Emergency Reports | News Releases | Participants
Sort by: Date | Category
Eugene/Spring/Rose/Alb/Corv News Releases for Fri. Jan. 24 - 7:05 am
Police & Fire
Albany Police arrest suspect in Missing Person Case -- Albany Police Case # 20-00214
Albany Police - 01/21/20 4:55 PM

On Tuesday, January 21, 2020, Albany Police Detectives continued follow-up on Tiffany Lazon’s disappearance and are investigating it as a homicide.

While investigating Lazon’s disappearance, detectives learned Craig Lazon had borrowed a battery-operated circular saw from a friend and returned the saw several days later.  The owner of the saw brought the information forward and turned the saw over to Albany Police Detectives.  The Oregon State Crime Lab inspected the saw, finding bodily tissue and blood on the saw.  The crime lab performed a forensic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) test on the bodily tissue and blood which matched Tiffany Marie Lazon’s DNA.

As of January 21st, 2020, Albany Police have still not received any verifiable sightings of Tiffany Lazon or information on her whereabouts.  Numerous search warrants have been served during the past 5 days providing further evidence and support that Tiffany Lazon is deceased.

On January 21, 2020, at approximately 4:30 p.m., Albany Police Detectives completed a probable cause affidavit and arrested Craig Alexander Lazon on the following charge:

  • ORS 163.115  Murder   

The investigation is continuing, and no further information will be released at this time. Anyone with information regarding this case is asked to call Albany Police Detectives at 541-917-7686.

#  #  #


Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building Digital Defense with Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA) (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 01/21/20 9:00 AM
TT - MFA - January 21, 2020 - GRAPHIC
TT - MFA - January 21, 2020 - GRAPHIC
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/3585/130441/thumb_TT_-_Multi-factor_authentication_-_January_21_2020_-_GRAPHIC.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. Today: Building a digital defense with the fancy-sounding multi-factor authentication. 

It sounds complicated – but multi-factor authentication – or MFA - really isn’t that difficult. In fact, you are probably already using it and just don’t realize it. 

MFA is just a process that requires you to prove who you are in more than one way. Banks, utilities, social media platforms, and more are using this technology every day to protect your private data. Remember the last time you had to answer a challenge question to get into your account? Or you received a one-time PIN via text or email to confirm that it was really you who forgot your password and are now trying to re-set it? That is multi-factor authentication.  

There are three categories of credentials: something you know, something you have, and something you are. Let’s break that down. 

  • “Something you know” would be your password or a set PIN that you use to access an account. The PIN doesn’t typically change. 

  • “Something you have” would be a security token or app that provides a randomly-generated number that rotates frequently. The token provider confirms that you – and only you – could know what that number is. Also, “something you have” could include verification texts, emails, or calls that you must respond to before accessing an account. 

  • “Something you are” includes fingerprints, facial recognition, or voice recognition. Sounds a bit unnerving – but think about how you unlocked your smart phone this morning. You’ve probably used your prints or your face several times already today just to check your email. 

Multi-factor authentication is required by some providers – but for others it is optional. If given the choice, it is in your best interest to take advantage of MFA whenever possible but definitely when dealing with your most sensitive personal data. This includes your primary email account, your financial records, and your health records. 

To make it easy, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security has gathered a list of links from all the major players to walk you through how to set up multi-factor authentication. The list includes the biggest banks, social media platforms, email providers, gaming sites, online health record providers, shopping sites, cloud storage companies, and more. You can get to it by going to https://stopthinkconnect.org/campaigns/lock-down-your-login 

As always, if you have been victimized by a cyber fraud, be sure to report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.IC3.gov or call your local FBI office. 

###




Attached Media Files: TT - MFA - January 21, 2020 - AUDIO , TT - MFA - January 21, 2020 - GRAPHIC

Update Alleged Hostage Report
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/23/20 10:07 AM

UPDATE Case 20-1327

UPDATED 012320

The Jackson County Sheriff’s Office has concluded the investigation into the alleged hostage situation reported via social media on 012120. Deputies investigating the incident in the 2500 block of Carr St. White City, Oregon, have found no probable cause to believe a crime occurred regarding the aspect of the case involving the caller being held hostage.

The case also lead to a search warrant that resulted in a stolen firearm being recovered at the scene. That element of the case will remain under investigation.

JCSO Case #20-1327

On 012120 at 0114 Emergency Communications of Southern Oregon was notified about a post on the Jackson County Scanner Page.  A 49-year-old male, posted on the scanner page that he was being held hostage at his residence and he needed help. The victim gave his address in the 2500 block of Carr St. White City, Oregon.  Units arrived and surrounded the house.  The homeowner opened the door and yelled for help.  Deputies made entry into the residence and detained four people. 

Those four were: Hector Orozco dob 08/24/1996; Martin Rodriquez Banuelos dob 01/05/1991; James Powers dob 12/25/1997; and a 59-year-old female.

Orozco was lodged on a State Parole Board Warrant for a weapons offense.  Banuelos was lodged for a Parole Violation for Possession of Dangerous Drugs.  Powers was lodged on a Detainer issued by his Probation Officer for PCS Meth.  The female subject was released at the conclusion of the investigation. 

A search warrant for the residence was obtained and served. A stolen firearm was recovered during the search.  The case remains under investigation and possible additional charges will be reviewed. 

 


Search Warrant Served in White City
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/22/20 1:25 PM

WHITE CITY,Ore. The Jackson County Sheriff's Office served a search warrant in the 8000 block of Gladstone in White City on 012120 at 10:50PM.

During the service of the warrant a total of 15 people were detained at the scene.  Three subjects were cited and released for drug law violations and one was arrested for warrants. 

Arrested was Elizabeth Ann Hibberd, 052680. She was lodged on two warrants. The warrants were Failure to Appear PCS Meth, $7500 bail and Failure to Appear-Violation of No Contact Order Bail $7500.

Subjects cited for Possession of Controlled Substance

were:

Adam James Hackworth, 040379, for PCS Meth.

Justin Dwayne Eidem, 101779, for PCS Meth.

Tara Marie Holland, 062584 for PCS Meth.

JCSO is continuing to investigate this incident.

 


Threat Of School Shooting Written on Bathroom Wall At Junction City High School
Junction City Police - 01/23/20 7:28 PM

On Thursday January 23rd, 2020 at approximately 3:13 PM the administrative staff of the Junction City High School reported that an unknown individual had written a message on a bathroom wall indicating the author was going to “shoot-up” the school tomorrow, presumably Friday, January 24th, 2020.

Junction City Police Officers immediately responded and began an investigation in conjunction with Junction City High School administrative staff.  The newly installed state-of-the-art closed circuit television system is proving to play a vital role in the investigation of this incident.

The Junction City Police Department has a strong and positive working relationship with the Junction City School District and at their request we will ensure there is highly-visible police presence on the high school campus tomorrow to ensure all staff, students, and visitors are safe and protected.  Anyone having any information on this incident is urged to immediately contact the Junction City Police Department at 541-998-1245.

This is an on-going criminal investigation.  Additional information will be provided as soon as it becomes available.

The following is the exact message that was sent by Junction City High School administration to all staff and parents of the high school earlier this afternoon.

A message from JUNCTION CITY HIGH SCHOOL

Dear Parents,

Junction City High School is committed to the safety and education of all our students. Essential to this commitment is open communication with parents about safety issues when they arise. For this reason, we want to make you aware of the facts surrounding a threat that was found written in a restroom on campus this afternoon, Thursday, January 23rd. 

After school we were made aware of the threat, which stated "I'm gonna shoot up the school tomorrow at 0900 hours.  Be ready." Followed by the date, 1/23/20.

Safety and security of students and staff is our first priority. We contacted local law enforcement immediately and are working with the Junction City Police Department to investigate the threat.  We ask that you speak to your students this evening, and that ANY INFORMATION YOUR CHILD MAY HAVE REGARDING THIS THREAT be reported directly to the Junction City Police Department 541-998-1245.  Reports can also be made anonymously through the SafeOregon website, by using the mobile app, or by calling or texting 844-472-3367.

While classes will resume as usual tomorrow, we ask that you notify us if you decide to keep your child home. There will be an increased police presence in and around the school and counselors will be available for students needing support.  All threats to our school or students are taken seriously and investigated thoroughly. If you discover anything that can assist in the investigation, please contact us immediately.

Thank you for your continued support. We will let you know as soon as possible when the situation has been resolved and will provide updated information if it becomes available.

Sincerely,

Dina Marschall & Brian Young

Co- Principals, Junction City High School


Tip of the Week for January 27 - Fans Don't Let Fans Drive Drunk (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/23/20 10:26 AM
2020-01/5490/130943/DUI_car-stop-1.jpg
2020-01/5490/130943/DUI_car-stop-1.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/5490/130943/thumb_DUI_car-stop-1.jpg

    "Fans Don't Let Fans Drive Drunk"      

It's time for Super Bowl Sunday!!  February 2nd, 2020. No matter which team you are rooting for, everyone should agree that "Fans Don’t Let Fans Drive Drunk".  That's the campaign from The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to help keep impaired drivers from getting behind the wheel. They are encouraging everyone to take part in making sure that football fans across the nation do not drop the ball on this issue.

In most states, drivers are considered alcohol-impaired if they have a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .08 or higher. (Utah recently went to .05 or higher) Drunk driving can be deadly; and even small amounts of alcohol can impair judgement to make driving unsafe According to the latest figures available from NHTSA, 37,133 people died in traffic crashes in 2017, and 29 percent of those killed, or 10,874, were due to drunk driving. Drunk driving deaths decreased 1.1 percent from 2016, according to revised estimates of 10,996 alcohol-related fatalities for 2016.

Be sure to have a game plan for the night so friends and family know who the designated driver will be. We want to encourage fans to turn over their keys to a sober driver – our vote for game MVP – before they begin drinking. Drunk driving can result in serious crashes, injuries or death. If you don’t have an MVP to make sure folks get home safely, consider other ride options. There are many other ways to ensure a safe ride home besides relying on a friend. The options include using public transportation, calling a taxi, or using a rideshare program.

This Super Bowl weekend, sober designated drivers should be sure to carry the ball and refrain from drinking alcohol. Be a team player and help keep impaired drivers from getting behind the wheel.  Don't fumble!  Remember: Fans Don't Let Fans Drive Drunk.

 

For more information and tips, visit our website at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.




Attached Media Files: 2020-01/5490/130943/012720-Fans_Dont_Let_Fans_Drive_Drunk.pdf , 2020-01/5490/130943/DUI_car-stop-1.jpg

Detectives Investigating Shooting in East Salem ***Correction - Update 1*** (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/23/20 3:43 PM
2020-01/1294/130904/Scene_1.jpg
2020-01/1294/130904/Scene_1.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/1294/130904/thumb_Scene_1.jpg

Correction to spelling of deceased male's name - correct spelling is Eduardo Flores Rodriguez

On January 21st, 2020, deputies from the Marion County Sheriff’s Office responded to the report of a shooting in the area of Snoopy Lane NE and Linus Court NE.  During the incident three people sustained gunshot wounds, including a male found in a silver Chrysler 300 at the scene with a gunshot wound to the head.  The male from the Chrysler 300 has been identified as Eduardo Flores Rodriguez, a 21 year-old from Woodburn.  Earlier today Flores Rodriguez was pronounced deceased at a local hospital.

A search warrant was served earlier this afternoon by the Marion County Sheriff’s Office SWAT Team and investigators at a residence on Snoopy Court NE.  No arrests have been made at this time in connection with the shooting.

Investigators are requesting anyone who may have information about the shooting to contact our non-emergency dispatch at 503-588-5032 or to submit an anonymous tip at https://www.co.marion.or.us/SO/Pages/tip411.aspx.

On January 21st, 2020, shortly after 11:00 pm, deputies from the Marion County Sheriff’s Office were dispatched to a shooting in the area of Snoopy Lane NE and Linus Court NE, in the unincorporated area of Salem.  Deputies arrived on scene to find a silver Chrysler 300 crashed into a van; one adult male in the vehicle had what is believed to be a gunshot wound to the head.  Medics transported the victim to an area hospital where he is in critical condition.  A short time later, two additional adult males arrived at Salem Hospital with gunshot wounds from the incident.  Both have been treated and released for their injuries.

Detectives from the Criminal Investigations Unit have taken over the investigation and are investigating.  If anyone has information about the shooting they are being asked to call the Sheriff’s Office non-emergency dispatch at 503-588-5032.




Attached Media Files: 2020-01/1294/130904/Scene_1.jpg , 2020-01/1294/130904/Scene.jpg , 2020-01/1294/130904/Scene_2.jpg , 2020-01/1294/130904/Command_Post.jpg

Multiple Weekend Crashes Lead to Road Closures in Northern Marion County (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/20/20 3:37 PM
Sunday Single Vehicle Roll Over
Sunday Single Vehicle Roll Over
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/1294/130868/thumb_Sunday_Roll_Over.JPG

On Monday, January 20th, 2020, at approximately 8:18 am emergency crews were dispatched to a head-on crash involving a semi-tractor and trailer on Ehlen Road NE near Donald Road NE in northern Marion County.  The semi-tractor and trailer carrying potato chips was overturned during the collision with a 2016 Jeep Cherokee.  The driver of the Jeep was extricated from the vehicle by emergency crews and transported by ground ambulance with non-life threatening injuries.  The driver of the semi-tractor was also taken to an area hospital with minor injuries.

During the investigation at the scene, investigators determined the semi-tractor and trailer were traveling eastbound on Ehlen Road NE prior to the collision.  Witnesses reported the driver of the semi-tractor was not driving within their lane prior to colliding with an oncoming vehicle.

Andrew Addo, 37 year-old male from Tacoma, has been identified as the driver of the semi-tractor belonging to J.B. Hunt Transport.  Addo was cited and released at the hospital for charges including Reckless Driving, Recklessly Endangering Another Person, and Assault in the Fourth Degree. 

This crash is the second major collision this weekend in northern Marion County which resulted in lengthy road closures.  On Sunday, January 19th, 2020, at just after 4:30 pm deputies were dispatched to the 8000 block of McKay Road NE to the report of a roll over crash involving a single vehicle, a 2019 Nissan.  When emergency crews arrived, they found the lone occupant of the vehicle trapped inside and had to extricate her.  The driver was transported by Life Flight to a Portland area hospital.  While emergency crews were on scene of Sunday afternoon’s crash, two additional non-injury crashes occurred in the immediate area.  The roadway was closed to traffic for approximately 1 ½ hours during the investigation of Sunday’s collision.

A 61 year-old Newberg woman, Dana Witt, has been identified as the involved driver in Sunday’s crash.  Investigators believe alcohol use was a contributing factor to the single vehicle roll over; Witt was cited and released at the hospital for DUII.  The driver sustained non-life threatening injuries as a result of the crash. 

The Sheriff’s Office would like to thank the numerous public safety partner agencies who assisted with the collisions.  These agencies include: St. Paul Fire District, Aurora Fire District, Woodburn Ambulance, Life Flight, Marion County Public Works, Linn County Sheriff’s Office, Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue, Keizer Police Department, METCOM 911, and the Willamette Valley Communications Center. 

As of 3:30 pm on Monday afternoon, Ehlen Road NE at Donald Road NE remains closed to traffic while crews work to clear the roadway following this morning’s head-on collision.  There is currently no estimated time frame for the roadway to reopen.




Attached Media Files: Sunday Single Vehicle Roll Over , Monday Heavy Wrecker Crew , Monday Wrecker Crew Cleanup , Monday Semi Overturned , Monday Semi Blocking Roadway

Deputies Responding to Shots Fired Prompts SWAT Response (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/18/20 4:17 PM
K9 Zeke
K9 Zeke
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/1294/130848/thumb_K9.jpg

On January 18th, 2020, shortly before 3:00 am deputies from the Marion County Sheriff’s Office were dispatched to the report of shots fired in the 4500 block of Agate Drive SE, in the unincorporated area of Salem.  Deputies contacted multiple people near the residence and learned a male had come to the home a short time earlier and fired multiple shots in front of the residence prior to going inside.  Deputies learned the suspect was searching for someone at the residence and had pointed a handgun at another male inside the house, taking their wallet.  There were no reported injuries as a result of the shots being fired by the suspect.

The suspect, Jeffrey Jeno Garza, was reported to still be hiding inside of the home along with multiple other people.  Over the course of the next few hours, multiple additional people came out of the residence to safety.  Marion County Sheriff’s Office SWAT was activated and responded to the scene along with investigators from the Criminal Investigations Unit.

Negotiators from the Sheriff’s Office SWAT Team spent the next several hours attempting to get Garza to surrender peacefully.  After attempts to get Garza to surrender voluntarily were unsuccessful, he was ultimately located hiding in a crawl space beneath the home by a police K-9.

Garza, a 39 year-old Woodburn man, was taken to an area hospital for treatment for his injuries.  He will be lodged at the Marion County Jail for multiple charges including Robbery in the First Degree, Theft in the Second Degree, and Unlawful Use of a Weapon.




Attached Media Files: K9 Zeke , Jeffrey Jeno Garza , 2020-01/1294/130848/Negotiators.jpg , 2020-01/1294/130848/Scene_2.jpg , 2020-01/1294/130848/Scene.jpg

Fatal Crash on Hwy 551 - Clackamas County
Oregon State Police - 01/22/20 11:28 AM

On Wednesday, January 22, 2020 at approximately 12:30 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle collision on Hwy 551 near milepost 1.

Preliminary investigation shows that a Toyota Camry, operated by Kelsie Martin (29) of Beavercreek, was northbound on Hwy 551 when for unknown reasons collided head on with a southbound Toyota Prius operated by Stephanie Patricio (33) of Woodburn.

Patricio sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Martin sustained serious and was transported by Life Flight to OHSU.

Alcohol impairment by Martin is suspected as a contributing factor.

OSP was assisted by Clackamas County Sheriff's Office, Canby Police Department, Aurora Fire Department, AMR Ambulance, and ODOT 


Medical
$5.1 million from Kaiser Permanente will house 300 Portland metro area seniors in 2020
Kaiser Permanente Northwest - 01/20/20 11:00 AM

$5.1 million from Kaiser Permanente will house 300 Portland metro area seniors in 2020

“Metro 300” initiative also kicks off new regional cross-sector investment fund

PORTLAND, Ore. – Kaiser Permanente Northwest is funding a $5.1 million project that will take an “anything necessary” approach to achieving the goal of housing 300 homeless, medically vulnerable seniors by the end of 2020.

“Without a safe, stable place to call home, it’s nearly impossible to focus on basic health and medical needs,” said Ruth Williams-Brinkley, president, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and Hospitals of the Northwest. “This is especially true for our seniors, who are often dealing with chronic diseases and other complex health issues. Kaiser Permanente’s mission is to improve the health of the communities we serve, which is why we’re advancing bold ideas to reduce homelessness.”

Launch of Regional Supportive Housing Impact Fund

Kaiser Permanente’s $5.1 million investment in the “Metro 300” initiative will also catalyze the new Regional Supportive Housing Impact Fund, which uses an innovative approach that will make funding for housing available more quickly and efficiently. The RSHIF, which will pool contributions from health system, philanthropy and business partners, will be administered by Health Share of Oregon, a coordinated care organization that manages the state’s Medicaid resources for the Portland metro region.

With Health Share as the lead entity, the RSHIF will combine philanthropic dollars with Medicaid funds and deploy them to increase the availability of deeply affordable housing with services and to support housing stability for people with complex health needs.

By addressing a key driver of health – housing – Kaiser Permanente is working with partners to improve the health and well-being of the communities we serve, including our members. As a health care organization, Kaiser Permanente recognizes that individuals who are homeless have a higher rate of hospital re-admissions and emergency room visits while also suffering from poorer health outcomes and higher mortality rates.

“Homelessness is the number one issue facing our community, and solving it requires long-term solutions that address the underlying reasons people become and stay homeless,” said Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler. “It’s a complex problem that requires the creativity and collaboration of everyone in our community, and we appreciate that Kaiser Permanente and others in our region’s health care, philanthropic, business and government sectors are taking an active role in bringing new solutions to the table.”

Partners in the RSHIF include:

  • Cambia Health Foundation
  • CareOregon
  • Central City Concern
  • Collins Foundation
  • Health Share of Oregon
  • Kaiser Permanente
  • Legacy Health
  • Meyer Memorial Trust
  • OHSU (and Adventist, an OHSU partner)
  • Oregon Community Foundation
  • Portland Business Alliance
  • Providence Health & Services

How Metro 300 Works

This initiative is modeled on Kaiser Permanente’s successful partnership in Oakland, California, that housed 515 seniors during 2019. Health Share, as administrator of the RSHIF, will allocate the Kaiser Permanente funding to housing agencies in each county, and the agencies will deploy this flexible resource to quickly house a total of 300 homeless people.

To qualify for the Metro 300 funding, individuals will have one or more disabling conditions and/or will be referred from one or more systems of care or institutions, such as recuperative care programs, assertive community treatment, hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, coordinated entry/coordinated access waitlists, federally qualified health centers, or warming shelters.

The counties will collaborate with a network of providers to serve the 300 seniors through an “anything necessary” approach that includes housing navigation, move-in and rental assistance and ongoing supportive services to ensure ongoing permanent housing stability. The counties will track a by-name list of people served, and Health Share will analyze health utilization and outcomes as part of an evaluation of the project’s impact.

Kaiser Permanente was joined by Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler, Multnomah County Chair Deborah Kafoury and other local leaders to announce the initiative at a press conference held at Argyle Gardens — Transition Projects’ new low-income single adult housing development — during a Martin Luther King Jr. Day service project by 180 Kaiser Permanente volunteers. The  deeply affordable low-income single adult housing, funded by the State of Oregon and other partners (and unrelated to the RSHIF or Metro 300 projects), will provide more than 70 people with a safe, clean place to live, and volunteers were helping with finishing touches like painting, building garden beds and organizing a food pantry.

Kaiser Permanente’s commitment to health through housing

Safe, stable housing is essential to a person’s health, and Kaiser Permanente is leading efforts to end homelessness and preserve affordable housing by making impact investments, shaping policy and catalyzing innovation through partnerships.

Kaiser Permanente’s approach to housing includes a variety of mechanisms and is effecting change across the housing system, from ending homelessness to providing investments for affordable housing development and preservation and advocating for policy change.

Recent programs, partnerships and investments:

  • Housing for Health grant initiative: a $2.2 million investment to support nonprofits across the region in hiring traditional health workers (peer support specialists and community health workers) to help people to find, secure and maintain safe, stable housing.
  • Housing Is Health: a $4 million investment in partnership with Central City Concern and 5 other health systems to build 3 new residential buildings in Portland.
  • Commons on MLK: A $750,000 contribution to the Commons on MLK project in Eugene, a “housing first” development that will provide 51 studio apartments for the chronically homeless and medically fragile. 
  • Community clinic integration grant initiative: a $600,000 grant initiative with 10 social service organizations to address housing and other social needs of Kaiser Permanente members and the larger community, improve referrals and data sharing between social services and health care providers, and create a learning collaborative to inform a social service resource locator in the Northwest region.
  • Community network: in 2019 Kaiser Permanente launched a new social health network in Oregon and Southwest Washington that is creating connections between health care providers and social services agencies to address pressing social needs such as housing, food, safety, transportation and utilities.
  • Mayors and CEOs for Housing Investment: a coalition between Kaiser Permanente, Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler and others in “Mayors and CEOs for Housing Investment”, a coalition that is advocating at the federal level.

About Kaiser Permanente

Kaiser Permanente is committed to helping shape the future of health care. We are recognized as one of America’s leading health care providers and not-for-profit health plans. Founded in 1945, Kaiser Permanente has a mission to provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. We currently serve 12.3 million members in eight states and the District of Columbia. Care for members and patients is focused on their total health and guided by their personal Permanente Medical Group physicians, specialists and team of caregivers. Our expert and caring medical teams are empowered and supported by industry-leading technology advances and tools for health promotion, disease prevention, state-of-the-art care delivery and world-class chronic disease management. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education and the support of community health. https://about.kaiserpermanente.org/

 

 


Utilities
Pacific Power crews restored service to approximately 1,000 customers last night with over 300 personnel continuing to make progress to restore remaining 500 customers††
Pacific Power - 01/20/20 10:11 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Jan. 20, 2020

Media contact: 800-570-5838

Pacific Power crews restored service to approximately 1,000 customers last night with over 300 personnel continuing to make progress to restore remaining 500 customers  

GRANTS PASS, ORE—Pacific Power restored service to approximately 1,000 customers last night– bringing the remaining customer count to approximately 500 – as crews made further progress clearing downed trees and making repairs. Damage from the destructive Jan. 16 winter storm left over 18,000 customers without service at its peak.

Pacific Power crews expect to see good restoration progress throughout today. The remaining pockets of outages are spread out from an area north of Grants Pass to south of Cave Junction, concentrated in the west side of Josephine County. Similar to previous days, repair work is taking place in difficult to reach, remote areas.  

Estimates put full restoration by the end of Tuesday or possibly Wednesday for certain individual customers with a large majority of the remaining 500 customers impacted by the winter storm outages having service returned by late Monday evening.

“We are thankful for our customers’ patience and understanding as our crews and contract personnel made steady progress over the past few days to restore service,” said David Lucas, vice president of transmission and distribution.“ 

Pacific Power encourages customers to report outages by calling 1-877-508-5088 or text OUT to 722797. Text STAT to 722797 to check the status of your outage. Customers and media representatives can also track outages of any size online. Updates will be made as new information becomes available or at least hourly at pacificpower.net/outage.

To ease the inconvenience of power outages and assist crews in restoring power, Pacific Power suggests the following tips and safety precautions:

  • Stay away from all downed power lines and utility lines. Even if the lines are not sparking, they could be energized and extremely dangerous. Call 911 and report the outage to Pacific Power at 1-877-508-5088.
  • Don’t drive over downed power lines.
  • Turn on your porch light. After crews complete repairs, they patrol the area of the power failure to see if any lights are still out
  • Check on your neighbors, especially those who may need special assistance. Also, check with others who have electricity, to see if you can visit.
  • If you have power at this time, keep mobile devices charged so that may be used in an emergency. Before anything happens, download the Pacific Power app to your smart device so you can have information readily available.
  • Remember your pets! Pets who spend a lot of time outdoors need more food in the winter because keeping warm depletes energy.
  • If you are using alternate heat or cooking sources, remember to allow plenty of ventilation. Never burn charcoal for heating or cooking indoors.
  • If you are using a generator, make sure to follow all manufacturer’s instructions. Make sure the generator is outside and not near any household air intakes. Do not connect the generator directly to your breaker box as this can create a dangerous situation for crews working on the powerlines. Instead plug essential appliances directly into the generator.

Pacific Power made additional restoration progress today returning service to approximately 1,500 customers
Pacific Power - 01/19/20 7:38 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Jan. 19, 2020

Media contact: 800-570-5838

Pacific Power made additional restoration progress today returning service to approximately 1,500 customers

GRANTS PASS, ORE—Pacific Power restored service to approximately 1,500 customers today – down from 3,000 at the beginning of the day – as crews continued to make further progress clearing downed trees and making repairs. Nearly 1,500 customers remain without power due to damaged lines and equipment from the destructive Jan. 16 winter storm that at its peak left over 18,000 customers without service.

The main challenge at this point are the hundreds of single outages spread across 60 to 70 miles with many of those single outages in outlying areas. Over 300 Pacific Power personnel will continue to work through the night and into next week to return service to all impacted customers.   

Pacific Power encourages customers to report outages by calling 1-877-508-5088 or text OUT to 722797. Text STAT to 722797 to check the status of your outage. Customers and media representatives can also track outages of any size online. Updates will be made as new information becomes available or at least hourly at pacificpower.net/outage.

To ease the inconvenience of power outages and assist crews in restoring power, Pacific Power suggests the following tips and safety precautions:

  • Stay away from all downed power lines and utility lines. Even if the lines are not sparking, they could be energized and extremely dangerous. Call 911 and report the outage to Pacific Power at 1-877-508-5088.
  • Don’t drive over downed power lines.
  • Turn on your porch light. After crews complete repairs, they patrol the area of the power failure to see if any lights are still out
  • Check on your neighbors, especially those who may need special assistance. Also, check with others who have electricity, to see if you can visit.
  • If you have power at this time, keep mobile devices charged so that may be used in an emergency. Before anything happens, download the Pacific Power app to your smart device so you can have information readily available.
  • Keep refrigerator and freezer doors closed. Most food requiring refrigeration can be kept safely in a closed refrigerator for several hours. An unopened refrigerator will keep food cold for about 4 hours. A full freezer will keep the temperature for about 48 hours. 
  • Remember your pets! Pets who spend a lot of time outdoors need more food in the winter because keeping warm depletes energy.
  • If you are using alternate heat or cooking sources, remember to allow plenty of ventilation. Never burn charcoal for heating or cooking indoors.
  • If you are using a generator, make sure to follow all manufacturer’s instructions. Make sure the generator is outside and not near any household air intakes. Do not connect the generator directly to your breaker box as this can create a dangerous situation for crews working on the powerlines. Instead plug essential appliances directly into the generator.

 


Service to nearly 3,000 Pacific Power customers in hard-hit Josephine County was restored yesterday and last night
Pacific Power - 01/19/20 10:31 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Jan. 19, 2020

Media contact: 800-570-5838

Service to nearly 3,000 Pacific Power customers in hard-hit Josephine County was restored yesterday and last night

GRANTS PASS, ORE—Pacific Power restored service to approximately 3,000 customers throughout yesterday as crews continued to make steady progress clearing downed trees and making repairs. Felled trees, blocked roads and hundreds of single outages spread across a large area have made the restoration work challenging. At its peak, more than 18,000 customers were impacted from the Jan. 16 winter storm. Approximately 3,000 customers remain without power.

“We’re thankful to all of our customers for their encouragement and understanding as our crews continue to make restoration progress in the wake of the winter storm,” said Dave Lucas, Pacific Power’s vice president of transmission and distribution. “We know how difficult it can be to go without power for an extended period. Our crews are focused on the task at hand and will continue to work around the clock to clear hazards, make repairs and restore service to our customers.”

Good weather will help aid restoration efforts today of the over 300 Pacific Power and contract personnel who are working in the area.

Pacific Power encourages customers to report outages by calling 1-877-508-5088 or text OUT to 722797. Text STAT to 722797 to check the status of your outage. Customers and media representatives can also track outages of any size online. Updates will be made as new information becomes available or at least hourly at pacificpower.net/outage.

To ease the inconvenience of power outages and assist crews in restoring power, Pacific Power suggests the following tips and safety precautions:

  • Stay away from all downed power lines and utility lines. Even if the lines are not sparking, they could be energized and extremely dangerous. Call 911 and report the outage to Pacific Power at 1-877-508-5088.
  • Don’t drive over downed power lines.
  • Turn on your porch light. After crews complete repairs, they patrol the area of the power failure to see if any lights are still out
  • Check on your neighbors, especially those who may need special assistance. Also, check with others who have electricity, to see if you can visit.
  • If you have power at this time, keep mobile devices charged so that may be used in an emergency. Before anything happens, download the Pacific Power app to your smart device so you can have information readily available.
  • Keep refrigerator and freezer doors closed. Most food requiring refrigeration can be kept safely in a closed refrigerator for several hours. An unopened refrigerator will keep food cold for about 4 hours. A full freezer will keep the temperature for about 48 hours. 
  • Remember your pets! Pets who spend a lot of time outdoors need more food in the winter because keeping warm depletes energy.
  • If you are using alternate heat or cooking sources, remember to allow plenty of ventilation. Never burn charcoal for heating or cooking indoors.
  • If you are using a generator, make sure to follow all manufacturer’s instructions. Make sure the generator is outside and not near any household air intakes. Do not connect the generator directly to your breaker box as this can create a dangerous situation for crews working on the powerlines. Instead plug essential appliances directly into the generator.

Power restorations in southern Oregon continued through the night as Pacific Power brings in additional crews to assist
Pacific Power - 01/18/20 11:20 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Jan. 18, 2020

Media contact: 800-570-5838

Power restorations in southern Oregon continued through the night as Pacific Power brings in additional crews to assist

Pacific Power has over 300 personnel working around the clock clearing downed trees and making repairs in aftermath of destructive winter storm

GRANTS PASS, ORE—Pacific Power restored power to approximately 1,900 customers during the night with additional crews and equipment coming in from across the region to assist with clearing downed trees and restoration efforts. Vegetation crews continue to focus on clearing away hundreds of felled trees and clearing debris from roads so line crews can safely make repairs to restore power to the remaining 6,000 customers impacted by the outages caused by the Jan. 16 winter storm that at its peak left more than 18,000 customers without power.

Crews have made steady progress during the night and expect to continue to restore more customers throughout today and into the evening. Restoration efforts have been hampered by the sheer number of outages spread across vast, difficult to access terrain and hundreds of felled trees.

More than 300 Pacific Power personnel and contractors are working around the clock in the area. Pacific Power estimates between 1,500 and 2,000 customers could be restored by this evening, but cautions some customers could remain without power into next week. 

Red Cross Shelters. Red Cross has opened emergency shelters in areas that are experiencing extended outages.

  • Illinois Valley High School:  625 E River St, Cave Junction, OR 97523,
  • Josephine County Fairgrounds, Pavilion Building:  1451 Fairgrounds Road, Grants Pass, OR, 97527. 

Pacific Power encourages customers to report outages by calling 1-877-508-5088 or text OUT to 722797. Text STAT to 722797 to check the status of your outage. Customers and media representatives can also track outages of any size online. Updates will be made as new information becomes available or at least hourly at pacificpower.net/outage.

To ease the inconvenience of power outages and assist crews in restoring power, Pacific Power suggests the following tips and safety precautions:

  • Stay away from all downed power lines and utility lines. Even if the lines are not sparking, they could be energized and extremely dangerous. Call 911 and report the outage to Pacific Power at 1-877-508-5088.
  • Don’t drive over downed power lines.
  • Turn on your porch light. After crews complete repairs, they patrol the area of the power failure to see if any lights are still out
  • Check on your neighbors, especially those who may need special assistance. Also, check with others who have electricity, to see if you can visit.
  • If you have power at this time, keep mobile devices charged so that may be used in an emergency. Before anything happens, download the Pacific Power app to your smart device so you can have information readily available.
  • Keep refrigerator and freezer doors closed. Most food requiring refrigeration can be kept safely in a closed refrigerator for several hours. An unopened refrigerator will keep food cold for about 4 hours. A full freezer will keep the temperature for about 48 hours. 
  • Remember your pets! Pets who spend a lot of time outdoors need more food in the winter because keeping warm depletes energy.
  • If you are using alternate heat or cooking sources, remember to allow plenty of ventilation. Never burn charcoal for heating or cooking indoors.
  • If you are using a generator, make sure to follow all manufacturer’s instructions. Make sure the generator is outside and not near any household air intakes. Do not connect the generator directly to your breaker box as this can create a dangerous situation for crews working on the powerlines. Instead plug essential appliances directly into the generator.

 


State
Public Notice: Waiver Comments Sought
Oregon Department of Human Services - 01/22/20 11:21 AM

The Oregon Department of Human Services’ Office of Developmental Disabilities Services is seeking public comment regarding the 1915 (c) #0117Children’s HCBS Waiver, #0375 Adult HCBS Waiver, # 40193 Medically Fragile Waiver, #40194 Behavioral Waiver, and # 0565 Medically Involved Waiver amendments.

The waiver amendments are requesting to:

  • #0375 Adult HCBS Waiver, #0117 Children’s Waiver,  # 40193 Medically Fragile Waiver, #40194 Behavioral Waiver, and # 0565 Medically Involved Waiver amendments -
    • Adjust the Supported Employment - Individual Employment Support rate methodology.
  •  #0117 Children’s Waiver, #40194 Behavioral Model Waiver and #0375 Adults Waiver amendments–
    • No longer require a new initial level of care (LOC) when someone transitions from one Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID) LOC waiver to another waiver with the same LOC, when they have a current, valid ICF/IID LOC.
  • #40194 Behavioral Model Waiver amendment -
    • Technical changes in Appendix B to keep Level of Care language consistent with the Children’s Waiver.
  • #0375 Adult HCBS Waiver amendment –
    • Allow the Direct Nursing Service in 24-hour residential group home settings. This includes adding a new provider type for Direct Nursing.
    •  Add Host Homes as a CMS approved Home and Community Based setting.

The proposed 1915 (c) waiver amendments are online at https://www.oregon.gov/DHS/SENIORS-DISABILITIES/DD/Pages/Compass-Project-Waivers-Rules-Policy.aspx

Print versions of the waiver amendments are posted in local Community Developmental Disabilities Programs (http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/SENIORS-DISABILITIES/DD/Pages/county-programs.aspx) and Support Services Brokerages (http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/SENIORS-DISABILITIES/DD/Pages/Support-Services-Brokerages.aspx). Print versions may also be obtained from Joli Schroader, Medicaid Waiver Analyst, 503-507-2083, .schroader@state.or.us">joli.r.schroader@state.or.us

Interested parties are asked to submit comments via one of two methods: Send an email to odds.info@state.or.us or send written comments addressed to ODDS Medicaid Waiver Analyst, 500 Summer Street NE E-09, Salem, OR 97301.

Deadline for comments is February 23, 2020. Mail responses must be received by this date in order to be considered.


Bandon man operating unlicensed investment business loses 90 percent of investors' funds in less than a year
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 01/23/20 9:13 AM

(Salem) – The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation is warning people to avoid investing with Robert Lee Adams, also known as Bob Adams, and his business, SimTradePro Inc. The division issued a cease-and-desist order against Adams and his business for operating as a state investment adviser without a license, and he may still be soliciting Oregon consumers.

Adams, a Bandon resident, formed a related company, Winning Investments, LLC, in 2017 allegedly to pool investor funds and invest them in the foreign currency exchange market. Four investors who participated lost more than $279,000 in less than a year. An elderly victim lost most of her retirement savings.

Adams charged each investor a $3,000 origination fee, offered the group investment strategies he selected, and pooled the investors’ funds in a local bank account. Adams then allegedly invested their funds in foreign currency trading programs that operated offshore. Adams and SimTradePro have never been licensed with the division as an investment adviser or investment adviser representative.

“Investments in foreign currency trading programs are extremely risky, and they are not for everyone,” said Andrew Stolfi, division administrator. “Before investing money you cannot afford to lose, and certainly before parting with your life savings, learn as much as you can about the firms and individuals you are considering. Make sure your investment adviser is licensed by the division and works with registered, reputable industry professionals.”

The division encourages everyone to protect their money. Ask questions to learn about your adviser’s registration status, disciplinary record, and complaint history. The first step before making an investment is to carefully choose a financial professional by checking their licensing status and background.

Oregonians are also encouraged to contact the division’s advocates at 888-877-4894 (toll-free) with questions or concerns about a financial adviser or product. If you have information or questions specifically regarding Robert Lee Adams and his business activities, contact Investigator Rachel Royston at 503-947-7093.

                                                                                               ###

About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov. 

About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and http://dfr.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx.


Snake River Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 01/20/20 9:38 PM
Robert M. McHale
Robert M. McHale
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/1070/130874/thumb_McHale_R.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Robert Michael McHale, died January 20, 2020. McHale was incarcerated at Snake River Correctional Institution (SRCI) in Ontario and passed away in the infirmary while on hospice. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified. 

McHale entered DOC custody on December 5, 2006, from Lincoln County with an earliest release date of September 7, 2055. McHale was 56 years old. Next of kin has been notified.  

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,700 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

SRCI is a multi-custody prison in Ontario that houses approximately 3,000 adults in custody. SRCI has multiple special housing units including disciplinary segregation, intensive management, infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care, and an administrative segregation unit. SRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including a contact center, laundry, and sign shop. SRCI specializes in incentive housing, specialized housing, individuals with mental health/medical vulnerabilities, education and trades programs, cognitive and parenting programs, and institution work programs. SRCI opened in 1991 and is the largest correctional institution in the state.

####

 

 




Attached Media Files: Robert M. McHale

1,791 acres of Wallowa Lake's East Moraine acquired for Wallowa County (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 01/21/20 3:03 PM
Map of the East Moraine property showing multi-use trails.
Map of the East Moraine property showing multi-use trails.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/1072/130890/thumb_East_Moraine_map.jpg

JOSEPH, Ore. – The breathtaking beauty of Wallowa Lake’s East Moraine forest and open space was permanently protected when almost 1,800 acres were transferred this week into Wallowa County ownership.

For over ten years the Wallowa Lake Moraines Partnership – a consortium comprised of the County, Wallowa Land Trust, Wallowa Resources, and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department – worked to acquire the property in order to eliminate any risk of home development, especially on the moraine’s vulnerable crest.  Now that it is under Wallowa County ownership, all development and subdivision rights have been extinguished and the property will be managed as a working community forest, protecting native plants, wildlife habitat, and cultural resources while providing non-motorized recreational access and returns to the local economy through sustainable forestry and grazing.

“We couldn’t have hoped for a better outcome that serves the public’s need for permanent protection and access to this spectacular natural landscape,” said John Hillock, Wallowa County Commissioner and Chair of the East Moraine Campaign.

Push to protect moraine receives broad support

After nearly a decade of negotiations, the Partnership and the former landowner, the Ronald C. Yanke Family Trust, came to a purchase agreement of $6 million in January 2019. Fundraising then went into full-gear, with over half coming in the form of a $3.5 million grant the Oregon Department of Forestry received from the USDA Forest Service’s Forest Legacy Program that helped the Partnership reach the purchase price in a voluntary sale by the Yanke Family Trust.

“Forest Legacy Program grants are one resource to help keep Oregon’s working forests intact so they can continue to provide social, environmental and economic benefits to Oregonians,” said Oregon State Forester Peter Daugherty. “We are pleased that we could help the Wallowa Lake Moraines Partnership protect this unique forest resource.”

 

Obtaining Forest Legacy grants is a competitive process, Daugherty said, adding “I am proud that to date we’ve brought in $8.2 million in federal money to fund the most worthwhile proposals from Oregon.”

 

Individual donors contributed more than $1.1 million to the purchase. Oregon Parks and Recreation contributed $1 million and its staff is lending a hand in formulating the land’s recreation plan. The Nez Perce Tribe gave $300,000 to the campaign and is helping the Partnership with the plan for management as well.

All told, almost $6.5 million was raised through grants and donations to purchase the moraine property and begin a multi-use management plan for its perpetual management. The Partnership continues to seek funding to support and sustain the management of the property.

“This is an incredible milestone,” says Kathleen Ackley, Wallowa Land Trust Director. “It’s by no means the end of the project, we still have a lot of work ahead of this, but this is something to be proud of.    More than a million dollars came from private individuals and families with deep connections to Wallowa County and an enduring love for Wallowa Lake and the Moraines.  We remain astonished by the incredible generosity of our community.”

A Community Legacy

For thousands of years the spectacular East Moraine has been a refuge for wildlife and sacred to indigenous peoples. Today it continues to be a working landscape enjoyed by locals and visitors alike. In recent years, the land was zoned for the development of houses, including three trophy homes on the crest of the moraine, but under county ownership the threats of development and subdivision are now extinguished in perpetuity.

Rebecca Miles, Nez Perce Tribe Executive Director noted, “Participating with the Partnership and representing the Nez Perce Tribe has been a true honor. This purchase is a dream come true, closing out any and all fears of potential development on the East Moraine. This is a historical feat for the permanent protection of such sacred lands. The protections of this property will ensure our ancestors and our way of life are forever protected and continue on.”

Once complete, a multi-use management plan will strive to balance healthy habitat for native plants and animals, cultural resources, non-motorized recreation, and sustainable timber harvest and range management. Securing the East Moraine creates a significant habitat corridor; protects cultural resources; expands upon existing conserved lands; and opens to the public the property’s beautiful views on the moraine’s southern crest in a manner that is respectful of its scenic beauty. The draft management is currently scheduled for public input and review in spring of 2020.

“Community forests are a powerful response to forest and rangeland loss to development,” adds Nils Christoffersen, Executive Director of Wallowa Resources. “The East Moraine is central to our community’s sense of place. This milestone helps us sustain our connection to the land, which is central to the custom and culture of everyone who calls this place home. It’s an incredible achievement.”

A ribbon-cutting ceremony and celebration is scheduled for late spring of 2020. Stay tuned for upcoming details!

Project funders include:

  • USDA Forest Service Forest Legacy Program via the Oregon Department of Forestry
  • Individual donors
  • Oregon Parks and Recreation Department
  • Nez Perce Tribe
  • Collins Foundation
  • Oregon Community Foundation
  • Travel Oregon in partnership with Eastern Oregon Visitors Association
  • Conservation Alliance
  • Land Trust Alliance/Yarg Foundation/ACE Program
  • Rose E. Tucker Charitable Trust
  • Walker Family Foundation
  • Cycle Oregon

About the Wallowa Lake Moraines Partnership

The Partnership was formed in 2011 by Wallowa Land Trust, Wallowa Resources, Wallowa County and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department to secure the East Moraine as a natural landscape and a model for sustainable natural resource management. The goals of the Partnership are to: provide public access respectful of the landscape and its scenic beauty; protect open space for wildlife, recreation, and natural resources; and, maintain sustainable working landscapes of farms, forests and rangeland to contribute to the local economy and rural ways of life.

For those seeking more information on the next steps of the Project, call or visit:

  • Kathleen Ackley, Executive Director of Wallowa Land Trust, 116 S River St, Enterprise, OR 97828, (541) 426-2042;
  • Nils Christoffersen, Executive Director of Wallowa Resources, 401 NE First St, Suite A, Enterprise, OR 97828, (541) 426-8053;
  • Wallowa County Board of Commissioners, 101 S River St, Enterprise, OR 97828, (541) 426-4543;
  • Matt Rippee, Oregon Parks and Recreation District, (541) 962-6518
  • Amy Singh, Oregon Department of Forestry, (971) 718-1054
  • or ?nd useful information at morainecampaign.org.



Attached Media Files: Map of the East Moraine property showing multi-use trails. , Significant development pressure leads to successful campaign to secure unique glacial landscape off the shore of Wallowa Lakeís East Moraine in northeast Oregon. Photo by Leon Werdinger

More than 2,700 businesses registered for Corporate Activity Tax
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 01/22/20 9:51 AM

Salem, OR—More than 2,700 businesses have already registered for the Corporate Activity Tax through the Department of Revenue’s Revenue Online system.

The new law requires businesses with Oregon commercial activity in excess of $750,000 to register for the Corporate Activity Tax. Once they reach that threshold businesses must register within 30 days. Some businesses may have reached the threshold early in January, while others might not top that mark until much later in the year.

Businesses that realized $750,000 in Oregon commercial activity on Jan. 1 must register by Jan. 31. Those businesses that crossed the $750,000 threshold in the days that followed will need to register in early February.

The department opened registration Dec. 4 and many businesses didn’t want to wait.

“The number of registrants is a positive sign that the Department of Revenue’s outreach efforts have been beneficial,” said Nia Ray, director of the Oregon Department of Revenue. “The agency will continue to operate as a source of guidance for CAT taxpayers. We anticipate a steady increase in registrants as more Oregon businesses reach the threshold.” 

Some registered businesses have already expressed an interest in making automated payments now for their first quarter estimated tax liability for the CAT. Direct payments and payments by other methods are not yet available for the CAT. It is anticipated that direct and automated payment functions will be available through Revenue Online in early February well before the first quarter estimated tax payment deadline of April 30.

During the 2019 session the Legislative Revenue Office predicted approximately 40,000 businesses would have to pay taxes under the CAT, which went into effect Jan. 1.

To register, individuals doing business in Oregon will need their name, and their social security number or individual taxpayer identification number. Businesses will need their entity’s legal name and federal employer identification number.

Businesses and individuals will need:

  • Their mailing address;
  • The date they exceeded or expect to exceed $750,000 in Oregon commercial activity;
  • A valid email address or current Revenue Online login, and;
  • Their Business Activity Code (Refer to the current list of North American Industry Classification System codes found with their federal income tax return instructions.)

Taxpayers don’t need a Revenue Online account to register for the CAT. Those who have Revenue Online accounts can’t be logged in to register for the CAT. Instead, they should go directly to the CAT webpage and click on the “Register for the CAT” link on the right-hand side of the page.

More information about the Corporate Activity Tax is available on the Department of Revenue’s website at www.oregon.gov/dor. It includes a list of frequently asked questions and a form to sign-up for email updates on the CAT. Stakeholders can direct questions or comments about the CAT via email to cat.help.dor@oregon.gov or call 503-945-8005.

Visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments; call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish); 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon; or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), call 800-886-7204.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:Employment in Oregon December 2019 News Release
Oregon Employment Department - 01/22/20 10:00 AM

Oregon’s Unemployment Rate Drops to 3.7 Percent in December 

Oregon’s unemployment rate dropped to 3.7 percent in December, the lowest on comparable records dating back to 1976. The November unemployment rate was 3.9 percent.

“The latest estimates suggest there are fewer unemployed Oregonians now than at any point since 1976, when comparable records begin. That’s especially striking considering Oregon’s labor force is twice as large as it was 44 years ago,” said Nick Beleiciks, Systems and Economic Analysis manager at the Oregon Employment Department.

In December, many of Oregon’s workforce metrics set records, indicating an increasingly tight labor market. The number of people who were unemployed for less than half a year dropped to the lowest level in at least 18 years. The number of people who were unemployed due to a layoff also dropped to the lowest level in the past two decades. The broadest measure of labor underutilization, called “U-6”, came in at the lowest on records dating back nearly two decades. This measure includes the unemployed, plus those who want a full-time job but who were working part-time due to the economy.

Total nonfarm payroll employment grew by 800 jobs in December, following a gain of 3,800 jobs, as revised, in November. December gains were strongest in leisure and hospitality (+2,000 jobs). In addition, several industries added between 300 and 500 jobs. Meanwhile, two industries declined by more than 500 jobs: health care and social assistance (-900 jobs) and professional and business services (-1,600 jobs).

Oregon’s over-the-year job growth of 1.4 percent equaled the U.S. job growth of 1.4 percent. Most of Oregon’s major industries expanded by between 1 percent and 3 percent since December 2018. The fastest growing industries in the past 12 months were private educational services (+1,300 jobs, or 3.6%) and transportation, warehousing, and utilities (+2,100 jobs, or 3.0%). In that time only two industries cut jobs: retail trade (-700 jobs, or -0.3%) and mining and logging (-300 jobs, or -4.2%).

Next Press Releases

The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the December county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, January 28th, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for January on Tuesday, March 3rd. At the time of the March 3rd press release all of the statewide employment and unemployment data will be revised for at least the prior two years. This is a normal part of the annual processing and revisions to these data.

Notes:

All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted, except for Mr. Beleiciks’s quote which is referring to the not seasonally adjusted unemployed.

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources.

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this Official Oregon Series data unless noted otherwise. This month’s release incorporates the April, May, and June 2019 tax records data. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS.

The PDF version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-01/930/130903/employment_in_Oregon_--_January_2020_--_press_release.pdf

CCO Financial Reporting Advisory Group meets January 28
Oregon Health Authority - 01/23/20 3:39 PM

January 23, 2020

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

CCO Financial Reporting Advisory Group meets January 28

What: A public meeting of the SB 1041 CCO Financial Reporting Advisory Group.

When: January 28, 9-11 a.m.

Where: Five Oak Building, Suite 775, 421 SW Oak St, Portland. Members of the public can call in to listen by dialing 888-808-6929, access code 915042#.

Agenda: welcome, (roll-call, agenda review, minutes review); OHA update; Q&A review, Exhibit L update and next steps; National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) timeline and reporting requirement; formal reporting guidance; form updates; redaction process and procedures; wrap-up and next steps.

For more information on the meeting, visit the group’s meeting page.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jeff Scroggin at 541-999-6983, 711 TTY, ey.scroggin@dhsoha.state.or.us">jeffrey.scroggin@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Northwest Regional Newborn Bloodspot Screening Advisory Board meets February 4
Oregon Health Authority - 01/22/20 12:12 PM

January 22, 2020

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Northwest Regional Newborn Bloodspot Screening Advisory Board meets February 4

What: A public meeting of the Northwest Regional Newborn Bloodspot Screening (NWRNBS) Advisory Board.

Agenda: Welcome; recap and review of work; disorder review introduction; spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) review and discussion (open comment period to include SMA); X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) review and discussion (open comment period to include X-ALD); review draft process for recommending the removal of disorders from the screening panel; wrap-up and next steps.

When: Tuesday, Feb. 4, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Two 10-minute public comment periods are scheduled at about 10 a.m. and 12:45 p.m.; comments are limited to from one to three minutes depending on the number of people providing comments.

Where: Oregon State Public Health Laboratory, Suite 100, Shared Conference Room, 7202 NE Evergreen Parkway, Hillsboro. Please check in at the front desk and bring a photo ID. A conference call line is available by dialing 720-707-2699 (West Coast); 646-558-865 (East Coast), access code 753 960 1319.

Background: The Northwest Regional Newborn Bloodspot Screening Program screens newborns for endocrine, hemoglobin, cystic fibrosis, immunodeficiency and metabolic disorders that may not be clinically evident in the first few days or weeks of life. Detecting these conditions early allows the infant to be referred for diagnosis and appropriate treatment to prevent death or disability. For more information, visit healthoregon.org/nbs.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Christianne Biggs at 503-693-4172, 711 TTY or S.AdvisoryBoard@dhsoha.state.or.us">NBS.AdvisoryBoard@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group meets January 23
Oregon Health Authority - 01/22/20 12:00 PM

January 22, 2020

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program Contact: Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group meets January 23

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group.

When: January 23, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Five Oak Building, Suite 850, Mary Conference Room, 421 SW Oak St., Portland. Space is limited. The public also may join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/4851900018377321985 and conference line at 888-398-2342, participant code 5731389.

Agenda: Welcome and introductions; updates; 2020 measure calculations: continuous enrollment criteria, 2019 baseline calculations; adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at http://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Technical-Advisory-Group.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Advance Directive Adoption Committee meets February 3
Oregon Health Authority - 01/22/20 11:47 AM

January 22, 2020

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Advance Directive Adoption Committee meets February 3

What: A public meeting of the Advance Directive Adoption Committee.

Agenda: Revise first draft of Advance Directive form; finalize first draft of instructions and FAQs to accompany form.

When: Monday, Feb. 3, 2-5 p.m. The meeting is open to the public. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Conference Room 177, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland.

Background: The Advance Directive Adoption Committee provides guidance to the Oregon Health Authority on necessary revisions to Oregon’s Advance Directive form.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Kati Moseley at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY or ina.moseley@dhsoha.state.or.us">Katarina.moseley@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Win for Life win one of many life changes (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 01/23/20 10:00 AM
2020-01/4939/130941/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg
2020-01/4939/130941/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/4939/130941/thumb_OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg

January 23, 2020 - Salem, Ore. – It’s been a very busy 12 months for Todd Williams. The Portland man got married, a got a new car and purchased a home, and after all that, won the Oregon Lottery.

“Now I can pay for it all,” Williams said when he claimed the top Win for Life prize of $1,000 a week for life.

Earlier this month, five minutes before he had to leave for work, Williams realized he won the Oregon Lottery’s Win for Life game. Williams, a regular Win for Life player, noticed his tickets while getting ready for work, and used the Lottery’s mobile app to scan the tickets.

“I had three or four tickets and I saw the story of the guy who put his Megabucks ticket through the washing machine and decided to check my tickets before work,” Williams said. “When I saw the animations on the app that I had won, I just kept scanning.”

Williams said he wanted to see the animations the mobile app plays when you scan a winning ticket -- blue confetti, fireworks, balloons and many others. He also couldn’t believe he won.

“I was so shocked, I ended up calling work and telling them I would be late,” he said. “I worked my shift, but obviously I had other things on my mind.”

With all of his major life changes in the past year, all he could say was, “Great timing!”

Williams purchased the winning ticket at the Fred Meyer on NE Glisan, in Portland and officials with the company said they were excited to have sold the top prize and were proud to be an Oregon Lottery retailer.

Fred Meyer will receive a retailer selling bonus of $13,000 for producing the winning ticket.

During the 2018 fiscal year, more than $90.1 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education, Outdoor School, Veterans services and watershed enhancement in Multnomah County, where Williams lives and purchased the ticket. Since 1985, Oregon Lottery players have won more than $38 billion in prizes.

The Oregon Lottery reminds players to always sign the back of their Lottery tickets, regardless of the game. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 are advised to contact the Lottery office and schedule an appointment to claim their prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $12 billion for economic development, public education, Outdoor School, state parks, Veterans services and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-01/4939/130941/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg , 2020-01/4939/130941/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg

Oregon Lottery to Present Portland Buy2 with Giant Oregon's Game Megabucks Check
Oregon Lottery - 01/21/20 10:31 AM

The Portland store sold the winning $8.4 million ticket

WHO: Oregon Lottery officials

WHEN: Noon, Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2020

WHERE: Buy2, 7545 SW Oleson Road, Portland

WHAT: Oregon Lottery officials will present an over-sized display check to representatives of Buy2 for selling the winning Oregon’s Game Megabucks $8.4 million jackpot ticket. Lottery officials will also be handing out a limited number of free promotional Scratch-it tickets at the event.

BACKGROUND: Scott Moe of Portland purchased an Oregon’s Game Megabucks and promptly put the ticket in his wallet, and then accidently ran it through his washing machine. Several other lottery tickets in his wallet were destroyed, but the one worth $8.4 million, survived. Moe purchased the ticket at the Buy2 in Portland, and he said he was going to invest his winnings. Moe opted to take the bulk-sum payment of $4.2 million and after taxes took home $2.85 million.

During the 2018 fiscal year, more than $90.1 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education, Outdoor School, veteran services and watershed enhancement in Multnomah County, where Moe lives and purchased the ticket. Since 1985, Oregon Lottery players have won more than $38 billion in prizes.

VISUALS: Oregon Lottery officials will present an over-sized ceremonial check to representatives of the Buy2 and will also distribute a limited amount of free promotional Scratch-it tickets to patrons of the store.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $12 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

###


Cascadia Quake Anniversary Reminds Oregonians to be 2 Weeks Ready (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 01/23/20 10:04 AM
2020-01/3986/130942/Cascadia_Graphic.jpg
2020-01/3986/130942/Cascadia_Graphic.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/3986/130942/thumb_Cascadia_Graphic.jpg

Many people in the Pacific Northwest are aware of the dangers of the Cascadia Subduction Zone since wider attention has been drawn to the 600-mile fault that runs from northern California to British Columbia, about 70-100 miles off the Pacific coast. The last Cascadia earthquake and tsunami occurred in this fault on January 26, 1700, with an estimated 9.0 magnitude.

Although it’s been 320 years since the last Cascadia event, we know another one will happen and that it’s a good idea to be prepared. It’s not a matter of if, but rather when, the next Cascadia earthquake and tsunami will strike.

Althea Rizzo, geologic hazards program coordinator for Oregon’s Office of Emergency Management, says that knowing what to do, and how to be prepared for a large-scale earthquake, or any disaster, can help to calm fear and empower people to take action. That action, says Rizzo, includes putting together a family plan and emergency kits to be 2 Weeks Ready.

“Being prepared to be self-sufficient for two weeks is an achievable goal and you may be more prepared than you think,” says Rizzo. “See what you already have and you can get there over time.”

Leadership in Oregon is making it a priority to get better prepared for the next Cascadia event. On Monday January 27, Governor Kate Brown is scheduled to attend an event commemorating the anniversary of Cascadia, and a briefing on the seismic safety technology called ShakeAlert, where she will also officially proclaim January 26-February 1 as Cascadia Earthquake Preparedness Week.

“When the next large-scale Cascadia earthquake and tsunami strike the Pacific Northwest, Oregon will face the greatest challenge of our lifetimes,” said Governor Kate Brown. “To be ready to recover, we must be aware and prepared. In the aftermath of a large-scale natural disaster, Oregonians will have to count on each other in the community, in the workplace, and at home until first responders are able to reach them. I urge everyone to start conversations this week with their families, friends, and loved ones about how to be safe and as ready as possible, especially by having two weeks of ready supplies.”

Oregon Office of Emergency Management has many tools and resources to be prepared for a Cascadia quake and other disasters. Check out our website at www.oregon.gov/OEM. 




Attached Media Files: 2020-01/3986/130942/Cascadia_Graphic.jpg , 2020-01/3986/130942/2_Weeks_Ready.jpg

Historic cemeteries commission to meet February 7
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/23/20 3:16 PM

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries will meet by conference call at 1 p.m. on February 7. Its agenda includes discussion of the statewide historic cemetery clean-up day. The meeting is open to the public and the agenda includes an opportunity for public comment.

 

State law established the seven-member Commission to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and help obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances. For more information about commission activities, contact coordinator Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail at i.gill@oregon.gov">kuri.gill@oregon.gov. The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986?0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.

 

For call-in details and the agenda or more information about the commission, visit www.oregonheritage.org.


Grants available for Oregon museum projects
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/23/20 8:18 AM

The Oregon Heritage Commission is offering grants to qualified museums for collections, heritage tourism, and education and interpretation projects. Awards typically range between $2,000 and $10,000.

 

Museums may apply for a variety of projects. Collections projects may include cataloging, archival storage, disaster preparedness, and conservation. Heritage tourism projects may include museum marketing and promotions, enhancing visitor experience, and training for museum staff. Education and interpretation projects may include exhibits, online education, school classes, workshops, and camps. Museums may also partner with other organizations for projects that might be outside of the museum, but still meet the museum’s mission.

 

“This program funds a variety of museum projects. We hope to see both creative and practical proposals,” said Oregon Heritage Commission coordinator Beth Dehn. Past projects include interpretation at the Gilliam County Historical Society, High Desert Museum, and Oregon Jewish Museum; collections projects by Benton County Historical Society, Gresham Historical Society, Lane County Historical Society, Museum of Natural and Cultural History, Tillamook Forest Center, Oregon Electric Railway Historical Society, and Oregon State Hospital Museum of Mental Health; and facility projects by Eugene Debbs Potts Foundation, North Lincoln County Historical Society, and Oregon Daughters of the American Revolution.  

 

The online grant application is simple to use and includes plenty of support.  A free workshop specific to this grant and how to use the online grant application will be offered February 13, 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. It will be available in person or as a webinar. Recorded trainings and tips are also online.

 

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon’s heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are also nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The commission’s mission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity.

 

To learn more about museum grants, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at i.Gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.


Local Government Grant Program Advisory Committee seeks to fill vacancies
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/23/20 7:00 AM

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is calling for qualified candidates to apply for two vacant positions on the agency’s Local Government Grant Program Advisory Committee.

The open positions are a county representative for counties east of the Cascade Mountains, and a citizen representative for the public at large.

The Local Government Grant Program is funded by the Oregon Lottery and awards about $6 million annually to community outdoor recreation projects throughout the state. The ten-member Advisory Committee meets annually in June to review project applications and recommend funding recipients to the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission.

Committee members typically serve four-year terms. Time commitment for committee members includes the annual June meeting, held over three days in Salem, and reviewing the several grant applications leading up to the meeting. 

Qualified candidates for the vacant positions will have a demonstrated interest in outdoor recreation. To apply, contact Mark Cowan, OPRD grant program coordinator, and request an interest form: k.cowan@oregon.gov">mark.cowan@oregon.gov or 503-986-0591.

Learn more about the Local Government Grant Program and the Advisory Committee online:  oregon.gov/oprd/GRANTS/pages/local.aspx


Grants available for historic cemetery projects
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/22/20 11:27 AM

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries is offering grants for qualified historic cemeteries. The annual grants fund projects that preserve historic cemeteries. Projects funded in the past include marker repair workshops, fencing, signs, interpretive panels and brochures, security lighting, access improvements, records management, and more.

 

Awards typically range between $1,000 and $8,000, but have been higher. Anyone may apply for a grant. Projects must be related to historic cemeteries listed with the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries. Recent projects include marker repair and workshops in several cemeteries, installations of signs and informational kiosks, a preservation plan, and a fence replacement.

 

“Our goal is to preserve Oregon’s historic cemeteries and offer support throughout the application process,” said historic cemeteries program coordinator Kuri Gill. Past awards include projects in in Clackamas, Douglas, Jackson, Lane, Multnomah Sherman, Columbia, Union, and Umatilla Counties.

 

The online grant application is simple to use and includes plenty of support.  A free workshop specific to this grant and how to use the online grant application system will be offered February 24, 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. It will be available in person or as a webinar. Recorded trainings and tips are also online.

 

State law established the seven-member historic cemeteries commission to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and help obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances. To learn more about the grants or workshops visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at i.Gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.

 

###


Milo McIver State Park schedules 10-day closure for Vortex2020 music festival Aug. 22-23
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/21/20 2:53 PM

ESTACADA, Ore. – Milo McIver State Park will be closed Aug. 16-25 for the Vortex2020 music festival, set for Aug. 22-23. The 10-day closure will allow for event setup and cleanup.

Vortex2020 is a two-day music and cultural festival celebrating community, historic awareness and stewardship of public lands. It is being produced, planned and funded by a private nonprofit named Vortex2020. Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) will provide the venue and assist with logistics to prioritize safety for all attendees.

“We are working closely with event organizers to ensure the park’s natural and cultural resources are protected,” said OPRD District Manager Mark Stevenson. “All park rules and regulations will apply, and visitor safety will be our top priority.”

Event organizers are planning for 10,000 attendees, plus an additional 2,000 event staff.

“We are accustomed to a large number of visitors and fully equipped to host this event,” Stevenson said. “This park was designed with heavy use in mind.” On a busy summer Saturday, 4,000-5,000 visitors come to the park to recreate.

The festival is a tribute to the original Vortex I rock concert, held 50 years ago in August 1970. Gov. Tom McCall made history by partnering with anti-war demonstrators to organize a weeklong “biodegradable festival of life” at Milo McIver in an attempt to avoid a Vietnam War protest in downtown Portland during a scheduled visit of President Nixon.

Organizers view Vortex2020 as a distinct event that honors the original. The mission states: “Vortex2020 will not be a nostalgia project, but a fresh statement of our values: community, unity, kindness, historic awareness, and stewardship of our precious public lands.”

This approach aligns with OPRD’s role as manager of state parks on behalf of Oregonians and presenter of history connected to those parks.

“Vortex I was a significant event in Oregon’s history, and we share Vortex2020’s commitment to honoring that history,” said OPRD Deputy Director MG Devereux. “We are pleased to partner with Vortex2020 by providing the venue.”

OPRD is working with recreation partners and property owners to develop temporary recreation options nearby during the closure.

More information on OPRD’s role in Vortex2020 is here. Information about the event, lineup and tickets can be found at vortex2020.org.  


Courts/District Attorneys
Portland Man Sentenced to Federal Prison for Cyber Intrusion of Former Employer
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 01/23/20 10:55 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—On January 22, 2020, Kristopher Ives, 33, of Portland, was sentenced to 12 months and one day in federal prison and three years’ supervised release for illegally accessing the computer network and data of his former employer, Gearbox Studios, after being terminated.

According to court documents, in 2008, Ives began working as a computer programmer for Gearbox Studios, a Portland-based digital marketing agency. Ives eventually became Gearbox Studio’s lead programmer for server architecture and support, a position of trust with access to the computer networks and data of both the company and the company’s clients.

Between February and May 2015, after being terminated from his position, Ives illegally accessed Gearbox’s computers to steal and tamper with data. He used this data to attack Gearbox’s servers and various websites belonging to Gearbox customers. Ives deleted nearly 20,000 products from customer websites and changed prices for various items. Ives also stole names and credit card numbers from these Gearbox customer websites and threatened to release the information unless Gearbox made payment to a bitcoin address.

On October 18, 2019, Ives pleaded guilty to one count of fraud in connection with computers.

This case was investigated by the FBI’s Oregon Cyber Task Force and prosecuted by Quinn P. Harrington, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

Any public or private entity suspecting a cyber intrusion or attack should contact the FBI through the Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or by calling your nearest FBI office.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Vancouver Woman Sentenced to 14 Years in Federal Prison for Drug Trafficking in Two Cases
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 01/22/20 12:51 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Darlene Michelle Sturdevant, 61, of Vancouver, Washington, was sentenced today to 14 years in federal prison and five years’ supervised release for conspiring to possess with intent to distribute methamphetamine and heroin throughout the Portland Metropolitan Area, possessing with intent to distribute heroin, and committing an offense while on release.

According to court documents, in February 2018, Sturdevant was a passenger in a vehicle driven by Rene Elene Griffen Nunn, 60, also of Vancouver, when the two were stopped by the Clackamas County Interagency Task Force (CCITF) and U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). Investigators believed Sturdevant and Nunn were driving from Vancouver to Portland to distribute drugs.

A search of the vehicle revealed $155,949, a digital scale, and a notebook in Sturdevant’s backpack and approximately 87 grams of heroin in Nunn’s purse. Investigators returned to Vancouver and searched a residence shared by Sturdevant, Nunn, and others and found an additional 367 grams of heroin and a kilogram of methamphetamine.

Sturdevant was charged with drug trafficking and released pending trial. After pleading guilty in October 2018, DEA learned that Sturdevant was again selling drugs. On January 29, 2019, DEA agents executed a search warrant at Sturdevant’s new residence in Portland and seized approximately 558 grams of heroin, digital sales, a drug ledger, and $27,250.

During sentencing, U.S. District Court Judge Marco A. Hernandez ordered Sturdevant to forfeit $183,199 seized by investigators.

On October 31, 2019, Nunn pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute heroin. She will be sentenced on March 4, 2020.

This case was investigated by the DEA and CCITF and was prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Oregon Man Sentenced to Prison for Sex Trafficking Minors
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 01/21/20 2:13 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—An Oregon man was sentenced today to 149 months and 12 days in prison, to be followed by a lifetime of supervised release, for sex trafficking minors, Assistant Attorney General Brian A. Benczkowski of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division and U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams of the District of Oregon announced.

Darryl Gartley, 23, pleaded guilty on Aug. 12, 2019, to two counts of sex trafficking minors before U.S. District Court Judge Michael H. Simon of the District of Oregon, who sentenced him earlier today and remanded him to the custody of the U.S. Marshals Service.

According to facts admitted by the defendant during his guilty plea, in the beginning of October 2016, he moved from California to Portland, Oregon. Shortly after moving to Oregon, the defendant met two 15 year old minor females. In or around December 2016 through January 2017, the defendant posted advertisements on Backpage and Craigslist, offering the minors to engage in sexual acts in exchange for money. The advertisements included pictures of the minors both clothed and nude.

This is the defendant’s second conviction for sex trafficking minors. On May 22, 2017, the defendant was sentenced to seven years imprisonment on a state conviction for sex trafficking minors in California.

The investigation of the case was conducted by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations with assistance from the U.S. Marshals Service and the San Diego County Sheriff’s Department. This case is being prosecuted by Trial Attorney Kaylynn Foulon of the Criminal Division’s Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section (CEOS) and Assistant U.S. Attorney Ravi Sinha of the U.S. Attorney’s Office in the District of Oregon.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse, launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice. Led by U.S. Attorneys’ Offices and CEOS, Project Safe Childhood marshals federal, state and local resources to better locate, apprehend and prosecute individuals who exploit children via the Internet, as well as to identify and rescue victims. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.justice.gov/psc.

The year 2020 marks the 150th anniversary of the Department of Justice. Learn more about the history of our agency at www.Justice.gov/Celebrating150Years.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Banks & Credit Unions
It's Time to Open Everyone's Eyes to Credit Unions (Photo)
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 01/23/20 8:02 AM
Open Your Eyes Poster
Open Your Eyes Poster
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/4992/130933/thumb_In-Branch_Poster_11_x_8.5.png

A campaign urging consumers to consider credit unions as the best financial partner has launched throughout the Northwest.

SeaTac, Washington (Jan. 23, 2020) — Not-for-profit, cooperative credit unions operate to serve the people and businesses of Main Street, not shareholders on Wall Street. Those who join credit unions become member-owners, which means they get to keep their money where it belongs – in their wallets.

Consumers across the nation are choosing credit unions as their financial partners because they see the difference in service and savings. But for many, there are misconceptions about credit union membership. Some believe they can’t join because they don’t meet a membership requirement. Others fear it’s difficult to access funds while traveling, or that mobile banking, for example, won’t be available to them. All of these misconceptions couldn’t be further from the truth.

The credit union consumer consideration campaign, Open Your Eyes to a Credit Union®, dispels these myths. Earlier this month, the cooperative campaign – funded by Northwest credit unions – launched in the Northwest, joining 18 other regions across the country.

“Consumers are ready for a change,” said Danielle Sittu, Northwest Credit Union Association SVP of Marketing and Communications. “They want a financial partner that makes them the number-one priority. Anyone can join a credit union. In the Northwest, the credit union industry is robust and growing stronger every day.”

Consumers across Idaho, Oregon, and Washington are now beginning to see the campaign’s bold, black-and-white digital ads on Facebook and Instagram telling them about the credit union difference. They’re also watching high-energy videos on YouTube that urge them to take their money to the next level. The ads guide consumers to YourMoneyFurther.com, a website that educates them on the benefits of membership and helps them locate a nearby credit union.

As of last month, 9.2 million people have seen the ads on social media and 28.2 million have watched videos on YouTube, with more than 426 million total impressions. And the buzz is only growing.

“The interaction we’re seeing from across the United States is impressive,” Sittu said. “We’re proud of our strong Credit Union Movement here in the Northwest, where cooperative values are held in high regard. And we are so excited to share, with consumers, why and how credit unions are the better financial services choice.”

To learn more about the Open Your Eyes to a Credit Union® campaign, visit YourMoneyFurther.com, and check it out on Twitter and Facebook.

                                                                                    <END>

The Northwest Credit Union Association is the trade association representing more than 175 not-for-profit, cooperative credit unions in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, and their 7.3  million consumer members. Those members are served by a professional workforce of 18,700 professionals. According to an independent analysis by economists at ECONorthwest, Northwest credit unions drove a positive economic impact of $7.8 billion last year. For information on how to join a credit union, please visit: https://yourmoneyfurther.com

 




Attached Media Files: News Release , Open Your Eyes Poster

Coos Co. Schools
North Bend School District Public Meetings -- January, 2020 Updated
North Bend Sch. Dist. - 01/23/20 11:20 AM

Below are North Bend School District public meetings currently scheduled for January:
 

January 16, 2020

Regular School Board Meeting

North Bend City Council Chamber at 7:00 p.m.
835 California St., North Bend, OR

 

January 27, 2020

Board Meeting Work Session - with Executive Session

North Bend School District Office at 5:30 p.m.

1913 Meade St., North Bend, OR

A. The Board will meet in executive session to consult with counsel concerning the legal rights and 
duties of a public body with regard to current litigation or litigation likely to be filed, pursuant to ORS 192.660(2)(h)
B. The Board will meet in executive session to conduct deliberations with persons designated by the governing body to carry on labor negotiations, pursuant to ORS 192.660 (2)(d)
C. The Board will meet in executive session to review and evaluate the employment-related performance of the chief executive officer of any public body, a public officer, employee or staff member who does not request an open hearing, pursuant to ORS 192.660(2)(i)

 

The schedule is subject to change.
Please email cschreiber@nbend.k12.or.us or visit www.nbend.k12.or.us for agenda information.

 


Private & Charter Schools
Oak Hill School Debaters Qualify for Tournament of Champions
Oak Hill School - 01/23/20 11:09 AM

Oak Hill School Debaters Qualify for Tournament of Champions in Lexington, Kentucky

Two Oak Hill School (Eugene, OR) debaters have now qualified for the annual Tournament of Champions (TOC), which will be held at the University of Kentucky in mid-April 2020.

With a runner-up finish in Policy Debate at the Jean Ward Invitational (Lewis & Clark College, Portland) on January 19, Oak Hill School seniors Katrina Carrier and Daisy Hagen earned their second – and thus qualifying – bid to the TOC. They had earned their first bid at the St. George’s School debate tournament in Spokane, WA, in December 2019, where they finished as co-champions. 

The TOC is one of the two most prestigious end-of-season tournaments in high school debate, bringing together an elite field of competitors. To earn an invitation, debaters must earn two ‘bids’ by finishing at or near the top at any of several designated qualifying tournaments held across the country from early-September 2019 through early-March 2020.

For additional information and/or photos, contact Oak Hill School debate coach Keith Eddins at 541-543-5508 or keith.eddins@oakhillschool.net.   


Organizations & Associations
Partners in Science Celebrates 30 Years of Hands-On Training for High School Educators
M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust - 01/23/20 6:30 AM

January 23, 2020

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Partners in Science Celebrates 30 Years of Hands-On Training for High School Educators

Program marks three decades of service, honors Salem-Keizer teacher

 

Vancouver, WA – The M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust celebrated the 30th anniversary of Partners in Science this week at the professional development program’s annual conference.

 

Partners in Science is a unique opportunity for high school science educators from around the Pacific Northwest to work one-on-one with a mentor conducting cutting-edge science research in an academic lab, a lab associated with another nonprofit institution or a national lab. Participants spend two summers in this environment, bringing their experiences back to their classrooms during the school year to help facilitate hands-on research to inspire and engage students from all backgrounds.

 

“Our benefactor, Jack Murdock, believed strongly in the power of hands-on research to inspire learning and spark innovation, particularly in the areas of STEM subjects that are so critical in our modern world,” said Dr. Moses Lee, senior program director for scientific research and enrichment programs, M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust. “We hear from educators regularly that this type of professional development opportunity is incredibly valuable in helping grow and enrich their teaching experience. We are grateful to play a small role in supporting educators in all communities across the Pacific Northwest.”

 

Partners in Science

Since it was founded in 1990, nearly 600 teachers from public and private high schools in Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington have had the opportunity to grow their professional experience by collaborating on science research with researcher mentors through the Partners in Science program. Nearly 340 educators have returned for an additional session and continued mentorship.

 

Participation in the two-year program is funded entirely through a Murdock Trust grant. In addition to the two-year mentorship program, participants also attend an annual conference, where they have the opportunity to present their work to their peers. Following the original grant, partners can apply for a two-year supplemental grant to translate their research experiences back to their classroom; thus, directly transforming their habits of teaching and student learning.

 

“Science can’t just be taught with a text book and lecture notes. Teachers and students need to have an opportunity to see how the work comes to life in real-world scenarios,” said Kim Newman, program director, M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust. Newman oversees the Partners in Science program and was a former participant when she was a biology and technology teacher at Camas High School. She notes that the impact of Partners in Science can be felt both by students and by the participants themselves.

 

“Many of our educators report feeling an increased confidence in their teaching after completing the program,” Newman added. “But we also see it in the classroom. Many Partners alumni transition from a ‘recipe’ style of lesson planning—where students are told to follow specific steps that will lead to a specific result—to an inquiry- based lesson plan, where students are given an opportunity to experiment with no defined path and the opportunity to hypothesize and discover the outcome themselves.”

 

Honoring Excellence

 

As part of the Partners in Science 30-year anniversary, the Murdock Trust introduced the new Murdock Exemplary Teacher-Researcher Award (META), honoring outstanding service by a Partners participant. This year’s winner, Dr. Jason Niedermeyer, is a biology teacher at South Salem High School and adjunct professor at Western Oregon University. 

 

“Dr. Niedermeyer is the definition of what the Partners in Science program is about as he is regularly praised by faculty and students for finding ways to bring science to life and get his students excited about research,” said Newman. “We are so pleased we can honor his outstanding work at this year’s conference and that we will be able to recognize more educators at future conferences.”

 

META includes an $8,000 cash award that is shared between the recipient and their school to support future, hands-on research opportunities.

 

For more information on the Partners in Science Program, please visit our website murdocktrust.org.

 

 

About M. J. Murdock Charitable Trust

The Murdock Trust, created by the will of the late Melvin J. (Jack) Murdock, provides grants to organizations in five states of the Pacific Northwest—Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington—that seek to strengthen the region’s educational, spiritual and cultural base in creative and sustainable ways. Since its inception in 1975, the Trust has awarded more than 6,800 grants totaling more than $1 billion. For more information, find the Murdock Trust on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, YouTube and on our website.

###


Alaska Airlines Keeps Oregon Private Colleges Flying in 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges & Universities - 01/22/20 10:59 AM
2020-01/4829/130906/Alaska_Logo_medium.jpg
2020-01/4829/130906/Alaska_Logo_medium.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/4829/130906/thumb_Alaska_Logo_medium.jpg

Since 1986, Alaska Airlines has provided an annual in-kind contribution of round trip, coach class flight vouchers for use by member colleges of the Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges & Universities (“The Alliance”). For 2020, Alaska Airlines officials generously renewed their support, contributing 75 round trip, systemwide vouchers for use by the colleges to recruit students, meet with donors, send representatives to academic conferences and events, and other college serving purposes. College representatives may use vouchers on select Alaska Airlines, SkyWest Airlines, and PenAir flights. The cumulative value of Alaska Airlines’ in-kind contributions totals over $2 million and more than 2,500 tickets have been used over the course of the partnership.

“On behalf of the Alliance Board of Trustees, we are grateful for all that Alaska Airlines has done for The Alliance and the member colleges and universities over the course of 35 years,” says Alliance Interim President Brent wilder. “These ticket vouchers provide tangible, direct budget relieving support for the Alliance member colleges and universities in their efforts to bring new, gifted students to the region, engage with alumni and friends across the country, and provide professional development to their administrators and staff.”

The following institutions have been granted flight vouchers for use in 2020: Concordia University-Portland, Corban University, George Fox University, Lewis & Clark College, Linfield College, Northwest Christian University, Pacific University, Reed College, University of Portland, Warner Pacific University, and Willamette University.

To learn more about establishing an partnership like that of Alaska Airlines with The Alliance, please contact Brent Wilder at 503.342.0004 or rent@oaicu.org">brent@oaicu.org.

The Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges and Universities (“The Alliance”) is comprised of 16 private, nonprofit, independent colleges and universities. In total, these institutions educate 34,289 students, delivering high-quality experiential learning with high-impact teaching strategies. Earned undergraduate and graduate degrees total 10,446. The Alliance is the collective voice of private education in public policy advocacy. We are at the intersection of business and philanthropy, creating innovative programs and scholarships that build an advanced and educated workforce for Oregon. For more information, visit www.oaicu.org.




Attached Media Files: 2020-01/4829/130906/Alaska_Logo_medium.jpg

Oregon's Barry Bushue honored with Farm Bureau Founders Award (Photo)
Oregon Farm Bureau - 01/20/20 8:09 AM
Former OFB President Barry Bushue (center) is joined on stage at the AFBF Convention by (from left) AFBF Vice President Scott VanderWal, Helen Bushue, OFB President Barb Iverson, former OFB President Sharon Waterman, and Kentucky Farm Bureau President Mar
Former OFB President Barry Bushue (center) is joined on stage at the AFBF Convention by (from left) AFBF Vice President Scott VanderWal, Helen Bushue, OFB President Barb Iverson, former OFB President Sharon Waterman, and Kentucky Farm Bureau President Mar
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/5507/130861/thumb_barrybushue2.jpg

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 20, 2020

Oregon’s Barry Bushue honored with Farm Bureau Founders Award

The American Farm Bureau Federation presented one of its highest honors, the Farm Bureau Founders Award, to Oregon’s Barry Bushue during AFBF’s 101st Annual Convention in Austin.

The Farm Bureau Founders Award was established in January 2017 to recognize exemplary leadership, service or contributions to Farm Bureau by officers or employees of AFBF and state Farm Bureau organizations.

Barry Bushue served as the vice-president of AFBF from 2008-2016 and is known as a tireless worker, mentor and fundraiser. He served as the Oregon Farm Bureau President from 1999-2018 and on the AFBF Board of Directors, Executive Committee, Trade Advisory Committee and the Vision for Action Task Force. He is a firm believer that farmers and ranchers should get involved in education and the policy making process.

Bushue says, “Activism needs to be a part of your business plan. You budget for fertilizer, you budget for your seed, you budget for maintenance, you budget for all these things you do, new tractors, whatever it is you need. But, if you don’t have a line item that somehow represents an activist piece of what it is you do and show your passion for agriculture, then I think you are missing something on your farm.”

Bushue and his wife, Helen, invite members of the public to their family farm outside Portland, Oregon, to pick various fruits, vegetables, and a fall favorite, pumpkins. Bushue says opening his farm to the public comes with its challenges but he has developed a customer base that recognizes the value of agriculture.

Sharon Waterman, also a former president of the Oregon Farm Bureau, talks about Bushue’s affection for Farm Bureau, “Barry talks about the Farm Bureau family and what we can do as a Farm Bureau family because if we stand together for agriculture, we can move forward.”

Bushue says his father told him if he was going to farm smart, he needed to be part of Farm Bureau, adding, “He said, ‘We’re going to go to the [Farm Bureau] meeting tonight, and you’re going with me. I embraced it and I loved it. I’ve always had a passion for it, I think I inherited that, it’s probably genetics in our family.”

Barry Bushue was nominated by the Oregon Farm Bureau. A national Farm Bureau committee selected each of the winners.

VIDEO: See a YouTube video about Barry Bushue here: https://oregonfb.org/barryfoundersaward/

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

Barrybushue: Former Oregon Farm Bureau President Barry Bushue also served as the vice-president of AFBF from 2008-2016. He and his wife, Helen, invite members of the public to their family farm outside Portland to pick various fruits, vegetables, and a fall favorite, pumpkins.

Barrybushue1: Oregon’s Barry Bushue addressing a crowd of 6,000 Farm Bureau members after receiving the 2020 Founders Award at the AFBF 101st Annual Convention in Austin.

Barrybushue2: Former OFB President Barry Bushue (center) is joined on stage at the AFBF Convention by (from left) AFBF Vice President Scott VanderWal, Helen Bushue, OFB President Barb Iverson, former OFB President Sharon Waterman, and Kentucky Farm Bureau President Mark Haney.

###

Note to Editors: “Farm Bureau” is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit, general farm organization representing the interests of farming and ranching families in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon at the county level in 1919 and the state level in 1932, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties.

Oregon Farm Bureau President Barb Iverson, elected on Dec. 12, 2019, comes from a multigenerational family farm from Woodburn, raising industrial hemp, grass seed, squash, vetch seed, hazelnuts, wine and table grapes, and operating the Wooden Shoe Tulip Festival, which attracts over 160,000 visitors each year. She is OFB’s 17th president.




Attached Media Files: Former OFB President Barry Bushue (center) is joined on stage at the AFBF Convention by (from left) AFBF Vice President Scott VanderWal, Helen Bushue, OFB President Barb Iverson, former OFB President Sharon Waterman, and Kentucky Farm Bureau President Mar , Oregonís Barry Bushue addressing a crowd of 6,000 Farm Bureau members after receiving the 2020 Founders Award at the AFBF 101st Annual Convention in Austin. , Former Oregon Farm Bureau President Barry Bushue also served as the vice-president of AFBF from 2008-2016. He and his wife, Helen, invite members of the public to their family farm outside Portland to pick various fruits, vegetables, and a fall favorite,