, thanks in part to funding from Pacific Power customers who voluntarily participate in the Blue Sky renewable energy program.

Altogether, Blue Sky customers are placing $1.1 million in new renewable energy investment in 2018, bringing more than 675 kilowatts of new renewable energy capacity online. Since 2006, Pacific Power Blue Sky customers have helped fund the installation of 101 community-based projects totaling 8.8 megawatts of renewable energy generation capacity, demonstrating the viability of renewable energy in their communities with more than $10 million in investment during that time.

Projects funded over the years include wind, solar, biomass, geothermal, low-impact hydro and wave technologies.

"Our Blue Sky customers put their dollars to work in their communities," said Cory Scott, Pacific Power's director of customer solutions. "Not only will these facilities supply renewable energy, but they are helping increase the visibility and adoption of renewable technology. We are proud to be part of this important partnership with communities and our Blue Sky customers."

"The Blue Sky program has one of the highest number of customer participants you'll find nationwide," added Berit Kling, project manager. "One of the reasons the Blue Sky program is so popular is the element of choice. Blue Sky customers choose to support renewable energy above and beyond Pacific Power's own growing renewable portfolio and projects like these provide customers with tangible connections to the program. In addition to greening their energy use by supporting newly developed renewable energy generation Blue Sky customers are helping fund new on-the-ground, renewable projects in their own communities that strongly contribute to the local economy."

Projects receiving funding this year range from arrays at Portland's St. Charles Parish School to a low-impact hydro facility at Wallowa Lake to a solar installation at a pet adoption center in Roseburg
These projects are on schedule to be completed in 2018:
St. Charles Parish School, Portland
Solar, 78 kilowatt
$300,000
Tri-City Joint Water and Sanitary Authority, Myrtle Creek, Ore.
Solar, 287 kilowatt
$200,000
Saving Grace Pet Adoption Center, Roseburg, Ore.
Solar, 43.2 kilowatt
$130,050
Siskiyou Family YMCA, Yreka, Calif,
Solar, 92 kilowatt
$109,000
Cantrall Buckley Community Park, Jacksonville, Ore.
Solar, 23.5 kilowatt
$89,530
Gem Theatre, Athena, Ore.
Solar, 26 kilowatt
$84,250
Bridge Housing Corp, Portland
Solar, 39.7 kilowatt
$73,324
Hood River County Health Dept. Hood River, Ore.
Solar, 24.5 kilowatt
$69,672
Lake County Library District, Lakeview, Ore.
Solar, 22.6 kilowatt
$64,726
Wallowa Lake State Park, Joseph, Ore.
Low-impact hydro, 18 kilowatt
$60,000
Beit Am Jewish Community Center, Corvallis, Ore.
Solar, 23.8 kilowatt
$51,250
Medford School District (Ruch Community School), Jacksonville, Ore.
Solar, 11.4 kilowatt
$24,337

###

About Blue Sky
The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has ranked Blue Sky fifth or better in the nation for the 14th consecutive year in the number of customers buying renewable power. The Blue Sky Block, Usage and Habitat products are Green-e Energy certified; More than 60,000 Pacific Power customers currently participate in the Blue Sky program across Oregon, Washington and California. For more information, visit pacificpower.net/bluesky.

About Pacific Power
Pacific Power provides electric service to more than 740,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. The company works to meet growing energy demand while protecting and enhancing the environment. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with 1.8 million customers in six western states Information about Pacific Power is available on the company's website, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube pages, which can be accessed via pacificpower.net.

Military
Klamath Falls grants 173rd Fighter Wing 50-year lease extension (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 02/15/18 1:40 PM
2018-02/962/112075/173rd_FW.jpg
2018-02/962/112075/173rd_FW.jpg
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KLAMATH FALLS, Oregon -- The City of Klamath Falls is demonstrating an unprecedented level of community support for the 173rd Fighter Wing, Oregon Air National Guard, by extending the lease on the airfield property until 2095 -- another 77 years, the longest lease of any base in the country.

A ceremony scheduled for at 1:45 p.m on Feb. 19, 2018, will host a number of community leaders at the base including U.S. Representative Greg Walden.

The event will commemorate a number of initiatives that help the wing maintain the only F-15C formal schoolhouse in the U.S. Air Force, including the finalization of an airspace expansion initiative and plans to continue numerous construction projects on the base past the year 2020.



Attached Media Files: 2018-02/962/112075/173rd_FW.jpg

Federal
BLM offers revision to methane waste prevention rule: Notice opens comment period for proposed venting and flaring regulation
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 02/12/18 2:23 PM
WASHINGTON -- As part of President Trump's Executive Order 13783 promoting energy independence [Section 7 (6)(iv)] from March 28, 2017, to review and modify federal regulations that unnecessarily hinder economic growth and energy development, the Bureau of Land Management today announced a proposal to revise the 2016 final Waste Prevention Rule (also known as the venting and flaring rule). The proposed rule would eliminate duplicative regulatory requirements and re-establish long-standing requirements that the 2016 final rule sought to replace. The proposal includes a 60-day opportunity for public comment.

"In order to achieve energy dominance through responsible energy production, we need smart regulations not punitive regulations," said Joe Balash, Assistant Secretary for Land and Minerals Management. "We believe this proposed rule strikes that balance and will allow job growth in rural America."

Among the concerns identified was that the economic impact on operators was underestimated in the 2016 rule. In addition, a review of existing state and federal regulations found considerable overlap with the rule.

As a result, the BLM is proposing to replace the venting and flaring rule with requirements similar to those that were in force prior to the 2016 final rule. This proposal would align the regulations with administration priorities on energy development, job creation and reduced compliance costs while also working more closely with existing state regulatory efforts.

In an earlier part of this effort, the BLM published a final rule entitled, "Waste Prevention, Production Subject to Royalties, and Resource Conservation; Delay and Suspension of Certain Requirements," which suspended or delayed certain requirements of the 2016 final rule until Jan. 17, 2019. The rule, finalized on Dec. 8, ensured that operators on federal and Indian oil and gas leases would not expend their resources on complying with the requirements of the 2016 rule that the BLM is today proposing to replace.

The BLM's proposal supports the administration's priorities that require agencies to seek ways to reduce the costs of regulatory compliance (Executive Order 13771, Reducing Regulation and Controlling Regulatory Costs) and that require the Secretary to reconsider the 2016 final rule (Executive Order 13783, Promoting Energy Independence and Economic Growth). Secretary Zinke followed up with Secretarial Order No. 3349, American Energy Independence, on March 29, 2017, which among other things, called for review of the 2016 rule.

"I am glad that Secretary Zinke is proposing to replace the unnecessary and costly methane rule," said Senate Environment and Public Works Committee Chairman John Barrasso (R-WY). "If left in place, the rule would have discouraged energy production and job creation in Wyoming and across the West."

"The previous administration scorned domestic energy development and crafted the prior rule to deliberately stifle it," said House Natural Resources Committee Chairman Rob Bishop

(R-UT). "This is a necessary step to promote investment in federal and tribal lands so that economies in the west can grow. We will continue to work in coordination with Secretary Zinke, the Trump administration, states and tribal communities to advance new and better policies."

"North Dakota has clearly demonstrated that state-led regulations can deliver good environmental stewardship without imposing unnecessary costs," Senator John Hoeven (R- ND) said. "Revising the duplicative BLM methane rule will empower greater energy production on federal lands. At the same time, we continue working to build the infrastructure we need across federal, state and private lands to capture this valuable resource and reduce flaring."

"Senate Democrats killed the historical opportunity to permanently rid North Dakota of the federal mediocrity that is the venting and flaring rule," said Congressman Kevin Cramer
(R-ND). "I appreciate the Administration's intentions - with the many problems associated with Obama's rule, I look forward to closely studying its proposed replacement. It is my hope it addresses North Dakota's issues, as we have expressed both to Interior and to the federal courts. Methane is a commodity, and facilitating its economical transfer to the market is the solution."

"The impacts of BLM's Obama-era venting and flaring rule would be devastating to the economy of New Mexico, which relies on the production of energy resources for thousands of jobs along with roughly 30-40% of the State's operating funds," said Congressman Steve Pearce (R-NM). "The full implementation of this rule would directly threaten funding for schools, teachers, hospitals, law enforcement, and other essential services our communities rely on. I appreciate the Secretary's commitment to improving this rule and look forward to working with the Department to move these necessary reforms forward."

While the proposed rule is open for public comment generally, the Federal Register notice specifically requests comment on ways that the BLM can reduce the waste of gas by incentivizing the capture, reinjection, or beneficial use of the gas.

Public comments on this proposed rule are due to the BLM within 60 days of the day it appears in the Federal Register, which is expected this week. The BLM is not obligated to consider, or include in the administrative record, comments received after that time or delivered to an address other than those listed below in making its decisions on the final rule.

ADDRESSES:

Mail: U.S. Department of the Interior, Director (630), Bureau of Land Management, Mail Stop 2134LM, 1849 C St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20240, Attention: 1004-AE52.

Personal or messenger delivery: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, 20 M Street, S.E., Room 2134 LM, Washington, D.C. 20003, Attention: Regulatory Affairs.

Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions at the website.

-- BLM --

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency's mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America's public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $75 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2016--more than any other agency in the Department of the Interior. These activities supported more than 372,000 jobs.

President's $1 Billion budget proposal for BLM supports access to public lands for multiple uses: Emphasizes the interconnection between people, the public lands and the economy
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 02/12/18 11:24 AM
WASHINGTON -- In keeping with the Administration's goal of securing America's energy dominance, President Trump has proposed a $1 billion Fiscal Year (FY) 2019 budget for the Bureau of Land Management that will provide resources to promote energy development on public lands while expanding access to recreation and conservation areas.

The President's proposal provides resources to support the Administration's goals and meets the BLM's multiple-use and sustained yield mission in other areas. The budget focuses on the BLM's field operations, including being a "Good Neighbor" to the communities that are home to BLM lands and within common regional boundaries with other Interior bureaus.

Conserving Our Land and Water Resources

BLM lands are working lands that allow traditional land uses such as grazing. The BLM currently administers approximately 18,000 grazing allotments on about 155 million acres of public lands. To support these efforts, the budget proposes $82.1 million for the Range Management program. In 2019, the Bureau will continue to streamline the grazing permit process and look for opportunities to incorporate flexible terms and conditions into permit renewals.

Generating Revenue and Utilizing Our Natural Resources

The budget requests $185 million to provide access to energy and minerals development, including resources to establish a competitive leasing program on the Coastal Plain (1002 Area) of the Alaska North Slope, as required by the recently enacted Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. The proposed funding for energy and minerals will add capacity and improve the federal coal leasing and permitting program.

Expanding Outdoor Recreation

Outdoor recreation is vital to the Nation's heritage and economy -- a fact that is recognized by the Bureau's 2019 budget request. Recreation activities on BLM lands, including hunting, fishing, motorized recreation, camping, and more, help support thousands of jobs and help contribute millions of dollars of economic activity. Expanding these opportunities is central to the 2019 proposal for the BLM as it requests $53.2 million for Recreation Resources Management, $11.9 million for Wilderness Management, and $26.3 million for National Monuments and National Conservation Areas. An investment of more than $90 million in these areas continues to support a wide range of recreational opportunities and creates job opportunities in many rural western communities.

Modernizing Our Organization and Infrastructure for the Next 100 years

The BLM owns more than 5,000 structures and buildings, including dams, bridges, electrical and communication systems, trails, and roads. With a request of $24.9 million, the BLM will tackle its highest priority deferred maintenance projects that support critical health or safety and mission essential repair projects in an effort to directly and positively impact the safety of both Interior employees and the public that they serve.

Protecting Our People and Resources

BLM lands lie directly along nearly 200 miles of the international boundary with Mexico in New Mexico, Arizona and California, where the BLM promotes safety, security, and environmental protection of public lands, public land users, and employees. The 2019 budget request includes $24.2 million for the Law Enforcement program to continue resource and public safety efforts along the southwest border, as well as combat marijuana cultivation on public lands and address other needs.

Legislative Proposals

To further support recreation on public lands, the Department is seeking the permanent reauthorization of the Recreation Fee program under the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, which expires on September 30, 2018. The Act provides nearly $260 million in revenue annually that is used to improve and support recreation facilities on parks and public lands, including BLM-managed lands.

The BLM seeks to lift the burdensome restrictions on how it manages the Wild Horse and Burro program, as part of the Department's effort to reduce the program's unsustainable long-term costs and to meet the legal obligations under the Wild Free-Roaming Horse and Burro Act of 1971.

The budget also proposes the permanent reauthorization of the Federal Land Transaction Facilitation Act, which expired in 2011. The Act allows lands identified in recent resource management plans as being available for disposal to be sold with the revenue used to acquire lands with high conservation values and to cover costs associated with conducting sales.


-BLM-


The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency's mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America's public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. The Department estimates that the diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $75 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2016--more than any other agency in the Department of the Interior. These activities supported an estimated 372,000 jobs.

Secretary Zinke to Host Press Call on FY 2019 Trump Administration Budget
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 02/12/18 8:27 AM
WASHINGTON - Today, at 12:30 PM EST, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke will host a news media telephone briefing regarding the FY 2019 Trump Administration budget. Credentialed members of the news media may RSVP for the call by emailing Alex at Interior_Press@ios.doi.gov to obtain the dial-in information.

WHAT:

Telephone press briefing
WHO:

U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke
WHEN:

Monday, February 12, 2018 at 12:30 PM EST
WHERE:

RSVP to obtain dial-in information
RSVP:

This call is only for members of the news media. Email Alex at Interior_Press@ios.doi.gov to obtain the dial-in information

State
Police Policy Committee will Recommend Board take Action Against 6 Officers
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 02/15/18 5:06 PM
The Police Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training (BPSST) held its regularly scheduled quarterly meeting today at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon.

To increase the public's trust, the Oregon legislature mandates the Board on Public Safety
Standards and Training establish minimum standards that are required to be met and maintained by Oregon's providers of public safety, including police officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, telecommunicators (9-1-1), emergency medical dispatchers, public safety instructors, and OLCC regulatory specialists. The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training is responsible for certifying public safety professionals who meet all of the Board-established intellectual, physical and moral fitness standards, and for denying, suspending or revoking the certification of those who do not meet or fall below these standards. The Police Policy Committee provides input and guidance to the Board on certification and training standards for more than 5,300 men and women who serve as city, county, state, tribal and university police officers around the state.

Recap of Police Policy Committee Actions -

# # Professional Standards Cases # # Note: individuals listed below have the ability to request a contested case hearing to challenge the Board's actions.

Administrative Closures -- 2 officers flagged and will be reviewed if rehired / 4 require no additional action needed by BPSST/DPSST.

Sarazin, Todd DPSST # 22892 -- Approved Administrative Closure

Hewitt, Megan DPSST # 31385 Hillsboro Police Department; Basic, Intermediate, Advanced, Supervisory, and Management - Police Certifications Police Policy Committee will recommend that Board revoke certifications - 10 years for gross misconduct and lifetime revocation for Dishonesty

O'Dea, Lawrence DPSST # 18924 -- Portland Police Bureau; Basic, Intermediate, Advanced, Management, Supervisory, and Executive Police Certification Police Policy Committee will recommend that Board not revoke certifications

Duncan, James DPSST # 35361 -- Oregon State Police; Basic Police Certification - Police Policy Committee will recommend that Board revoke certifications - 7 years for gross misconduct and lifetime revocation for dishonesty

Markos, Nicholas DPSST # 32110 -- Washington County Sheriff's Office; Basic, Intermediate, and Advanced Police Certifications and Instructor Certification - Police Policy Committee will recommend that Board revoke certifications - 10 years for gross misconduct, 10 years for misuse of authority, and lifetime revocation for dishonesty

Roberts, Matthew DPSST # 31889 -- Oregon Liquor Control Commission; Basic Regulatory Specialist Certification & Instructor Certification -- Police Policy Committee will recommend that Board revoke certification for lifetime for dishonesty

Bazer, Tanner DPSST # 55400 -- Springfield Police Department; Basic Police Certifications - Police Policy Committee will recommend Board take no action

Hosek, Ronald DPSST # 05927 -- Basic, Intermediate, Advanced, and Supervisory Police Certifications - Police Policy Committee took no action -- requested additional information on matter

Chastain, Daniel DPSST # 36610 -- Portland Police Bureau; Basic Police Certification - Police Policy Committee will recommend that Board revoke certifications - 10 years for gross misconduct and 10 years for dishonesty

Brodeur, Marc DPSST # 43446 -- Yamhill County Sheriff's Office; Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Corrections and Police Certifications - Police Policy Committee will recommend that Board revoke certifications -- 10 years for dishonesty

Miller, Nicholas DPSST # 51590 -- Formerly Employed with the Eugene Police Department; Complaint -- Police Policy Committee recommends that DPSST staff not move forward on this matter.


# # Administrative Actions Taken # #


Proposed Rule Adoption for OAR 259 Division 8 -- Signature Authorities - Approved

Proposed Rule Changes for OARs 259-008-0040 and 259-008-0060 - Nine Months of Experience Required for Basic Certification - Approved

Proposed Rule Changes for OARs 259-008-0005, 259-008-0020, 259-008-0060, 259-008-0064 and 259-008-0065; Multi-Discipline Certifications - Approved

Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-008-0100 -- Updates to the Retirement Card Program - Approved


## Snapshot of Oregon's criminal justice work force and DPSST's professional standards activities ##


Currently Certified law enforcement professionals in Oregon as of December 31, 2017:
Police 5,373
Corrections 4,036
Tele/EMD 898/861
P & P 644
OLCC 35

Criminal Justice Professional Standards Cases Opened by DPSST in 2017:
Police 96
Corrections 118
Tele/EMD 023
P & P 011
OLCC 001
Instructor 001

Criminal Justice Professional Standards Cases Pending with DPSST as of December 31, 2017:
Police 68
Corrections 84
Tele/EMD 09
P & P 05
OLCC 02
Instructor 00

Criminal Justice Professional Standards Cases Closed by DPSST in 2017:
Revoked 75
Deny 00
No Revoke 05
No Deny 22
No Action 134
Suspended 01

The next meeting of the Board is scheduled for April 26, 2018. Board, and Policy Committee, meeting minutes can be found online at http://www.oregon.gov/DPSST/BD/pages/index.aspx

# Background Information about the Board and Department #

The Board consists of 24 members representing city, county and state public safety professionals representing each of the disciplines (police, fire, 9-1-1, corrections, private security), and a private citizen appointed by the Governor. The current Board Chair is Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff's Office. The Board includes administrators as well as non-management representatives from statewide organizations. The Board represents more than 40,000 public safety professionals and establishes minimum standards for the training and certification of city, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security/private investigator providers, and makes determinations on waiver requests. The Board is supported by six policy committees and a number of sub-committees representing the public safety disciplines, which provide technical expertise and serve as vital links to public safety organizations. The Board operates in close partnership with the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST).

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) implements minimum standards established by the Board for training and certification of city, county, tribal and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers. DPSST provides training to more than 20,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem; certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director of DPSST.

374th Basic Police Class to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 02/15/18 8:29 AM
The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 374th Basic Police Class.

The Basic Police Class is 16-weeks in length and includes dozens of training areas including survival skills, firearms, emergency vehicle operations, ethics, cultural diversity, problem solving, community policing, elder abuse, drug recognition, and dozens of other subjects. Basic Police Class 374 began its training course with 40 officers and deputies on October 9, 2017.

Basic Police Class 374 will graduate at the Oregon Public Safety Academy at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE in Salem, Oregon on Friday, February 16, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. with a reception immediately following the graduation. Chief Gerald Moore of the City of Salem Police Department will be the guest speaker. Officer Christopher Sobremonte of the City of Sweet Home Police Department will be the class speaker.

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training would like to invite you to join us in observing the ceremony and congratulating Basic Police #BP374 on their successful completion of basic training.

The graduating students appreciate the family, friends and guests who make graduation an appropriate conclusion to their basic training at the Oregon Public Safety Academy.

Graduating members of BP374:

Barry, Jeffrey
Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

Bass, Matthew R
Polk County Sheriff's Office

Baxter-Dunlap, Brady
Cottage Grove Police Department

Bell, Daniel
Marion County Sheriff's Office

Billman, Cody M
Enterprise Police Department

Bodine, Dalton
Salem Police Department

Burke, Jane D
Dallas Police Department

Canham, Christopher
Eugene Police Department

Conard, Laura
Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

Cook, Gerald M
Polk County Sheriff's Office

Craig, Preston
Lincoln City Police Department

Dalton, Christian
Marion County Sheriff's Office

Deese, Justin
Klamath County Sheriff's Office

Drumm, Christopher
Eugene Police Department

Hamlin, Brian
Salem Police Department

Hernandez, Juan Jr.
Eugene Police Department

Hudson, Michael D
Lane County Sheriff's Office

Josephson, Steven E
Jackson County Sheriff's Office

Larkin, Lisa M
Corvallis Police Department

Lay, Drew M
Lane County Sheriff's Office

Moore, Brian
Eugene Police Department

Nygren, Nicole
Roseburg Police Department

Ostby, Tyler
Gresham Police Department

Parmer, John "Colby"
Salem Police Department

Payne, Brett
Salem Police Department

Pena, Miguel
Klamath County Sheriff's Office

Pettit, Kyle
Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

Potter, David
Eugene Police Department

Russell, Justin
Eugene Police Department

Salazar, Vincennt
Salem Police Department

Shaffer, Ruby
Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

Sobremonte, Christopher
Sweet Home Police Department

Stedman, Joshua
Umatilla Tribal Police Department

Stone, Emily
Medford Police Department

Sturges, Erick W
Josephine County Sheriff's Office

Tugwell, Christopher
Lincoln County Sheriff's Office

Walsh, Colin
Grants Pass Dept of Public Safety

Zepeda-Leos, Martin
Tillamook County Sheriff's Office


## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff's Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

More than 300 Firefighters to Visit Salem this Weekend for DPSST's Winter Fire School (Photo)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 02/14/18 6:38 PM
Vehicle rescue
Vehicle rescue
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-02/1187/112048/thumb_Winter_Fire_School_2016_C.jpg
More than 300 career and volunteer firefighters from throughout the state will converge on Salem (Oregon) this weekend for the annual Winter Fire School hosted by the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) at the Oregon Public Safety Academy.

On February 17th and 18th, 2018, DPSST will host the largest fire service training event in the Pacific Northwest that is offered free of charge.

Eleven classes will be offered by DPSST, the National Fire Academy, the Oregon Fire Chiefs Association, and the City of Dallas Fire & EMS Department.

Classes offered range from leadership topics such as Supervising Emergency Medical Services and New Fire Chief: Challenging Issues; to classes that focus on tactics; safety; to hands-on classes such as vehicle rescue, emergency vehicle operations and live fire training.

This event is held in a weekend setting because over 80% of the firefighters in Oregon are volunteers.

While many people are aware of DPSST's law enforcement training programs, they may not realize that DPSST is also the state fire training organization for Oregon and provides hundreds of training opportunities to firefighters each year at the Academy and at regional locations statewide.

DPSST appreciates the red carpet hospitality local businesses, and the community as a whole, roll-out for the career and volunteer firefighters attending this weekend training opportunity.



Attached Media Files: Vehicle rescue , Vehicle rescue , Car Fire , Skid Truck , Car Fire

New Members Appointed to the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 02/14/18 10:44 AM
Doug Marteeny and Darren Bucich have been approved as new members of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training (BPSST or Board).

Linn County District Attorney, Doug Marteeny, was approved by Governor Brown and the Senate to represent the Oregon District Attorney's Association on the Board, effective 2/14/18. In this first term, he will serve two and a half years remaining, in the position previously occupied by former Crook County District Attorney Daina Vitolins, now appointed to Oregon's 22nd Judicial District Circuit Court.

McKenzie Fire & Rescue Fire Chief, Darren Bucich, was approved by Governor Brown and the Senate to represent the Oregon Fire Chief's Association on the Board, effective 2/14/18. In this first term, he will serve two and a half years remaining, in the position previously occupied by former Douglas County Fire District #2 Fire Chief, Greg Marlar (Retired).

The Board consists of 24 members representing Oregon's public and private safety professionals, and includes a representative from the Federal Bureau of Investigation and a private citizen. All members are appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the State Senate.

The Board is responsible for the establishment of minimum standards for the training and certification and for making determinations regarding the denial, suspension or revocation of public and private safety certifications and licenses for Oregon's 42,000 police officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers, regulatory specialists of the Oregon Liquor Control Commission, private security providers, private investigator and polygraph examiners.

The Board is supported by five policy committees and a number of sub-committees representing the public and private safety disciplines, which provide technical expertise and serve as vital links to public safety organizations. The current Board Chair is Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff's Office.

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is responsible for the implementation of the standards established by the Board for training and certification. DPSST provides training to more than 20,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem; certifies or licenses qualified individuals at various levels from basic through executive and certifies qualified instructors. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director of DPSST.

Corrections Policy Committee Will Recommend BPSST Revoke 11 Certifications
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 02/13/18 3:44 PM
The Corrections Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training (BPSST) held its regularly scheduled quarterly meeting today at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon.

To increase the public's trust, the Oregon legislature mandates the Board on Public Safety
Standards and Training establish minimum standards that are required to be met and maintained by Oregon's providers of public safety, including police officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, telecommunicators (9-1-1), emergency medical dispatchers, public safety instructors, and OLCC regulatory specialists. The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training is responsible for certifying public safety professionals who meet all of the Board-established intellectual, physical and moral fitness standards,and for denying, suspending or revoking the certification of those who do not meet or fall below these standards. The Corrections Policy Committee provides input and guidance to the Board on certification and training standards for more than 4,500 men and women who serve as corrections and parole and probation officers around the state.

Recap of Corrections Policy Committee Actions -

# # Professional Standards Cases # #

Administrative Closures -- Corrections - 3 officers flagged and will be reviewed if rehired / 2 no additional action needed by BPSST/DPSST.

Audisio, Tyler DPSST # 58186 -- Josephine County Sheriff's Office; Application for Training and Subsequent Certification - Committee recommends Board take NO action to deny certification.

Edison, James DPSST # 38290 -- DOC Powder River Correctional Facility; Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Corrections Certifications - Committee asked for additional information - case held for next meeting.

Gilham, Robert DPSST # 57870 -- Warm Springs Police Department; Application for Training and Subsequent Certification - Committee recommends Board revoke certification for 3 years for gross misconduct and revoke certification for lifetime for dishonesty.

Dan, Peter DPSST # 33705 -- Washington County Community Corrections; Basic and Intermediate Corrections Certifications - Committee recommends Board revoke certification for 5 years for gross misconduct and revoke certification for lifetime for dishonesty.

Pishioneri, Joseph DPSST # 09995 -- Lane County Sheriff's Office; Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Police and Corrections Certifications - Committee recommends Board revoke certification for 10 years for misuse of authority and revoke certification for lifetime for dishonesty.

Rava, Bruce DPSST # 48376 -- Basic and Intermediate Corrections Certifications - Committee recommends Board revoke certification for 10 years for gross misconduct and revoke certification for lifetime for dishonesty.

Severe, Billy DPSST # 51493 -- DOC/Snake River Correctional Institute; Basic Corrections Certification - Committee recommends Board revoke certification for 10 years for gross misconduct and revoke certification for lifetime for dishonesty.

Trono, Robert DPSST # 42442 -- Deschutes County Sheriff's Office; Basic, Intermediate, Advanced, Supervisory and Management Corrections Certifications - Committee recommends Board revoke certification for 10 years for gross misconduct and revoke certification for 10 years for misuse of authority.

Goucher, Steven DPSST # 40781 -- Basic Corrections Certification - Committee recommends Board suspend certification for 3 years for gross misconduct.

Hein, Brenda DPSST # 48399 -- Clackamas County Community Corrections; Basic and Intermediate Corrections Certifications - Committee recommends Board revoke certification for 10 years for gross misconduct and revoke certification for lifetime for dishonesty.

Szabo, Brandon DPSST # 48987 -- Deschutes County Sheriff's Office; Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Corrections Certification - Committee recommends Board revoke certification for lifetime for dishonesty.

Torres, Hector I DPSST # 38280 -- Department of Corrections TRCI; Basic and Intermediate Corrections Certifications - Committee recommends Board revoke certification for 10 years for gross misconduct. revoke certification for 10 years for misuse of authority, and revoke certification for lifetime for dishonesty.

Nungaray, Robert DPSST # 55334 -- DOC-Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution; Basic Corrections Certifications - Committee recommends Board revoke certification for 10 years for gross misconduct and revoke certification for lifetime for dishonesty.


# # Administrative Actions Taken # #


Committee recommends Board adopt Proposed Rule changes for OARS 259-008-0005, 259-008-0020, 259-008-0060, 259-008-0064 and 259-008-0065; Multi-Discipline Certification

Committee recommends Board adopt Proposed Rule Changes for OARs 259-008-0040 and 259-008-0060- Nine Months of Experience Required for Basic Certification

Committee recommends Board adopt Proposed Rule Change for OAR 259-008-0100-Updates to the Retirement Card Program

Committee recommends Board adopt Proposed Rule Adoption for OAR 259 Division 8 Signature Authorities for DPSST Forms


## Snapshot of Oregon's criminal justice work force and DPSST's professional standards activities ##

Currently Certified law enforcement professionals in Oregon as of December 31, 2017:
Police 5,373
Corrections 4,036
Tele/EMD 898/861
P & P 644
OLCC 35

Criminal Justice Professional Standards Cases Opened by DPSST in 2017:
Police 96
Corrections 118
Tele/EMD 023
P & P 011
OLCC 001
Instructor 001

Criminal Justice Professional Standards Cases Pending with DPSST as of December 31, 2017:
Police 68
Corrections 84
Tele/EMD 09
P & P 05
OLCC 02
Instructor 00

Criminal Justice Professional Standards Cases Closed by DPSST in 2017:
Revoked 75
Deny 00
No Revoke 05
No Deny 22
No Action 134
Suspended 01

The next meeting of the Board is scheduled for April 26, 2018. Board, and Policy Committee, meeting minutes can be found online at http://www.oregon.gov/DPSST/BD/pages/index.aspx


# Background Information about the Board and Department #

The Board consists of 24 members representing city, county and state public safety professionals representing each of the disciplines (police, fire, 9-1-1, corrections, private security), and a private citizen appointed by the Governor. The current Board Chair is Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff's Office. The Board includes administrators as well as non-management representatives from statewide organizations. The Board represents more than 40,000 public safety professionals and establishes minimum standards for the training and certification of city, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security/private investigator providers, and makes determinations on waiver requests. The Board is supported by six policy committees and a number of sub-committees representing the public safety disciplines, which provide technical expertise and serve as vital links to public safety organizations. The Board operates in close partnership with the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST).

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) implements minimum standards established by the Board for training and certification of city, county, tribal and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers. DPSST provides training to more than 20,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem; certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director of DPSST.

2018 Department of Human Services Child Welfare Action Plan Community Forum coming Coos and Curry County.
Oregon Department of Human Services - 02/13/18 11:53 AM
Make plans to attend the DHS Child Welfare Action Plan Community Forum for Coos and Curry County on February 27, 2018.

You are invited to provide input to the Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) on Oregon's foster care system. DHS would like to hear directly from the people and communities it serves.

The community forum will include:
Updates from DHS leadership
In-depth roundtable discussions to provide solutions to child safety barriers
Opportunity to network and ask questions of DHS leadership and staff

These listening tours have proven to be valuable and have already happened in these locations:
Bend - Wednesday, January 3
Oregon City - Tuesday, January 16
Beaverton - Thursday, January 18
Roseburg - Wednesday, January 24
Klamath Falls - Thursday, January 25
La Grande - Thursday, February 1

Your participation is extremely valuable to us as we move forward. Join us February 27, 2018 in North Bend. Forums will be held in additional communities in March. DHS will publicize them as the dates get closer.

Tuesday, February 27
NORTH BEND:
Oregon Department of Human Services, 1431 Airport Lane, North Bend, OR
6:00 pm - 8:30 pm - Community Forum
Please let us know if you plan to attend: child.safety@state.or.us - Use subject line NORTH BEND

For more information, contact:
Pamela Heisler, Public Engagement Project Manager, 503-910-7422 | PAMELA.L.HEISLER@state.or.us.

# # #

Oregon Disabilities Commission Executive Committee to meet February 20 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 02/12/18 6:31 AM
(Salem, Ore.) -- The Oregon Disabilities Commission (ODC) Executive Committee will meet from 1:30 to 3 p.m. on Tuesday, February 20, 2018, at the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, 500 Summer St N.E., Room 160, Salem, Oregon, 97301. The meeting is open to the public.
The agenda includes regular ODC business, review and approval of meeting agenda and prior meeting minutes, public comment, announcements, ODC business topics, other topics and next meeting agenda ideas.
Those who can't join in person, may call into the meeting through conference line, 503-934-1400, using access code, 12345684.
The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Alex Pelusi at Alex.J.Pelusi@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting.
For questions about the meeting, please contact: Jeff Puterbaugh, policy analyst at Jeffrey.L.Puterbaugh@state.or.us.
###
About the Oregon Disabilities Commission:
The Oregon Disabilities Commission is charged by state statute to advise the Department of Human Services, the Governor, the Legislative Assembly and appropriate state agency administrators on issues related to achieving the full economic, social, legal and political equity of individuals with disabilities. ODC also acts as a coordinating link between and among public and private organizations services individuals with disabilities.

Medicaid Long Term Care Quality and Reimbursement Advisory Council to meet February 14 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 02/12/18 6:27 AM
(Salem, Ore.) -- The Medicaid Long Term Care Quality and Reimbursement Advisory Council will meet from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., Wednesday, February 14, at the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, Room 473, 500 Summer St. N.E., Salem. The meeting is open to the public.

Agenda items include: announcements, council business, public comment, NCI-AD survey results reflecting feedback from 589 Oregonians, legislative session and rules updates.

For those who can't attend in person, the meeting can be accessed through a toll-free phone number that can also be used to join the meeting through Skype for Business. That number is: 1-503-934-1400, using participant code, 957372.

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility, or to request an accommodation, please contact Alex Pelusi at alex.j.pelusi@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting.
For questions about this meeting, please contact: Max Brown, 503-945-6993, or max.brown@state.or.us.
# # #
About the Medicaid Long Term Care Quality & Reimbursement Advisory Council: The Medicaid Long Term Care Quality and Reimbursement Advisory Council (MLTCQRAC) was established by the 1995 Legislative Assembly to advise the Department of Human Services Aging and People with Disabilities program on changes or modifications to the Medicaid reimbursement system for long-term care and community based care services.

First 2018 meeting of the Oregon Veterans' Advisory Committee will be held in Corvallis (Photo)
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 02/13/18 12:16 PM
2018-02/1082/111992/Department_Horiz_Web.jpg
2018-02/1082/111992/Department_Horiz_Web.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-02/1082/111992/thumb_Department_Horiz_Web.jpg
The first 2018 meeting of the Advisory Committee to the Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs will be held from 9:30 a.m. to noon March 7 at 4 Spirits Distillery, 3405 S.W. Deschutes St. in Corvallis. The public is invited to attend and participate.

The committee is made up of veterans appointed by the governor to provide counsel on veteran issues and represent veteran concerns across Oregon. Its nine members serve in a vital advisory role to the director and staff of the Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs.

The advisory committee's meetings are held throughout the state on the first Wednesday in March, June, September and December. Registration is encouraged, but not required. If you plan on attending, please RSVP online at www.surveymonkey.com/r/VAACMar2018.

More information can be found online at www.oregon.gov/odva/Pages/advisory.aspx or to contact the Advisory Committee, please email vaac@odva.state.or.us.



Attached Media Files: 2018-02/1082/111992/Department_Horiz_Web.jpg

Oregon OSHA further extends comment period for pesticide rules
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 02/16/18 4:34 PM
(Salem) -- The Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division (Oregon OSHA) has again extended the public comment period on proposed additional safeguards against pesticide drift. The decision moves the deadline from Feb. 28 to March 15 and allows more time to comment on the proposed rules while considering a revised statement of need and financial impact.

Oregon OSHA appointed a Fiscal Impact Advisory Committee to provide additional analysis as part of the agency's updates to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Worker Protection Standard. The committee included both grower and worker representatives. The committee finished its work in February with an Amended Statement of Need and Fiscal Impact.

Oregon OSHA's rule proposals add protections to the EPA's Application Exclusion Zone. The zone surrounds and moves with pesticide-spray equipment during applications. It must be free of all people other than appropriately trained and equipped pesticide handlers.

Learn more about Oregon OSHA's rule proposals and review the Amended Statement of Need and Fiscal Impact at http://osha.oregon.gov/rules/making/Pages/proposed.aspx

Learn more about the Fiscal Impact Advisory Committee at
http://osha.oregon.gov/rules/advisory/ag-emp/Pages/wps-fiac.aspx

Extending the comment period through March 15 marks the third time Oregon OSHA has allowed more time to review and remark on the rule proposals. The comment period was originally scheduled to end Dec. 15. To comment:

Department of Consumer and Business Services/Oregon OSHA
350 Winter St. NE
Salem, OR 97301-3882
Email: tech.web@oregon.gov
Fax: 503-947-7461


###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit www.osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

Senate confirms new leadership for Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 02/15/18 8:27 AM
(Salem) -- The Oregon State Senate confirmed Cameron Smith as director for the Department of Consumer and Business Services this week. He has served as acting director for the department since Gov. Kate Brown nominated him in December 2017.

Previously, Smith served as director of the Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs, senior policy advisor to both Gov. John Kitzhaber and Gov. Ted Kulongoski, and a captain in the U.S. Marine Corps, completing three tours of duty in Iraq. Smith, originally from Boston, lives with his wife and two children in Portland.

"What attracted me to join the department was our mission and the breadth and depth of our programs and policy areas," said Smith. "But more than anything, I was attracted by the stellar reputation of this team, from the front-line staff through leadership."

In one of his first official decisions as director, Smith appointed Andrew Stolfi as the state's insurance commissioner. Stolfi joined the department earlier this month to serve as the administrator for the Division of Financial Regulation.

Stolfi spent six years in Switzerland at the International Association of Insurance Supervisors, most recently serving as chief operating officer and chief counsel. Before joining the association, Stolfi served in senior management roles at the Illinois Department of Insurance.

"I have a passion for consumer protection, which makes it an honor to return to the U.S. to serve as insurance commissioner for this great state," said Stolfi. "I look forward to working with Director Smith, as well as our public and private partners to protect Oregonians' access to fair financial products and services."

Stolfi has been on the job for two weeks. He looks forward to his wife and two children joining him in Salem soon.

###

About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov.
About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and www.insurance.oregon.gov.

Oregon will be one of first three states awarded federal funds to support reinsurance program
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 02/13/18 8:59 AM
(Salem) -- Oregon is one of the first three states to receive funding from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to support a state reinsurance program. The state's award will be approximately $54 million.

The Oregon Reinsurance Program, created during last year's legislative session, spreads the risk of high-cost claims among all insurance companies to steady the individual health market. The Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services will manage the program.

"This federal funding recognizes our work to provide comprehensive health insurance options for Oregonians," said Cameron Smith, director of the Department of Consumer and Business Services. "The Oregon Reinsurance Program will help provide market stability for over 200,000 individuals, and encourage insurance companies to offer plans in every corner of the state."

The reinsurance program will be funded by the federal award, funds from the Oregon Temporary Reinsurance Program that ended in 2016, the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace assessment, and the assessment that was approved by the Measure 101 vote.

Now that funding is secured, the department can set operating parameters and guidelines for the reinsurance program. Estimated funding will be more than $90 million for 2018.

###

About DCBS:
The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

Oregon Department of Forestry hosts national conference in central Oregon on aviation's role in fighting wildfires
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 02/16/18 4:34 PM
News Release

Feb. 16, 2018

Contacts:
Neal Laugle, ODF Aviation Manager, 503-945-7508
Bobbi Doan, ODF Public Affairs Specialist, 503-945-7506


SALEM, Ore. -- Wildfires are increasingly fought in the skies as well as on the ground. Nowhere was that more apparent than at this year's National States Fire and Aviation Conference hosted by the Oregon Department of Forestry in central Oregon Feb. 6-8.

The meeting's purpose was to bring aviation managers from across the nation to discuss important fire and aviation issues impacting aerial firefighting programs. Over the course of three days, dozens of fire managers, contractors, vendors and researchers engaged in learning about the latest advances in aerial firefighting technology. The conference highlighted multiple presentations about unmanned aerial vehicles (also known as drones), including lessons learned from their experimental use in last summer's wildfires, to the evolving regulations governing how they can be flown.

Additional topics included short-wave infrared technology and its ability to see through heavy smoke and provide sharp images and fire mapping in real time for on-the-ground fire managers. Attendees also heard about aircraft maintenance, new research on chemicals to make water more effective at suppressing wildfire, and Colorado's expanding use of its firefighting plane for other hazard-related missions.

Attendees came from as far away as Alaska, Florida and Pennsylvania to the site of the conference at the Sunriver Resort near Bend, not far from where a number of wildfires burned in the Cascades during 2017. Deputy State Forester Nancy Hirsch welcomed the conference attendees to Oregon, emphasizing the importance of cooperative relationships between states during increasingly challenging fire seasons.

ODF's Aviation Manager Neal Laugle said the event underscored the growing recognition of the vital importance of aircraft in the battle against catastrophic wildfire. "From detection to fire mapping and active suppression support, aircraft now play a critical role in the fight to save lives, property and natural resources," Laugle said. "Next year marks the 100th anniversary of the state of Oregon beginning to use aircraft to spot wildfire from the sky, so we were especially proud to host this year's conference. It looks like the next 100 years will see even greater reliance on airborne resources by state and federal agencies to help us carry out our firefighting mission."

# # #

State Land Board appoints interim State Lands director at Feb. 13 public meeting
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 02/13/18 4:15 PM
Salem -- The State Land Board today voted unanimously to appoint Vicki Walker as the interim director of the Department of State Lands (DSL).

Current DSL director Jim Paul will leave the agency at the end of February to take a position as Assistant Director for Administrative Services at the Oregon Department of Corrections.

Walker served as the Oregon State Director for the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development from November 2009 to January 2017. While at USDA, Walker oversaw the investment of $4.8 billion for more than 24,000 projects that helped rural Oregonians. Projects included helping low-income rural residents purchase and repair homes; building or maintaining 200 low-income apartment complexes; and assisting 900 rural businesses expand operations.

Before her work at the USDA, Walker served for ten years in the Oregon Legislature (2003 to 2009), and as the administrator of the Oregon Board of Parole and Post-Prison Supervision in 2009.

Gov. Kate Brown, chair of the Land Board, praised the selection of Walker, saying "Vicki Walker thinks outside the box, and has always paid careful attention to how to every taxpayer dollar is spent. Her previous experience at the helm of an agency and proven ability to manage change will serve her and the department well."

In other business, the Land Board approved the department's three proposed legislative concepts; received reports on the agency's Aquatic Resource Management and Real Property Programs, and the annual Department of Forestry report on Common School Fund Forest Lands. Director Paul also provided an update on the Elliott State Forest Public Ownership Project.

The Land Board recognized Paul for his seven years of service, and thanked him for his guidance through many tough issues over his tenure. They also recognized Cynthia Wickham, Deputy Director for Administration, who is retiring at the end of February, and who served for 22 years at DSL.

The State Land Board consists of Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of State Dennis Richardson and State Treasurer Tobias Read. The Department of State Lands administers diverse natural and fiscal resources. Many of the resources generate revenue for the Common School Fund, such as state-owned rangelands and timberlands, waterway leases, estates for which no will or heirs exist, and unclaimed property. Twice a year, the agency distributes fund investment earnings to support K-12 public schools. The agency also administers Oregon's Removal-Fill Law, which requires people removing or filling certain amounts of material in waters of the state to obtain a permit.

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www.oregon.gov/dsl

Nurse Staffing Advisory Board meets in Portland February 28
Oregon Health Authority - 02/16/18 11:26 AM
February 16, 2018


What: The quarterly public meeting of the Nurse Staffing Advisory Board

Agenda: Review of minutes from November 29, 2017, meeting; waiver update; Nurse Staffing Survey update; plans of correction; NSAB member memos; emerging issues in nurse staffing; and public comment. The agenda will be available on the board's website at http://www.healthoregon.org/nursestaffing on February 21.

When: February 28, 1 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Public Health Division director board room, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland. A conference call line is available at 877-336-1829, access code 2075141.

Background: The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board advises the Oregon Health Authority on the administration of Oregon's nurse staffing laws; identifies trends, opportunities and concerns related to nurse staffing; makes recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the basis of those trends, opportunities and concerns; and reviews enforcement powers and processes under Oregon's nurse staffing laws.

For more information, see the agency's nurse staffing website at http://www.healthoregon.org/nursestaffing.

Program contact: Anna Davis, 971-673-2950, anna.l.davis@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:
ˇ Sign language and spoken language interpreters
ˇ Written materials in other languages
ˇ Braille
ˇ Large print
ˇ Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Anna Davis at 971-673-2950, 711 TTY or anna.l.davis@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet February 16 in Wilsonville
Oregon Health Authority - 02/13/18 4:40 PM
February 13, 2018

Contact: Heather Johnson, 503-508-8276, heather.n.johnson@state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority Metrics and Scoring Committee.

When: February 16, 9 a.m. to noon. Public testimony will be heard at 9:20 a.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Room 210 29353 SW Town Center Loop E, Wilsonville

Attendees can also follow the presentation by webinar and listen to discussion by telephone. Register for the webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/7438627555801803523. Conference line: 888-204-5984, participant code 1277-166. The telephone will be unmuted during public testimony.

Agenda: Welcome, consent agenda and updates; public testimony; review CCO Metrics Mid-Year Report; presentation on Medicaid waiver and evaluation; discuss program structure and planning.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/hpa/analytics/Pages/Metrics-Scoring-Committee.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:
Sign language and spoken language interpreters
Written materials in other languages
Braille
Large print
Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Heather Johnson at 503-508-8276, 711 TTY, heather.n.johnson@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Marine Board Holding Hearing on Proposed Muffler Rules
Oregon Marine Board - 02/14/18 11:37 AM
The Oregon State Marine Board will be holding a hearing on the proposed addition of a shoreline sound measurement procedure into the rules for recreational motorboats on February 27, at 6 pm. The meeting will be held at the Marine Board office, 435 Commercial St. NE, in Salem.

The agency convened a rules advisory committee to discuss the proposed rule amendment which aims to provide law enforcement a mechanism to safely test, from the shoreline, sound levels produced by recreational motorboats that are underway for violations of noise standards from ineffective or non-existent muffling devices. The committee was also charged in developing a fiscal impact.

Written comments will be accepted until March 2, 2018 by 5 p.m. and can be submitted via email to osmb.rulemaking@oregon.gov or by U.S. mail to: June LeTarte, Administrative Rules Coordinator, 435 Commercial St. NE, Suite 400, Salem, OR 97301. Comments via telephone will not be accepted.

To view the proposed language, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/info/Pages/Rulemaking-and-Public-Notices.aspx.

Courts/District Attorneys
Eloy Carrera Jr. pleads guilty to murder, robbery and unlawful use of a weapon
Marion Co. Dist. Attorney's Office - 02/14/18 1:03 PM
At a hearing this morning before the honorable Judge Hart, Eloy Carrera Jr. (22 years old) entered pleas of guilty to Murder with a Firearm, two counts of Robbery in the First Degree, and two counts of Unlawful Use of a Weapon. Sentencing is set in the same courtroom on February 28, 2018 at 9:00 am. These charges stemmed from a shooting on August 1, 2016 in the 4800 block of Jean Court NE in Salem that caused the death of Brett White (44 years old). No further information will be released as charges are pending on a second defendant, Denzel Cortez Hawthorne.

Judge denies DNA testing motion for Oregon death row inmate
Marion Co. Dist. Attorney's Office - 02/12/18 5:17 PM
To: All Media

From: Marion County District Attorney Walt Beglau

Date: February 12, 2018

RE: State of Oregon v. Jesse Lee Johnson, 98C46239, Defendant's Motion for Post-Conviction DNA Testing Pursuant to ORS 138.690.


Today Marion County Circuit Court Judge Channing Bennett DENIED convicted capital murderer Jesse Lee Johnson's Motion for Post-Conviction DNA Testing Pursuant to ORS 138.690 in a letter opinion (attached).

Johnson was convicted of Aggravated Murder and sentenced to death in Marion County Circuit Court in 2004 for killing Harriet "Sunny" Laverne Thompson on March 28, 1998.

Johnson's conviction and death sentence were automatically reviewed by the Oregon Supreme Court as required by Oregon Law. In 2007, the court affirmed Johnson's conviction and death sentence. State v. Johnson, 342 Or 596 (2007).

Johnson pursued another challenge to his conviction and death sentence in a post-conviction proceeding beginning in 2008. That was litigated for over seven years until the post-conviction court DENIED Johnson relief on May 15, 2015. Johnson v. Premo, Marion County Circuit Court No. 08C11553.

On July 26, 2016, Steven Wax from the Oregon Innocence Project was court-appointed at the defendant's request.

On November 16, 2016, Wax along with attorneys Brittney Plesser and Aliza Kaplan with the Oregon Innocence Project filed this Motion for Post-Conviction DNA Testing Pursuant to ORS 138.690.

On March 23, 2017, the state filed its response asking the court to deny Johnson's request.

On October 4, 2017, a hearing was held before Judge Bennett and the motion was taken under advisement. Today's ruling denying Johnson's motion for additional DNA testing was based on his failure to articulate a "theory of defense" or make a case that DNA testing would lead to a finding of innocence. (Opinion, Page 3)

Judge Bennett noted that the evidence at the jury trial in 2004 "focused on Defendant's denial that he knew the victim, his denial that he had been in the victim's apartment, his confession made to a drug dealer, Defendant's possession of the victim's jewelry shortly after the crime, Defendant's palm print and thumb print found on items at the crime scene and a witness who described someone similar to the Defendant being outside the crime scene on the night of the murder. Further DNA testing of the items identified by the Defendant would not controvert any of this evidence." (Opinion, Page 3)

The Marion County District Attorney's Office has been in contact with Harriett Thompson's family throughout this entire process.



Attached Media Files: Court's Letter Opinion

Parks and Recreation
Willamalane Test
Willamalane - 02/12/18 3:22 PM
This is a test of the Willamalane FlashAlert System.

This is only a test.

Banks & Credit Unions
Give Your Wallet Some Love This Valentine's Day (Photo)
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 02/13/18 8:07 AM
Infographic for social media
Infographic for social media
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-02/4992/111972/thumb_LoveSocial_Wallet.jpg
Join an Oregon Credit Union and Ditch Those Annoying Fees!
TIGARD, OR.--. Flowers, chocolates, engagement rings, and acts of kindness are all great on Valentine's Day, but we have another idea: show your wallet some love. If your heart is broken over the high price of roses and candy, know that those treats might be more affordable if you avoid bank fees and join a local credit union.

Wouldn't you love to save over $250 a year in interest on your car loan? Don't you pine for free checking? Wouldn't it be sweet to use an ATM when you travel and not pay a fee for it? Couldn't you just kiss a credit card with a lower interest rate than other financial institutions are charging--up to 2.65 percent lower? Those are the benefits two million Oregonians are loving, because they are credit union members.

The key difference between credit unions and other financial institutions is that credit unions are not-for-profit cooperatives. If you're a member, you're an owner. Instead of paying Wall St. stockholders, credit unions return direct benefits to Main St. owners and that means you. Lower interest rates on loans and credit cards, networked, surcharge-free ATMs, and higher interest on your savings are just some of the benefits of credit union membership. That's a relationship worth being in!

Nearly all Oregon residents are eligible for credit union membership. Be #CUobsessed and own your money. To find a credit union that's convenient for you, please visit www.asmarterchoice.org.

" Oregon Membership Benefits Report," Credit Union National Association study based on Dratatrac, NCUA, and CUNA comparison of bank and credit union rates, for 12 months ending in Sept 2017.

The Northwest Credit Union Association is the not-for-profit trade association representing over 180 credit unions in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, and their 6.5 million consumer members. Northwest Credit unions are not-for-profit cooperatives, owned by their members. Credit unions help members achieve their financial goals. All earnings in excess of operating expenses and required reserves are returned to members in the form of lower loan rates, fewer fees and higher interest paid on savings. For information on how to join a credit union, please visit http://www.asmarterchoice.org.
Wells Fargo's support of Oregon and S.W. Washington communities in 2017 totals more than $4.79 million in donations and volunteer hours (Photo)
Wells Fargo - 02/14/18 10:57 AM
Wells Fargo employees volunteer at a SOLVE cleanup in Medford.
Wells Fargo employees volunteer at a SOLVE cleanup in Medford.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-02/1188/112021/thumb_group_1.jpg
PORTLAND, Ore. -- Wells Fargo and its employees provided more than $4.79 million worth of support to schools and nonprofit groups in Oregon and S.W. Washington in 2017 to help local communities succeed.

"Caring for our customers and communities is embedded in our culture," said Region Bank President Tracy Curtis of Portland. "We strive to create a positive, lasting impact through our operations, business practices, philanthropy and community engagement," added Region Bank President Cindy Johnson of McMinnville.

The total dollars given in this region included $2,837,870 in grants from Wells Fargo and $835,794 in personal gifts and pledges made by Wells Fargo employees.

In addition, Wells Fargo's employees in this region volunteered 46,318 hours for thousands of local schools and nonprofit agencies in 2017. Based on the value of a volunteer's time (estimated at $24.14 by the nonprofit Independent Sector), those hours are the equivalent of a donation of more than $1.1 million.

Serving Pacific Northwest customers and communities since 1852, Wells Fargo has repeatedly been ranked among the most generous corporations in Oregon and America. The company is planning to donate $400 million to community and nonprofit organizations across the nation this year. More information about Wells Fargo's community support is posted at wellsfargo.com.
# # #



Attached Media Files: Wells Fargo employees volunteer at a SOLVE cleanup in Medford. , Wells Fargo employees volunteer at Salem Boys and Girls Club. , Wells Fargo employees volunteer at Bags of Love in Eugene. , Wells Fargo employees volunteer at Blanchet House in Portland.

Organizations & Associations
Celebrate our High School today with the unveiling of Springfield High School's new mural (Photo)
AARP Oregon - 02/16/18 8:18 AM
2018-02/5564/112095/mural_-_painting1.jpg
2018-02/5564/112095/mural_-_painting1.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-02/5564/112095/thumb_mural_-_painting1.jpg
This week the nation endured another horrible tragedy. But in Oregon, high school students and seniors came together to create something beautiful - a new permanent mural for the school

Springfield will be officially brighter Friday with the unveiling of a new mural designed by artist Jessilyn Brinkerhoff and painted by students of Springfield High School and volunteers with AARP Oregon under the artist's direction.

There will be an official dedication with the artist, students, AARP Oregon and Springfield Mayor Christine Lundberg at 10 AM, Friday, February 16 at Springfield High School, 875 7th Street, Springfield. And in honor of Black History Month, AARP Oregon Executive Member Geneva Craig will share her experiences as a teenager in Selma Alabama during the Civil Rights marches including "Bloody Sunday." Principal Jose da Silva will also speak at the event.

Adding to the excitement and diversity of the morning will be Mariachi Del Sol providing musical entertainment.

"We're so thrilled that AARP funded this mural to celebrate diversity and the value of intergenerational partnerships," said Carmel Perez Snyder, AARP Oregon Outreach and Advocacy Manager in Lane County. "Springfield's efforts to build an age-friendly city makes this community a wonderful place to live, work and play."

Information on the Guest Speaker:
Geneva Craig bio: Born in Selma, Alabama, during the time of segregation, Craig became an active participant in the civil rights movement. She was repeatedly jailed for demonstrations against Alabama for the state's refusal to let African-Americans vote, and she was among the nonviolent protesters beaten by Alabama state troopers on "Bloody Sunday," when they tried to cross the Edmund Pettus Bridge on March 7, 1965, during the first Selma to Montgomery march.
Craig is a member of the AARP Oregon Executive Council, a former chairperson of the AARP Oregon Diversity Advisory Council and clinical program coordinator of the Inpatient Rehabilitation Center at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center.

Information on the Artist:
Jessilyn Brinkerhoff bio: is here: http://lanearts.org/artists/jessilyn-brinkerhoff-mural-painting-graphic-design/



Attached Media Files: 2018-02/5564/112095/mural_-_painting1.jpg , 2018-02/5564/112095/Mural_-_painting_2.jpg

Kids, Seniors, ART! Join AARP and the Lane Arts Council for the Lively and Colorful Unveiling of a New Springfield Mural (Photo)
AARP Oregon - 02/14/18 2:01 PM
2018-02/5564/112033/mural_-_painting1.jpg
2018-02/5564/112033/mural_-_painting1.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-02/5564/112033/thumb_mural_-_painting1.jpg
Springfield will be officially brighter Friday with the unveiling of a new mural designed by artist Jessilyn Brinkerhoff and painted by students of Springfield High School and volunteers with AARP Oregon under the artist's direction.

There will be an official dedication with the artist, students, AARP Oregon and Springfield Mayor Christine Lundberg at 10 AM, Friday, February 16 at Springfield High School, 875 7th Street, Springfield. And in honor of Black History Month, AARP Oregon Executive Member Geneva Craig will share her experiences as a teenager in Selma Alabama during the Civil Rights marches including "Bloody Sunday." Principal Jose da Silva will also speak at the event.

Adding to the excitement and diversity of the morning will be Mariachi Del Sol providing musical entertainment.

"We're so thrilled that AARP funded this mural to celebrate diversity and the value of intergenerational partnerships," said Carmel Perez Snyder, AARP Oregon Outreach and Advocacy Manager in Lane County. "Springfield's efforts to build an age-friendly city makes this community a wonderful place to live, work and play."

Information on the Guest Speaker:
Geneva Craig bio: Born in Selma, Alabama, during the time of segregation, Craig became an active participant in the civil rights movement. She was repeatedly jailed for demonstrations against Alabama for the state's refusal to let African-Americans vote, and she was among the nonviolent protesters beaten by Alabama state troopers on "Bloody Sunday," when they tried to cross the Edmund Pettus Bridge on March 7, 1965, during the first Selma to Montgomery march.
Craig is a member of the AARP Oregon Executive Council, a former chairperson of the AARP Oregon Diversity Advisory Council and clinical program coordinator of the Inpatient Rehabilitation Center at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center.

Information on the Artist:
Jessilyn Brinkerhoff bio: is here: http://lanearts.org/artists/jessilyn-brinkerhoff-mural-painting-graphic-design/



Attached Media Files: 2018-02/5564/112033/mural_-_painting1.jpg , Mural painting

Red Cross Honors Local 'Heroes' at 21st Annual Awards Ceremony
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 02/13/18 3:20 PM
The Red Cross will honor the heroic, lifesaving and outstanding actions of local community members at the Hero Awards Breakfast on March 9, 2018.

PORTLAND, Ore. February 13, 2018-- The American Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) will honor ordinary people and their extraordinary and lifesaving actions at its 21st Annual Heroes Breakfast event on March 9, 2018.

The stories of Hero Award winners honored at the event include:
A woman who coordinated the rescue of hundreds of livestock, horses and other large animals in the Columbia River Gorge during the Eagle Creek wildfire
Two firefighters who entered a fully-engulfed building to rescue a woman trapped on the second floor. One firefighter hung by rope from the burning building's upstairs window with the rescued woman in his arms until a ladder truck arrived to retrieve them
A high school student who saved his father's life by performing CPR during a sudden cardiac arrest
A utilities employee who noticed a customer having a medical emergency while he was on the phone with her and summoned an ambulance minutes before she had a massive stroke

"The selflessness, bravery and commitment to community displayed by this year's Hero Award winners is beyond inspiring," said Josy Wright, board chair of the Southwest Washington Chapter of the American Red Cross. "Hearing their stories is a powerful reminder that there are amazing people among us."

Heroes Breakfast Event Details

7:30 a.m. -- 9:30 a.m. (doors open at 7 a.m.)
Vancouver Hilton, 301 W 6th St. in Vancouver, WA
For more information and to purchase tickets visit www.redcross.org/Heroes2018.

"The Red Cross is honored to recognize people who have so admirably contributed to the betterment of our community," said Candace Horter, chief executive officer of the American Red Cross Cascades Region. "Just like Hero Award winners, the Red Cross steps up to help in times of need. For the past two decades we've been committed to honoring people who live our mission to prevent and alleviate human suffering."

About the Heroes Breakfast
For 21 years, the Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington has honored local people for risking their own lives to save the life of another or for going beyond the call of duty to positively impact the community. Last year, nearly 600 people attended the 20th Anniversary Heroes Breakfast and Red Cross Centennial Celebration.
To view the stories of last year's Hero Award recipients, click here: http://rdcrss.org/2AGwQwC.
To view photos of last year's event, click here: http://bit.ly/2H8V3Qd.

Full List of 2018 Hero Award Winners and Their Stories

Community Hero: Kim Mosiman
During the September 2017 Eagle Creek wildfire in the Columbia River Gorge, Kim Mosiman mobilized her vast network of animal owners and volunteers to coordinate a rescue effort for hundreds of livestock, horses and other large animals in the path of the massive wildfire. Mosiman managed the rescue effort nonstop for several days, making phone calls, dispatching trailer drivers and identifying safe locations for the evacuated animals to stay. Mosiman, along with several other property owners across the state, provided shelter and food to animals that were evacuated from the fire path for more than a week, until fire evacuation levels were reduced. Thanks to Mosiman's efforts, more than 500 animals were saved from the Eagle Creek Fire's fast-moving and deadly flames.

Good Samaritan Hero: Joshua Vincent
Joshua Vincent, a Clark Public Utilities employee, answered a customer's phone call last March that ended up saving that customer's life. The female customer didn't realize she was experiencing a medical emergency during the phone call, but Vincent could tell something was wrong. Her speech was slowed, she was having trouble keeping details straight and she had mentioned a doctor's appointment early in the conversation. Vincent kept the customer on the phone while he summoned an ambulance to her location. The customer was moments away from suffering a massive stroke, and her doctors said that had Vincent not called the ambulance when he did, she very likely would have died.

First Responder Heroes: Scott Kohler and Matt Towner, Clackamas Fire Department
In September of 2017, firefighters Scott Kohler and Matt Towner, along with crews from Clackamas Fire District #1 and Portland Fire and Rescue, responded to a two-alarm house fire in Happy Valley, Oregon, where a woman was trapped inside the burning home. Firefighters Kohler and Towner entered the burning structure and ascended stairs to the second floor, where the woman was trapped, with the carpet melting to their feet from the extreme heat. By the time they found the woman, the only safe way out of the house was through the upstairs window. As they waited for a ladder to be brought to the window from one of the fire engines, the firefighters hung from the window by rope with the woman sitting in Kohler's lap as he balanced against the side of the fully engulfed house. The ladder arrived, and the firefighters helped the woman to the ground, where she was treated by EMS for extensive burns and smoke inhalation. The woman was quickly transported to the Legacy Emmanuel's burn center in Portland and ultimately recovered from her injuries. She is alive today and thankful for the brave actions of Firefighters Kohler and Towner.

Give Life Hero: Brandon Parsons
In October of 2016, Brandon Parsons was at work on a construction site when he was suddenly struck by a vehicle that had veered out of its lane and slammed directly into the paving machine that Parsons was operating. The accident left Parsons with injuries so severe they required multiple surgeries and, eventually, the amputation of his right leg. His injuries resulted in Parsons needing 29 units of blood products to replace the blood he had lost. Parsons is alive and well today because of the lifesaving blood he was given while under medical care. After he was released from the hospital, it was important for Parsons to be able to give back. In November 2017, he organized a blood drive, collecting 34 pints of blood. Brandon continues to be a regular blood donor, plans to hold additional blood drives and will be forever grateful to the donors who supplied the blood which saved his life.

Military Hero: Crystal Purdy
Crystal Purdy has dedicated her career to serving veterans who are without family or friends in their final years of life. Through her job at a local funeral home, Purdy partners with the organization Dignity Memorial to provide no-cost final arrangements for U.S. veterans, some of whom are homeless or have no close friends or family to lay them to rest with proper military honors. In addition to helping provide this service, Purdy volunteers with local veterans' groups outside of work, including the Portland chapter of Team Red, White and Blue, a group dedicated to enriching the lives of veterans by engaging them with their community through physical and social activity. Purdy is also the Pacific Northwest Regional Coordinator for Operation Enduring Warrior, an organization whose mission is to honor, empower and motivate wounded veterans through a physical, mental and emotional rehabilitation. Purdy coordinates events for area veterans such as skydiving, snowshoeing, rock climbing, attending an opera and group dinners. Purdy is passionate about serving those to serve and looks for any opportunity to support and give back to veterans.

Youth Good Samaritan Hero: Zachary Rodgers
Zachary Rodgers was watching television with his family on November 6, 2017, when his father, Ryan, suddenly went into cardiac arrest. Without hesitation, Zachary immediately began performing CPR on his father while his mother and sister called 911. He continued doing CPR for several minutes until emergency medical services arrived and transported Ryan by Life Flight to the hospital. Zachary's quick thinking and immediate action kept his father alive until first responders arrived. Zachary's father, Ryan, is well on his way to recovery, and the father and son are closer now, than ever.

Voluntary Service Hero: Jack Crowell
Jack Crowell is an extraordinary Red Cross volunteer whose skills are numerous and his dedication to the mission to alleviate human suffering, overwhelming. Crowell has been instrumental in leading an effort to make the Warm Springs reservation in Central Oregon safer by helping to get smoke alarms installed and home fire safety education delivered to more than 470 people in the Warm Springs community in one year -- that's nearly 16% of the total Warm Springs population. Crowell also responds to disasters big and small, in his community and across the country, including deployments to California to provide wildfire relief assistance; and North Carolina and Florida to support hurricane relief efforts. He has driven an emergency response vehicle, used to serve food to communities following a disaster, across the United States to support Red Cross disaster relief efforts following Hurricane Matthew. In the past several years, Crowell has deployed nationally three times and responded to dozens of local disasters. As if that isn't enough, in his spare time Crowell also volunteers to deliver lifesaving blood products from the Red Cross to hospitals. His selfless devotion to serve others makes him our 2018 Voluntary Service Hero.

About the American Red Cross
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org/Cascades or find us on Facebook at Red Cross Cascades, Twitter at @RedCrossCasc and find us on Instagram at @RedCrossCascades.



Attached Media Files: News Release - Red Cross to Honor Local Heroes at 2018 Heroes Breakfast

Red Cross Responds to Home Fire Affecting Four in Bandon
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 02/12/18 2:31 PM
Disaster responders with the local American Red Cross responded to a home fire disaster on
February 12, 2018, at approximately 12:00 p.m. in the 51000 block of Pioneer Road in Bandon, OR. The fire affected four, including two adults, two children and four pets. The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.
The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average
of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day. The Red Cross advocates
emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community.
Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at
www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.

Red Cross Responds to Home Fire Affecting Two in Albany
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 02/12/18 10:07 AM
Disaster responders with the local American Red Cross responded to a home fire disaster on
February 12, 2018, at approximately 7:00 a.m. in the 100 block of Curtis Street, NE in Albany, OR. The fire affected two adults and one pet. The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.
The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average
of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day. The Red Cross advocates
emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community.
Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at
www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.

Results of the Region 17 Chess Tournament at Willamette High School (Photo)
Chess for Success - 02/14/18 3:30 PM
2018-02/1811/112039/State_t-shirt_2018.jpg
2018-02/1811/112039/State_t-shirt_2018.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-02/1811/112039/thumb_State_t-shirt_2018.jpg
Results of the Region 17 Chess Tournament at Willamette High School

The following students have qualified for the State Chess Tournament:

Charlemagne Elementary
o 4 students qualified as individuals
o The team qualified
Edgewood Community Elementary School
o 1 student qualified as an individual
Roosevelt Middle School
o 8 students qualified as individuals
o The team qualified
South Eugene High School
o 2 students qualified as individuals
Willamette High School
o 1 student qualified as an individual

These individual and team winners are invited to the 51st Chess for Success State Chess Tournament March 9 and 10 at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland.

Chess for Success (CFS) is celebrating its 25th anniversary. CFS is a Portland based non-profit organization whose mission is to help children succeed in school and in life through learning chess. The organization runs chess clubs in more than 78 schools throughout the state of Oregon and Southwest Washington serving more than 2,000 students. To learn more visit their website, www.chessforsuccess.org.

Excellent photo opportunity!
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Attached Media Files: 2018-02/1811/112039/State_t-shirt_2018.jpg , 2018-02/1811/112039/Brookwood_Team.jpg

Thousands of Girl Scout Cookie Booths Open TOMORROW, February 16, In Oregon and SW Washington (Photo)
Girl Scouts of Ore. and SW Washington - 02/15/18 2:07 PM
Girl Scouts Cookie Booth Sales
Girl Scouts Cookie Booth Sales
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-02/6250/111865/thumb_Cookies-18-3.jpg
Thousands of Girl Scout Cookie Booths Open TOMORROW, February 16, In Oregon and SW Washington
Girl Scout S'mores(TM) cookies back by popular demand!

PORTLAND, OR. -- February 15, 2018 -- Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington (GSOSW) will officially launch the 2018 cookie booth season tomorrow, February 16. Back by popular demand are Girl Scout S'mores(TM)! Cookies can be purchased from more than 30,000 Girl Scout Cookie booths between Friday, February 16 and Sunday, March 11 for $5 per box.

"I'm excited for girls to have this business experience, and put themselves out there," says GSOSW Director of Product Sales Paige Walker. "A Girl Scout Cookie booth is basically a pop-up shop and these young women are entrepreneurs selling an iconic product. As they're talking with community members at booths, they're learning people skills. As they're making decisions about their cookie business, they're practicing skills that prepare them for a successful future."

While the girls ask for the sale, Walker has an ask for customers, too: "When you meet a Girl Scout at a cookie booth, ask her why she is selling cookies!"

COOKIE FINDER
Signature Girl Scout Cookies, including Thin Mints(R), Samoas(R) and Trefoils(R) will be offered among the eight Girl Scout Cookie varieties at all booths throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington. Girl Scout S'mores(TM) cookies and gluten free Toffee-tastic(TM) specialty cookies are available at select cookie booths while supplies last. Customers can find a Girl Scout Cookie booth near their location with the Cookie Finder at girlscoutsosw.org/cookies or use the Girl Scout Cookie Finder app available for iPhone or Android.

THE POWER BEHIND THE GIRL SCOUT COOKIE PROGRAM
The Girl Scout Cookie Program teaches girls the skills they need to become effective leaders, manage finances and gain confidence in handling money--skills that will stay with them for a lifetime. Each box of Girl Scout Cookies sold powers real-life experiences for thousands of local girls.

"We are so grateful to the stores, businesses and organizations that host Girl Scouts at cookie booths," says Walker. "The community partners that provide these spaces are making a valuable investment in girls' entrepreneurial experience."

KEEPING IT LOCAL
100 percent of the net revenue earned from cookie sales remains within the local region. Every purchase of Girl Scout Cookies helps provide for new and unique opportunities for local girls including valuable educational experiences that offer lifelong impact. Girl Scout campers in Oregon and Southwest Washington use cookie program proceeds to fund their own camp and travel adventures. And, nearly every Girl Scout troop uses some portion of their cookie proceeds to give back to their local communities.

ABOUT THE GIRL SCOUT COOKIE PROGRAM
A little more than a century ago, girls began participating in what would evolve into the largest entrepreneurial training program for girls in the world: the Girl Scout Cookie Program. To learn more about the history of the cookie program, please visit: girlscoutcookies.org.

ABOUT GIRL SCOUTS OF OREGON AND SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON
Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington serves 13,955 girls in 37 counties with the help of over 10,000 volunteers. The Girl Scout mission is to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. Every opportunity in Girl Scouting, including the Girl Scout Cookie Program, develops essential skills in an all-girl, inclusive, safe environment. For information, please visit: girlscoutsosw.org.

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Media Contacts:

Sarah Shipe, Director of Communications
(503) 977-6861 | After Hours: 503-930-5275, Mobile | sshipe@girlscoutsosw.org

Maureen A. Kenney, Public Relations Specialist
(503) 977-6817 | mkenney@girlscoutsosw.org



Attached Media Files: GS Cookie Booth Sales News Release , Girl Scouts Cookie Booth Sales , Girl Scouts Cookie Booth Sales , Girl Scouts Cookie Booth Sales , Girl Scouts Cookie Booth Sales , Girl Scouts Cookie Booth Sales

Amazon Adventure, an Epic Journey of Discovery in the Heart of the Rainforest, comes to the Empirical Theater at OMSI
OMSI - 02/14/18 11:09 AM
PORTLAND, Ore. (February 14, 2018) - AMAZON ADVENTURE, based on the true story of explorer Henry Walter Bates, opens at the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) on Friday, February 16. Playing on the 4-story screen of the Empirical Theater, AMAZON ADVENTURE is a compelling detective tale of peril, perseverance, and ultimately, success, drawing audiences into the fascinating world of animal mimicry, the astonishing phenomenon where one animal adopts the look of another, to gain a survival advantage.

"The Giant Screen is the ideal format to take audiences to places they might not normally go and to see amazing creatures they might not normally see," said Executive Producer Jonathan Barker, CEO of SK Films. "From a humble background, with an unstoppable passion for science and life, Bates played guitar, had a pet monkey, relied on Amazonian natives to survive and learned many of their languages. He made crucial contributions to our understanding of the natural world and should be more widely known, which is why we're thrilled to introduce his remarkable story to the public."

Bates risked his life for science during his 11-year expedition into the Amazon rainforest and provided "the beautiful proof" to Charles Darwin for his then controversial theory of natural selection, the scientific explanation for the development of life on Earth.

Painstakingly researched for three years, AMAZON ADVENTURE enlisted the expertise of more than 100 scientists and historical advisors. The team's commitment to authenticity resulted in this rigorous re-creation, using actual instruments and tools from the 1850s and incorporating many of Bates' own words into the script, as he was a gifted storyteller.

The film, a co-production between Canada, the UK and Brazil, was granted unprecedented access by the Natural History Museum of London to film Bates' own scientific field notebooks, botanical drawings and the butterflies he personally collected over 160 years ago.

Developed and produced in close collaboration with HHMI Tangled Bank Studios, AMAZON ADVENTURE also received major funding from the National Science Foundation through the film's educational outreach partner, Pacific Science Center. Other key partners include the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Simons Foundation, and Foxconn Brazil and Vale.

AMAZON ADVENTURE opens at OMSI on February 16. Tickets to the film are $8.50 for adults, $6.50 for youth (ages 3-13), and $7 for seniors (ages 63+). Guests can purchase tickets online, via phone at 503.797.4000 or in person at the museum. For more information, visit www.omsi.edu.

About SK FILMS
SK Films is a Toronto-based, multi-platform entertainment content provider and a world leader in 3D film production and distribution. The company was founded in 1998 by Jonathan Barker and the late Robert Kerr, the visionary co-founder of IMAX Corporation.

About HHMI Tangled Bank Studios
HHMI Tangled Bank Studios is a production company established and funded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute as an extension of its longstanding science education mission. Dedicated to the creation of original science documentaries for broadcast, theatrical and digital distribution, the company's award-winning programs address important contemporary issues and capture compelling stories of discovery across all branches of scientific inquiry. For more information, please visit www.tangledbankstudios.org.

About OMSI
Founded in 1944, the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) is one of the nation's leading science museums, a world-class tourist attraction, and an award-winning educational resource for the kid in each of us. OMSI operates the largest museum-based outdoor science education program in the country and provides traveling and community outreach programs that bring science learning opportunities to schools and community organizations in nearly every county in Oregon. OMSI is located at 1945 SE Water Avenue, Portland, OR 97214. For general information, call 503.797.4000 or visit omsi.edu.