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Eugene/Spring/Rose/Alb/Corv News Releases for Tue. Jun. 30 - 2:20 pm
06/30/15
State announces workshops to help Oregon businesses reach global markets
Business Oregon - 06/30/15
Business Oregon and its partners will host six workshops as part of a statewide initiative to help small- and medium-sized businesses continue reaching international customers and suppliers.

The summer trade workshops are one part of an initiative approved by Governor Kate Brown in April to identify reliable, low-cost shipping options for businesses affected by the loss of Hanjin and Hapag-Lloyd container service at the Port of Portland's Terminal 6.

The workshops with exporters and importers will help to identify the challenges and opportunities they face and will lead to specific recommendations to the 2016 Legislature for freight transportation projects.

The initiative is co-sponsored by the Port of Portland, the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

The first of a series of workshops will be held in Portland on Friday, July 24. Other meetings are planned for Redmond, Hermiston, Ontario, Albany and Medford. Visit the Keep Oregon Trade Moving Web site for more details.

Why global trade matters to Oregonians: Global trade supports farms, forests and manufacturers from Brookings to Baker City and Astoria to Boardman. Trade supports nearly 500,000 jobs in Oregon. Nearly 90 percent of the state's exporters are small- or medium-sized companies, and imports into Oregon deliver supplies to our manufacturing plants and goods to our corner stores. For more, check out our trade fact sheet.

About container service at the Port of Portland: The Port of Portland continues to work to build container service to Terminal 6. For more information, visit the Port of Portland's Terminal 6 overview.

Export promotion: Business Oregon's global trade team continues to help small businesses break into new global markets. With $381,000 in export grants in fiscal year 2014, we helped 108 businesses produce $6 million in immediate sales. Learn more.
Salem Hospital Foundation scholarship program reaches $2.5M milestone
Salem Health - 06/30/15
The Salem Hospital Foundation announced that 84 students in medical or medically related field will receive a collage scholarship for the 2015 to 2016 academic year. A total of $167,500 will be awarded to students pursuing degrees in a variety of medical programs--putting the foundation's total scholarship funding over the $2.5 million mark since it began in 1968.

Several named scholarships were awarded in honor or memory of local community members--including the Rollin Haag nursing scholarship, the Elmera "Tiny" Richardson nursing scholarship, the Sewell Family scholarship, and the Grayce & Glola Sigg nursing scholarship. In addition, the Salem Self-Help Nursing Scholarship was awarded through the Salem Foundation.

Recipients for the 2015 to 2016 school year are:

Albany: Sandra Moreno

Amity: Brooke Barnes; Daniela Juarez and Arley Semon

Aumsville: Shelby Dewar

Canby: Bailey Woodin

Dallas: Angie Bishop; Jamie Broussard; Leslie Classen; Christina Feil; Brenda Hess; Shaymarie Parker and Kristi Tichenor

Gates: Julie Minton

Hillsboro: Nathan Hoover

Independence: Sheali Bowker; Kirsten Fertig; Mayra Garcia-Murillo and Ana Ramirez Falcon

Keizer: Melissa Ball; Rachel Hittner; Jamie Lindsey; Sharon Marsoun; Rebekkah Tipton and Catherine Traeger

Lincoln City: Lindsay Hadfield

Madras: Moriah Pugh

Monmouth: Shannon Carey; Katie Groff and Sarah Solvedt

Portland: Amber Banks and Bethany Sappington

Salem: Paige Baldwin; Sara Banning; Nicole Blanco-Mills; Mike Bobko; Heather Boone; Bianney Cano; Melanie Clearwater; Jill Cohen; Jon Deming; Joel Donley; Hillary Drake; Nathanael Eisenhut; Rebecca Elmer; Patricia Elmore; Grant Fahey; Stephanie Hamel; Melody Hankins; Carol Hannibal; Anna Hiebert; Daryn Jones; Erin Jones; Stephanie Koyama; Hannah Kuizenga; Kyle Lenz; Benjamin Long; Teresa McCarrell; Keith McMillin; Lindsey McQuillan; Pierce Moon; Ronda Murdock; Emma O'Neal; Michael Polacek; Gerri Pratt; Amanda Reynolds; Stephanie Rodriguez; Michelle Shidler; Michelle Slattum; Zachary Smith; Sarah Tomscha; Madison Van Dorp; Laura Vogt; Lan Vu and Annette Whitney

Sheridan: Kaci Jones; Andy Walker and Kirsten Walker

Silverton: Rebekah Kaufman; Nduta Nyoro-Cayton; Brian Reif and Shasta Stocker

Stayton: Brooke Jordan

Turner: Rachel Hickman

The Salem Hospital Foundation was established in 1968 by a group of Salem citizens interested in advancing healthcare through donations. It is a charitable, tax-exempt organization that supports medical and medically related projects of Salem Hospital. The Foundation's 15 volunteer directors help raise funds and manage the resources of the Foundation, while distributing the funds according to the wishes of those who have given. Visit us at salemhealth.org/about/foundation and "Like" us on facebook.com/salemhospitalfoundation.
Oregon Dept. of Forestry fire update - June 30, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/30/15
This is an Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) daily fire update for Tuesday, June 30, 2015.

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
The lightning-caused Jones Canyon Fire is 500 to 600 acres, burning in the Fossil Subunit of the Central Oregon District, 12 miles NE of Monument. The fire is active and uncontained.

Harper Creek Complex - The complex includes three fires: The largest is the Harper Creek Fire at 320 acres, located four miles south of Mt. Vernon. The Hog Creek Fire is 96 acres, located six miles east of Long Creek. The Luce Creek Fire is 25 acres, located three miles SW of John Day. All are lightning caused and burning in the John Day Unit of the Central Oregon District. Firefighters expect to fully contain the two smaller fires by the end of shift today. The largest fire is 50 percent contained. ODF is gradually releasing firefighting resources from the Harper Creek Complex and reassigning them to the Jones Canyon Fire.

The lightning-caused, 15-acre Happy Ridge Fire reported June 29 burning in the Central Oregon District has been contained and is in mop-up. Air support played a key role in catching the fire at relatively small size.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS
The lightning-caused Sugarloaf Fire experienced some growth yesterday and is approximately 5,000 acres. It is burning in the Prineville BLM District north of Dayville and is 20 percent contained. ODF's Incident Management Team 1 is in command of the suppression operation.

The 14,600-acre Jaca Reservoir Fire burning 87 miles south of Vale on Bureau of Land Management lands is 40 percent contained. Cause is under investigation. More info: http://gacc.nifc.gov/nwcc/information/fire_info.aspx

The 248-acre Jones Canyon Fire burning 20 miles SW of Ukiah on is uncontained. Cause is under investigation. More info: http://gacc.nifc.gov/nwcc/information/fire_info.aspx

The 639-acre Little Basin Fire burning in the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area, Wallowa-Whitman Nat'l Forest, is 97 percent contained. Cause is under investigation. More info: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4290/

The lightning-caused, 5,345-acre Buckskin Fire burning on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest is 60 percent contained. More info: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4286/

The lightning-caused, 320-acre Bunker Hill Complex burning 30 miles SE of Oakridge on the Willamette National Forest is 30 percent contained. More info: http://gacc.nifc.gov/nwcc/information/fire_info.aspx

The lightning-caused, 4,000-acre Leslie Gulch Fire burning 45 miles south of Vale on Bureau of Land Management lands is uncontained. More info: http://gacc.nifc.gov/nwcc/information/fire_info.aspx

The lightning-caused, 300-acre Candy Kid Fire burning on Bureau of Land Management lands eight miles north of Drewsy is uncontained. More info: http://gacc.nifc.gov/nwcc/information/fire_info.aspx

The lightning-caused, 300-acre OR-OCH-000297 Fire burning 11 miles south of Dayville on National Forest lands is uncontained. More info: http://gacc.nifc.gov/nwcc/information/fire_info.aspx
Workplace safety training grants available
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 06/30/15
(Salem) - Starting July 1, Oregon OSHA will accept applications for the development of innovative workplace safety and health training programs. Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, encourages unique projects such as mobile apps, videos, or online educational games to engage workers.

The training grants will focus on programs that target a high hazard Oregon industry (construction, agriculture, young workers, etc.) or a specific work process to reduce or eliminate hazards. Any labor consortium, employer consortium, association, educational institution affiliated with a labor group, or other nonprofit organization may apply. Applicants may apply for up to $40,000 per grant project without a requirement for any matching dollars or in-kind contributions. Grant applications are due Oct. 9, 2015.

Some examples of past grant projects include:
A bilingual training program for hazard identification
A video on Christmas tree harvest safety
An online training program to help workers comply with electrical standards
An educational program for prevention of ergonomic-related injuries for nurses

The Oregon State Legislature established the grant program in 1990. Employers cannot use the program to fund training projects for their employees.

Materials produced by grant recipients become the property of Oregon OSHA. They are housed in the Oregon OSHA Resource Center and are available to the public for checkout from the library. Some programs are also available online.

Grant application information is available at http://www.orosha.org/grant-programs.html. Contact Teri Watson at 503-947-7406 or teri.a.watson@oregon.gov for more information.

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About Oregon OSHA:
Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, go to www.orosha.org.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter at www.twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on insurance, mortgages, investments, workplace safety, and more.
06/29/15
Red Cross Responds to Home Fires in Umatilla County and Coos County
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 06/29/15
Red Cross disaster action team volunteers covered two corners of the state today, responding to home fires in Pendleton in northeast Oregon, and in Charlston on the southern Oregon coast.

The single-family fire in Pendleton took place in the 600 block of SE 6th Street, and affected two adults and two children. Red Cross provided food and clothing.

The home fire in Charlston, in Coos County, occurred yesterday in teh 90000 block of Wayfarer Lane. Red Cross volunteers met today with the affected family which included three adults and a child. Red Cross provided clothing, shoes and lodging. Two pets were lost in this fire.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in communities across Oregon and southwest Washington. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 to schedule an appointment.

Know what to do before, during and after a home fire. Take a few moments to review your family's exit plan should there be a fire in your home. This information, and more, is available at www.redcross.org or in a free Prepare! Resource Guide published by the American Red Cross Cascades Region. The guide can be downloaded at http://rdcrss.org/1zq8XW6.
Benton County SHERIFF'S OFFICE SPONSORS DRUG TAKE-BACK Event Results (Photo)
Benton Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/29/15
2015-06/1505/85788/DSC_0510.JPG
2015-06/1505/85788/DSC_0510.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-06/1505/85788/thumb_DSC_0510.JPG
June 29, 2015, BENTON COUNTY, OR - Benton Co

Nearly 300 pounds of expired and unwanted medications were collected Saturday by the Benton County Sheriff's Office. The goal of the event, which was held at the Benton County Fairgrounds, was to keep unused prescription drugs from being misused and to help keep them out of the water supply.

Approximately 166 vehicles came through the drop site where prescription pills and over-the-counter medications were collected. The collected medications were maintained in law enforcement custody until they were incinerated.

"We couldn't have offered this event without the support of our Sheriff's Office volunteers," said Sheriff Scott Jackson. "Our certified Reserve Deputies provided law enforcement security for the event and were supported by volunteers from our Search and Rescue Units and our Auxiliary Team."

This is the sixth year the Benton County Sheriff's Office has offered this service. Participation was down somewhat from the past two years most likely due to the record-high temperatures.

A number of national studies indicate that the intentional abuse of prescription drugs, particularly among teens, is a continuing concern. Additionally, disposing of medications by flushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash is discouraged because it can lead to contamination of our drinking water.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1505/85788/DSC_0510.JPG
Oregon Dept of Forestry Fire Update for Monday, June 29, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/29/15
Due to exceptionally dry landscape and drought conditions, hot weather and forecasted lightning, the risk of extreme fire activity remained high through the weekend and into this coming week. The Oregon Department of Forestry, forestland owners and agency partners are managing fire conditions usually experienced in late July or early August.

A high pressure system is forecast for the southern Oregon area, with high temps, dry weather and slight chance of thunderstorms. The National Weather Service is calling for a hot and dry air mass to settle back into the Willamette Valley and Portland areas through the end of the work week; a Red Flag warning for thunderstorms is in effect for NE Oregon.

>FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
The 700-acre lightning-caused Harper Complex Fire is burning in timber, brush and grass approximately 8 miles southwest of John Day. Approximately 10 residents are threatened. This complex includes the lightning-caused Hog Creek Fire, 30 acres, and the 25-acre Luce Creek Fire. A local Type 3 Team has been assigned to the Harper Complex.

The Jones Canyon Fire is approximately 500 acres and burning approximately 12 miles NE of Monument in grass, brush and juniper in the old Monument Complex. Resources assigned: 4 engines, 1 crew, 1 dozer and 1 helo have been assigned to this fire.

The Sugar Loaf Fire was reported Saturday burning in grass and timber in central Oregon on BLM land 9 miles north of Dayville. One outbuilding has been destroyed and 12 residences threatened. Fire size is estimated at 4,095 acres. ODF Team 1 (Buckman) is assigned to this fire. Evacuations are being coordinated by the Grant County Sheriff's Office.

In addition to the Sugarloaf fire, firefighters have been working on the 250-acre Buck Creek Fire located 18 miles northeast of Hampton, Oregon, which is now at 90 percent containment, and the 30-acre Bear Creek Fire located 7 miles south of Prineville Reservoir, which is now 100 percent contained.

The Smith Hollow Fire is burning in grass and brush near Fossil; this 21-acre fire is 100 percent lined. Cause is under investigation.

As the 4th of July holiday approaches, fire officials also want to remind everyone that possession or use of fireworks on private, state, Forest Service and BLM land is illegal.


>FIRES ON OTHER LANDS
Jaca Reservoir Fire (USDI / BLM) is located 87 miles south of Vale, Oregon, is estimated at 1,500 acres and is burning in brush and grass.
The Leslie Gulch Fire (USDI / BLM) is a lightning-caused fire burning in grass and brush approximately 45 miles south of Vale.

The lightning-caused Bunker Hill Fire (USFS) reported June 26 burning in timber 30 miles SE of Oakridge, OR., is 167 acres and 10 percent contained. More info available at: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4328/http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4328/

The lightning-caused Buckskin Fire (USFS) reported June 11 burning 10 miles SW of Cave Junction on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest is 5,345 acres and 60 percent contained. More info available at: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4286/

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015, through today:
Lightning-caused fires: 74 fires burned 114 acres
Human-caused fires: 233 fires burned 531 acres
Total: 313 fires burned 645 acres

10-year average (January 1 through the present date in the year):
Lightning-caused fires: 25 fires burned 25 acres
Human-caused fires: 148 fires burned 1,306 acres
Total: 172 fires burned 1,331 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.
Recent fires over the weekend are not yet included in these figures.

When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
The Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website /http://www.nwccweb.us/ or
The national Incident Information System site / http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/ .

For information on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands view:
the department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
the Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.
Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici To Present Civil Air Patrol Billy Mitchell Award
Oregon Civil Air Patrol - 06/29/15
Tualatin High School junior Ellie Parker will be presented the Civil Air Patrol's prestigious Billy Mitchell award by Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici this Thursday, July 2, 10:00 - 10:30
at the Congresswoman's Beaverton office at 12725 SW Millikan Way, Suite 220, Beaverton. This award will recognize cadet Parkers' completion of an enlisted training program and promotion as a commissioned officer in the Civil Air Patrol with the rank of Second Lieutenant.
Cadet Parker joined the Aurora Composite Squadron of the Oregon Wing CAP in February of 2013 after determining that she wanted to enter the Air Force Academy and as a step towards her goal of obtaining a private pilot's license. Cadet Parker completed her solo flight last year and is on track obtain her license later this summer.

In addition to the Civil Air Patrol, cadet Parker is active in other areas such as the Youth Advisory Council, National Honor Society, National Society of High School Scholars and varsity track. Maintaining a 4.0 GPA at Tualatin High School, cadet Parker is also taking a full International Baccalaureate course load and will be formally applying to the Air Force academy.
The General Billy Mitchell Award is earned by Civil Air Patrol cadets who have successfully completed the second phase of the cadet program. It marks the end of the enlisted phase of the cadet program; cadets are promoted to Cadet Second Lieutenants upon receipt and, by extension, Cadet Officers. The award is given in honor of Maj Gen William "Billy" Mitchell, former Deputy Chief of the Army Air Service and military aviation visionary.

In order to earn this award, cadets must pass a series of leadership, aerospace and physical fitness tests and attend character development training for each achievement from Cadet Airman Basic through Cadet Chief Master Sergeant. In addition, cadets must attend a military-style encampment before this award is made, and have maintained active membership in the Civil Air Patrol for at least 18 months since joining. Only 15% of Civil Air Patrol cadets achieve the Mitchell Award.

Civil Air Patrol, the official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force, is a nonprofit organization with 58,000 members nationwide, operating a fleet of 550 aircraft. CAP, in its Air Force auxiliary role, performs about 85 percent of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center and is credited by the AFRCC with saving an average of 70 lives annually. Its unpaid professionals also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies. The members play a leading role in aerospace education and serve as mentors to more than 24,000 young people currently participating in the CAP cadet programs. Performing missions for America for the past 73 years, CAP received the Congressional Gold Medal in 2014 in honor of the heroic efforts of its World War II veterans. CAP also participates in Wreaths Across America, an initiative to remember, honor and teach about the sacrifices of U.S. military veterans. Visit www.capvolunteernow.com for more information.
Salem Fire Promotes Three and Graduates Five (Photo)
Salem Fire Dept. - 06/29/15
Recruit Graduates
Recruit Graduates
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-06/1061/85776/thumb_2015_SFD_Recruit_Class.jpg
The Salem Fire Department recognized five new firefighter/paramedics on their successful completion of the department's firefighter academy, along with three new promotions at a ceremony held June 26 at the fire training facility. Also recognized during the ceremony were three fire department members who had received promotions earlier this year. The celebration ceremony included department members, family, and friends of the newly promoted officers and new firefighter/paramedics.

Fire Chief Michael Niblock began the ceremony by recognizing the recent promotions of Battalion Chiefs Ty Gunesch and Kyle Amsberry along with Apparatus Operator/Engineer Brandon Hoff, who all earned promotions earlier this year.

Chief Niblock then introduced members of the department who were selected for promotions, which were the result of comprehensive promotional examinations conducted by the department earlier this year.

Robin Chitwood was promoted to the rank of deputy chief effective June 15, 2015. Deputy Chief Chitwood was hired by the Salem Fire Department in October of 1991 and has served in positions as firefighter/paramedic, EMS coordinator, apparatus operator/engineer, captain, and battalion chief. Additionally he has served on the rope rescue and confined space team, hazardous materials team, and was a Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) medic. Deputy Chief Chitwood is responsible for managing the Training & EMS Division of the department, a role that he has held in an interim capacity since January of 2015.

Jeff Zaluskey was promoted to the rank of captain effective May 29, 2015 and is assigned to B-Shift. Captain Zaluskey was hired by the Salem Fire Department in March of 1998 and has served in positions as firefighter/paramedic and apparatus operator/engineer. He is a current member on the regional hazardous materials team, a position he has held since 2000 and also was a SWAT medic for 6 years. Additionally, he has served as a medic evaluator and a member of the department's accountability committee.

Jeremy Tinney was promoted to the rank of captain effective June 23, 2015 and is assigned to A-Shift. Captain Tinney was hired by the Salem Fire Department in April of 2001 and previously served as a firefighter/paramedic. He is a current member on the department's technical rescue team and has served as a medic evaluator and a member of the department's protective clothing committee.

Chief Niblock recognized five new firefighter/paramedics on their successful completion of the department's intensive 14-week firefighter academy, which included a combination of classroom, hands-on, and on-the-job training. The graduates include
Nick Bradley, Bryce Glovatsky, Justin Gregory, Lucas Rathburn, and Cody Welling. The new firefighters are now assigned to their new shift assignments to continue their year-long probationary period.

The Salem Fire Department serves a population of 188,000 residents, responding to nearly 20,000 calls to 9-1-1 each year.

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Attached Media Files: Recruit Graduates , Captain Tinney , Captain Zaluskey , DC Chitwood
Multiple Vehicle Crash On HWY 38 Takes Life Of California Woman - Douglas County
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/29/15
On June 28, 2015 at about 3:00PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a multiple vehicle crash on HWY 38 near milepost 9 (east of Reedsport).

According to Sergeant Josh Young, a 2009 Nissan Cube, operated by Sarah E WRIGHT, age 35, of Palm Springs, CA, was traveling westbound on HWY 38 when it crossed the centerline. The Nissan struck an eastbound 2004 Dodge Ram Pickup towing a fifth wheel recreational vehicle and then a 2003 Honda Pilot which had been following the Dodge. The Nissan came to a rest on it's roof.

WRIGHT and her passenger, Evan T FASS, age 28, of Palm Springs, CA, were transported to Bay Area Hospital in Coos Bay. The operator of the Honda, Catherine M PATTERSON, age 54, of Portland, and her passenger, Freda G MCCREA, age 77, of Portland were also transported to Bay Area Hospital.

WRIGHT was pronounced deceased upon her arrival at the hospital. The level of injuries for the others transported is unknown at this time.

The operator of the DODGE pickup, Dan W AGEE, age 39, and his passengers; Joann M AGEE, age 34, and a four year old male were uninjured (all from Woodburn).

HWY 38 was closed for several hours while the investigation was conducted and wreckage removed. OSP was assisted on scene by the Douglas County Sheriff's Office, Lower Umpqua Hospital Ambulance and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

The investigation is continuing into contributing factors. More information will be released when it is available.
06/28/15
Kidnapped Woman Is Saved By 911 Call in Northeastern Oregon
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/28/15
On June 27, 2015 at about 6:12AM, the Morrow County Sheriff's Office received a 911 call from a female who advised she had been kidnapped and was trapped in a car traveling on I-84.

Members from the Morrow County Sheriff's Office, Gilliam County Sheriff's Office and Oregon State Police responded and located the vehicle on I-84 traveling westbound near milepost 143 (east of Arlington).

Law enforcement stopped the vehicle and the driver was identified as William T COOTER II, age 42, of Greeneville, TN. The female was located inside the vehicle and identified as the person who called 911.

A roadside investigation revealed COOTER had assaulted and held his female passenger against her will. Further learned was COOTER and the victim did not know each other prior to the incident.

COOTER was arrested and was lodged at the Northern Oregon Regional Correctional Facility in The Dalles on the following charges: Kidnapping 1st Degree, Rape 1st Degree, Sex Abuse 1st Degree, Sodomy 1st Degree, Assault IV, Coercion, Menacing, Unauthorized Use of a Motor Vehicle, Unauthorized Entry into a Motor Vehicle, Criminal Mischief 2nd Degree, False Information to a Police Officer, Possession of Methamphetamine, and Interfering with Making a Report.

This is an ongoing investigation and more information will be released when it is available.
Deputies Searching Santiam River For Missing Man **Update w/ Additional Photo** (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/28/15
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Tonight at about 9:00 p.m., the Linn County Sheriff's Office Dive Rescue Team located the body of Ralph Macfawn, age 56, of Salem a short distance from where he entered the river to swim. Deputies do not know what caused Mr. Macfawn to drown, but according to witnesses Mr. Macfawn was heard calling for help, he then submerged and never resurfaced.

Tonight our thoughts are with Mr. Macfawn's family who were on scene at the time of this tragedy. The Sheriff's Office would like to thank the some 30 emergency personnel, 5 boat teams and the Linn County Sheriff's Office Dive Rescue Team for their assistance in recovering Mr. Macfawn. A list of responding agencies is posted below.

Salem Fire Department
Albany Fire Department
Scio Fire Department
Jefferson Fire Department
Linn County Sheriff's Office
Benton County Sheriff's Office
Albany Police Department




Deputies with the Marion County Sheriff's Office Marine Patrol Unit are currently searching the waters of the Santiam River at the Santiam River Rest Stop near the Marion and Linn County borders. Deputies were called at about 5:40 p.m., after an adult male was seen entering the water and never resurfacing.

Currently units from the Jefferson Fire Department, Salem Fire Department and the Benton County Sheriff's Office are assisting in the search. This story will be updated as details become available.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1294/85759/Jefferson.jpg , 2015-06/1294/85759/Jefferson_2.jpg
Motor Vehicle Crash on HWY 18 Involving Yamhill County Deputy near McMinnville (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/28/15
CrashPhoto2
CrashPhoto2
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OSP Troopers and emergency crews responded to this morning's serious injury motor vehicle crash involving a Yamhill County Sheriff's Office patrol vehicle and a passenger vehicle on HWY 18 milepost 40, near McMinnville.

According to OSP Sergeant Jesse Orosco, on June 28, 2015 at about 7:17 AM, a 2006 Hyundai Santa Fe, operated by Randy D MANNS, age 46, of Depoe Bay, was traveling eastbound on HWY 18, and for unknown reasons, drifted off the highway into the adjacent ditch. MANNS over-corrected, traveling across the eastbound lane and into the westbound lane of travel where the Hyundai collided head-on with a westbound Yamhill County Sheriff's Office patrol vehicle, a 2008 Ford Crown Victoria, operated by Deputy Dave MILLS, age 27, of Sheridan.

Both vehicles received heavy impact damage and the Hyundai started on fire. Yamhill County Deputy Tim Casey and a Good Samaritan helped get MANNS out of his burning vehicle while OSP Senior Trooper Dan Davis and two other Good Samaritans extinguished the fire with fire extinguishers.

MANNS was airlifted to Legacy Emanuel Medical Center in Portland and Deputy MILLS was ground transported to the Salem Hospital, both with serious injuries.

On scene evidence indicates that both occupants were wearing their seat belts and the cause of the crash is still under investigation.

Both directions of HWY 18 were closed for several hours while the investigation and recovery efforts were made. OSP was assisted on scene by Yamhill County Sheriff's Office, McMinnville Fire Medics, and the Oregon Department of Transportation.


Attached Media Files: CrashPhoto2 , CrashPhoto1
Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) daily fire update for Sunday, June 28, 2015.
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/28/15
Due to exceptionally dry landscape and drought conditions, hot weather and forecasted lightning, the risk of extreme fire activity has remained high through the weekend and into this coming week. The Oregon Department of Forestry, forestland owners and agency partners are prepared to manage conditions usually experienced in late July or early August.

Saturday, an excessive heat warning was in effect for the Willamette Valley including the greater Portland and Vancouver area, the lower Columbia and the western and central Columbia River gorge. The Northwest Interagency Coordination Center in Portland advises that "A surge of moisture and instability will continue moving northward across Oregon and Washington today and tonight. Lightning strikes are expected to ignite new fires despite showers with the thunderstorms. The combination of fire danger, instability, and numerous lightning strikes is creating nearly optimum conditions for ignition and growth of large, costly fires across much of the geographic area through Monday before conditions moderate during the new week."

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
The Sugar Loaf Fire was reported burning Saturday burning in grass and timber in central Oregon on BLM land 9 miles north of Dayville. Extreme Fire behavior with residences evacuated and one outbuilding destroyed. Fire size is estimated at 5,500 acres. A State Type I Team is being assigned to this fire. Evacuations are being coordinated by the Grant County Sheriff's Office.

In addition to the Sugarloaf fire, firefighters are working on The Buck Creek Fire (#250) located 18 miles northeast of Hampton, Oregon, which held at 250 acres overnight; and the Bear Creek Fire (#251) located 7 miles south of Prineville Reservoir near Bear Creek Butte. This fire held at 30 acres overnight. Crews will continue to hold and improve containment lines on these fires today. No estimate of containment is currently available.

>Red Flag Warnings remain in effect through 9 p.m. tonight for lightning, primarily in areas east of Prineville. As the 4th of July holiday approaches, fire officials also want to remind everyone that possession or use of fireworks on Forest Service or BLM land is illegal.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS
The lightning-caused Buckskin Fire (USFS) reported June 11 burning 10 miles SW of Cave Junction on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest is 5,345 acres and 60 percent contained. More info available at: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4286/

The lightning-caused Bunker Hill Fire (USFS) reported June 26 burning 30 miles SE of Oakridge, OR., is 150 acres and 0 percent contained. More info available at: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4328/http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4328/

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

For information on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands view:
the department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
the Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.
06/27/15
Fatal Crash on HWY 6 at MP 2 Involving Three Vehicles near Tillamook (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/27/15
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On June 27, 2015 at about 12:54 PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a report of a multiple vehicle crash on HWY 6 at milepost 2 near Tillamook.

According to Trooper Jace Hall, a 2013 Grey in color Hyundai Elantra, operated by James H BRENNAN, age 79, and occupied by Anna M BRENNAN, age 78, of Aloha was stopped on Wilson River Loop facing southbound with several cars in front, preparing to turn east on State Route 6. A 2003 Tan in color Chevy Silverado, operated by a male juvenile, age 16, of Tillamook, was westbound on State Route 6, approaching the intersection of Wilson River Loop. A 2009 Red in color Chevy HHR, operated by Francis R MEETZE III, age 41, and occupied by Brooke R MEETZE, age 34 and male juvenile, age 3, of Tillamook was stopped, facing eastbound on State Route 6, preparing to turn north onto Wilson River Loop.

Preliminary investigation indicates the Hyundai attempted to turn east onto State Route 6 and entered the intersection when it was unsafe to do so. The Silverado attempted to stop but was unable to avoid a collision. The Silverado struck the Hyundai in the Hyundai's driver side. The two vehicles then collided with the stopped HHR. The driver of the Hyundai, James BRENNAN, was pronounced deceased at the scene. The passenger of the Hyundai was flown by Oregon Lifeguard (Helicopter) to a Portland area hospital for further treatment. No other occupants were transported and all occupants were wearing their safety belts. Airbags deployed in the Silverado and Hyundai.

HWY 6 was closed for hours as traffic was routed on alternate roads during the investigation. The investigation is still continuing and more information will be released when available.

OSP Troopers were assisted by the Tillamook Police Department, the Tillamook County Sheriff's Office, the Tillamook Ambulance, the Oregon Lifeguard (helicopter), the Tillamook Fire Department, and the Oregon Department of Transportation.


Attached Media Files: SR6MP20627152 , SR6MP20627151
Serious Injury Two Vehicle Motorcycle Crash in Marion County
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/27/15
A Marion County man and woman were injured when the motorcycle they were riding was struck from behind by another vehicle on Highway 99E approximately 1 mile south of Woodburn.

According to Lt. Steve Duvall, on June 27, 2015 at about 2:45 PM, OSP and other emergency personnel responded to the report a motor vehicle crash with multiple injuries on Highway 99E near milepost 34 that had all traffic blocked.

Preliminary information indicates Daniel Meija-Romero, age 20, of Woodburn, was operating a 1997 Ford van northbound on Highway 99E behind Randy Epperly, age 48, of Hubbard and Nancy Sabelieff, age 42, of Aurora, who were on a 2005 Harley Davidson motorcycle. Epperly slowed or stopped his motorcycle in the northbound lane due to heavy traffic. Based on witness statements, Meija-Romero reportedly did not slow down with traffic then suddenly swerved left and struck the motorcycle and both riders. Both Epperly and Sabelieff were wearing helmets.

Epperly sustained minor injuries and was transported by ambulance to Salem Hospital where he was treated and released. Sabelieff sustained serious injuries. She was transported to the Salem Hospital where she was admitted for treatment. Meija-Romero was not injured.

The investigation remains active and on-going and Senior Trooper Frank Hagen of the OSP Salem Area Command is the lead investigator.

OSP was assisted at the scene by Woodburn Fire Department and EMS, Woodburn Police Department, Marion County Sheriff's Office and the Oregon Department of Transportation.
Critical Injury Motorcycle Crash in Marion County
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/27/15
A Marion County man was critically injured when he lost control of his motorcycle and crashed on Highway 214, 7 miles east of Highway 22.

According to Lt. Steve Duvall, on June 27, 2015 at about 10:32 AM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report a motor vehicle crash on State Route 214 near milepost 17.5.

Preliminary information is Mark Boardman, age 28, of Sublimity, was operating a 2014 Yamaha motorcycle. Boardman attempted to negotiate a curve while traveling westbound when he lost control and crashed into a metal fence. Boardman was wearing a helmet.

Boardman sustained life threatening head injuries. He was transported by ambulance to Stayton Hospital in critical condition where he was stabilized then transferred to Salem Hospital for advanced care.

OSP was assisted by Sublimity Fire Department, Stayton EMS and the Oregon Department of Transportation. Sr. Tpr. Frank Hagen of the OSP Salem Area Command is the lead investigator.
OSP Investigates Motor Vehicle Crash in Rural Polk County
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/27/15
An early morning single vehicle crash in Polk County took the life of a Salem woman and left three injured.

According to Lt. Steve Duvall, on June 27, 2015 at about 6:53 AM, a 2005 Dodge Neon, operated by Triston Ferguson, age 21, of Salem, was traveling east on Highway 194, Monmouth Highway, approximately 3 miles west of Monmouth. The driver attempted to negotiate a curve but left the roadway on the south side. Evidence at the scene indicates the vehicle then spun out of control and rolled over several times into a field on the north side of the highway. Several residents heard the crash and assisted with first aid of the injured.

Ferguson sustained moderate injuries and was transported to the Salem Hospital by ambulance. Three additional passengers were in the vehicle, identified as: Kayla Lane, age 19, of Salem; Kodi Cooper, age 21, of Salem and Catherine Bartlett-Twete, age 20, of Salem. Lane sustained moderate injury and was transported by ambulance to the Salem Hospital. Cooper was critically injured and transported by helicopter to the Salem Hospital. Initial investigation revealed Bartlett-Twete was partially ejected during the crash. She sustained critical injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.

The crash remains under active investigation. OSP requests that any person who may have witnessed the crash or was with the occupants of the vehicle prior to the crash, contact Troopers at the Salem Area Command through the OSP Northern Command Center, phone: 503-375-3555. Sr. Trooper Jay Davis and Recruit Kevin Ely are the primary investigators.
The Polk Co. Fire Department and EMS, Polk Co. District Attorney's Office, Marion/Polk Medical Examiner's Office and the Oregon Department of Transportation also responded to the scene.

No further information is available for release at this time. The investigation will continue and further information will be released as it becomes available.
Busy Time for Linn County Search & Rescue (Photo)
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 06/27/15
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The Linn County Sheriff's Office is currently hosting its 22nd annual Search and Rescue (SAR) Training Academy. The eleven-day academy will conclude this Sunday, June 28, at which time 22 recruits will join the ranks of over 100 state certified volunteer Search and Rescue members in Linn County.

At the conclusion, the recruits will have received training that includes classes in wilderness survival, shelter building, search tactics, first-aid/CPR, map and compass reading, rappelling, and many more topics. They also participated in a three-day field exercise in the Cascades that included a 20-mile hike.

This has proven to be a busy time for Search and Rescue. While participating in training, they were also called out for several missions including assisting the Polk County Sheriff's Office with a search for a missing person.

On the same day as the Polk County search, they received a call of missing hikers on the Pacific Crest Trail that had become separated from their hiking group. The missing individuals ended up walking out to the trailhead on their own.

Part of the SAR academy included a three-day field training exercise on the Old Cascade Crest Trail. On the third day of the exercise, members conducted an evidence search from a cold case involving a homicide from several years ago. While on this search, they were notified of and responded to a rescue on the Iron Mountain Trailhead.

The rescue involved evacuating Beverly Ringer, 70 years old from Redmond Oregon, who fell and broke her leg. Twenty SAR members responded and were assisted by the Sweet Home Fire Department. Ringer was cared for, taken to the trailhead, and then transported to the hospital by the Sweet Home Fire Department.

Sheriff Bruce Riley would like to take this opportunity to congratulate the new SAR members on a job well done! He would also like to thank all the other volunteers and training staff from the Linn County Sheriff's Office, under the direction of Staff Sergeant Joe Larsen, for all their hard work. Riley added, "Without their dedication, commitment, and compassion for those in need of search and rescue, our ability to conduct these missions would not be possible."

Sheriff Riley would also like to remind people who are recreating in the mountains to be prepared and properly equipped. This includes being prepared to spend the night in the woods by taking appropriate food, water, a map, and a cellphone. Also be sure to tell friends or family members where you are going, your anticipated route and when they can expect you to return. He also recommends taking a personal tracker or spot locator.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/2993/85738/sar.2.jpg , 2015-06/2993/85738/sar.1.jpg
Red Cross Responds To Florence Home Fire
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 06/27/15
On June 27 at 3:10pm, Disaster Action Team members responded to a residential fire that occurred in the 900 block of Rhododendron Drive in Florence, Oregon.

This single-family fire affected two adults. Red Cross provided disaster recovery information.
Serious Injury Motorcycle Crash, HWY 224 Near Estacada (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/27/15
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A Clackamas man was seriously injured when he lost control of his motorcycle and crashed 16 miles east of Estacada.

According to Trooper Cameron Bailey, on June 27, 2015 at about 09:31 AM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report a motor vehicle crash on State Route 224 near milepost 37.

Preliminary information is Jerry KILGORE, age 54, of Clackamas, was operating a 1999 Harley Davidson motorcycle and negotiating a corner eastbound when he lost control and impacted into the guardrail.

KILGORE sustained minor visible injuries and a non-life threatening head injury. He was transported by ground ambulance to Estacada, where he met a LifeFlight helicopter and was later transported to OHSU.

The investigation is continuing and more information will be released when it is available. OSP was assisted by American Medical Response, the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office and the Oregon Department of Transportation.


Attached Media Files: LF0627152 , LF0627151
Motor Vehicle Crash on HWY 30 Involving Columbia County Deputy near Rainer (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/27/15
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OSP Troopers are continuing their investigation on Friday evening's injury crash on HWY 30, west of RAINIER, which sent a Columbia County Deputy to the hospital.

According to Trooper Robin May, on June 26, 2015 at about 5:42 PM, a 2004 Hyundai Sonata, operated by Diane J CASTILLO, age 54, of Rainier, was traveling eastbound on HWY 30 near MP 45 and stopped waiting to turn. A 1997 Jeep Wrangler, operated by Laurence Keith M FRANE, age 53, of St. Helens, struck the rear of the Sonata. Impact drove the Sonata into the path of a westbound Columbia County Sheriff's Office Chevy Tahoe, operated by Deputy Roy CALDWELL, age 47, which resulted with a sideswipe impact between the Sonata and the Tahoe.

Deputy CALDWELL was transported to St. John's Medical Center in Longview Washington where he was treated for non-life threatening injuries and released.

OSP was assisted by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office, Columbia River Fire and Rescue, and the Oregon Department of Transportation. Both directions of HWY 30 were closed for about two hours.

Enforcement action is pending the conclusion of the investigation which is continuing. No further information at this time.


Attached Media Files: SR30MP45Crash062615
Red Cross Responds To Roseburg Fire
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 06/27/15
On June 26,2015 at approximately 6:45 PM Red Cross  volunteers responded to a residential fire that occurred  in the 900 block of SE Mill St. in Roseburg, OR.

This single family fire affected 2 adults and 2 dogs. Red Cross provided food, clothing, shoes, lodging, and information about recovery services.
06/26/15
Photo Release: Oregon Air National Guard honors deploying Citizen-Airmen with ceremony at Portland Air National Guard Base (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 06/26/15
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Photo Captions

150626-CH590-372
Oregon Air National Guard Lt. Col. Sean Sullivan, (left foreground), commander of the 123rd Fighter Squadron, 142nd Fighter Wing, along with other Citizen-Airmen, salute the official party during the unit's mobilization ceremony, June 26. The ceremony, held at the Portland Air National Guard Base, in Portland, Oregon, honored approximately 200 Citizen-Airmen who are scheduled to deploy to Romania in support of Operation Atlantic Resolve. (Oregon Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. John Hughel, 142nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs/Released)

150626-Z-CH590-274
Oregon Governor Kate Brown and other members of the official party (left), watch as members of the 142nd Fighter Wing Base Honor Guard post the US Flag during the mobilization ceremony for the 142nd Fighter Wing, June 26. The ceremony, held at the Portland Air National Guard Base, in Portland, Oregon, honored approximately 200 Citizen-Airmen who are scheduled to deploy to Romania in support of Operation Atlantic Resolve. (Oregon Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. John Hughel, 142nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs/Released)

150626-Z-CH590-283
Oregon Air National Guard Lt. Col. Sean Sullivan, (left foreground), commander of the 123rd Fighter Squadron, 142nd Fighter Wing, presents the unit flag of the 142nd Fighter Wing to Oregon Governor Kate Brown during the unit's mobilization ceremony, June 26. The ceremony, held at the Portland Air National Guard Base, in Portland, Oregon, honored approximately 200 Citizen-Airmen who are scheduled to deploy to Romania in support of Operation Atlantic Resolve. (Oregon Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. John Hughel, 142nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs/Released)

150626-Z-CH590-361
Oregon Governor Kate Brown greets deploying Citizen-Airmen of the 142nd Fighter Wing following the unit's mobilization ceremony, June 26, at the Portland Air National Guard Base, in Portland, Oregon. The ceremony honored approximately 200 Citizen-Airmen who are scheduled to deploy to Romania in support of Operation Atlantic Resolve. (Oregon Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. John Hughel, 142nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs/Released)


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/962/85723/150626-Z-CH590-361.jpg , 2015-06/962/85723/150626-Z-CH590-283.jpg , 2015-06/962/85723/150626-Z-CH590-274.jpg , 2015-06/962/85723/150626-CH590-372.jpg
Information on Heceta Head Lighthouse tours
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/26/15
News Release // Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. // FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE // June 26, 2015

Media Contact: Kevin Beck, Park Manager, 541-547-3416x221, kevin.beck@oregon.gov

Florence OR - Starting June 26, 2015, Heceta Head Lighthouse tours will be conducted from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily. Lighthouse maintenance and inspections of the upper levels mean tours will only be conducted on the lawn area adjacent to the lighthouse and in the first level of the lighthouse, but not up in the tower itself. An updated schedule of tower tours will be announced when they resume.

Heceta Head State Scenic Viewpoint <http://tinyurl.com/hecetaheadpark> is 14 miles north of Florence on US 101, and features the lighthouse, short trails, picnicking, a small beach, and a historic lighthouse keepers home managed by the US Forest Service, but operated by a concession as a bed and breakfast <http://hecetalighthouse.com/>. The park serves an estimated 625,000 visitors a year.

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State park and marina at Lake Billy Chinook open for visits
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/26/15
Note: version sent seconds ago said it was draft. It's not. It is, however, Friday.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

News Release // Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. // FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE // June 26, 2015

Media Contact:
Chris Havel, Director's Office, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department
Cell: 503-931-2590

Culver OR - Recent news about algae at Lake Billy Chinook may have travelers wondering whether to visit the destination reservoir in central Oregon's Jefferson County.

The Cove Palisades State Park staff note algae normally grows rapidly this time of year at Lake Billy Chinook. The park is on the south end of the lake along the Crooked River and features trails, two campgrounds totaling more than 250 tent and RV sites, cabins, and a full-service marina (http://covepalisadesresort.com/) with fuel and houseboats for rent.
Eight miles west from the campground and marina, on different arm of the reservoir along the Metolius River, tests were positive for toxins related to the algae. County health authorities will test the area around the state park and hope to have results before the Independence Day holiday weekend.

The park has posted information about the health advisory, but the campgrounds and marina are operating as usual.

# # #
Oregon's Hospitals and Legislators Applaud Passage of Update to Nurse Staffing Law
Oregon Assn. of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS) - 06/26/15
June 26, 2015 - Today the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS) joined Senator Laurie Monnes Anderson in applauding the passage of Senate Bill 469 in the Oregon Legislature. The bill, which passed the legislature yesterday, will update and clarify Oregon's nurse staffing law. Oregon hospitals and the legislators involved in this work focused on the goal of ensuring patient safety and appropriate staffing levels in Oregon's community hospitals while preserving the flexibility that the modern health care delivery environment demands.

"Today we have taken a very important step towards establishing a foundation of trust and open communication around nurse staffing and its support of patient safety," said Carol Bradley, Chief Nursing Officer of Legacy Health, who was a lead negotiator on behalf of OAHHS. "While the negotiations were challenging at times, it was clear that both sides shared a desire to best serve patients and to ensure that our hospitals can meet the ever-growing demands of health care delivery during a time of great transition. We appreciated the partnership of all those involved, and look forward to working to implement this law as we collaboratively envisioned it. In the end, Oregon will see better health outcomes and better run hospitals as a result of the work we did together."

"I applaud OAHHS and the ONA for working together to find common ground and deliver a compromise bill that addresses the concerns of both hospitals and nurses," said Senator Monnes Anderson, RN, Chair of the Senate Health Committee. "Working together on behalf of Oregonians is the keystone of our state's way of doing business. I am proud to support this legislation, and to work towards providing the best possible care to Oregonians."

Key updates and clarifications in the bill include:

Staffing plans approved by the hospital-based nurse staffing committees must be implemented by hospital (with certain exceptions i.e. emergencies)
Maintains balanced nurse staffing committees and defines the process to select members
Creates a statewide Nurse Staffing Advisory Board, which may make recommendations to OHA on nursing issues. The Advisory Board reflects the make-up of hospital staffing committees
Requires posting at each nursing unit a summary of the staffing law, plus how to report violations
Limits on mandatory overtime
Increases the frequency and predictability of state compliance audits at hospitals and aligns them with hospitals' licensure renewal process
Implements a timeline for complaint investigations to ensure that deficiencies are addressed in a timely manner
Sets out a mediation process for times when staffing plans cannot be agreed upon
Implementation:
o Staffing committees established by or before Jan. 1, 2016
o Committee to develop hospital-wide staffing plan by Jan. 1, 2017

Oregon's nurse staffing law was passed in 2001 and updated in 2007 with agreement from hospitals and nurses. It set forth certain processes and requirements relating to nurse staffing at hospitals. SB 469 is an update to the prior legislation.

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Heat wave triggers water safety warnings
Legacy Health - 06/26/15
In response to recent drowning incidents in Oregon and Southwest Washington, physicians from Legacy Emanuel Medical Center and Randall Children's Hospital are urging the community to use extra caution this weekend.

"Given the heat wave, we feel it's more imperative than ever to stress the importance of water safety as people look to our rivers and lakes as a way to escape the high temperatures," says Randall Children's Hospital Pediatric Intensive Care Unit physician, Andrea Hoogerland, M.D. "Our unit cared for one drowning victim this May and has seen four more already in June."

Water safety tips

Designate a responsible adult to watch young children. Children need to be an arm's length from a supervising adult at all times.

Wear a life jacket. Air-filled or foam toys are not safety devices. They are not designed to keep swimmers safe.

Watch for dangerous waves, floating debris and signs of rip currents such as water that is discolored and choppy or foamy and moving in a channel away from shore.

Always know the depth of water before you dive. Remember "feet first, first time." Natural bodies of water change with time. What was safe last week may not be tomorrow.

Surgeon Dean Gubler, D.O. with Legacy Trauma Services at Legacy Emanuel warns, "These are preventable events that are often increased by drinking alcohol. Alcohol influences balance, coordination and judgment, which are heightened by sun exposure and heat." He adds, "Stick with water or sports drinks to stay hydrated."
Sheriff Jason Myers Promotes Deputy to Sergeant (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/26/15
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On Wednesday, the 24th, Sheriff Jason Myers swore in his newest Sergeant at the Marion County Sheriff's Office. Sergeant Jacob Ramsey began his career with the Sheriff's Office in 1998, was promoted to Deputy in 1999 and has worked in our Jail his entire 17 year career.

Sergeant Ramsey was joined at his swearing in by friends and co-workers who took part in a small ceremony and celebration of his new job. Commander Kevin Schultz was quoted as saying, "We are very excited to add Jacob to our management team and look forward to watching him develop as a leader in our organization." Please help us congratulate Sergeant Ramsey and wish him good luck in his new career path.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1294/85699/Sgt.Ramsey_Promotion.JPG
Oregon Dept. of Forestry wildfire summary - week ending June 26, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/26/15
Wildfire activity on the 16 million acres of private and public lands protected by the Oregon Dept. of Forestry (ODF) was relatively light this past week. Fire managers are currently focused on fire weather conditions predicted to set up today and continue into the weekend.

The Northwest Interagency Coordination Center in Portland advises that "Lightning and atmospheric instability are expected to begin over sections of southern Oregon today and spread northward over the weekend. Fire danger indices have climbed high enough to warrant elevated risk of large fires due to the number of lightning strikes expected over the weekend. A number of sections of Oregon and Washington will be affected, so pay attention to local weather forecasts. Thunderstorms will become wet but the atmospheric instability plus the sheer number of new starts from lightning will challenge initial attack over the weekend. A number of new large fires are likely to result."

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
No new fires 10 acres or larger were reported on ODF-protected lands this week.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS
The Buckskin Fire reported June 11 burning 10 miles SW of Cave Junction on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest is 5,345 acres and 60 percent contained. More info available at: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4286/

The Little Basin Fire reported June 15 burning 10 Miles North of Imnaha in the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area is 630 acres and 97 percent contained. More info available at: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4290/

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015, through today:
Lightning-caused fires: 74 fires burned 114 acres
Human-caused fires: 239 fires burned 532 acres
Total: 313 fires burned 646 acres

10-year average (January 1 through the present date in the year):
Lightning-caused fires: 25 fires burned 25 acres
Human-caused fires: 150 fires burned 1,308 acres
Total: 175 fires burned 1,333 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.

When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.
Oregon OSHA reminds employers to prevent heat illness during heat wave
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 06/26/15
(Salem) - Landscaping, construction, and agriculture are all labor-intensive activities that can raise the body temperature of workers in hot weather. This could lead to heat illness or even death, if precautions are not taken.

"Employers should provide drinking water, offer a shaded place for workers to take breaks, and watch for signs of trouble," said Penny Wolf-McCormick, Portland health enforcement manager for Oregon OSHA.

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, encourages employers and workers to learn the signs of heat illness and focus on prevention. Exposure to heat can lead to headaches, cramps, dizziness, fatigue, nausea or vomiting, and even seizures or death.

"Heat illness can be deadly, but it's preventable," Wolf-McCormick said.

To help those suffering from heat exhaustion:
Move them to a cool, shaded area. Do not leave them alone.
Loosen and remove heavy clothing.
Provide cool water to drink (a small cup every 15 minutes) if they are not feeling sick to their stomach.
Try to cool them by fanning them. Cool the skin with a spray mist of cold water or a wet cloth.
If they do not feel better in a few minutes, call 911 for emergency help.

Heat stroke is a more severe condition than heat exhaustion and can result in death. Immediately call for emergency help if you think the person is suffering from heat stroke.

Here are some tips for preventing a heat-related illness:
Perform the heaviest, most labor-intensive work during the coolest part of the day.
Use the buddy system (work in pairs) to monitor the heat.
Drink plenty of cool water (one small cup every 15 to 20 minutes).
Wear light, loose-fitting, breathable clothing (such as cotton).
Take frequent short breaks in cool, shaded areas - allow your body to cool down.
Avoid eating large meals before working in hot environments.
Avoid caffeine and alcoholic beverages (these make the body lose water and increase the risk of heat illnesses).

Employers can calculate the heat index for their worksite with the federal OSHA heat stress app for mobile phones. The tool is available at
http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatillness/heat_index/heat_app.html. A number of other tools are available at http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatillness/index.html.

Oregon OSHA also has a pocket-sized booklet available, in both English and Spanish, with tips for working in the heat: http://www.orosha.org/pdf/pubs/4926.pdf (English version).

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About Oregon OSHA:
Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, go to www.orosha.org.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter at www.twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on insurance, mortgages, investments, workplace safety, and more.
06/25/15
OSP Continuing Death Investigation In Lincoln County
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/25/15
The Oregon State Police Newport Area Command conducted a death investigation which occurred on the Pacific Ocean 24 mile west of Newport. The deceased was identified as Richard ENDERLE, age 64, of Tigard.

On June 25, 2015 at about 10AM, a medical issue arose while ENDERLE was halibut fishing 24 miles from Newport on the Pacific Ocean. ENDERLE became unresponsive and CPR was conducted by the other occupants of the boat. The US Coast Guard responded and continued CPR until further medical staff arrived. The boat and occupants was driven to the Yaquina Bay Coast Guard Station where ENDERLE was pronounced deceased.

Next of kin notification was conducted by Washington County Sheriff's Office. OSP Newport Area Command was assisted by US Coast Guard, Pac West, OSP- Fish & Wildlife, Lincoln County Medical Examiner's Office and the Lincoln County District Attorney's Office.
Man Arrested After Cutting Head Off Cat (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/25/15
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A man is in custody after disrobing and cutting the head off of his mother's cat and breaking its tale. Rudi Espinoza, age 24, of Salem was arrested and taken to the Marion County Jail, just after midnight for two counts of Aggravated Animal Abuse.

Deputies were called to the 4600 block of Shawnee Lane SE after neighbors called 911 to report Mr. Espinoza knocked on their door, wearing only boxers and covered in blood. Mr. Espinoza was described as acting very strange and appeared to be under the influence. After arriving on scene Mr. Espinoza was taken into custody without incident where deputies notice he was covered in scratches and bite marks.

It was during the investigation the cat was found decapitated inside of the residence, when asked why he killed the cat, Mr. Espinoza stated, "Because it is evil and nosey." Mr. Espinoza was arraigned today, his bail was set at $100,000 and his next court appearance will be on July 7th at the Circuit Court Annex.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1294/85682/Espinoza.jpg
Health advisory issued June 25 for Lake Billy Chinook Reservoir
Oregon Health Authority - 06/25/15
June 25, 2015

High toxin levels found in reservoir in Jefferson County

A health advisory is being issued today for Lake Billy Chinook Reservoir, located 26 miles southwest of Madras in Jefferson County.

Water monitoring has confirmed the presence of blue-green algae and the toxins they produce. These toxin concentrations can be harmful to humans and animals.

Swallowing or inhaling water droplets, as well as skin contact with water, should be avoided. Drinking water directly from Lake Billy Chinook Reservoir is especially dangerous.

Oregon Public Health officials advise campers and other recreational visitors that toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating the water with camping-style filters.

People who draw in-home water directly from Lake Billy Chinook Reservoir are advised to use an alternative water source because private treatment systems are not proven effective at removing algae toxins. However, public drinking water systems can reduce algae toxins through proper filtration and disinfection. If people on public water systems have questions about treatment and testing, they should contact their water supplier.

Oregon health officials recommend that people who choose to eat fish from waters where algae blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, because toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Public health officials also advise people to not eat freshwater clams or mussels from Lake Billy Chinook Reservoir and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations do not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

Exposure to toxins can produce symptoms of numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems, and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of skin irritation, weakness, diarrhea, nausea, cramps and fainting should also receive medical attention if they persist or worsen. Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets fishing with them should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in the reservoir.

The public will be advised when the concern no longer exists.

With proper precautions to avoid water contact, people are encouraged to visit Lake Billy Chinook Reservoir and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

For local information, contact the U.S. Forest Service at 541-549-7700. For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0400.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website. To find out if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at www.healthoregon.org/hab and select "algae bloom advisories," or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767.

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Apartment Complex Fire Started By Juvenile Playing With Lighter ***Update Important Fact Change*** (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/25/15
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Last night Deputies with the Marion County Sheriff's Office assisted the Marion County Fire District with an investigation into a fire at an apartment complex in the 4000 block of Satter Drive NE in Salem. Deputies were able to determine that the fire originated outside the apartment complex, near a garbage dumpster and was started by a six year old, male, who had been playing with a lighter.

The fire caused extensive damage to the building but luckily no one was hurt. The six year old will be referred to the Juvenile Court System to determine the best way to treat this type of behavior. The Sheriff's Office does not intend to release any further details regarding this investigation, the suspect's name, or the address of the fire's origin.

The Sheriff's Office would like to remind parents that it is never too early to teach your children about the dangers of fire. Please remember to keeps things like matches and lighters in a safe place and out of the reach of children.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1294/85674/20150624_173405_1.jpg , 2015-06/1294/85674/20150624_173505_1.jpg
Remember to water trees deeply as mercury climbs
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/25/15
The weather forecast is calling for high temperatures around most of the state through the weekend and even into the middle of next week. It's a time to keep fire prevention uppermost in our minds, and also, to remember to protect the health of trees in yards and landscapes by deeply watering them.

"Summer temperatures can be hard on trees, especially landscape trees in our urban areas," says Kristin Ramstad, an urban forester with the Oregon Department of Forestry. "If they aren't well-watered, warm weather and prolonged drought eventually make trees more susceptible to insect and disease problems," adds Ramstad.

Seems like a good time to remember that when temperatures in Oregon get warm and stay warm, it can take a toll on trees as well as people. The Oregon Department of Forestry suggests a few tips for keeping your trees healthy during times of heat stress.

Symptoms of drought
One of the first signs that a deciduous tree (i.e., trees like birches or maples that drop leaves in the winter) needs water is that its leaves begin to look dull, and sometimes, limp.

More advanced symptoms of needing water are browning of leaves, wilting, and curling at the edges. Leaves may also develop a scorched or burned look, turning yellow or brown on outside edges, or between leaf veins. Leaves may even appear smaller than usual, drop prematurely, or turn brown but remain on the tree.

When drought-stressed, the needles of conifers (evergreen trees such as Ponderosa Pine or Douglas-fir) may turn yellow, red, purple or brown.

Watering tips

Given their benefits, longevity, and contributions to the environment, give your trees higher watering priority than lawns. Keep in mind that if trees are only provided with shallow water every so often, they're probably only getting a fraction of what they need. Watering trees for short periods of time encourages shallow rooting, which can lead to future health problems for the tree.

To make sure your tree gets the water it needs, saturate the soil within the drip line - that's the circle that could be drawn on the soil around the tree directly under the tips of its outermost branches. Using a regular hose or a soaker hose, water deeply and slowly - slowly is important, so the water doesn't run-off. To make sure it gets enough water, keep moving the hose around different areas under the tree.

For conifers, water 3 to 5 feet beyond the drip line on all sides of the tree. Also, if you have a choice, water trees during the cooler part of the day. Another way to water trees slowly is to put a nail hole in the bottom (near the edge) of a five gallon bucket. Fill the bucket with water, and leave the slowly leaking bucket under the canopy of the tree. Do this twice or three times per tree, moving the bucket each time.

Other tips: Use mulch
Using mulch is an excellent way to care for trees in warm weather, as it helps the soil below trees retain moisture and stay cool. Mulch can be made of bark, wood chips, leaves and evergreen needles.

Apply mulch within the drip line, at a depth of four inches, leaving a six-inch space between the mulch and tree trunk. Mulch will also help discourage weeds.

Lastly, don't plant annual flowers or other ground covers under the canopy of your tree, as they'll compete with the tree's roots for moisture and nutrients.

Good tree care = a good investment

Trees and forests enhance quality of life in many ways, providing shade, wildlife habitat, clean air, wood and other products, raising property values, and providing clean, healthy streams. What's more, on hot days, we all rely on the shade of the trees in our yards and communities. Therefore, it is a really good idea to keep our trees healthy and watered.

For more information about trees and tree care:
www.isa-arbor.com/
www.treesaregood.com/treecare/treecareinfo.aspx
Red Cross First Aid Service Team Onsite at USA Track and Field Championships (Photo)
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 06/25/15
Red Cross F.A.S.T. volunteers are on site with other first response representatives at events in the Eugene/Springfield area.
Red Cross F.A.S.T. volunteers are on site with other first response representatives at events in the Eugene/Springfield area.
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The American Red Cross First Aid Service Team will be onsite for the 2015 USATF Outdoor Championships at historic Hayward Field in Eugene, Ore., today through Sunday June 28, to assist with potential heat-related issues given the expected high temperatures.

According to USA Track & Field's website, the USATF Outdoor Championships bring the nation's best athletes to Eugene, Oregon to compete at Hayward Field as the final stop on the 2015 Outdoor USATF Championship Series. Athletes will earn spots on the 2015 IAAF World Championships team set for August 22-30 in Beijing, China, as well as on the Pan Am Games, Thorpe Cup, Pan Am Juniors and NACAC Championships teams.

Red Cross F.A.S.T. volunteers will also provide services next summer for the 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials - Track & Field at Hayward Field and will be on site at Diamond Woods Golf Course in Monore, Ore., on July 10 to assist as the third annual American Red Cross Golf Tournament sponsored by Willamette Valley Restoration.


Attached Media Files: Red Cross F.A.S.T. volunteers are on site with other first response representatives at events in the Eugene/Springfield area. , The American Red Cross First Aid Service Team provides services at many community events.
Single Vehicle Crash On HWY 138E Kills Two Roseburg Residents - Douglas County
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/25/15
On June 24, 2015 at approximately 11:19PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel respond to the report of a single vehicle fatal motor vehicle on Hwy 138E at Milepost 5.5 (just east of Roseburg).

According to Sergeant Ken Terry, initial investigation revealed that a 1999 Volkswagen Bug operated by Danica SCHNAIBLE, age 18, of Roseburg, was westbound on Hwy 138E and when for unknown reasons left highway and impacted an embankment on the south side of Hwy 138E.

The vehicle traveled a short distance before coming to a stop in the eastbound lanes of travel. SCHNAIBLE was pronounced deceased on the scene by medical personnel. The male passenger, Kiona SIEWELL, age 21, of Roseburg was pronounced deceased by medical personnel after being treated for injuries.

The investigation was conducted by the Oregon State Police with assistance of the Douglas County Sheriff's Office, Oregon Department of Transportation, and Fire District No. 2 personnel. The highway was closed for approximately 4 hours in both directions during the investigation,

More information will be released when it is available.
Five ways to beat the heat
Pacific Power - 06/25/15
Pacific Power media hotline: June 25, 2015
1-800-570-5838 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Five ways to beat the heat
Tips from Pacific Power to stay cool, use less energy and save money

PORTLAND, Ore. --With forecasts predicting triple-digit temperatures throughout the Northwest over the next week, Pacific Power wants to remind customers to stay safe and use these tips to beat the heat, use less energy and save money.

Be air conditioner smart
Set your thermostat at 78 degrees. This will keep you comfortable and cooling your house below that temperature can increase your air conditioning bill as much as 8 percent.
Don't turn off the air conditioner when you're gone; instead set it higher, at 85 degrees. That setting allows your air conditioner to use less electricity to cool the house than if the air conditioning has been off all day, but doesn't shut down altogether.
Use an air conditioner timer or programmable thermostat; set it to start bringing your home's temperature from 85 degrees down to 78 degrees no more than 30 minutes before you get home.
Replace air conditioner now before hot spell sets in, then once a month. The dirtier your filter, the less efficient it is.
Lamps, televisions or any other appliance that creates heat needs to be kept away from the thermostat; they will impact its accuracy.
Your air conditioner will operate most efficiently if you trim nearby foliage to allow adequate air flow around the unit.
Don't block inside distribution vents with furniture or other objects.

Don't let the sun shine in
On warm days, close blinds and drapes, especially in south-facing windows which allow in the most heat.

Open windows in the evening and circulate cool air
Open windows in evening and early morning to let in cool air. Be aware, however, of any safety or security issues.
Use fans to bring in and circulate cool air. Ceiling and window fans use less electricity than an air conditioner when the compressor is engaged. Running an air conditioner in fan-only mode can also be effective as outside temperatures drop.

Reduce the heat inside
Use heat-producing appliances like ovens, dishwashers and dryers in the early morning or late evening when temperatures are cooler.
Grill outside or use a microwave or toaster oven. A toaster oven uses one-third to one-half as much energy as a regular oven and releases less heat into the home.
Turn off heat-generating devices when not in use, including lamps, televisions and computers.

Think for the long term
Plant deciduous trees to shade the south side of your house. Well-placed trees can reduce cooling needs as much as 20 percent, and an air conditioner operating in the shade can use as much as 10 percent less electricity.
Insulate floors, walls and attics to keep cooler in summer and warmer in winter. Seal and insulate air conditioning ducts that run through unconditioned spaces.
Get your air conditioner tuned up annually.
Consider a new air conditioner, heat pump and other appliances -- new models are more efficient and may lower your electric bill. Look for ENERGY STAR appliances.

For more information and tips, visit bewattsmart.com.

About Pacific Power
Pacific Power provides electric service to more than 730,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. The company works to meet growing energy demand while protecting and enhancing the environment. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with almost 1.8 million customers in six western states Information about Pacific Power is available on the company's website, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube pages.
Salem Fire Encourages "Keep it Legal, Keep it Safe"
Salem Fire Dept. - 06/25/15
It's that time of year again - the 2015 fireworks season is here. Beginning June 23 and running through July 6, fireworks are approved for sale in Oregon. State-legal fireworks can be purchased from licensed retailers in Salem during this time period. You can also enjoy watching the large professional fireworks displays around the area, including Riverfront Park in downtown Salem on July 4.

Each year during this time period, the Salem Fire Department responds to a number of fireworks related incidents. Some of these incidents have resulted in very large dollar losses and have damaged both vehicles and buildings. Injuries related to fireworks use are also a concern and national statistics indicate children and teenagers have two-and-a-half times the risk of fireworks-related injury as compared to the general population.

Protect your family and property from fireworks related fires and injuries by practicing the "Four BE's" as recommended by the Oregon State Fire Marshal's Office and the Salem Fire Department.

BE PREPARED before lighting the fireworks
Use only legal fireworks available at licensed fireworks sales locations
Store fireworks out of children's reach
Always read and follow the fireworks label directions
Place pets indoors; they are easily frightened by fireworks
Always have water handy (a garden hose or a bucket of water)

BE SAFE when lighting fireworks
An adult should always light the fireworks
Keep matches and lighters away from children
Use fireworks only outside - away from combustibles
Light one firework at a time and move away quickly
Keep children and pets away from fireworks
Do not throw fireworks or hold in your hand

BE RESPONSIBLE after lighting fireworks
Soak used fireworks thoroughly in a bucket of water
Dispose of used fireworks and debris properly
Never re-light a "dud" firework (wait at least 15-20 minutes and then soak it in a bucket of water)

BE AWARE of laws governing fireworks
Use only legal fireworks
Use fireworks only in legal places
Consumer fireworks are prohibited in City and State Parks

The Salem Fire Department encourages you and your family to have a fun and enjoyable Independence Day celebration by ensuring safe practices and legal use of consumer fireworks. Please use your fireworks safely and responsibly and remember to "Keep it Legal and Keep it Safe."

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DCBS issues statement on King v. Burwell opinion
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 06/25/15
This morning, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its opinion in King v. Burwell, upholding tax credits for customers buying health insurance through both state and federal marketplaces.

"Oregon operates - and had always operated - a state-based marketplace, and we are pleased that the Court recognized that status in its opinion today," said Patrick Allen, director of the Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS).

Oregon's health insurance marketplace moves from Cover Oregon to DCBS July 1, 2015. The department will continue to use the HealthCare.gov website but will perform all other marketplace responsibilities, such as most plan management responsibilities, in-person assisters/navigators program, consumer outreach and education, operations, and the Small Business Health Options Program (SHOP) marketplace.

The opinion has no impact on Oregon's health reform efforts.

"We look forward to helping connect even more Oregonians with health coverage when open enrollment begins this fall, and continuing work with our state partners on efforts to reduce costs and improve quality of care," Allen said.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.Oregon.gov.
Oregon's Scenic Bikeway Program expands to southern Oregon
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/25/15
Cyclists have two new Scenic Bikeways to explore--The Cascade Siskiyou Scenic Bikeway in Ashland and the Wild Rivers Coast Scenic Bikeway in Port Orford. The Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission formally approved the new designations June 24 at a meeting in Joseph.

"We are pleased to expand the Bikeways program to include the beauty and adventure in southern Oregon," said Alexandra Phillips, Scenic Bikeways Coordinator for Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). "Both routes offer the best of Oregon cycling: culture, scenery, diverse ecosystems and wonderful cycling experiences."

The Wild Rivers Coast Scenic Bikeway passes rugged and rocky ocean views unique to the south coast and old growth forest along the federally-designated Wild and Scenic Elk River. The 60-mile ride is anchored in the quaint fishing hamlet of Port Orford, the oldest town on the Oregon coast.

The Cascade Siskiyou Scenic Bikeway incorporates 5,000 feet of steep and winding climbs through oak savannah and the ecologically diverse ecosystem of the Cascade Mountains. The 55-mile route starts in Ashland, famous for theater, fantastic dining and proximity to many outdoor recreation opportunities.

New Bikeway routes are proposed by local cyclists and selected for their scenic quality, road conditions and general riding enjoyment. Proposed routes are carefully reviewed and ridden, with only about half meeting the criteria for designation. Once designated, directional signs are installed along the route, and staff post information online for riders to plan their trip, including printable maps, elevation profiles, services and points of interest.

"Oregon recognizes the significance of bicycle tourism, as it brings around $400 million per year to the state," said Todd Davidson, Travel Oregon CEO. "The Scenic Bikeways program highlights stunning areas to ride throughout Oregon. In addition to creating lasting memories for visitors, these Bikeways also help generate jobs in the communities they cross through."

Oregon's Scenic Bikeway program launched in 2005 and continues to be the only such program in the nation. The program comprises 14 designated Scenic Bikeways representing a total of 982 miles. It's coordinated through a partnership between Cycle Oregon, Travel Oregon, the Oregon Department of Transportation and OPRD.

All the information bicyclists need to plan their ride can be found on RideOregonRide.com/CascadeSiskiyou and RideOregonRide.com/WildRiversCoast, including printable maps, accommodations and amenities along the route. Directional signage will be posted along the road later this summer.
Oregon Air National Guard's 142nd Fighter Wing scheduled to mobilize Airmen to Romania
Oregon Military Department - 06/25/15
PORTLAND, Oregon - More than 200 Citizen-Airmen from the Oregon Air National Guard's 142nd Fighter Wing are scheduled to take part in a mobilization ceremony at the Portland Air National Guard Base, Friday, June 26, at 1:00 p.m., in Building 255.

Scheduled to attend the ceremony are: Oregon Governor Kate Brown; Oregon Senator Alan Olson (District-20); Maj. Gen. Daniel Hokanson, Adjutant General, Oregon; and Mr. Dave Stuckey, Deputy Director of the Oregon Military Department, among others.

Members from the 142nd Operations Group, 142nd Maintenance Group, and 142nd Mission Support Group are deploying to Romania from July to October 2015 as part of the 123rd Expeditionary Fighter Squadron in support of Operation Atlantic Resolve.

The 123rd Fighter Squadron commander, Lt. Col. Sean Sullivan, will serve as the 123rd Expeditionary Fighter Squadron commander while deployed. The squadron will provide F-15 fighter jets, support equipment and personnel as a Theater Security Package (TSP) to augment the U.S. Air Forces in Europe's (USAFE) existing efforts.

The squadron will train alongside NATO allies to strengthen interoperability and to demonstrate U.S. commitment to the security and stability of Europe. This will be the 142nd Fighter Wing's largest deployment to Eastern Europe.

Members of the Oregon Air National Guard's 142nd Fighter Wing have deployed across the globe since September 11, 2001. Most of these members are traditional Guardsmen that leave full time jobs or school to serve in support of military operations.

Media is invited to attend. For more information, contact 142nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs at 503-335-4347.


About the 142nd Fighter Wing:
With more than 1,000 Airmen, the 142nd Fighter Wing guards the Pacific Northwest skies from northern California to the Canadian border, on 24-hour Aerospace Control Alert as part of Air Combat Command and the North American Aerospace Defense (NORAD) Command. Our mission is to provide unequalled, mission-ready units to sustain combat aerospace superiority and peacetime tasking any time, any place in service to our nation, state and community. The fighting "Redhawks" are proud to serve as a vital part of the Total Force team, defending our nation with the F-15 Eagle. The wing also stands ready to participate in state and federal contingency missions as required.
06/24/15
***Update*** Fatal Crash Blocking HWY 34 Near Tangent (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/24/15
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Two Sweet Home men were killed in an afternoon crash in Linn County.

According to Sergeant Nathan House, on June 24, 2015 at about 4:06PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a head-on collision on HWY 34 Milepost 7.5 (near Tangent).

Preliminary information indicates a 2013 Ford F150 was traveling eastbound on HWY 34, and for unknown reasons, crossed the centerline into the westbound lanes. The Ford struck a westbound 2007 Kenworth dump truck, operated by Scott D LILLIS, age 51, of Philomath, head-on. The dump truck and it's trailer (loaded with gravel) overturned and came to rest in the westbound lanes of travel. LILLIS was transported to Good Samaritan Hospital in Albany for serious injuries.

The operator of the Ford, Donald L ROBERTS, age 24, of Sweet Home, was transported by air ambulance to Salem Memorial Hospital where he died. His passenger, Mason D TAGEN, age 25, of Sweet Home, was deceased upon emergency crews arriving.

On scene evidence indicates ROBERTS and LILLIS were using seatbelts and TAGEN was not. The cause of the crash is still under investigation. Both directions of HWY 34 were closed for several hours while the investigation and recovery efforts were made. OSP was assisted on scene by Tangent Fire, Albany Fire and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

Further information will be released when it is available.
End Update

Previous Release:
OSP Troopers and emergency crews are on scene of a fatal motor vehicle crash involving a commercial motor vehicle and passenger vehicle on HWY 34 Milepost 7. Both directions of travel are blocked and are expected to be closed for hours. Use alternative routes and visit www.tripcheck.com for road status.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1002/85651/IMG_20150624_173836963.jpg , 2015-06/1002/85651/IMG_20150624_170904513.jpg , 2015-06/1002/85651/IMG_20150624_173513939.jpg
Photo Release: Oregon woman first in National Guard history to enlist into combat engineer career field (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 06/24/15
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Photo Release


150624-Z-TK422-909 & IMG_2265:

Mackenzie Clarke (left), of Damascus, Oregon, takes the oath of enlistment into the Oregon Army National Guard at the Military Entrance Processing Station (MEPS) in Portland, Oregon, June 24. Eighteen-year old Clarke, who is a recent graduate of Clackamas High School, made national history by becoming the first Army National Guard member to enter into theU.S. Army's 12B (combat engineer) Military Occupational Specialty (MOS). "I wanted to do something worthwhile and interesting," Clarke said of her new career path. According to Oregon Army National Guard Recruiting & Retention Battalion, Clarke is scheduled to attend the Recruit Sustainment Program at Camp Rilea in Warrenton, Oregon, until her tentative report date at Basic Combat Training in October. Photo by Nick Choy, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.



150624-Z-TK422-914:

Mackenzie Clarke (second from left), of Damascus, Oregon, poses with members of the Oregon Army National Guard Recruiting & Retention Battalion following her oath of enlistment ceremony at the Military Entrance Processing Station (MEPS) in Portland, Oregon, June 24. From left to right are; Sgt. Dimitri Fenrick, Mackenzie Clarke, Staff Sgt. Erin Meyers and Master Sgt. Mark Browning. Eighteen-year old Clarke, who is a recent graduate of Clackamas High School, made national history by becoming the first Army National Guard member to enter into the U.S. Army's 12B (combat engineer) Military Occupational Specialty (MOS). "I wanted to do something worthwhile and interesting," Clarke said of her new career path. According to Oregon Army National Guard Recruiting & Retention Battalion, Clarke is scheduled to attend the Recruit Sustainment Program at Camp Rilea in Warrenton, Oregon, until her tentative report date at Basic Combat Training in October. Photo by Nick Choy, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/962/85653/IMG_2265.JPG , 2015-06/962/85653/150624-Z-TK422-914.JPG , 2015-06/962/85653/150624-Z-TK422-909.JPG
Shooting Investigation Continuing In Josephine County
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/24/15
The Oregon State Police Central Point Major Crimes Section is continuing their investigation into a shooting which occurred Tuesday evening in the Sunny Valley area.

According to Detective Sergeant Jeff Fitzgerald, on June 23rd, 2015, at approximately 5:07 PM, Josephine County 911 received a call of a shooting which occurred at 3152 Leland Road in Sunny Valley. The Josephine County Sheriff's Office initially responded to the address and subsequently requested the Oregon State Police Major Crimes Section to respond and investigate.

Initial information indicates that a confrontation occurred near the residence of 3152 Leland Road between David L MAIN, age 64, of Sunny Valley and Jason Ryan TAYLOR, age 30, of Wolf Creek, which resulted in TAYLOR being shot by MAIN. TAYLOR was transported to Three Rivers Medical Center where he was treated and later transported to another hospital.

The OSP Central Point Major Crimes Section is continuing their investigation into the circumstances surrounding the incident and the events leading up to the shooting. No arrests have been made at this time. This is an active investigation and no further information is being released at this time.
Marine Board Denies Petition for Rulemaking to Create a Navigation Safety Zone at Cape Kiwanda
Oregon Marine Board - 06/24/15
On June 24, 2015, in a unanimous decision, the Marine Board voted not to initiate rulemaking to consider adoption of a new rule in Chapter 250 Division 020. A petition received April 10, 2015, requested rulemaking to establish a navigation safety zone at Cape Kiwanda, prescribe the marking of the safety zone with lighted markers, and make the operation of a surfboard within the safety zone whenever dory rigs and trailers are parked on the beach a violation of ORS 830.365(1).

Marine Board staff reviewed the Board's rulemaking authorities and the propositions of law asserted by the petitioner and concluded that the Marine Board can only make regulations for specific areas relating to the operation of boats, that as used in ORS 830.365, the term "surfboarding," is referring to a towed watersport and the term "surfboard" is a towed device, and therefore, a surfboard is not a "boat" as defined in ORS 830.005.

Based on this analysis, staff determined that the Marine Board does not have authority to regulate surfboards, as requested in the petition, except when those surfboards are used as a towed device and involving the operation of a boat. Staff recommended that the Marine Board deny the petition. Marine Board staff have participated in, and will continue to participate in, Cape Kiwanda Master Plan Meetings.

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Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers return to Southern Oregon from Afghanistan deployment (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 06/24/15
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MEDFORD, Oregon - Nearly 200 Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers of 1st Battalion, 186th Infantry Regiment, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team, returned to Oregon, June 24, following an overseas deployment to Afghanistan.

The 1-186th Infantry Battalion is headquartered in Ashland with companies based in Medford, Roseburg, Grants Pass, Coos Bay and St. Helens.

The Soldiers are arriving in Medford via chartered flights from Fort Hood, Texas, where they completed administrative and medical demobilization processing. The first flight arrived this morning with nearly 125 Soldiers that were bused to their local armories (50 Soldiers returned to Grants Pass, 60 Soldiers returned to Roseburg, and about 15 Soldiers returned to Coos Bay) where their families waited to greet them. Another flight will arrive later this evening with approximately 70 more Soldiers who will greet their families at the Medford Armory.

One group of about 70 Soldiers from the 1-186th Infantry Battalion returned early to Oregon last month, May 5.

A formal demobilization ceremony is scheduled to recognize the battalion for their overseas service, Aug. 8 at 10:00 a.m. at the South Medford High School stadium.

Photo Captions:
150624-Z-PL933-002: Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers of 1st Battalion, 186th Infantry Regiment, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team, returned to Medford, Oregon, June 24, following a nine-month deployment to Afghanistan. Col. William J. Prendergast, IV, commander of the 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team greeted the Soldiers as they disembarked the plane. (Photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

150624-Z-OT568-037: Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers of Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 186th Infantry Battalion, march toward the armory where families wait to greet them upon returning to Roseburg, Oregon, June 24, following a nine-month deployment to Afghanistan. Nearly 200 Citizen-Soldiers of the 1-186th Infantry Battalion are returning to Southern Oregon and another 70 Soldiers returned last month. The battalion is scheduled to be recognized for their overseas service in a formal demobilization ceremony, Aug. 8, in Medford, Oregon. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class April Davis, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

150624-Z-OT568-082: Oregon Army National Guard Staff Sgt. Nathan Long, of Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 186th Infantry Battalion, meets his five-month-old son, Easton, for the first time upon returning to Roseburg, Oregon, June 24. Long was one of nearly 200 Citizen-Soldiers of the 1-186th Infantry Battalion returning to Southern Oregon following a nine-month deployment to Afghanistan. Easton was born while Long was deployed. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class April Davis, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

150624-Z-OT568-141: Oregon Army National Guard Staff Sgt. Nathan Long, of Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 186th Infantry Battalion, greets his five-month-old son, Easton, and fiancé, Ally Brissett, upon returning to Roseburg, Oregon, June 24. Long was one of nearly 200 Citizen-Soldiers of the 1-186th Infantry Battalion returning to Southern Oregon following a nine-month deployment to Afghanistan. Ally dressed the baby in a shirt that read, 'I waited my whole life to meet you' because Easton was born while Long was deployed. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class April Davis, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

150624-Z-OT568-147: Oregon Army National Guard Spc. Forrest Disney, of Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 186th Infantry Battalion, greets his children, 8-year-old Hannah (right), and 3-year-old Hank, upon returning to Roseburg, Oregon, June 24. Disney was one of nearly 200 Citizen-Soldiers of the 1-186th Infantry Battalion returning to Southern Oregon following a nine-month deployment to Afghanistan. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class April Davis, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

150624-Z-OT568-163: Oregon Army National Guard Sgt. Dustin Roberts, of Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 186th Infantry Battalion, greets his wife, Candace, and daughter, Sophia, upon returning to Roseburg, Oregon, June 24. Roberts was one of nearly 200 Citizen-Soldiers of the 1-186th Infantry Battalion returning to Southern Oregon following a nine-month deployment to Afghanistan. Sophia suffers from brittle bone disease and underwent surgery to stabilize her legs while Roberts was deployed. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class April Davis, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/962/85647/150624-Z-OT568-037.JPG , 2015-06/962/85647/150624-Z-PL933-002.jpg , 2015-06/962/85647/150624-Z-OT568-082.JPG , 2015-06/962/85647/150624-Z-OT568-141.JPG , 2015-06/962/85647/150624-Z-OT568-163.JPG , 2015-06/962/85647/150624-Z-OT568-147.JPG
Fire danger on the rise
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/24/15
High Temperatures and Threat of Lightning Forecasted

Fire managers throughout Oregon are feeling the heat. Continued hot, dry weather is plaguing the region that could lead to a significant fire from a single spark.

"I'm sure everyone is aware of the heat wave that is predicted over the next several days," says Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Prevention Coordinator Tom Fields. "While we're all looking for ways to stay cool, now is not the time to be careless with activities that could lead to a wildfire."

Fire season is now in effect throughout Oregon and much of the state is experiencing fire danger conditions normally seen in late July and August. ODF Meteorologists are predicting record warm weather across Oregon later this week, with afternoon temperatures climbing into the 95-105° F range by Friday and continuing through the weekend. In addition, southerly flow aloft will bring an increasing risk of dry thunderstorms, on both sides of the Cascades, beginning in southern Oregon on Friday and spreading north across the state this weekend. With forests already at mid-August dryness levels, the impending hot spell and dry lightning poses a significant fire weather threat. While wildland fire agencies gear up for natural-caused wildfires, the last thing anyone wants is careless human-caused fires.

"The conditions are driving the story. So far, we're seeing above normal numbers of human-caused fires." Fields says even activities not normally linked to fire starts are causing concern. "We have had three fires related to target shooting just in the last week. One of those fires burned 67 acres and cost over $80,000 to put out. These fires, and the fact that we have already had 80-plus human-caused fires above the average for this time of year is an indication that we need everyone to think twice before conducting any spark emitting activity."

So far in 2015 the Oregon Department of Forestry has suppressed 301 fires in 2015, 227 of which were started by people. The two leading causes are debris burning and campfires. Many parts of the state have imposed public fire restrictions on outdoor debris burning, campfires, off road driving, fireworks, the use of tracer ammunition and exploding targets to name a few. Log on to www.oregon.gov/odf for fire restrictions in your area or call your local Oregon Department of Forestry office or fire department.
I-5 Pursuit In Marion County Leads To Two Arrests (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/24/15
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On June 24, 2015 at about 1:30PM, an OSP Lieutenant observed a 2002 Honda Odyssey van driving recklessly on I-5 northbound near milepost 258. The lieutenant attempted to stop the vehicle which failed to yield, continuing at a high rate of speed and erratically changing lanes.

The Honda continued northbound where more law enforcement agencies joined in efforts to stop the vehicle including attempts to deploy spike strips. The Honda ran out of gas near milepost 277 northbound and the driver, identified as Anna S LYAKHOVETSKAYA, age 21, of Salem, was taken into custody.

While LYAKHOVETSKAYA was being taken into custody, a 2001 Chevy S-10 pickup drove up the shoulder at a high rate of speed and almost crashed into emergency personnel. The driver of the Chevy was identified as Igor S KULIK, 27, of Salem. Investigation revealed both LYAKHOVETSKAYA and KULIK knew each other and KULIK was attempting to catch up to the pursuit.

LYAKHOVETSKAYA was arrested for Felony Attempt to Elude, Reckless Driving, Reckless Endangering and Resisting Arrest. KULIK was arrested for Reckless Driving and Reckless Endangering.

OSP was assisted by the Marion County Sheriff's Office and Woodburn Fire. I-5 was backed up while emergency crews were on scene.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1002/85644/277nb.jpg
Extreme heat conditions by weekend prompt Oregon Public Health warning
Oregon Health Authority - 06/24/15
June 24, 2015

Oregonians should stay hydrated, limit sun exposure as temps top 100

As the state's temperatures break into the triple digits by this weekend, health officials are recommending Oregonians take steps to prevent heat-related illnesses that can lead to heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

"Summers in Oregon are great and people want to be outdoors, but temperatures at or above 100 degrees can be dangerous," says Bruce Gutelius, M.D., M.P.H., deputy state epidemiologist at the Public Health Division. "Heat exhaustion and heat stroke are real problems that can lead to death, so people need to take precautions to protect their health."

According to the National Weather Service, the hottest weather of the year throughout Oregon so far is expected to arrive at the end of this week, and continue through the weekend and into next week. The hottest day in the Willamette Valley will be Saturday, when temperatures will reach 100 degrees in lower elevations and get above 90 in higher-elevation areas. Eastern Oregon temperatures will be between 100 and 110 degrees into next week.

The Oregon Public Health Division offers the following tips for staying safe and healthy during extreme heat conditions:

1. Stay cool
-- Stay in air-conditioned places when temperatures are high, if possible.

-- Limit exposure to the sun from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. when ultraviolet (UV) rays are strongest. Try to schedule activities in the morning and evening.

-- Open windows to allow fresh air to circulate, especially during morning and evening hours, and close shades on west-facing windows during the afternoon hours.


-- Use portable electric fans to exhaust hot air from rooms or draw in cooler air.
-- Wear loose-fitting clothing to keep cool and protect your skin from the sun.

-- Use cool compresses, misting, and cool showers and baths.

-- Avoid hot foods and heavy meals; they add heat to the body.

-- Never leave infants or children in a parked car. Nor should pets be left in parked cars - they, too, can suffer heat-related illness.

-- Dress infants and children in loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.

-- Use sunscreen with at least SPF 15 when going outside.

2. Stay hydrated
-- Regardless of your level of activity, drink plenty of fluids, even if you are not thirsty and especially when working outside.

-- Avoid alcohol or liquids containing large amounts of sugar.

People with a chronic medical condition such as heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, cancer, or kidney disease may be less likely to sense and respond to changes in temperature. Also, they may be taking medications that can worsen the impact of extreme heat. People in this category should be closely monitored to make sure they're drinking enough water, have access to air conditioning and know how to keep cool.

Those who exercise or work outdoors in extreme heat are more likely to become dehydrated and get heat-related illness and should pay particular attention to staying as cool and hydrated as possible.

For more information, visit the Oregon Public Health Division Extreme Heat page at http://public.health.oregon.gov/Preparedness/Prepare/Pages/PrepareForExtremeHeat.aspx or the CDC Heat Stress page at http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/heatstress.

# # #
***Update*** Double Murder Investigation Continuing In Josephine County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/24/15
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The Oregon State Police is seeking the public's assistance for information regarding a Toyota Celica that is believed to be associated with a double homicide that occurred on June 15, 2015, in Josephine County. The vehicle was known to be in the Colonial Valley area on that date and may have been involved in other crimes. The vehicle is a 1994 Toyota Celica, two door, black in color with an Oregon License of 966EXX.

The suspect in the double homicide, Brian Scott KILLIAN, may have been driving this vehicle on an around the time of the homicide. Anyone with information regarding this vehicle or anyone who has had recent contact with KILLIAN is encouraged to contact Detective Bryan Scott at 541-618-7957.

All media inquiries should be directed to the Josephine County District Attorney's Office.
End Update

Previous Release:
The Oregon State Police in conjunction with the Josephine County Major Crimes Team is investigating a double homicide which occurred north of Grants Pass on Monday.

According to Detective Sergeant Jeff Fitzgerald, on June 15th, 2015, at approximately 3:25 PM, Josephine County 911 received a report of a possible deceased person at a residence in the Colonial Valley area just north of Grants Pass. OSP troopers and detectives, along with the Josephine County Sheriff's Office responded to the address where they located the bodies of Jerry JACKSON, age 75 and Joann JACKSON, age 73 who both appeared to be the victim of homicidal violence.

The Josephine County Major Crimes Team, consisting of members from the Oregon State Police, Josephine County Sheriff's Office, Grants Pass Department of Public Safety and the Josephine County District Attorney's Office was activated to investigate, with the Oregon State Police designated as the lead investigating agency.

A suspect, identified as Brian Scott KILLIAN, age 28, of Grants Pass was taken into custody at a separate location in Josephine County. Killian was lodged at the Josephine County Jail on 8 counts of Aggravated Murder, Unlawful Use of a Weapon, 2 counts of Animal Abuse in the 1st Degree, Robbery in the First Degree, Robbery in the 3rd Degree, 2 counts of Burglary in the First Degree, Attempted Assault in the 2nd Degree, Unlawful Use of a Motor Vehicle, Attempted Unlawful Use of a Motor Vehicle, Reckless Driving and Reckless Endangering.

The investigation into this incident is still continuing and no further information will be released at this time. All media inquiries should be directed to the Josephine County District Attorney's Office.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1002/85417/celica_1.JPG , 2015-06/1002/85417/celica_2.JPG
Heat wave coming in much of Oregon, learn how to beat the heat (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 06/24/15
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The National Weather Service in Portland and others have issued an excessive heat watch for the inland areas of Southwest Washington and Northwest Oregon from the coast range to the Cascades. The NWS Portland watch is in affect from Friday afternoon through Sunday, June 26-28.

With temperatures likely to reach 100 degrees and potential for muggy conditions, it is important to be cautious during this abnormally early heat wave.

"While enjoying the weekend, we need to make sure we take heat warnings seriously," said Oregon Office of Emergency Management Director Andrew Phelps. "It is important to keep an eye on those who are most vulnerable to the effects of extreme heat like infants and young children, our elderly family members and neighbors, and those with chronic medical conditions."

Here are some tips from our partners at the National Weather Service for how to beat the heat:
Avoid exertion during the heat of the day
Stay hydrated with clear, non-alcoholic, non-caffeinated liquids
Do not leave pets and children in automobiles
Use caution near rivers or lakes and be sure to wear a life jacket
Reschedule strenuous activity to early morning or evening
Know the signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion and heat stroke
Wear light weight and loose fitting clothing when possible
Keep blinds or shades closed during the day
Wait until cooler times of day to run dishwashers and clothes dryers
Instead of using a stove consider a microwave or outdoor grill

Furthermore, to reduce risk during outdoor work, The Occupational Safety and
Health Administration recommends scheduling frequent rest breaks in shaded or air conditioned environments, and anyone overcome by heat should be moved to a cool, shaded location.

"Heat stroke and other heat-related illness is an emergency," added Phelps. "Call 911 or seek medical attention immediately if you think someone is experiencing health issues due to the heat."


CAPTION:
This image from RAPTOR (Real-Time Assessment and Planning Tool for Oregon) - Oregon's Common Operating Picture for Emergency Management and Response, shows an excessive heat watch warning (maroon color), and heat advisory (light tan) from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. http://www.oregon.gov/OMD/OEM/Pages/plans_train/RAPTOR.aspx


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/3986/85636/5015865_OEM_Logo_Design_2014-COLOR.png , 2015-06/3986/85636/HeatWatchAdvisory.JPG
Bike MS 2015: Willamette Valley (Photo)
National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Oregon Chapter - 06/24/15
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Don't Just Ride, Bike MS

Friday, July 31- Sunday, August 2, 2015

At Bike MS, the ride is just icing on the cake. You'll also kick back and relax with old friends while you eat mouth-watering BBQ, down ice cold beverages, watch a classic movie on our big outdoor screen, sing your heart out on karaoke night, and share your adventures from the road.

Our weekend escape in gorgeous Monmouth, Oregon is for every kind of rider. From the "I haven't been on a bike since Uncle Merton repossessed my Schwinn" to "sure, I can ride 100x faster than the speed of light, can't you?"

Don't feel like riding? No problem. You can volunteer, make a donation, or even sponsor the event.

And here's the best part: The dollars you raise for Bike MS fund critical research, programs, and services that help people who live with multiple sclerosis right here in our neighborhood. How sweet is that?
Bike MS is more than an escape-it's something you believe in.

For more information, visit bikeMS.org or call Amy Harris, Bike Manager, at (503)-445-8351.

CYCLISTS
Registration: $50-$75
Fundraising Minimum: $250
Phone: (503)-445-8351
Email: Amy.Harris@nmss.org
Event URL: bikeMS.org
http://bitly.com/1d4mDxW

VOLUNTEERS
Information: Will receive a t-shirt, food, and water at the event. There are various time slots and positions available.
Phone: (503)-445-8356
Email: Wendy.Allison@nmss.org
Volunteer URL: http://bit.ly/1Gn2alb


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/3737/85632/NEW_Bike_Sig.jpg
American Red Cross Offers Tips to Stay Safe When Temperatures Soar (Photo)
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 06/24/15
Have fun in the sun - and the water - but stay Red Cross safe!
Have fun in the sun - and the water - but stay Red Cross safe!
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Dangerously hot weather is predicted for Oregon and Southwest Washington over the next few days. Avoid heat-related emergencies and water tragedies by staying informed and using American Red Cross safety tips. Listen to NOAA Weather Radio for updates from the National Weather Service.

"High temperatures, humidity and hot, indoor environments can quickly cause heat-related emergencies," said Troy Jenkins, Red Cross Health & Safety training manager. "Excessive heat can lead to sunburn, heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke."

The Red Cross has some simple steps to help beat the heat:
Never leave children or pets alone in vehicles. The temperature inside can reach a dangerous level within a few minutes.
Drink more water than usual - even if you're not thirsty.
Wear loose-fitting, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
Avoid working outdoors; if you must do so, take frequent breaks and use the buddy system.
Check on family, friends and neighbors who do not have air conditioning, who spend much of their time alone, or who are more likely to be affected by the heat.
If possible, bring animals inside. If not, frequently check to ensure they are comfortable and have water and a shady place to rest.
Community cooling centers are available in Portland metropolitan area. Check with your local county office to locate centers near you.
This weekend temperatures are expected to reach record highs, possibly in the triple digits. And with the increased heat, more and more people will take up swimming to cool themselves off.

"Many people will flock to local lakes, rivers, pools, and the coast," says Brian Hoffmeister, American Red Cross aquatic specialist. "This year Oregon has already experienced a record number of drownings. There are ways to stay safe."

Helpful tips before rushing to pool parties or rivers and lakes this weekend:
The water is cold. Cold water can easily lead to hypothermia and put even strong swimmers in a dangerous situation.
Be careful around moving water which may be much faster and stronger than it appears. This can swiftly push you downstream or exhaust strong swimmers. Be honest with yourself about your swimming abilities.
Look before you leap! Don't blindly jump into unfamiliar water. Underwater obstacles can cause significant injury or death. Always jump feet first especially this year with severely low water levels.
Never swim alone. Always swim with others, preferably in a supervised or lifeguarded area.
Wear a lifejacket. They are simple to use and can prevent most drowning events. Make sure jackets are properly fitted and contain a U.S. Coast Guard Approved label.
Know how to respond to a water emergency. Swimmers in distress need help immediately; reach or throw, don't go. Call 9-1-1.

Additional resources for heat waves, and swimming safely in lakes, rivers and streams are available from the American Red Cross.

The free Red Cross Emergency App provides instant access to expert heat safety tips. Users also have the option of receiving alerts for excessive heat watches, warnings and heat advisories. The Red Cross Pet First Aid App has steps pet owners should take to help keep their furry friends safe during hot weather. People can find the apps in their app store by searching for American Red Cross and at redcross.org/apps.

People can learn how to prevent and respond to heat-related and other emergencies by taking a Red Cross First Aid and CPR/AED or Advance Child Care Training course. A variety of online and in-class options are available. Course and registration information is available at redcross.org/takeaclass.

About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

# # #


Attached Media Files: Have fun in the sun - and the water - but stay Red Cross safe! , When temperatures soar, remember to drink plenty of water, even if you are not thirsty. , A person who is drowning has the greatest chance of survival if these steps are followed.
Health advisory for water contact at Tolovana State Park Beach lifted June 24
Oregon Health Authority - 06/24/15
June 24, 2015

Testing shows fecal bacteria levels have subsided

The Oregon Health Authority today lifted a public health advisory for contact with marine water at Tolovana State Park Beach, located in Clatsop County. The health authority issued the advisory June 23 after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from subsequent samples taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality showed contamination had subsided and the water no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk associated with water contact activities. However, officials recommend staying out of large pools on the beach that are frequented by birds, and runoff from those pools, because the water may contain increased bacteria from fecal matter.

State officials continue to encourage other recreational activities at all Oregon beaches, suggesting only that water contact be avoided when advisories are in effect.

Since 2003, state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are OHA, DEQ and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

For more information, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program's website at www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0400, or call the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767.

# # #
Pacific Power Blue Sky customers fund $121,500 worth of habitat restoration
Pacific Power - 06/24/15
Contact: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tom Gauntt, Pacific Power, June 24, 2015
503-813-7291

Haley Walker, The Freshwater Trust
503-222-9091, ext 30


Pacific Power Blue Sky customers fund $121,500 worth of habitat restoration
Voluntary program provides channel for customers to support renewable energy and the restoration of native fish habitat

PORTLAND, Ore. - In 2015, Pacific Power and The Freshwater Trust, a river restoration nonprofit, will award more than $120,000 to four on-the-ground restoration projects across Oregon, thanks to customers choosing Pacific Power's Blue Sky Habitat Fund.

Through an automatic $2.50 monthly donation, more than 4,300 Pacific Power customers have had a direct hand in the restoration and protection of native fish habitat. This year, projects financed by the fund will benefit tributaries of the Willamette, the Sandy, the Rogue and the Applegate rivers.

"For more than 13 years, Pacific Power has offered its customers an easy way to make a real difference for Oregon's freshwater ecosystems and species," said Valerie Smith, Pacific Power's director of customer services. "While the program is completely voluntary, we've seen that many individuals and families want to make an impact on the environment and their communities."

Since 2011, more than 42 miles of restored stream can be attributed to the Blue Sky Habitat program.

Once a year, watershed councils and nonprofits apply for a portion of the funding. The Freshwater Trust, a nonprofit with more than 30 years of experience restoring freshwater ecosystems in Oregon, reviews the applications and evaluates them based on a key set of criteria.

"Priority is given to on the ground habitat restoration projects that provide a direct benefit to native anadromous fish, many of which are listed as either threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act," said Jessa Irzyk, habitat restoration coordinator and project manager with The Freshwater Trust. "We also want to see a strong technical and scientific approach with quantifiable outcomes to the proposed restoration projects that is carried out by a qualified restoration team. This is in order to make sure that the actions being taken will indeed have a significant beneficial impacts on the waterway as a whole."

This year, the largest award of $32,000 was granted to the Geos Institute to aid in the removal of the Fielder and Wimer Dams on Evans Creek in Oregon's Rogue River Basin. Both dams are abandoned irrigation projects and have fish ladders, but neither meets Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) or National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) fish passage criteria. Due to a narrow range of flow conditions and lack of debris maintenance, fall Chinook, threatened Coho salmon, summer and winter steelhead and cutthroat trout do not easily migrate around the dams. In fact, some fish leap out of the Fielder Dam ladder and perish on the rocks nearby.

"Our freshwater resources in the West are precious," said Irzyk. "The more innovate ways we can come together to make a positive impact for them and the wildlife that call them home, the better."

About Blue Sky
The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has ranked Blue Sky fifth or better in the nation for the 12th consecutive year in the number of customers buying renewable power. The Blue Sky Block, Usage and Habitat products are Green-e Energy certified; About 55,000 Pacific Power customers currently participate in the Blue Sky program across Oregon, Washington and California. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net/bluesky.

About Pacific Power: Pacific Power provides electric service to more than 730,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. Our goal is to provide our customers with value for their energy dollar, and safe, reliable electricity. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with almost 1.8 million customers in six western states. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net.

About The Freshwater Trust
The Freshwater Trust is an action-oriented 501(c)(3) not-for-profit that restores rivers and streams throughout Oregon. The Freshwater Trust uses cooperative, market-based solutions that benefit rivers, working lands and local communities - from working with landowners to keep more water in streams to streamlining restoration processes to achieve greater pace and scale to improving aquatic habitat using a localized approach. For more information, visit thefreshwatertrust.org.

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More on the projects funded in 2015:
Project name: Fielder and Wimer Dam Removal
County: Jackson
Watershed: Rogue River
Amount: $32,000 of $726,456 total project cost
Description: Geos Institute is partnering with American Rivers and WaterWatch Oregon to remove Fielder and Wimer Dams on Evans Creek, a tributary to the Rogue River. Successfully removing these structures will restore unimpeded fish passage for migrating and resident aquatic species. Both dams are among the top 10 on the statewide inventory of fish passage barriers priority list. While both dams have fish ladders, neither meets Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) or National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) fish passage criteria.

Native fish benefited: Coho salmon, fall Chinook, summer and winter steelhead, cutthroat trout, Pacific lamprey and Klamath small scale sucker


Project name: Main Stem Ash Creek Riparian Revegetation - Luckiamute Watershed Council

County: Polk

Watershed: Willamette River

Amount: $29,562 of $219,644 total project cost

Description: The Luckiamute Watershed Council will remove non-native and invasive species and restore streamside vegetation along nearly three miles of Ash Creek, a tributary to the Willamette River. Flowing through the Cities of Monmouth and Independence, the creek and its floodplain provide important ecological functions, including flood storage and habitat for upper Willamette winter steelhead and spring Chinook. However, historic clearing of streamside vegetation, encroaching development, and channel dredging has damaged parts of the creek. Through community partnerships, the Watershed Council will restore and protect the streamside corridor along Ash Creek's main stem, a highly visible and accessible waterway for two cities with a combined population of more than 18,500 people.

Native fish benefited: Spring Chinook and winter steelhead



Project name: Thompson Creek Habitat Restoration Project - Phase 2 - Applegate Partnership & Watershed Council

County: Jackson

Watershed: Applegate River

Amount: $29,563 of $456,082 total project cost
Description: The Applegate Partnership & Watershed Council will take on the restoration of another 2.63 stream miles of Thompson Creek, a tributary of the Applegate River. This would be the second phase in the "Thompson Creek Habitat Restoration Project," expanding the project's total stream miles restored to 4.4 stream miles. Thompson Creek has potential to be prime habitat for Coho salmon, yet it struggles with high water temperatures, which can be deadly to native fish populations. Through the restoration of streamside vegetation and the strategic replacement of large wood, Thompson Creek will take another step forward toward becoming a more hospitable habitat for fish to thrive.
Native fish benefited: Chinook salmon, Coho salmon, summer and winter steelhead

Project name: Upper Sandy River Basin Habitat Project - The Freshwater Trust

County: Clackamas

Watershed: Sandy River

Amount: $30,375 of $977,808 total project cost

Description: The Freshwater Trust, US Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management will lead the Upper Sandy River Basin Habitat Restoration Project on behalf of the Sandy River Basin Partners. The project's goal is to benefit federally-listed spring Chinook, Coho and winter steelhead in the Sandy River basin by accelerating the recovery of naturally functioning conditions within the stream channels and floodplain areas of Salmon River and Still Creek. Funding will support the reactivation of flow to historic side channels, construction of large wood habitat structures, restoration of alcoves, enhancement of secondary channel habitat, boulder placements, and placement of additional large wood in side channels. This work is part of a multi-year, basin-scale restoration effort previously funded by Pacific Power.

Native fish benefited: Spring Chinook salmon, coho, winter steelhead and Pacific lamprey
Exclusive Media Preview TODAY at 2pm - Major World War II Exhibition Opens June 26 at Oregon Historical Society in Portland; Features Enigma Machine
Oregon Historical Society - 06/24/15
Media Preview Event

Media are invited to a private tour and preview of the exhibition on Wednesday, June 24 at 2pm at the Oregon Historical Society. Please contact Rachel Randles (rachel.randles@ohs.org) if you plan to attend or to set up an interview.

Press Images: http://bit.ly/1cJk5EM
Please include credits listed in file name when used for publication.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

On exhibit June 26 - December 7, 2015

Portland, OR - World War II, considered the most momentous event of the twentieth century, will be the focus of World War II: A World at War, A State Transformed, a major exhibition opening at the Oregon Historical Society (1200 SW Park Ave., Portland 97205) on Friday, June 26, 2015. The exhibition will feature rare documents and artifacts from world and military leaders including Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, and Dwight D. Eisenhower, and will also share stories of the impacts of the war on Oregonians.

"World War II forever changed history in Oregon and across the globe," said OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk. "It is a fitting subject for the largest exhibition and program series ever hosted at the Oregon Historical Society."

A special preview and opening will be held Thursday, June 25 for OHS members, where historian David Eisenhower, the grandson of the late Dwight D. Eisenhower, will join the official ribbon cutting of this 6,000 square foot exhibit. Following the reception, all are welcome to attend a lecture with Eisenhower at the First Congregational Church (1126 SW Park Ave., Portland 97205) at 7pm. Tickets are on sale for $20 ($10 for OHS members) and can be purchased online through BoxOfficeTickets.com or at the door the night of the lecture.

Throughout the run of the exhibit, OHS will be hosting programs and lectures focusing on World War II. A complete list of these programs is available at www.ohs.org.

EXHIBITION OVERVIEW

From North Africa, to Europe, to the Pacific: A World at War

This original Oregon Historical Society exhibition presents the worldwide conflict through artifacts and manuscripts on loan from the Portland-based Mark Family Collection, including a very rare Nazi Enigma machine, the military uniforms of Gen. George Patton and Dwight D. Eisenhower, the only copy of the Atlantic Charter personally signed by Winston Churchill and Franklin Roosevelt, and a life preserver from the U.S.S. West Virginia, which was damaged at Pearl Harbor.

Letters and manuscripts provide a lens onto the many events of World War II, from prominent battles to critical political decisions. Notable documents include handwritten letters from General Eisenhower to his wife Mamie and letters from Senator Mark Hatfield, a Naval Lieutenant during the war, to his parents.

Oregon: A State Transformed

The exhibit also focuses on Oregon, a state transformed during the mid twentieth century. Items drawn from the Oregon Historical Society's archives and from collections across the state tell of events that dramatically changed Oregon, including the social impact of the Kaiser shipyards, the internment of Japanese Americans, and the only World War II casualties to occur in the continental U.S.--the result of a Japanese balloon bomb.

An Unparalleled Interactive Experience

Digital and hands-on components within the exhibit provide visitors with unique interactive experiences. Touch screens will feature an original code breaking game inspired by the Enigma machine. To get into the mindset of America's best military leaders, visitors can plot the movement of troops on a "war table." Multi-media experiences include screenings of WWII newsreels and military field phones playing radio newscasts from the era. Plus, visitors can take a "selfie" with Winston Churchill's wax doppelganger, originally on display at Madame Tussaud's in London.

Propaganda Posters, Canteens & Captain America

The Art of War: Propaganda Posters of World Wars I & II
Continuing in the museum's North Wing Gallery is a visually stunning exhibition of propaganda posters, which opened this past February. Also on loan from the Mark Family Collection, these posters provide a unique glimpse into an era before television and internet when artists and marketers were challenged to communicate to the general public in a way that would simply and enduringly convey important messages.

The Final Chapter: Peace and Reconciliation
The Oregon Historical Society is proud to also host a special display of Yosegaki Hinomaru flags. These World War II era Japanese national flags were customarily given to Japanese soldiers before they departed for battle and included signatures and words of encouragement from friends and family. These flags often became "treasures of war," and were taken as souvenirs back to the United States and other Allied nations. Pacific Northwest historian and author Rex Ziak and his wife Keiko Ziak have undertaken a project to reunite these flags with the families of the original owners. So far, the Ziaks have collected nearly 100 flags, of which 30 have been claimed by Japanese families. This special display at OHS will share the emotional story of this reunion effort.

Kilroy's Canteen
Named after the iconic WWII cartoon figure, Kilroy's pays tribute to USO clubs iconic of the era and features a variety of unique items ranging from a poker table used by Harry Truman during his presidency to a tribute to the 41st Infantry Division (also known as the "Sunset Division"). Composed of National Guard Units from Oregon, Washington, Montana, and Idaho, the 41st Division battled Japanese forces in New Guinea and the Philippines from 1943-45, where they became known as the "Jungleers." The war's enduring presence in popular culture is also highlighted with the shields used by actor Chris Evans in the 2011 movie Captain America: The First Avenger.

The Oregon Historical Society is open seven days a week, Mondays - Saturdays from 10am - 5pm and Sundays from 12pm - 5pm. Admission is $11, and discounts are available for students, seniors, and youth. OHS members and Multnomah County residents receive free admission every day. Thanks to a generous donation from Columbia Sportswear, all United States military veterans will receive free admission throughout the run of the exhibit.



About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state's collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon's history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon's cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.
Keep safety in mind with expected extreme heat (Photo)
Salem Health - 06/24/15
Paul Gramenz, MD
Paul Gramenz, MD
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With soaring temperatures expected through Fourth of July weekend, the staff and physicians of Salem Hospital's emergency department want area residents to stay healthy and safe.

They offer these tips to help you, your children, your elderly parents, and even your pets, stay safe--and what to do if you have problems in the heat.


Stay well hydrated

Drink two to three quarts of fluid per day (non-caffeinated).
Do not limit intake to just water. You also need electrolytes, which you can get from a variety of sports drinks.
If you are thirsty, you have waited too long.
One way to tell if you are getting enough fluid is to look at your urine. In general, it should be clear. A yellow color means you need to drink more water--unless it is affected by food, vitamin, medication or caffeine intake.
Limit alcohol intake. It doesn't count toward your water consumption and it can impair your judgment.
Be smart about outdoor activities.
Stay inside, unless your job requires you to be outdoors.
If you have to be outdoors, avoid strenuous activities between the hottest times of the day--typically from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
If you need to be outdoors, prime the pump before you go: Start your fluid intake before you take your first step outside.
Wear sun block and a hat.
Use a water sprayer (mister) to cool off. Battery-operated, hand-held fans may also be helpful.


Some people need extra precautions

High heat can cause confusion.
The very young and the elderly are most prone to thermal-regulation problems--their bodies simply have a harder time regulating heat. They especially should avoid the outdoors and manage their fluid intake. This is also true for people with chronic illnesses, like those on dialysis.
"It is important to check on those who you may not otherwise think to check on--our elderly who live alone," says Heather Cofer, RN, emergency department nurse manager with Salem Hospital. "Stop by a neighbor's or your parent's house with some cool lemonade, or give them a call to make sure they have what they need to fare the weather alright. They will appreciate it and you will be their unsung hero."
Children can become dehydrated much more quickly than adults. Be sure they get enough fluid and follow all heat and sun-safety procedures.
Don't overdress newborns. If you're wearing a tank top and shorts, then a similar outfit for your baby is appropriate--whether it's a shorts outfit or simply a t-shirt and diaper. Stay in the shade. Use a lukewarm washcloth to cool baby--and carry a blanket to protect the baby when you enter air-conditioned extremes.
Some medications can cause problems during heat spells, particularly some psychiatric medications and diuretics. Talk with your pharmacist if you have concerns.
Notice a distressed pet in a hot car? Call 911 if you can't locate the owner quickly.


Be safe in the water

When it gets hot, it can be tempting to jump in the river to cool off. Be careful. Remember, Oregon rivers are cold--even on hot days. Do no dive into rivers or ponds--they may be shallow.
Wear a lifejacket on boats and in the river.
Do not drink alcohol.
Parents should closely watch their children in the water--plus people who have mental or physical disabilities.
If you have a backyard pool, make sure it has a fence around it.


Warning signs and what to do if you experience them

Heat illness goes through three stages: heat cramps, exhaustion, and then heat stroke.
If you experience heat cramps, you will have muscle cramps and feel dizzy. You need to get in the shade and use a cold compress and take fluids.
With heat exhaustion, you will sweat excessively and look pale. Get in the shade, use a cold compress, and drink fluids. I-V fluids may be needed.
"If you are having a heat stroke, you will be very pale and have a fever. You will not be able to sweat and you will be mentally confused. Your body core temperature has gotten too high. Call 911!" says Paul Gramenz, MD, an emergency physician and medical director/section chief with Salem Hospital.
Heat-related illness could cause serious problems. You can reduce your chance of feeling tired or becoming seriously ill with a few simple steps.

Salem Hospital is part of Salem Health, along with West Valley Hospital, Willamette Health Partners and other affiliated health care organizations offering exceptional care to people in and around Oregon's mid-Willamette Valley. The prestigious 2015 Truven Health 50 Top Cardiovascular Hospitals named Salem Hospital among the highest performing hospitals in the nation--and the only Oregon hospital, and one of two Pacific Northwest hospitals, to receive this honor. "Like" us on facebook.com/salemhealth; follow us on Twitter: @salemhealth; and view us at youtube.com/salemhealth.


Attached Media Files: Paul Gramenz, MD
2014 Health System Transformation report: Coordinated care model shows continued progress for second calendar year
Oregon Health Authority - 06/24/15
June 24, 2015

Oregon's health system transformation continued to show positive trends in health care quality and financial measures for the second year in a row. That is the overall message of the 2014 Health System Transformation report released today by the Oregon Health Authority.

The 2014 Health System Transformation report lays out the progress of Oregon's coordinated care organizations (CCOs) on key quality and financial measures. The report includes expanded information on the new Oregon Health Plan members who have joined since Jan. 1, 2014, when more Oregonians became eligible for Medicaid as allowed under the Affordable Care Act.

This report, which covers calendar year 2014, continues to show improvements in areas such as enrollment in patient-centered primary care homes, and continued decreases in both emergency department visits and hospital admissions due to chronic diseases.

The report also says that all of Oregon's CCOs showed improvement in a number of quality incentive measures and 13 of the 16 CCOs earned the full amount of their quality pool payments in 2014.

"We have added more than 434,000 Oregonians to the Oregon Health Plan since January 1, 2014, and the coordinated care model continues to show improvements to Oregonians' care for the second straight year," said Lynne Saxton, Oregon Health Authority director. "These improvements are a great example of how CCOs are implementing positive changes through better care coordination and integration of services."

The coordinated care model continues to show improvement in the following areas for the state's Oregon Health Plan members:

-- Decreased emergency department (ED) visits. Emergency department visits for people served by CCOs decreased 22 percent since 2011 baseline data. Many CCOs have implemented a number of best practices to reach this result, including the use of emergency department navigators. For example, one such program includes referrals to a patient-centered primary care home for patients who do not have a primary care provider, as well as intensive management for patients who visited the ED three or more times within six months.

-- Decreased hospital admissions for short-term complications from diabetes. The rate of adult patients (ages 18 and older) with diabetes who had a hospital stay due to a short-term problem from their diabetes dropped by 26.9 percent since 2011 baseline data.

-- Decreased rate of hospital admissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The rate of adult patients (ages 40 and older) who had a hospital stay due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or asthma decreased by 60 percent since 2011 baseline data.

-- Increase in patient-centered primary care home (PCPCH) enrollment. PCPCH enrollment has increased 56 percent since 2011. Additionally, primary care costs continue to increase, which means more health care services are happening within primary care rather than other settings such as emergency departments.

This report also shows areas of challenge. In 2014, CCOs saw a reduction in cervical cancer and chlamydia screenings for women, which may be due to changes in national guidelines, which recommend women wait three to five years between Pap tests and to wait until age 21 to have their first Pap test. In addition, members initiating alcohol and drug treatment increased; however, ongoing treatment after an initial visit or service for alcohol and drug use remained unchanged, showing room for improvement.

Finally, financial data indicate that coordinated care organizations are continuing to hold down costs. Oregon is staying within the budget that meets its commitment to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to reduce the growth in spending by 2 percentage points per member, per year.

"The CCOs are clearly hitting their marks as they work toward the triple aim of better health, better care and lower costs," said Saxton. "These metrics offer positive proof that Oregon's health system is continuing to improve care for the nearly 1.1 million Oregonians who need it most."

The report is available online at www.Oregon.gov/oha/metrics.

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Operation Dry Water -It's all about Impairment (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 06/24/15
Boater consuming beer on the water.
Boater consuming beer on the water.
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The Marine Board and law enforcement from 32 counties and the Oregon State Police will be participating in Operation Dry Water, during the weekend of June 26-28, as part of a nationally coordinated effort to reduce the number of accidents and fatalities related to boating under the influence of intoxicants (BUII).

So far this year, Oregon has experienced five recreational boating fatalities. Of the five, three are being investigated for potential drug and alcohol impairment.

"Boating under the influence of intoxicants means prescription drugs, alcohol, inhalants, marijuana, or any other substance that impairs a person's ability to make sound judgments and have the ability to safely operate a boat," says Ashley Massey, Public Information Officer for the Marine Board.

And this doesn't just apply to motorboats. Of the three fatalities involving marijuana, other drugs and alcohol, two involved paddlecraft and one, a motorboat. Oars and paddles that are used in kayaks, canoes, drift boats and stand up paddleboards are not easy to control, especially when coming upon a rapid, obstruction, or in a fast moving current if the person is inexperienced. Of the five fatalities, four occurred on rivers and one in the pacific ocean. "Rivers and the surf zone are the most dangerous areas for people to recreate, and require skill, quick thinking, good balance and vision, and fast reactions because the weather and water levels continually change," says Massey. Drugs and alcohol's effects are also amplified on the water with the combination of sun, glare, wind, waves and other motion.

Impaired boaters can expect to be arrested or face serious penalties. In Oregon, the consequences of being convicted of BUII include the possibility of jail time, $6,250 in fines and loss of boating privileges. The Marine Board urges boaters to boat safe, and boat sober -from any type of intoxicants.

For more information about Operation Dry Water, visit www.operationdrywater.org or the Marine Board's Boating Safety Program at www.boatoregon.com.
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Attached Media Files: Boater consuming beer on the water.
06/23/15
Water Rescue underway on the Northfork. ****UPDATED RELEASE (3)**** PHOTO ATTACHED (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/23/15
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The young man who died while swimming at Salmon Falls Park yesterday, has been identified as Blayk Wallace of Salem. Blayk had just graduated from West Salem High School and was going to be celebrating his 18th Birthday in August.

The Wallace family does not wish to speak with the media.

This is a very tragic event which occurred yesterday. No alcohol was involved during this incident. However, we would like to remind folks that even with warm temperatures the water may still be very cold and consideration should be given to that as well as water currents and using a life jacket. Our thoughts and prayers go out to the Wallace family.




It has been confirmed the 17 year old who was involved in the water rescue at Salmon Falls Park earlier today, has died. We do not anticipate any further releases this evening as notifications to the boys family is being made.




Deputies with the Marion County Sheriff's Office as well as fire personnel responded to a report of a water rescue at Salmon Falls Park at 2:40 P.M. Initial reports were delayed due to the location of the park and no cell phone service available.

Information the Sheriff's Office received from a citizen was a 17 year old male went under the water and had not come back up. A citizen left the park to get cell service to call for help. Fire and medical personnel arrived first and then deputies to find the male had been pulled from the water by several bystanders.

The bystanders began CPR and continued until medical personnel arrived on scene. The male was transported by ambulance to an area hospital where his status is unknown.

The investigation is on-going at this time and we will send out another update when more information is available as


Emergency crews are currently responding to Salmon Falls Park on the Little Northfork on a report of a subject in the water. The information is limited at this time due to the lack of cell phone coverage in the area. Witnesses reported a male subject went into the water and did not come out. More details will be released as responding deputies arrive on scene and assess the situation.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1294/85575/Blayk_Wallace.png
Fireworks - Keep it Legal, Keep it Safe
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 06/23/15
The Office of State Fire Marshal (OSFM), Oregon fire service, Keep Oregon Green, natural resource agencies, Oregon fireworks wholesalers, and safety experts encourage Oregonians to "Keep it Legal and Keep it Safe" when using fireworks. The 2015 Oregon fireworks sales season opens Monday, June 23 and runs through Sunday, July 5. The OSFM and their partners want everyone to know what fireworks are legal in Oregon, where they are permitted, and the important steps to take for fireworks safety.

"People often forget that legal fireworks can only be purchased from Oregon permitted fireworks retailers and stands," says State Fire Marshal Jim Walker. "And, regulations limit where those fireworks may be used. For example, fireworks are prohibited on all Oregon beaches, in parks, and campgrounds."

July 4th holiday forest visitors are advised to leave all fireworks at home. The use of fireworks is prohibited on all national forestland, and most other public lands. "Fireworks compound the threat to already dry forests," states Keep Oregon Green President Kristin Babbs. "Enjoy fireworks where they belong: on the pavement- safely away from houses, vehicles, and flammable vegetation."

Oregon law bans possession, use, or sale of fireworks that fly, explode, or travel more than six feet on the ground or 12 inches into the air. Fireworks commonly called bottle rockets, Roman Candles, and firecrackers are ILLEGAL in Oregon.

There were 165 reported fireworks-related fires in Oregon during 2014, resulting in 33 injuries and more than $178,000 in property damage. Over the past five years, from 2010 through 2014, there were 839 reported fireworks-related fires in Oregon resulting in one death, 159 civilian injuries, and more than $3.9 million in property damage.

Officials may seize illegal fireworks and fine offenders up to $1,000 per violation. Those who misuse fireworks or allow fireworks to cause damage are liable and may be required to pay fire suppression costs or other damage. Parents are also liable for fireworks damage caused by their children.

"All Oregonians share the responsibility to use only legal fireworks and use them carefully," adds Walker. And we encourage you to be aware and considerate of neighbors and their pets, before deciding on when and where you choose to light fireworks."

The OSFM encourages everyone to use the four B's of safe fireworks use:
Be Prepared before lighting fireworks: keep water available by using a garden hose or bucket.
Be Safe when lighting fireworks: keep children and pets away from fireworks.
Be Responsible after lighting fireworks: never relight a dud. Wait 15 to 20 minutes then soak it in a bucket of water before disposal.
Be Aware: use only legal fireworks and use them only in legal places.

The four B's of fireworks safety brochure is available here:
http://www.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/docs/Licensing_permits/fireworks/4BesFireworks.pdf.

Tips in Spanish are also available at: http://www.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/docs/Licensing_permits/fireworks/Fireworks_4Bs_Spanish.pdf.

More fireworks information is available at:
http://www.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/Licensing_Fireworks_Home.shtml


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1062/85602/4besfireworks.pdf
AARP Oregon "Ben Westlund Down the Trail" Awards to Recognize Legislative Champions
AARP Oregon - 06/23/15
In a ceremony on June 24th at the State Capital in Salem, AARP Oregon will issue awards to 12 "Legislative Champions" who helped launch bills and initiatives prioritized by AARP Oregon in 2015.

The first in a series, "AARP Oregon Ben Westlund Down the Trail" award honors the memory of an admired Oregon statesman known for his policy work and spirit of bipartisanship and for his "Down the Trail" adieus (he didn't like the finality of goodbyes). Ben Westlund was a popular Oregon legislator who was elected State Treasurer in 2006 and who passed away while in office in 2010.

"I am sure Ben Westlund would wholeheartedly support the efforts and work of AARP," said Ben's brother, Dr. Richard Westlund. "And he, and his entire family, would be honored to lend his name and "Down the Trail" slogan to an award that recognizes those who work so hard at caring for people as they transition through the different stages of life."

In 2015, award recipients moved forward in showing their care for Oregonians of all ages by passing a bill that improves the health of hospital-discharged patients through caregiver instruction on medication management and other tasks; by creating the Oregon Retirement Savings Board to produce a retirement savings plan with state oversight for workers without one through employers; and by supporting an initiative that protects elders from abuse through prevention, law enforcement and adult protective services.

Being recognized for their leadership on the CARE Act are: Senator Elizabeth Steiner Hayward, Senator Tim Knopp, Senator Laurie Monnes Anderson, Representative Mitch Greenlick, Representative Gene Whisnant, Representative Nancy Nathanson, and Representative Bill Kennemer.

Being recognized for their leadership on the Retirement Security bill are: Senator Lee Beyer, Representative Tobias Read and State Treasurer Ted Wheeler

Being recognized for their leadership on Elder Abuse Prevention are: Representative Vic Gilliam and Representative Val Hoyle.

"AARP Oregon Ben Westlund Down the Trail" awards ceremony will be held at noon, Wednesday, June 24, Room 350, Salem State Capital. Libby Westlund and other family members of Ben Westlund will join AARP Oregon Volunteer President Chad Cheriel and AARP Oregon Director Jerry Cohen in distributing the awards.
Wrong Way Driver Killed On I-84 When He Collides Head-On With Commercial Vehicle - Gilliam County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/23/15
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On June 22, 2015 at about 11:15PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to reports of a head-on crash on I-84 near milepost 114 in Gilliam County.

According to Sergeant John Katzenstein, a 1999 Jeep Cherokee, operated by Tyler D BROWN, age 25, of Hermiston, for an unknown reason was traveling eastbound in the westbound lanes of travel on I-84.

OSP began receiving complaints of this wrong way driver and troopers began to respond, but a short time later BROWN's vehicle struck a 1999 Peterbilt truck head-on. Both vehicles came to rest in the travel lanes and caught fire. The driver of the Peterbilt, Michael MCCRIGHT, age 61, of Redmond, managed to escape the fire as both vehicles became fully engulfed. MCCRIGHT was not injured. BROWN was declared deceased on scene.

The truck had was loaded with recently harvested salmon which took hours for fire crews to fully extinguish. Both directions of I-84 were closed for almost four hours until one lane in each direction could be opened. Crews are still on scene cleaning the highway.

OSP was assisted by Sherman County Fire, Rufus Rural Fire Department and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

No further information is available at this time.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1002/85597/100_0159.JPG , 2015-06/1002/85597/100_0167.JPG
OSP Conducts Death Investigation At Deadman Pass Rest Area - Umatilla County
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/23/15
On June 19, 2015, at about 9:48AM, the Oregon State Police Southern Dispatch Center received notification that a commercial truck had been located at the eastbound Deadman's Pass rest area (I84 exit 228) for about five hours. Another driver stopped and checked the commercial truck, located a suicide note, and called police.

Oregon State Police Troopers from Pendleton responded to the rest area. They were contacted by a subject who was geocaching in the area and located the deceased truck driver approximately 100 yards from his truck in a wooded area. Evidence at the scene and evidence discovered during the death investigation were consistent with suicide as the cause of death.

The deceased was identified as Guy S KRAVITZ, age 51, of Twin Falls, ID. The investigation is still continuing by the Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office.

Help is available for community members struggling from a mental health crisis and/or suicidal thoughts. Suicide is preventable. If you or someone you know needs help with suicidal thoughts or is otherwise in an immediate mental health crisis, please contact your local crisis help resources.

In addition to local resources in your community, a toll free line is available for Oregon Partnership Lifeline/National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255).
Health advisory issued June 23 for water contact at Tolovana State Park Beach
Oregon Health Authority - 06/23/15
June 23, 2015

The Oregon Health Authority issued a public health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Tolovana State Park Beach, located in Clatsop County.

Water samples indicate higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria, which can result in diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. Direct contact with the water should be avoided in this area until the advisory is lifted, especially by children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at Tolovana State Park Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0400, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk, even during an advisory. Neighboring beaches are not affected by this advisory.

Since 2003, state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state organizations participating in this program are the Oregon Public Health Division, Department of Environmental Quality and Parks and Recreation Department.

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Second Annual Camp Prepare! (Photo)
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 06/23/15
Camp Prepare! is a great opportunity for families to get together.
Camp Prepare! is a great opportunity for families to get together.
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Portland, Ore. June 22, 2015 - Calling all campers and preparedness enthusiasts! The Red Cross Cascades Region invites all Oregonians and Southwest Washingtonians to join us on August 1 for the second annual Camp Prepare! This region-wide coordinated camping event invites people of all ages to experience life using only the contents of their preparedness kits. Whether people plan to pitch a tent in their backyard or a local state park, campers are tasked with spending one night living without the comforts of electricity, running water or technology (with the exception of Red Cross apps).

"There is a lot of overlap in what people have in a preparedness kit and what you would bring on a camping trip, " says Melinda Davis, preparedness and partnerships manager. "Camp Prepare! is a great way to remind people to update their kits and find out if their current supplies are going to work in a real post-disaster situation."

Common items used for camping such as water, canned food, flashlights, extra batteries and first aid supplies are just a few of the things that should be in a disaster preparedness kit. While the Red Cross recommends at least a three-day supply of food and water, larger disasters may require people to have enough supplies to live comfortably for several weeks as may be the case if and when the 9.0 Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake hits.

Henry Soderberg, preparedness coordinator for the Southwest Oregon Chapter of the American Red Cross, took part in the first Camp Prepare! and recommends it as a way to review your family's "go" kit.

"Having an opportunity to check out my kit in advance to get ready for the camp out was a great way to see what items I needed to add or update," says Henry. "I camped with other Red Cross team members, and we shared food and other items. This really highlighted the importance of being part of a community that is prepared."

To participate and become an official "camper," visit www.redcross.org/campprepare. In addition to camping registration, the website also offers useful information about what belongs in a typical preparedness kit and what to do before, during and after common disasters.


About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

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Attached Media Files: Red Cross volunteers learn new survival techniques from leadership volunteer George Roth. , Camp Prepare! is a great opportunity for families to get together. , Camp Prepare! participants gather to learn new fire starting techniques.
Hot Weather Fire Prevention and Safety
Salem Fire Dept. - 06/23/15
With the projected warmer weather over this weekend and into next week, the Salem Fire Department reminds everyone that additional steps should be taken to prevent fire and maintain health. Due to increased temperatures and lower fuel moistures, the risk of fire ignition and fire spread is magnified. Additionally, high heat can impact the health of people and pets. Here are some key points to follow to "beat the heat" and be safe:

Fire Prevention
Dispose of cigarettes properly in non-combustible ashtrays or extinguish them in water or sand. In Oregon, cigarettes start one in ten fires statewide.
When using barbecue grills, maintain clearance from combustible decks, fences, and vegetation. Allow ashes to completely cool and then dispose of them in metal containers. Barbecue ashes can maintain ignition temperatures for many hours, even if the surface is cool to touch.
Avoid using welding, grinding, or mowing equipment near dry weeds and grass.
Avoid parking vehicles in dry, weedy areas. The temperature of vehicle exhaust components can easily ignite dry grass and weeds.
Don't overload electrical outlets with portable fans, air conditioners, or extension cords. Don't use extension cords with air conditioners.
Keep a fire extinguisher, water hose, or bucket handy in the event a fire occurs.
Observe no-burn regulations and fireworks restrictions.

Hot weather Safety
Stay hydrated and drink plenty of water. Avoid caffeinated or alcoholic drinks, which promote dehydration.
Minimize direct exposure to the sun and wear sunscreen.
Limit exercise and exertion - rest frequently and pace yourself.
Wear temperature-appropriate, light-weight, and loose-fitting clothing.
During the warmest parts of the day, consider indoor activities such as visiting Salem's libraries, a shopping mall, or a movie theater. Salem's central library (585 Liberty Street SE) is open Tuesday through Thursday from 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. and Friday and Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Additionally, the West Salem Library (395 Glen Creek Road NW) is open Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays, from 2:00 pm to 6:00 pm.
Consider scheduling outdoor activities during cooler time periods.
Don't leave children or pets in vehicles. Check on family, friends, and neighbors who may be at higher risk to heat-related issues.

Being prepared and proactive can decrease the likelihood of fires starting and spreading. Take time to review your family's fire evacuation plan and emergency preparedness supplies and also review the basic safety tips for staying cool.

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06/22/15
Deputies On Scene of Fatal Motor Vehicle Crash ***Update 3*** (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/22/15
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The female passenger who was ejected and killed in Friday's Crash has been identified as Sabrina Guerra, 27, of Salem. A photo of Sabrina is not available as of this time and family is not available for comment.




Updated mug shot of Hastings.



The driver of the vehicle in last night's fatal crash has been identified as Wesley Thomas Hastings, age 41, of Salem. Crash Team Investigators believe that Mr. Hastings was traveling north on Manning Road, when he failed to negotiate a curve, forcing the SUV he was driving to
leave the roadway and eventually roll over. Tragically the passenger was ejected, killing her instantly.

Mr. Hastings was taken to the Salem Hospital where he was treated and then arrested by Deputies for the crimes of Manslaughter II and DUII. Investigators have identified the passenger and are working to notify her next of kin. Mr. Hastings will be arraigned on Monday at 3:00 p.m. at the Marion County Circuit Court Annex. Anyone one with information regarding the crash is asked to call Deputy Casey Burnham at 503-991-6743.

The image of Mr. Hastings was taken in September of 2014, a current booking photo is not yet available.




Tonight at 6:30 p.m., Deputies were called to the intersection of Manning Road NE and Deconinck Road NE, near Woodburn, to investigate a single vehicle, rollover crash. When Deputies arrived two adults were found outside of the vehicle, one person was seriously injured and the other was deceased.

Members of our Crash Team are headed to the scene to continue the investigation. Manning Road is currently closed at Lebrun Road NE and Deconinck Road NE is closed at Arbor Grove Road NE. Deputies expect the closure to remain in effect for the next several hours and drivers are asked to avoid the area. Deputies are asking anyone who may have seen the crash to call 503-588-5032.

Additional details will be released as soon as they become available, that time frame is currently not known.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1294/85529/Manning.jpg , 2015-06/1294/85529/HASTINGS_2015.jpg
Stepped-up fire rules take effect June 23 in West Lane, So. Cascade Districts
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/22/15
On June 23, the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) will increase restrictions on forest activities in the Western Lane and South Cascade Districts due to rising fire danger. The "Regulated-Use" closure specifically aims to reduce the chance of wildfires starting from public activities in forested areas.

"Fire danger is trending much higher than normal and is either setting or close to setting records," South Cascade District Forester Greg Wagenblast said. "Large fuels are very dry for this time of the season and the grasses are curing (drying) out."

He noted that all wildland fuels - including grasses, woody debris and vegetation - are susceptible to ignite and carry fire under current conditions.

The tightened restrictions ban the following activities:

- Smoking in the forest except in closed vehicles
- Campfires outside of designated campgrounds
- All open fires
- Use of motorized vehicles except on improved roads
- Use of any fireworks and the use of chainsaws
- Mowing of tall dead or cured grass between the hours of 1 p.m. and 8 p.m.

The Regulated-Use closure also requires forest users to carry a shovel with a 26-inch handle and an 8-inch blade, and either one gallon of water or a 2-1/2 lb., ABC-rated fire extinguisher.

Western Lane and South Cascade declared fire season June 16. That declaration primarily affects forest operations, such as logging sites, by requiring firefighting equipment on site and the use of precautionary measures against fire. The Regulated-Use closure taking effect June 23 extends restrictions and preventative measures to the public on all private forestlands in Lane County and eastern Linn County.

Link Smith, Western Lane District Forester, noted that the National Weather Service has forecast very hot weather starting mid-week.

"That will dry out fuels and increase fire danger even more," he said, "so we're asking for the public's assistance with fire prevention and fire safety."

The district foresters said complying with Regulated Use is one way the public can help protect their communities and the natural resources of the state.
Adaptive Riding Institute - Ready for a New Ride as Horses of Hope Oregon: An Equine Therapy Experience (Photo)
VanNatta Public Relations - 06/22/15
hohlogoc
hohlogoc
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Salem, Oregon (June 22, 2015) The former Adaptive Riding Institute has been re-named Horses of Hope Oregon: An Equine Therapy Experience (HOH). Founded in 1988, the nonprofit organization provides equine therapy for people living with physical, emotional and behavioral challenges.

HOH Executive Director, Teresa Whalen said, "The Board of Directors feels that this new name really represents what we are all about: Hope. We also want to clarify the importance of equine therapy in our name. Our vision is to continue the expansion of our equine-based programs and the development of this facility as a community resource for personal wellness and development for the greater Willamette Valley and Oregon."

The facility is located at Stalle di Speranza (Stable of Hope) on 38 acres on Cloverdale Drive in Turner with 24 stalls, indoor/outdoor arenas and viewing areas.

"One of the best parts of our campus is the five acre sensory trail," said Leslie Simpson, HOH Board Secretary. "It winds through an evergreen forest and up and down hills. There is so much for riders and volunteers to see, smell, hear and feel, as we walk through there."
Equine-assisted therapy has been used for centuries. Ancient Greek literature mentioned the use of horseback riding as therapy. In Scandinavia equestrian therapy was used during an outbreak of polio in 1946. Equestrian riding was offered to wounded soldiers in England during World War I. The British Riding for the Disabled Association (RDA) was founded in 1969.

You can find out how to donate, sponsor a horse, volunteer or arrange an equine therapy experience at Horses of Hope at www.HorsesofHopeOregon.org or call 503-743-3890, 2895 Cloverdale Drive SE, Turner, OR 97392

About Horses of Hope Oregon: Founded in 1988, the nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization, provides equine therapy for people living with physical, emotional and behavioral challenges. The facility is located at. 2895 Cloverdale Drive SE, Turner, OR 97392. www.HorsesofHopeOregon.org or call 503-743-3890.


Attached Media Files: hohlogoc , arena , stable , pasture
Applications Open for Organizations Seeking Help with Downtown Revitalization Efforts
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/22/15
State Main Street (R) Program Provides Development, Training, Networking Opportunities
Salem, Oregon, June 23, 2015 -- Oregon Main Street is now accepting applications from organizations interested in receiving downtown revitalization assistance at its Main Street(R) and Transforming Downtown designation levels. Organizations at this level receive access to the highest level of services and support available through the program's "Tier System Network." The network also includes Affiliate and Exploring Downtown levels of participation.
Successful applicants receive assistance to help revitalize the economy, appearance, and image of their traditional business district. Services vary from community to community, but generally include work plan and committee development along with specialized training and networking opportunities.
Visit www.oregon.heritage.org for more information on the Tier System, including eligibility and designation criteria for all levels of assistance. Main Street and Transforming Downtown level applications are available on the website or by calling 503.986.0679 or by email at sheri.stuart@oregon.gov. Completed applications must be received by August 11, 2015.
The Oregon Main Street Program is modeled on the National Main Street Approach(R), which has been used in more than 2,000 cities nationwide. It emphasizes four critical areas of downtown revitalization: organization helps everyone work toward the same goals and maximizes involvement of public and private leaders within the community; promotion brings people back downtown by helping to attract visitors, shoppers, and investors; design enhances a district's appearance and pedestrian amenities while preserving its historic features; and economic vitality stimulates business development and helps strengthen the district's economic base.
Participating Performing Main Street(R) designation level communities currently include Albany, Astoria, Corvallis, McMinnville, Oregon City, and Roseburg. Transforming Downtown level communities include Baker City, Bandon, Canby, Carlton, Coos Bay, Cottage Grove, Dayton, Estacada, Hillsboro, Klamath Falls, La Grande, Milton-Freewater, Newberg, Oakridge, Port Orford, Sherwood, Springfield, The Dalles, and Tillamook.
Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, and is a designated coordinating program member of the National Main Street Center. Oregon Main Street provides assistance to all communities whether they are just beginning to explore options for their downtown or are seeking recognition as an accredited Main Street(R) town.
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Smoke Management Committee to meet June 25, Salem
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/22/15
Smoke Management Committee to meet June 25, Salem
A five-member committee tasked with advising the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) on the state's Smoke Management Plan will meet Thursday, June 25 in Salem. Highlight items on the agenda include:

- Spring burning report
- Polyethylene on piles study update
- Data system program update
- Program fund balance and financial review

The meeting agenda can be viewed online at: www.oregon.gov/odf/FIRE/SMP/SMAC%20AgendaFINAL%20Jun2015.pdf

The meeting will run from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Santiam Room - Building D, Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters, 2600 State St., in Salem.

The meeting is open to the public, and public comments will be received at 10:30 a.m. and 2:10 p.m.

By Oregon statute, the Smoke Management Advisory Committee includes representatives of industrial and non-industrial forest landowners, the U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management and the general public.
Corvallis Police Request Assistance from Community in Solving Robbery (Photo)
Corvallis Police - 06/22/15
2015-06/1393/85567/male_6.jpg
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On June 15, 2015, shortly after 3:30pm, Corvallis Police responded to a complaint of a robbery and stolen vehicle from parking lot in the 1100 block of NE 2nd St. When officers arrived they contacted a male victim who reported an unknown male had stolen his Toyota pickup.

According to the victim, he observed the suspect who stole his pickup in the parking lot when he pulled in. While in the lot, the victim got out of his vehicle, and left it running with the driver's door open. While the victim was leaning against the bed of the truck, the suspect rushed past him, into the driver's seat, and closed the door. The victim fought with the suspect through the open window of the driver's door. He attempted to remove the keys, and attempted to keep the suspect from putting the pickup in drive, but was unable to do either. The suspect drove away at a high rate of speed.

The pickup is described as a tan colored 2008 Toyota Tundra pickup with Oregon license 115DSM. This pickup has not yet been located.

The suspect was described as a white male in his late 30's. He is about 5'10" tall with a stocky build. At the time of the crime he was wearing a bright aqua blue T-shirt with a design on it and cargo shorts.

Working with local businesses, officers were able to locate video surveillance footage that captured the suspect prior to the robbery. Photos of this individual are attached. If anyone has any information regarding the identity of this subject, of the location of the missing pickup, please call Officer Lyssa Richmond at 541-766-6924.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1393/85567/male_6.jpg , 2015-06/1393/85567/male_4.jpg , 2015-06/1393/85567/male_1.jpg
Salem Firefighters Meet Fire Victims (Photo)
Salem Fire Dept. - 06/22/15
Photo
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Firefighters from the Salem Fire Department met last week with members of the Hunsaker family to celebrate the recovery of Syke, a family pet that was rescued from a fire early in April.

On the morning of April 2, Salem firefighters were dispatched to a residential fire in the 1900 block of Fieldcrest Court South. While en route, firefighters received information that there was a possibility of two dogs located inside the burning home. Upon arrival, firefighters found a well-involved structure fire and initiated an offensive fire attack, searching for victims and extinguishing the fire. During the primary search of the home, firefighters found two dogs and quickly removed them from the building, which was heavily charged with smoke. The owners of the home were not at home when the fire occurred.

While firefighters continued fire suppression activity inside the home, additional firefighters quickly went to work on resuscitation attempts for both dogs, using specially designed pet masks to deliver oxygen. Rescue efforts were successful for one of the dogs and firefighters reunited Syke with family members who had just arrived on scene after being alerted to the fire. Syke was transported by the family to a local veterinarian, Titus Zoe DVM, who provided additional treatment. Unfortunately, the other family dog was not able to be resuscitated and perished from exposure to smoke from the fire. The cause of the fire was investigated by Salem fire investigators and determined to be accidentally caused.

The Salem Fire Department serves a population of 188,000 residents, responding to nearly 20,000 calls to 9-1-1 each year, including approximately 150 structure fires annually. Pet oxygen masks have been carried on Salem fire engines since 2011 and were made possible by fundraising efforts by Salem Firefighters Local 314 and generous local donations from residents and businesses in Salem.
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Attached Media Files: Media Release , Photo
Interagency Wildland Firefighting School begins today in Sweet Home (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/22/15
Enrollees learn the basics of fire behavior and a live fire exercise takes place Friday.
Enrollees learn the basics of fire behavior and a live fire exercise takes place Friday.
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(Sweet Home, OR) For the 19th consecutive year, forestry officials from the U.S. Forest Service, Oregon Department of Forestry and Bureau of Land Management are hosting an interagency fire school to prepare new firefighters for the rigors of fighting fire - both in Oregon's forests and in rural-urban interface areas.

Classes begin Monday, June 22, and continue for 5 days.
 
This intensive training - so essential to the safety and effectiveness of fire crews as they battle blazes during fire season - is an opportunity for members of the media to observe and take video or photos of firefighting, initial attack, fire safety protocol and various tasks involved in fire suppression.
 
Co-Incident Commanders ("IC's") Ryan Sullivan, Assistant Fire Management Officer, U.S. Forest Service, McKenzie River Ranger District, and Craig Pettinger, Unit Forester, Oregon Department of Forestry, Sweet Home, see fire school as an opportunity to train firefighters in both tactical skills and safety. Students are employees of the agencies and many are seasonal.

Safety principles of fire training include wearing protective gear, safe use of tools, being on the lookout for hazards and maintaining proper spacing amongst workers.
 
"Fire School provides essential training in wildland fire to new firefighters and gives career firefighters a chance to refresh their skills and explore leadership opportunities," said Sullivan. "A nearby forest landowner, Cascade Timber Consulting, Inc., provides a new field site each year and we are very grateful," he added. "Field exercises greatly enhance the students' training experience - working in smoke, hiking through uneven terrain and working closely with crew members to dig fireline are all things they'll experience this season as wildland firefighters."
 
More than 200 trainees from a variety of agencies across the state - including the Willamette and Siuslaw National Forests, Bureau of Land Management, and Oregon Department of Forestry - will be in attendance. The interagency school takes place June 22 through Friday June 26 at Sweet Home High School, 1920 Long Street in Sweet Home.
 
Classes, then a field exercise
Trainees spend the first part of the week in a classroom setting. This year's classes include basic fire behavior, map and compass use, teamwork, safety, use of engines, tools and hose lays, fighting fire in the rural-urban interface and fire investigation. Students sleep in tents at the school and eat their meals communally, giving them a taste of a real fire camp.

"Safety is paramount in every aspect of wildland firefighting, and it begins with our training exercises," said Pettinger.  "Working together in a training setting improves communications and builds effective relationships for the agencies to draw on during fire season."

The five-day course culminates in a live fire exercise Friday. The June 26 exercise provides trainees with the final challenge: applying their newly acquired skills to suppress and mop-up a real fire.
 
For more information, please contact Public Information Officers Stefanie Gatchell, (541)367-3962, or Cynthia Orlando, (503)945-7421.

Note to Media:
This opportunity offers access to both trainee and experienced firefighters as they prepare for the 2015 fire season. However, we require 24 hour notice of your intent to participate, as all media must be accompanied by an agency escort and have personal protective equipment.
 
Personal protective equipment includes Nomex pants, long sleeve Nomex shirt, gloves, hard hat, and boots with vibram soles. Protective equipment (excluding leather boots) may be available for media to borrow. Please contact Stefanie Gatchell to make arrangements.


Attached Media Files: Enrollees learn the basics of fire behavior and a live fire exercise takes place Friday.
06/19/15
Creswell Man Is Killed When He Drives His Pickup Into Path Of Log Truck (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/19/15
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A Creswell man was killed Friday morning when he drove his pickup the wrong way on Interstate 5 and collided with a loaded log truck in Lane County.

According to Lieutenant Lang Hinkle, On June 19, 2015 at about 6:30AM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a head-on collision on Interstate 5 near milepost 182 (just north of Creswell).

Preliminary information indicates a 1999 Dodge Pickup, operated by Keith E HENNINGSEN, age 36, of Creswell began driving northbound in the southbound lanes of Interstate 5 from the Creswell interchange.

HENNINGSEN's vehicle made it a short distance before striking a 2001 Kenworth truck loaded with logs, head-on. HENNINGSEN was pronounced deceased on scene. The operator of the Kenworth, Robert A FRANKLIN, age 62, of Vader, WA, was transported to a local hospital for non-life threatening injuries.

According to witnesses, FRANKLIN tried to swerve to avoid HENNINGSEN's vehicle but it appeared HENNINGSEN intentionally steered into the path of the truck. Further investigation revealed HENNINGSEN had made suicidal comments to family members and was specific about driving into the path of a log truck.

Both southbound lanes were blocked for about an hour. OSP was assisted by the Lane County Sheriff's Office, South Lane Rural Fire Department and the Oregon Department of Transportation.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1002/85528/P232.jpg , 2015-06/1002/85528/P2208.jpg
Crook County Man Arrested For Child Pornography Related Charges (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/19/15
2015-06/1002/85526/babcock.jpg
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On Thursday, June 18, 2015 OSP Troopers and Detectives members served search warrants at 191 NW 8th Street in Prineville as part of an ongoing child pornography investigation. Ryan M BABCOCK, age 32, was arrested on multiple counts of encouraging child sexual abuse and possession of materials depicting sexually explicit conduct of children.

According to Detective Mitch Meyer, the investigation began when OSP received a tip from the Oregon Department of Justice's Internet Crimes Against Children Team. The tip indicated that someone in Prineville was sharing pornographic images of children engaged in sexual relations with other adults. This person also created an email account under a false name in order to conceal his true identity.

A search warrant was applied for and granted authorizing the release of BABCOCK's Internet activity and related data. Oregon State Police Detectives working in conjunction with the Oregon Department of Justice's Internet Crimes Against Children Team learned that BABCOCK had been trading sexually explicit images with others through the fictitious email account. An additional warrant was granted to search BABCOCK's residence after his identity was revealed.

Several smart phones, laptop computers, and data storage devices were seized from his residence. The computers and smart phones will be forensically analyzed for additional evidence and attempts will be made to identify the children depicted in the images.
BABCOCK was lodged at the Crook County Jail on the following charges: 12 counts of encouraging child sexual abuse in the first degree and 12 counts of possessing materials depicting sexually explicit conduct of children in the second degree.

The investigation is continuing and no further information available for release at this.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1002/85526/babcock.jpg
The Cattlemen's Midyear Meeting Brings in Top Industry Speakers (Photo)
Oregon Cattlemen's Association - 06/19/15
Colin Woodall speaks to OCA members
Colin Woodall speaks to OCA members
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SALEM,Ore., (06/18/2015) - Wolves, water and international trade. These were just three of the many topics discussed at the Oregon Cattlemen's Association's 2015 Midyear event. Over 130 ranchers from all across Oregon traveled to the town of John Day where the Grant County Fairgrounds hosted the event.

Attendees heard from over 15 different speakers and interacted with 17 various vendors at the Midyear Trade show.

"My overall experience was great," said speaker and Northwest Ag Information Network journalist KayDee Gilkey. "I was pleasantly surprised at the turnout for my presentation." Gilkey presented tips on how ranchers can interact with the press in order to get their story told. "I was happy [people] stuck around and hope they gleaned some tips," Gilkey said.

The lineup of speakers impressed past OCA president and current OCA Water Resources chair, Curtis Martin. He felt each session was packed full of information. He encourages members to look into attending future OCA Midyear events. "When members come they feel rejuvenated and encouraged," Martin said.

This year, OCA was able to bring in National Cattlemen's Beef Association's Vice President of Government Affairs, Colin Woodall. "Colin is diligent in working for the cattle industry in Washington D.C.," said Keith Nantz, chair for both NCBA Young Beef Leaders program and Oregon's Young Cattlemen's Committee. "It was our privilege to have him speak at Midyear." Woodall covered several topics that NCBA is paying close attention to in D.C. including TPA and TPP, the international trade bills. "Our attendance was great. We feel this was largely due to Colin's excellent presentation at our Midyear event," said OCA Executive Director Jerome Rosa.

The event wrapped up on Friday June 12, with a barbecue hosted by Prairie City FFA and meat donated by Country Natural Beef.

The Oregon Cattlemen's Association was founded in 1913 and works to promote environmentally and socially sound industry practices, improve and strengthen the economics of the industry, and protect its industry communities and private property rights.

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Attached Media Files: Colin Woodall speaks to OCA members
Woman In Wheelchair Struck And Killed On I-5 Near Coburg
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/19/15
On June 18, 2015, just before midnight, OSP Troopers received a call regarding a possible crash involving a wheelchair located on Interstate 5 near milepost 198. Upon arrival, it was discovered a passenger vehicle operated by a Tigard resident was traveling northbound she struck a female in a wheelchair who was in the lane of travel.

The female in the wheelchair was deceased upon emergency crews arriving. The vehicle driver remained on scene and is cooperating with the investigation which is still continuing. OSP was assisted on scene by the Coburg Fire Department and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

The female has not yet been identified. More information will be released when it becomes available.
Lane Education Service District Board of Directors to Meet Tuesday, June 23, 2015
Lane ESD - 06/19/15
The Lane Education Service District Board of Directors will meet on Tuesday, June 23, 2015 at 6:00 p.m. An executive session is scheduled for 5:45 p.m., where the Board will conduct an executive session "to conduct deliberations with persons designated by the governing body to carry on labor negotiations," pursuant to ORS 192.660 (2)(d) and 2) the Lane ESD Board of Directors will hold an Executive Session under provisions of ORS 192.660(2)(a) to consider the employment of a public officer, employee, staff member or individual agent.

The meetings will be held at Lane Education Service District, 1200 Highway 99 N., Eugene, Oregon.
Oregon Dept. of Forestry Wildfire Summary, week ending 06-19-15
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/19/15
Though forest conditions are extremely dry across the state, wildfire activity on the 16 million acres of private and public lands protected by the Oregon Dept. of Forestry has been relatively moderate. Considerable credit goes to the Oregon public for exercising fire safety awareness in the forest. Nature has contributed, too, with only limited lightning occurring during the week.

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
Sunset Grade Fire - The 67-acre fire, reported June 13, burned on the Tillamook State Forest. ODF, assisted by the Forest Grove and Banks Fire departments, contained the fire the next morning. Cause is under investigation.

Powder House Canyon Fire - The 33-acre fire was reported June 15 burning in the Central Oregon District - John Day Unit. ODF resources currently at the fire include: two fire engines, two hand crews, one water tender, and one bulldozer on standby. The fire is 90 percent contained and in mop-up. Cause is under investigation.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS
Buckskin Fire - This 2,635-acre fire reported June 11 is burning 10 miles SW of Cave Junction in southwestern Oregon on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest, in an area previously burned in the 2002 Biscuit Fire. The fire is currently six percent contained. The cause is lightning. More information is available at: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4286/

Little Basin Fire - This 630-acre fire reported June 15 is burning 10 miles north of Imnaha in the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area. The fire is currently 85 percent contained. Cause is under investigation. More information is available at: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4290/

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015, through today:
Lightning-caused fires: 74 fires burned 114 acres
Human-caused fires: 185 fires burned 516 acres
Total: 259 fires burned 630 acres

10-year average (January 1 through the present date in the year):
Lightning-caused fires: 22 fires burned 20 acres
Human-caused fires: 128 fires burned 1,271 acres
Total: 150 fires burned 1,291 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website, www.oregon.gov/odf/Pages/fire/fire.aspx#Fire_Stats,_Info_&_Updates_

When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.
***Update*** Motor Vehicle Crash Blocking HWY 20 Near Santiam Junction - Linn County
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/19/15
On June 18, 2015 at about 6:47PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a two vehicle, head-on crash on HWY 20 near Milepost 80.

Preliminary information indicates a 2001 Subaru Outback was traveling westbound on HWY 20 when it lost control and crossed the centerline, striking a 2005 Chevy Trailblazer head-on. The operator of the Subaru, Cody D OXFORD, age 24, had life threatening injuries and was taken by air ambulance to Saint Charles in Bend.

The operator and passenger of the Chevy, Roy WRIGHT, age 42, and Lauren WRIGHT, age 40, both of Springfield were taken by ground ambulance to Saint Charles Bend for serious injuries.

It was determined through the investigation; OXFORD was intoxicated and subsequently cited for DUII-Alcohol, Reckless Driving, two counts of Recklessly Endangering and two counts of Assault. Both directions of HWY 20 were closed for two hours while the investigation was conducted.

No further information available at the time of this release. Photos of the scene will be available later today and will be provided to media when requested.
End Update


Previous Release:
There is a two vehicle, head-on crash just east of Santiam Junction on HWY 20 (Milepost 80) which is blocking both directions of travel. Air ambulance is enroute for multiple patients with serious injuries. Please visit www.tripcheck.com for road status.

More information will be released when it is available.
06/18/15
Motorcycle Crash Takes Life Of California Man In Harney County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/18/15
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According to Sergeant Brian Williams, on June 18, 2015, at about 3:43PM, a 2009 Harley Davidson motorcycle, operated by Steven A GALE, age 71, of Montara, CA, rear-ended another motorcycle on HWY 20 at milepost 114 (near Sage Hen Rest Area). The other motorcycle, a 2008 Harley Davidson, operated by Robert RESCH, age 65, of Half Moon Bay, CA, lost control and crashed on the highway. RESCH and his passenger, Janet KLUZIK, age 54, of Half Moon Bay, CA, were both ejected.

After striking RESCH's motorcycle, GALE's motorcycle veered into the path of a 2011 Ford F250 head-on. GALE was deceased upon arrival of emergency crews. The occupants of the F250, Richard CHERNABAEFF and Kristine CHERNABAEFF (both of Kerman, CA) were not injured.

RESCH was taken to Harney District Hospital for minor injuries. His passenger, KLUZIK, was taken to Saint Charles Medical Center in Bend by air ambulance for serious injuries.

Preliminary information indicates GALE and RESCH had been traveling together when they became separated. It appears GALE was traveling at a high rate of speed when he collided with RESCH who had just pulled out from Sage Hen Rest Area.

OSP was assisted at the scene by the Harney County Sheriff's Office, Hines Police Department and the Oregon Department of Transportation. The investigation is still continuing and information will be released when it is available.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1002/85505/5061.jpg , 2015-06/1002/85505/0618_17.jpg , 2015-06/1002/85505/20150.jpg
Red Cross responded to a single-family fire in Roseburg
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 06/18/15
A single-family fire occurred in the 700 block of Buckman Road in Roseburg, OR.
A Red Cross Disaster Assistance Team responded.
The fire displaced 2 adults and 4 dogs. A 5th dog perished
Lodging, food, clothing, shoes, comfort kits, recovery information, disaster health services, and disaster mental health information were provided.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness: Get informed, make a plan, build a kit and review your family's plan if there is a fire in your home. Know what to do before, during and after a home fire. This information and more is available at www.redcross.org or in a Prepare! Resource guide published by the American Red Cross Cascades Region. The guide can be downloaded at http://redcross.org/1zq8XVV6.
8 Years Later, Fugitive Responsible For Death Of Marion County Sheriff Deputy Still Wanted (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/18/15
2015-06/1002/85502/Fredinburg.jpg
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This week marks the eighth anniversary of the death of Marion County Sheriff Deputy Kelly Fredinburg who was killed in a late night traffic crash involving another vehicle on Highway 99E north of Gervais. The driver of the other involved vehicle, Alfredo De JESUS ASCENCIO, is still a fugitive wanted for two counts of Criminally Negligent Homicide for causing the death his 19-year old passenger and Deputy Fredinburg. A reward of up to $21,000 is still available for information that leads to the arrest of De JESUS ASCENCIO.

The Fredinburg family worked closely with law enforcement officials to establish the "Oregon Officer Reward Fund" (OORF), available to help law enforcement arrest persons wanted in connection with line-of-duty police injury and death criminal investigations in Oregon. The family's relentless commitment, along with a $20,000 reward, supports and helps investigators to find the fugitive responsible for Deputy Fredinburg's death. This reward is in addition to $1,000 offered by Crime Stoppers (#07-28) for information that leads to an arrest in the case.

ALFREDO De JESUS ASCENCIO, who turned 28 years of age in January 2015, has been sought by the Marion County District Attorney's Office, Oregon State Police (OSP) and Marion County Sheriff's Office (MCSO) since he was indicted August 3, 2007 by a Marion County Grand Jury on two counts of Criminally Negligent Homicide.

On June 16, 2007 at approximately 11:30 p.m. Deputy Fredinburg was enroute to an emergency call southbound on Highway 99E north of Gervais when his patrol car was struck head-on by a northbound vehicle driven by De JESUS ASCENCIO. Deputy Fredinburg's patrol car caught fire and he was pronounced deceased at the scene. Deputy Fredinburg joined MCSO in August 2006 after working the previous six years for the Polk County Sheriff's Office. He was 33 years old when he died.

Nineteen-year old passenger, Oscar Ascencio-Amaya, died from his injuries the following day at a Portland-area hospital. A second passenger received minor injuries.

De JESUS ASCENCIO, who was 20 years of age at the time of the crash, was treated for critical injuries at a Portland-area hospital. Investigators learned later he fled the U.S. to Mexico around the time he was indicted August 3, 2007 and an arrest warrant was signed by a judge. Investigators believe De JESUS ASCENCIO is currently at an unknown location in Mexico. He was last believed to be in the area of Puacuaro, Michoacan, Mexico.

Anyone with information related to this investigation to help locate De JESUS ASCENCIO can report tips by phone at:

In Oregon, call 800-452-7888.
From anywhere in the United States for English and Spanish speakers to the Crime Stoppers Tip Line, refer to case #07-28, (bilingual call takers), call 1-503-823-HELP (4357).
Residents within Mexico can call the Crime Stoppers Tip Line, refer to case #07-28, (bilingual call takers) at +011-503-823-4357.

Email tips can be sent to crimetips2OSP@state.or.us.

Tips should have as much detail as possible including specific details about the type of case and information related to the criminal investigation. Even though tips may be received anonymously, those providing tips are encouraged to give contact information for follow-up by the investigator(s), if needed.

Note: De Jesus Ascencio photograph is only photo available and was taken before June 2007.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1002/85502/Fredinburg.jpg , 2015-06/1002/85502/Dejesus_Ascencio.jpg , 2015-06/1002/85502/Oscar_Ascencio_Amaya.png
Medford Man Arrested For Several Road Rage Incidents - Jackson County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/18/15
2015-06/1002/85500/Nuckols.jpg
2015-06/1002/85500/Nuckols.jpg
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Richard A NUCKOLS, age 18, of Medford, was arrested for several incidents of road rage and aggressive driving that was a result of an ongoing investigation by the Oregon State Police.

This investigation was initiated related to a driving complaint received by the Southern Command Center (SCC) of the Oregon State Police on May 11, 2015 at 12:38PM. The initial 911 call identified NUCKOLS' vehicle, a vibrant blue 2013 4-door Dodge Dart. The vehicle was uniquely identified by tinted windows and black aftermarket wheels.

The victims in this first known incident described extremely reckless driving at the Milepost 27 (South Medford) interchange area. NUCKOLS was traveling northbound on Interstate 5, speeding excessively prior to the exit and then intentionally swerved at and ultimately forced the two victims (driver and passenger) off the roadway and onto the shoulder. Both victims sustained head and neck injuries while avoiding the collision.

Ongoing investigation continued related to the May 11th incident. As the investigation progressed Senior Trooper Tom Harrison uncovered three additional incidents of extreme and intentionally reckless driving by NUCKOLS.

The following is a summary of the other events:
On March 11, 2015, NUCKOLS reportedly ran multiple vehicles off I-5 at Exit 27. This incident was reported by a single victim who reported NUCKOLS speeding excessively, following too closely, and using his vehicle to intentionally cause other vehicles to swerve out of his way.

On May 18, 2015, NUCKOLS ran four motorcycle riders off the interstate at Exit 27, eventually causing one of the riders to be forced to lay down his bike.

On May 21, 2015, NUCKOLS was reported to be driving recklessly northbound on Interstate 5 between the Talent, Oregon and Phoenix, Oregon interchanges. NUCKOLS made numerous erratic lane changes at high rates of speeds when he suddenly pulled in front of the victims. NUCKOLS then slammed on his brakes in the fast lane at an estimated 70 MPH down to 35 MPH. Just prior to taking Exit 24, NUCKOLS swerved violently towards the victims and caused them to partially leave the roadway into the center median gravel shoulder.

Each of the described incidents were presented to the Jackson County District Attorney's Office and an indictment was obtained charging NUCKOLS with 4 counts of Unlawful Use of a Weapon (Vehicle), 2 counts of Assault III, 4 counts of Reckless Endangering Another Person and 4 counts of Reckless Driving. On June 16, 2015, at 4:10 PM, NUCKOLS was arrested and bail was set at $98,000.

No further information available at the time of this release.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1002/85500/Nuckols.jpg , 2015-06/1002/85500/Nuckols_car_5.21.jpg
National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors Offers Free Membership to National, State and Local Association Available to new advisors in the insurance and financial planning industry (Photo)
VanNatta Public Relations - 06/18/15
KimKelly NAIFA President Eugene
KimKelly NAIFA President Eugene
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-06/1853/85497/thumb_Merrie_(Kim)_Kelly_CLTC.jpg
Salem, Oregon (June 18, 2015) - At a time where the business of providing advice on insurance and financial matters is more complicated than ever, helping advisors understand changes in the law and the industry is just as important.

To help those new in the industry to best advise their clients on insurance and financial planning issues, The National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors of Oregon (NAIFA Oregon) has approved free national, state and local association membership. The benefit is available to new agents, less than three years in the industry, now through Sept. 30, 2015.

NAIFA Oregon president-elect, Sheri Webber said this type of program has never before been offered by NAIFA. "This is an opportunity for new Oregon agents and advisors to work with experienced agents and receive critical updates on legislative policy changes that affect our industry."

NAIFA Oregon President Kim Kelly added, "NAIFA helped me to grow my business. This is an exceptional opportunity for new agents to take advantage and participate in NAIFA."

NAIFA has eight local associations in Oregon as well as a state headquarters located in Salem. Through its meetings and conferences, NAIFA Oregon provides continuing education training to industry members. To learn more about the benefit visit Naifaoregon.org and use the NAIFAORFREE promo code at the end of the process, or download an application and mail (NAIFA Membership Lockbox, P.O. Box 758658, Baltimore, MD, 21275), or fax (1-877-508-9842) to NAIFA. Valid through Sept. 30, 2015.

______________________________________________

About NAIFA: Founded in 1890 as The National Association of Life Underwriters (NALU), NAIFA is one of the nation's oldest and largest associations representing the interests of insurance professionals from every Congressional district in the United States. NAIFA members assist consumers by focusing their practices on one or more of the following" life insurance and annuities, health insurance and employee benefits, multiline, and financial advising and investments. NAIFA's mission is to advocate for a positive legislative and regulatory environment, enhance business and professional skills, and promote the ethical conduct of its members. NAIFA Oregon is headquartered in Salem. www.NaifaOregon.org, P.O. Box 2881, Salem OR, 97308, 503-371-7457.


Attached Media Files: KimKelly NAIFA President Eugene , NAIFAOregonlogo
Oregon National Guard hosts active duty Air Assault and Pathfinder specialty courses (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 06/18/15
2015-06/962/85493/150611-Z-VA638-002.jpg
2015-06/962/85493/150611-Z-VA638-002.jpg
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WARRENTON, Oregon - The Oregon National Guard hosted U.S. Army Air Assault and Pathfinder courses at Camp Rilea Armed Forces Training Center, in Warrenton, Oregon, May 30 - June 14.

Hundreds of service members from across active duty U.S. Army and Air Force, Reserves and National Guard components, converged on the Oregon Coast to test their mettle and earn the coveted Air Assault and Pathfinder qualification badges. The courses were instructed by a Mobile Training Team from the Army National Guard Warrior Training Center, based out of Fort Benning, Georgia.

More than 220 service members participated in the 12-day Air Assault course. The course prepares service members for air mobile operations, including combat assault, rappelling, physical fitness, and various other critical skills. Students were tested with an obstacle course and two-mile run before being allowed to continue with the rest of the training. Throughout the course duration, students were evaluated with written and hands-on examinations, conducted tower and aircraft rappelling, and were tested on sling-load operations. A sling-load operation involves slinging an item under an airborne helicopter to fly it to another location. Prior to graduation, the students had to complete a 12-mile foot march with full combat-load in less than three hours.

Approximately 25 service members attended the 14-day Pathfinder course. The course trains and evaluates service members in establishing helicopter landing zones, pick-up zones, and drop zones. Students learned air traffic control techniques to guide and communicate with aircraft, as well as planning and conducting air assault and sling-load operations.

Video is available for high definition download through Defense Video & Imagery Distribution System:
Air Assault Rappel Tower B-Roll: https://www.dvidshub.net/video/410468/air-assault-rappel-tower-broll-camp-rilea-ore-2015#.VYNEUU3JC70

Air Assault Orientation Flight B-Roll: https://www.dvidshub.net/video/408004/air-assault-flight-familiarization#.VYNEwE3JC70

Air Assault Obstacle Course B-Roll: https://www.dvidshub.net/video/407789/air-assault-school-2015-o-course-broll#.VYNFAE3JC70

Pathfinder Sling-Load B-Roll: https://www.dvidshub.net/video/408862/pathfinder-course-sling-load#.VYNFrU3JC70

Pathfinder Air Drop B-Roll: https://www.dvidshub.net/video/408865/pathfinder-course-virs-b-roll#.VYNF003JC70

PHOTO CAPTIONS:
150610-Z-YI240-004: A Soldier practices rappelling from a tower during a two-week Air Assault course at Camp Rilea Armed Forces Training Center, in Warrenton, Oregon, June 10. Camp Rilea is one of many locations across the country chosen to host the Air Assault course, instructed by a Mobile Training Team from the Army National Guard Warrior Training Center, out of Fort Benning, Georgia Service members from active duty U.S. Army and Air Force, Reserve and National Guard components tested their mettle during the course to earn the coveted Air Assault qualification badge. (Photo by Spc. Michael Germundson, 115th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

150610-Z-YI240-006: Soldiers practice rappelling from a tower during a two-week Air Assault course at Camp Rilea Armed Forces Training Center, in Warrenton, Oregon, June 10. Camp Rilea is one of many locations across the country chosen to host the Air Assault course, instructed by a Mobile Training Team from the Army National Guard Warrior Training Center, out of Fort Benning, Georgia Service members from active duty U.S. Army and Air Force, Reserve and National Guard components tested their mettle during the course to earn the coveted Air Assault qualification badge. (Photo by Spc. Michael Germundson, 115th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

150611-NO327-Z-002: Soldiers and Airman watch as their classmates rappel from HH-60 Blackhawk helicopters during a two-week Air Assault course at Camp Rilea Armed Forces Training Center, in Warrenton, Oregon, June 11. Camp Rilea is one of many locations across the country chosen to host the Air Assault course, instructed by a Mobile Training Team from the Army National Guard Warrior Training Center, out of Fort Benning, Georgia. Service members from active duty U.S. Army and Air Force, Reserves and National Guard components tested their mettle during the course to earn the coveted Air Assault qualification badge. (Photo by Spc. Tyler Meister, 115th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

150611-NO327-Z-003: Instructors from the Army National Guard Warrior Training Center, out of Fort Benning, Georgia, demonstrate how to perform a proper sling-load with a HH-60 Blackhawk helicopter during a two-week Air Assault course at the Camp Rilea Armed Forces Training Center, in Warrenton, Oregon, June 11. Service members from active duty U.S. Army and Air Force, Reserves and National Guard components gathered at Camp Rilea to attend the course and earn the coveted Air Assault qualification badge. Camp Rilea is one of many locations across the country chosen to host the Air Assault course. (Photo by Spc. Tyler Meister, 115th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

150611-Z-VA638-004: Staff Sgt. Robert Higley, of the U.S. Army's Charlie Company, 423rd Infantry Battalion, 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division, uses hand signals to direct an HH-60 Blackhawk helicopter where to drop a utility trailer during a field exercise for the Pathfinder Course at Camp Rilea Armed Forces Training Center in Warrenton, Oregon, June 11. A class of 23 Soldiers and Airman took part in the 14-day course, learning about air traffic control, selection and preparation of drop and landing zones, and verbally initiated air drops. (Photo by Sgt. Aaron Ricca, 115th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

150611-Z-VA638-002: Staff Sgt. Glenn Breivogel (left), of the Oregon Army National Guard's Headquarters, 249th Regional Training Institute, and Staff Sgt. Jesus Carlos (right) from the U.S. Army's 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division, take cover in the grass shortly after a landing zone insertion from a HH-60 Blackhawk helicopter at Camp Rilea Armed Forces Training Center, in Warrenton, Oregon, June 11. A team of 13 Soldiers and Airmen were deployed to rig a Humvee for sling-load during a 14-day Pathfinder Course instructed by a Mobile Training Team from the Army National Guard Warrior Training Center, out of Fort Benning, Georgia (Photo by Sgt. Aaron Ricca, 115th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/962/85493/150611-Z-VA638-002.jpg , 2015-06/962/85493/150611-Z-VA638-004.jpg , 2015-06/962/85493/150611-NO327-Z-003.jpg , 2015-06/962/85493/150611-NO327-Z-002.jpg , 2015-06/962/85493/150610-Z-YI240-006.jpg , 2015-06/962/85493/150610-Z-YI240-004.jpg
Watch For New Speed Zone in Local Construction Project (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/18/15
2015-06/1294/85489/Construction.jpg
2015-06/1294/85489/Construction.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-06/1294/85489/thumb_Construction.jpg
A Marion County Public Works construction project that began today and will finish up around the end of August, will be affecting traffic in the area and adding a new lowered speed limit. Crews will be widening Cordon Road NE and adding left turn lanes at the intersections of Carolina and Indiana Avenue NE.

For the duration of the construction project, the section of Cordon Road NE, spanning from Sunnyview Road NE to Silverton Road NE will be reduced from 55 MPH to 45 MPH. Along with the new speed zone signs this area has been deemed a constructions zone where traffic fines will double. The Sheriff's Office and our Public Works Department are asking you to watch for workers, be patient, expect delays and if possible use alternate routes to home and work.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1294/85489/Construction.jpg
Hospital Performance Metrics Advisory Committee to meet June 26
Oregon Health Authority - 06/18/15
June 18, 2015

Contact: Pamela Naylor, 971-673-3392 (meeting information and accommodations)

What: The Oregon Health Authority Hospital Performance Metrics Advisory Committee will meet Friday, June 26. The primary focus of the meeting will be to begin discussions of the metrics to be included in the third year of the program. Public testimony will be taken.

When: Friday, June 26, 1-4 p.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College, Wilsonville Training Center, Room 210, 29353 SW Town Center Loop East, Wilsonville. The public also can join through a listen-only conference line at 1-877-336-1828, participant code 9657836#.

For more information, an agenda and hospital metrics meeting packet, visit the committee's website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/analytics/Pages/Hospital-Performance-Metrics.aspx.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Individuals requiring accommodation may request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations by calling the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

# # #
Red Cross responds to a multi-family fire in Albany, OR.
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 06/18/15
A multi-family fire occurred in the 5000 Block of Pacific Blvd SW in Albany Oregon.
A Red Cross Disaster Team responded.
The fire affected 4 adult.
Red Cross provided food, clothing, and shoes, Disaster Health Services, comfort kits and blankets.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness: Get informed, make a plan, build a kit and review your family's plan if there is a fire in your home. Know what to do before, during and after a home fire. This information and more is available at www.redcross.org or in a Prepare! Resource guide published by the American Red Cross Cascades Region. The guide can be downloaded at http://redcross.org/1zq8XVV6.
Preliminary health insurance rate decisions for 2016 released
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 06/18/15
Note: The above downloadable file contains preliminary rate decision tables and decision summaries.

Salem - Beginning today, Oregon consumers can see the Oregon Insurance Division's preliminary decisions for 2016 individual and small employer health insurance rates. The division, part of the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services, must approve any rates before they can be charged to policyholders.

These preliminary decisions will undergo continued review and discussion through public hearings being held and streamed online June 23-25. This is the first year that preliminary decisions are available before rate hearings are held. This provides the public greater opportunity to review and comment on the division's preliminary decisions.

The public comment period will remain open through Thursday, June 25. There will be a dedicated public comment period during each public rate hearing. For a schedule of hearings and to submit comment online, visit www.oregonhealthrates.org.

Health insurance rates are an estimate of future expenses, including medical and prescription drug claims costs and administrative expenses. These estimates are based on historical data and forecasts of future trends. When developing 2014 and 2015 rates, there was no claims data available for plans sold since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. This data was available for the first time when setting 2016 rates.

With 2014 claims and cost information in hand, Insurance Division actuaries determined that the cost of providing coverage for individual plans in Oregon was $830 million, while premiums were only $703 million. This means costs exceeded rates by $127 million, or an average of $624 per person.

"As regulators, our mission is to protect Oregon's insurance consumers. That means consumers are not overcharged for health insurance, but it also means that rates must cover the cost of patients' medical bills when they go to the doctor, hospital, or pharmacy," said Insurance Commissioner Laura Cali. "We have proposed increased rates in order for consumers to continue counting on the coverage they have purchased."

In the individual market, the division's preliminary rate decisions range from an average rate increase of 8.3 percent to an average rate increase of 38.5 percent, depending on the insurance company. Under the preliminary decisions, Silver Standard Plan premiums for a 40-year-old in Portland would range from $271 to $389 a month.

In the small group market, the division's preliminary rate decisions range from an average rate decrease of 7.6 percent to an average rate increase of 15 percent. Silver Standard Plan premiums for a 40-year-old in Portland would range from $275 to $356 a month.

Preliminary rate tables, a summary of the state of the individual and small group markets and the preliminary decision information for each carrier can be found at www.oregonhealthrates.org.

###

The Insurance Division is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and www.insurance.oregon.gov.


Attached Media Files: Download preliminary rate tables and decision summaries.
Coos Bay School District Public Meeting Schedule for end of June and month of July, 2015
Coos Bay Sch. Dist. - 06/18/15
Below is the list of Coos Bay Public Schools Public Meetings currently scheduled for the end of June and month of July, 2015. All meetings are held at Milner Crest Education Center, 1255 Hemlock Ave., Coos Bay, unless otherwise noted. The schedule is subject to change. For a list of all public meetings scheduled, go to http://cbd9.net/public-meetings-schedule

Special Board Meeting - rescheduled to June 29 at 10:00 AM. Agenda will be posted by June 25th at the following link: http://cbd9.net/schoolboard/agendas. It is subject to change.

Facilities Planning Committee - July 8 at 5:30 PM. A quorum of the board may be in attendance at the meeting but will not be acting on district business as a board. For more information, contact Rocky Place at rockyp@coos-bay.k12.or.us or 541-266-6581.
Policy Committee - July 13 at 9:30 AM. For more information, contact Adrian DeLeon at adriand@coos-bay.k12.or.us or 541-297-8115.
Regular Board Meeting - July 13 at 6:00 PM. Agenda and packet will be posted by July 9th at the following link: http://cbd9.net/schoolboard/agendas. It is subject to change.

All Coos Bay School District Board Meetings are subject to the Public Meetings Law (ORS 192.610-192.710). The public is welcome to attend. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. Request for other accommodations should be made to Peggy Ahlgrim at 541-267-1310, 541-269-5366 (fax) or peggya@coos-bay.k12.or.us

Peggy Ahlgrim
Secretary to Superintendent and School Board
Coos Bay School District
1255 Hemlock Ave.
Coos Bay, OR 97420
541-267-1310 Ext. 1002
541-267-1308
06/17/15
Red Cross responds to a single-family fire in in the 4000 block of W 11th Avenue in Eugene, OR.
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 06/17/15
familyle-family fire in the 4000 block of W 11th Avenue in Eugene, OR.
The fire impacted 2 adults, 1 child, and 1 pet.
A Red Cross Disaster Assistance Team responded.
Lodging, food, clothing, shoes, infant supplies and formula, comfort kits, stuffed animals, recovery information, disaster health services, and disaster mental health were provided.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness: Get informed, make a plan, build a kit and review your family's plan if there is a fire in your home. Know what to do before, during and after a home fire. This information and more is available at www.redcross.org or in a Prepare! Resource guide published by the American Red Cross Cascades Region. The guide can be downloaded at http://redcross.org/1zq8XVV6.
Media Advisory - Keep it Legal, Keep it Safe - Media Avisory
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 06/17/15
EVENT FOR MEDIA ONLY

Keep it Legal, Keep it Safe
Live fireworks safety demonstration - safer use of legal fireworks in legal places

WHEN: Tuesday, June 23, 2015 at 9:30 a.m.

WHERE: Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue Training Center
12400 SW Tonquin Road, Sherwood, Oregon

WHO: The Office of State Fire Marshal, Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue, Oregon State Parks, U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Oregon Department of Forestry, Clackamas Fire District #1, Portland Fire & Rescue, Salem Police Department, Legacy Oregon Burn Center, Multnomah county animal services, the Oregon Humane Society, and Oregon fireworks wholesalers will provide information on legal fireworks in Oregon, where fireworks may be used, education, and safety and enforcement efforts. Live fireworks demonstrations are scheduled.

WHAT: Keep it legal, keep it safe
Legal fireworks in legal places
Live demonstration - Safer use of fireworks

June 23 opens the season for fireworks sales in Oregon. Legal fireworks may be purchased only from Oregon permitted fireworks retailers and stands. The Office of State Fire Marshal has issued more than 740 retail fireworks permits, and 131 display permits. Oregon law forbids possession, use, or sale of fireworks that fly, explode, or travel more than six feet on the ground or 12 inches in the air. Bottle rockets, Roman candles, and firecrackers are ILLEGAL in Oregon.

All fireworks are prohibited on all Oregon beaches, in parks, and campgrounds.

Illegal fireworks can be expensive. Under Oregon law, officials may seize illegal fireworks and fine offenders up to $500 per violation for possession of illegal fireworks and endangering life and property. Offenders may also be arrested. Any fireworks causing damage, or misuse of fireworks carries a liability for the offender, who may be required to pay for resulting fire or other damage. Parents are liable for fireworks-caused damage by their children. Costs may include assessed fines as well as the cost of suppressing fireworks-caused fires.
Western Oregon University hosts world's largest swim lesson (Photo)
Western Oregon University - 06/17/15
The 2014 World's Largest Swimming Lesson at WOU
The 2014 World's Largest Swimming Lesson at WOU
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WHO: Western Oregon University (WOU) and The World's Largest Swimming Lesson (WLSL)

WHAT: WOU is the only site in Oregon participating in WLSL this year. WLSL is an attempt to break an international Guinness World Record for largest swimming lesson, as well as an effort to spread the word that swimming lessons help prevent drowning among children. Drowning is the leading cause of unintended, injury related death of children aged 1 to 5. WLSL holds the current Guinness World Record, which stands at 36,564 participants representing 22 different countries. This free event is open to the public; all ages welcome and no pre-registration required.

WHERE: Wolverton Memorial Pool inside the Peter Courtney Health and Wellness Center Western Oregon University (345 Monmouth Ave. N. in Monmouth, Ore.). An online map is here: http://www2.wou.edu/pls/wou2/ucs.video_tour.p_main

WHEN: Thursday, June 18, 2015. The pool opens at 9:50 a.m. and the lesson begins at 10 a.m.

CONTACT: Melissa Bergeland, assistant director of programs at the Peter Courtney Health and Wellness Center; 503-838-8860 or bergelandm@wou.edu.


Attached Media Files: The 2014 World's Largest Swimming Lesson at WOU , The 2014 World's Largest Swimming Lesson at WOU , The 2014 World's Largest Swimming Lesson at WOU
Salem sees May spike in bicycle thefts (Photo)
Salem Police Dept. - 06/17/15
2015-06/1095/85458/CR2015_Salem_Police_Dept.Bike_Theft_Tips.jpg
2015-06/1095/85458/CR2015_Salem_Police_Dept.Bike_Theft_Tips.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-06/1095/85458/thumb_CR2015_Salem_Police_Dept.Bike_Theft_Tips.jpg
June 17, 2015 Salem, OR: Spring ushered in sunny weather, and a rise in bicycle thefts as Salem Police crime statistics show 46 bicycles were stolen in May. "We've had 159 bicycles stolen since the start of the year," said Lt. Dave Okada of the Community Response Section, "and nearly one-third of those occurred in May."

Bicycle theft is not a new phenomenon in Salem; however, the last three years of reported bicycle thefts show the trend points upward. In 2012 306 bicycles were reported stolen, 429 in 2013, and 454 in 2014.

Said Okada, "Because Salem experienced such a spike in May, we want to be sure to remind residents of some of the things they can do to minimize their chances of becoming a victim." Firstly, reports indicate criminals were able to thieve many of the bikes because they were simply left unsecured. "Even if the cyclist thinks they are just going to be away from their bike for 'just a minute,' a minute is all it takes for a prolific criminal," he warned.
"Reports also demonstrate bike owners are using defeatable locks making the theft even more egregious because the owners were making an effort to protect their property," Okada explained, "and, yet, the lock was easy enough for the criminal to bypass."

Salem Police urges bike owners to utilize the following strategies to address bike theft in our community:
1) Use a U-lock to secure your bicycle to a rack or sturdy, fixed object. Also, before you leave it unattended, take any removable accessories with you.
2) Know your bicycle's serial number, make, model, color, etc. Know all the possible identifiers in case of theft - especially the serial number. Prove ownership with your purchase receipt, and a photograph of yourself with the bike.
3) Register your bike with a registry service. Registries work to increase likelihood of recovery, and decrease potential theft.

The Salem Police Department has a bicycle registration program (http://bit.ly/SPDBikeReg) which provides users with a sturdy tag, and entry of their information into the police database. However, there are other registries available such as Bike Index (www.bikeindex.org) and Project 529 (https://project529.com) with other elements, such as stolen bicycle searches and social media features. We encourage bicycle owners to check out all the registries, and determine which is best for them - or use them all!

Non-bike owners can help, too. "As always, we ask residents to be alert, and report all suspicious activity to the police immediately," Okada concluded.

#S #P #D

Image: CR2015 Salem Police Dept.Bike Theft Tips.jpg


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1095/85458/CR2015_Salem_Police_Dept.Bike_Theft_Tips.jpg
Fire restrictions tighten June 19 in NW Oregon - includes Tillamook, Clatsop State Forests
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/17/15
The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) will tighten fire prevention rules starting June 19 in northwestern Oregon, including the Tillamook and Clatsop State Forests, and private lands in the Northwest Oregon Forest Protective Association.

"In order to keep communities safe and avoid wildfire risk, we'll begin restrictions on public use of the forest on Friday. These restrictions ban fireworks, exploding targets, campfires outside of designated locations, and other fire-prone activities," said Mike Cafferata, ODF District Forester. "These restrictions respond to the extremely dry conditions we're experiencing and to the Sunset Grade Fire, which we believe was started by one of these activities last weekend."

The following restrictions on activities in the forest will apply starting June 19:

Smoking is prohibited while traveling, except in closed vehicles on improved roads.

Open fires are prohibited, including campfires, charcoal fires, cooking fires and warming fires, except at designated locations. Use of wood-burning devices, used in conjunction with temporary dwellings, including tents and trailers, is prohibited. Portable cooking stoves using liquefied or bottled fuels are allowed.

Use of motor vehicles, including motorcycles and all-terrain vehicles, is prohibited, except on improved roads and designated areas.

Possession of the following firefighting equipment is required while traveling, except on state highways, county roads and driveways: one shovel and one gallon of water or one operational 2-?1/2 pound or larger fire extinguisher.

Use of fireworks is prohibited.

Use of exploding targets is prohibited.

Cutting, grinding and welding of metal is prohibited.

Contact the Tillamook, Astoria or Forest Grove district offices for more information about the fire prevention rules. Contact information available at: www.oregon.gov/ODF/pages/offices.aspx
Fire restrictions go into effect in West Oregon District June 22
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/17/15
On Monday, June 22, the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) will increase restrictions on forest activities in the West Oregon District due to rising fire danger. The "Regulated Use" closure is specifically geared to reduce the chance of wildfires starting from public activities in forested areas. The restrictions ban the following activities:

- Smoking in the forest except in closed vehicles
- Campfires outside of designated campgrounds
- All open fires
- Use of motorized vehicles except on improved roads
- Use of any fireworks and the use of chainsaws
- Mowing of tall dead or cured grass between the hours of 1:00 PM and 8:00 PM
- The Regulated Use closure also requires forest users to carry a shovel with a 26-inch handle and an 8-inch blade, and either one gallon water or a 2-1/2 lb., ABC-rated fire extinguisher

Fire season was declared on the West Oregon District on June16. This declaration primarily affects forest operations, such as logging sites, by requiring firefighting equipment on site and the use of precautionary measures against fire. The "Regulated Use" closure extends restrictions and preventative measures to the public on all private and Bureau of Land Management forest lands in Benton, Lincoln, Polk and southern Yamhill counties.

Conditions in the forest are forecast to be warmer and drier as the summer progresses, pushing the fire danger up. The intent of the Regulated Use closure is to limit some of the potential ignition sources of forest fires. Human activities continue to be the top cause of forest fires.

For further information on the public use restrictions, please do not hesitate to contact the Oregon Department of Forestry during normal business hours:

Benton County: Philomath Office - (541) 929-3266
Lincoln County: Toledo Office - (541) 336-2273
Polk County or Yamhill County: Dallas Office - (503) 934-8146
Fire restrictions go into effect in West Oregon District June 22
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/17/15
On Monday, June 22, the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) will increase restrictions on forest activities in the West Oregon District due to rising fire danger. The "Regulated Use" closure is specifically geared to reduce the chance of wildfires starting from public activities in forested areas. The restrictions ban the following activities:

- Smoking in the forest except in closed vehicles
- Campfires outside of designated campgrounds
- All open fires
- Use of motorized vehicles except on improved roads
- Use of any fireworks and the use of chainsaws
- Mowing of tall dead or cured grass between the hours of 1:00 PM and 8:00 PM
- The Regulated Use closure also requires forest users to carry a shovel with a 26-inch handle and an 8-inch blade, and either one gallon water or a 2-1/2 lb., ABC-rated fire extinguisher

Fire season was declared on the West Oregon District on June 16. This declaration primarily affects forest operations, such as logging sites, by requiring firefighting equipment on site and the use of precautionary measures against fire. The "Regulated Use" closure extends restrictions and preventative measures to the public on all private and Bureau of Land Management forest lands in Benton, Lincoln, Polk and southern Yamhill counties.

Conditions in the forest are forecast to be warmer and drier as the summer progresses, pushing the fire danger up. The intent of the Regulated Use closure is to limit some of the potential ignition sources of forest fires. Human activities continue to be the top cause of forest fires.

For further information on the public use restrictions, please do not hesitate to contact the Oregon Department of Forestry during normal business hours:

Benton County: Philomath Office - (541) 929-3266
Lincoln County: Toledo Office - (541) 336-2273
Polk County or Yamhill County: Dallas Office - (503) 934-8146
Veteran Benefits Expo slated on June 24 in Salem
Oregon Dept. of Veterans' Affairs - 06/17/15
SALEM - In conjunction with the 70th anniversary of the founding of the Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs (ODVA), the agency is hosting the state's first-ever Veteran Benefit Expo, a free event for veterans and their families, on Wed., June 24, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Salem Convention Center.

More than 90 state, federal and community resource organizations have partnered with ODVA and are registered to exhibit benefits across a variety of veteran resource areas including health care, compensation, education, business, employment, long-term care, recreation and more.

"Never have all these resources been in one location," said Cameron Smith, ODVA's director. "We are sincerely proud to partner with Oregon's veteran resource community and agencies to host this unique opportunity for veterans."

Smith said among other things, veterans and families will have direct access to experts who can answer questions about everything from business certifications to education, military records to medals, recreational passes to veteran ID cards.

For more information and a list of exhibitors visit www.expo.oregondva.com.

On June 16, 1945 legislation became effective that created the Oregon Dept. of Veterans' Affairs.

Currently, ODVA has nearly 80 employees in Salem and Portland who assist and advocate for four generations of veterans who have served in five wars and in peacetime. Oregon is home to more than 322,000 veterans.

The Salem Convention Center is located downtown at 200 Commercial St. S.E. Contact ODVA at 503-373-2390.
Committee for Family Forestlands meets Friday, June 26
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/17/15
Family forestland owners wanting to learn about a developing strategic initiative to help them can join the committee and Private Forests Division Chief Peter Daugherty Friday afternoon as they discuss the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats family forest owners face. The Committee for Family Forestlands will meet from 9:00 am - 3:00 pm Friday, June 26 at the Oregon Department of Forestry, Santiam Room Building D, 2600 State Street, Salem.

Agenda
Daugherty will provide legislative and streamside shade buffer, also known as riparian rulemaking analysis, updates. Jennifer Weikel, an agency biologist, will present information about the bald eagles' comeback and how it may impact forested lands.

Before noon the committee will hear about taxes and large woody debris, which helps create healthy fish habitat. Tammy Cushing, Oregon State University's Starker Chair of Private and Family Forestry, will discuss taxes and forestry information affecting family forest owners.

The Committee welcomes public input at its meetings.

Committee
The Committee researches policies impacting family forestland viability, resource protection, and forestry benefits. Based on its findings the Committee recommends actions to the Oregon Board of Forestry and State Forester.

The thirteen member committee includes seven voting and six non-voting members. Voting members include a representative from each the family forest owner, environmental, forest products industry, and the general public communities. Non-voting ex-officio members may include representatives from the Oregon Department of Forestry, Oregon State University, Oregon small forestland groups, forestry-related industry associations, and the Oregon Forest Resources Institute.

Public Meetings
Members of the public may attend the meeting. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. For additional information about attending the meeting, accessibility, or special accommodations, contact Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502. The Committee website can be found at: www.oregon.gov/ODF/pages/board/cff/cff.aspx.

###
Oregon Health Policy Board/Early Learning Council joint subcommittee to meet June 22
Oregon Health Authority - 06/17/15
June 17, 2015

Contact: Leslie Carver, 971-673-2947 (meeting information or accommodations)

What: The Oregon Health Policy Board/Early Learning Council joint subcommittee will meet Monday, June 22, in Portland. The primary focus of this meeting will be to review the 2014 Kindergarten Assessment data and the progress on coordination of developmental screening. Public testimony will not be heard during the meeting.

When: Monday, June 22, 9-11 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon Street, Room 1E, Portland

Agenda:
April minutes;
Data focus: 2014 Kindergarten Assessment results;
Developmental screening update and care coordination;
Joint ELC/OHPB priorities - reflect and next steps.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Individuals requiring accommodation may request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations by calling the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

# # #
06/16/15
Sheriff's Deputies Need Your Help in Identifying Fraud Suspect
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/16/15
On May 2nd, Sandra Peterson, age 70, of Salem attended a gardening class at Egan Gardens, located at 9805 River Road NE, in Salem. On May 5th, Ms. Peterson realized she had lost her wallet and found someone had been using her debit card.

Deputy Martin Bennett began working with Ms. Peterson and tracked one of the purchases to the United Market, located at 1970 Lancaster Drive NE, in Salem. The card was used at the market to purchase $113.97 in items. Deputy Bennett was able to obtain video of the suspect but as of this date has not been able to identify her.

We are distributing a series of images that shows the suspect, a white female in a blue top, purchasing items at the United Market. If you know this suspect please call Deputy Martin Bennett at 503-566-6927. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o0p9cgASabE&feature=youtu.be
BCSO Marine Deputies Rescue Swimmer on the Willamette River near Corvallis
Benton Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/16/15
NEWS RELEASE - For Immediate Release
Benton County Sheriff's Office, Corvallis, OR 97330

Monday, June 15, 2015, 12:00 pm, BENTON COUNTY, OR - Benton Co

BCSO Marine Deputies Rescue Swimmer on the Willamette River near Corvallis
On Saturday, June 13, 2015, at about 3:30 pm, Marine Deputies Bill Ellison and Jordan Kirksey were in a patrol boat on the Willamette River near the Crystal Lake Boat Ramp in Corvallis. They saw an individual attempt to swim across the river from the boat ramp. Deputy Ellison is a retired Corvallis Firefighter with many years of experience as a rescue swimmer. He recognized that the individual was going to have difficulties swimming with a strong current. They went over to the male at the same time he began struggling in the cold, swift current and began to yell for help. Deputy Kirksey was able to pull Dominic Garcia, 51, of Albuquerque, New Mexico, onto the boat before he went under the water. He was not wearing a personal floatation device and was transported back to shore without any injuries. Dominic Garcia stated that he did not know that it would be so difficult to swim across the river.
The Benton County Sheriff's Office would like to remind the public that the rivers are a dangerous place to recreate. The public should always safely plan their trips, including wear personal floatation devices, sound producing devices, letting a third party know the duration and location of their trip, bringing a charged cell phone in a waterproof bag, etc.

End
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Employment in Oregon May 2015 News Release
Oregon Employment Dept. - 06/16/15
Oregon's Labor Market Largely Unchanged in May

Oregon's unemployment rate was essentially unchanged at 5.3 percent in May compared with 5.2 percent in April. This kept the state's rate close to the national level, as the U.S. unemployment rate was 5.5 in May and 5.4 percent in April.

An unemployment rate close to 5 percent is near the lowest Oregon's rate has been over the past 40 years. The rate did reach similar levels during four prior periods of economic expansion since the 1980s, but Oregon's rate never dropped substantially below 5 percent. The record low in the series, which dates back to 1976, occurred in January and February 1995, when the rate dropped to 4.7 percent.

Payroll employment growth paused in May, posting a seasonally adjusted decline of 1,400, the first monthly drop since September 2012. But this one-month decline is not an indicator of continued job losses. Despite the one-month decline in jobs, payroll employment was still up substantially over the year, having added 50,500 jobs, or 2.9 percent, since May 2014.

Taking a breather from rapid growth in recent months, most industries hired close to their normal, seasonal numbers of jobs in May. Retail trade was the biggest exception as it added only 700 jobs in May, when an increase of 2,100 is its seasonal norm.

The slight dip in the May jobs figures could be payback from strong gains in recent months. Oregon's mild and dry winter helped keep people employed in industries affected by winter weather. For example, construction employment didn't drop as much as normal during January and February. This allowed many in construction to get back to work sooner than usual. Following these unusual fluctuations, construction employment stood at its highest May total in seven years at 81,300 jobs, a gain of 1,100, or 1.4 percent, since May 2014.

Real wages are growing. With Oregon's unemployment rate dropping close to historic lows, wage gains reflected a tightening labor market. Average hourly earnings increased 2.2 percent over the year for Oregon's private-sector payroll employees. These wage gains were above the rate of consumer price inflation.

Next Press Releases
The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the May county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, June 23rd, and the statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for June on Tuesday, July 14th.??NLG


Notes:
All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted except for the detailed industry employment components.

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources.

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this official Oregon series data unless noted otherwise. This month's release incorporates the October, November and December 2014 tax records data. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS.



The pdf version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon Centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program -- auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For the Deaf and Hard of Hearing population, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.


Attached Media Files: Employment in Oregon May 2015 Press Release
Oregon Virtual Academy
Oregon Virtual Academy - 06/16/15
Special meeting of the Board of Directors June 22, 2015.
06/15/15
Travel Back in Time This Independence Day with a Ride on the Oregon Historical Society's Shay Locomotive (Photo)
Oregon Historical Society - 06/15/15
Mt. Emily on July 4, 2014
Mt. Emily on July 4, 2014
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-06/2861/85408/thumb_MountEmily#1.July4.2014.5.jpg
Portland, OR - ALL ABOARD for an old-fashioned, all American 4th of July in Prineville, Oregon! This Independence Day, the Oregon Historical Society and the City of Prineville (COP) will run the Mt. Emily Shay #1 on a series of excursion trips beginning at 9am, with runs occurring every hour on the hour through 3pm. The Mt. Emily is a Shay steam locomotive built in 1923 which was designed to haul logs to the mill. It is one of only a handful of operable Shay locomotives left in the world, and it was donated to the Oregon Historical Society collection in the 1950s and has been lovingly cared for by the COP.

Boarding will be at the COP Team Track located at 1521 NW Lamonta Road. These historic rides are FREE and open to the public and each run can accommodate 90-100 people. Following your train ride through Prineville, you and your family are welcome to join the 4th of July festivities taking place throughout town. Visit http://www.mountemilyshay.com to learn more about Mt. Emily and her history.

Directions to the COP Team Track: Enter Prineville from HWY 126 Eastbound, and then turn left at the first light onto Harwood Street. Go North from Harwood to Lamonta Road, then turn left and continue ?1/4 mile. The Team Track will be on your left.


About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state's collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon's history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon's cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.


Attached Media Files: Mt. Emily on July 4, 2014
OSP Continuing Fatal Crash Investigation in Josephine County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/15/15
2015-06/1002/85404/100_0441.JPG
2015-06/1002/85404/100_0441.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-06/1002/85404/thumb_100_0441.JPG
An early morning crash in Josephine County takes the life of a Grants Pass woman.

According to Sergeant Brandon Boice, on Monday, June 15, 2015, at approximately 12:20AM, a 2006 Toyota RAV4, being operated by Steven R SCHURPF, Jr, age 29, of Grants Pass was southbound on Azalea Drive near Ewe Creek Road when it failed to negotiate a left-hand curve. The vehicle left the roadway onto the right (west) shoulder and rolled several times.

SCHURPF's passenger, Tamera R DILLARD, age 27, of Grants Pass was ejected during the crash. She was pronounced deceased at the scene. SCHURPF had to be extricated from the vehicle and was transported to Three Rivers Hospital in Grants Pass and later medically cleared/released to OSP custody with no injuries.

SCHURPF was arrested and lodged at the Josephine County Jail on charges of Manslaughter I, DUII and Reckless Driving. Drugs, alcohol and excessive speed are being investigated as factors in the crash. OSP was assisted at the scene by Rural Metro Fire and AMR medical.

No further information is available. More information will be released as it becomes available.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1002/85404/100_0441.JPG , 2015-06/1002/85404/100_0395.JPG , 2015-06/1002/85404/100_0394.JPG
Reward Announced in 2014 South Dakota Murder Case; Digital Billboards in Oregon and 11 Other States Profile the Victim (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 06/15/15
Dashewich - FBI billboard
Dashewich - FBI billboard
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-06/3585/85401/thumb_Dashewich_-_FBI_Billboard.jpg
Update: Lamar Advertising is also running the FBI Seeking Information poster on its digital billbaord located at 2973 12th Street SE, Salem, OR.



The following is being sent to local media at the request of the FBI's Office of Public Affairs as part of a national publicity campaign:


The FBI is announcing a $5,000 reward for information that leads to an arrest in the murder of Theresa Dashewich, a 47-year-old woman who disappeared from a Montana truck stop a year ago and whose body was found several days later and 375 miles away in a culvert off a South Dakota interstate highway.

The Bureau's reward is in addition to the $5,000 reward being offered by the South Dakota Division of Criminal Investigation, the lead investigating agency. South Dakota officials requested the FBI's operational assistance in identifying the person or persons responsible for Dashewich's death because of the interstate nature of the case. The case was also added to our Highway Serial Killings Initiative, through which we assist on investigations involving violent crime victims with some nexus to our nation's highways.

Dashewich, an Ohio native who led a transient lifestyle and often frequented truck stops, was last seen in the early morning hours of June 14, 2014, talking to truck drivers outside a Flying J truck stop in Billings, Montana. She was wearing a gray t-shirt, navy sweatpants, and white tennis shoes, and she carried a duffel bag. At approximately 8 a.m. on June 14, 2014, a person resembling Dashewich was observed walking away from the Flying J toward the eastbound on-ramp of Interstate 90. Her body was discovered on June 17 along I-90 by a passing motorist--she had been beaten to death, and investigators believe she had been held against her will, possibly in a large vehicle.

In Oregon, Clear Channel Outdoor is running the "Seeking Information" poster on its digital billboard at the intersection of Highway 8 and SE 73rd Avenue in Hillsboro.

Anyone with information on the case is asked to call 1-800-CALL-FBI (225-5324), or contact the nearest FBI field office or American Embassy or Consulate. Help bring closure to the victim's family and the responsible perpetrator(s) to justice.

###


Note to media: The primary press release in this case, issued by the South Dakota Attorney General's Office, is attached along with an image that is being used in the digital billboards.

The FBI is also profiling this case across various social media platforms and web resources. Please refer to the following links for more photos, videos and other material:


"Seeking Information" poster on FBI.gov: https://www.fbi.gov/wanted/seeking-info/theresa-dashewich/view

FBI.gov News Blog story: https://www.fbi.gov/news/news_blog/reward-announced-in-2014-murder-case

Podcast: https://www.fbi.gov/news/podcasts/wanted/seeking-information-on-unsolved-homicide.mp3/view

"Vodcast": https://www.fbi.gov/news/videos/seeking-information-in-murder-of-theresa-dashewich

"Case of the Week": https://www.fbi.gov/wanted

Shared on the FBI's Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/FBI

Tweeted on the FBI's "Most Wanted" account: https://twitter.com/FBIMostWanted/status/610471508608176128


Attached Media Files: South Dakota AG Press Release , Dashewich - FBI billboard
New State Report Highlights Non-Motorized Boating (photo) (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 06/15/15
Non-motorized boaters
Non-motorized boaters
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-06/4139/85393/thumb_paddlers.jpg
In 2014, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department and the State Marine Board partnered in a first-of-its-kind survey to Oregonians who participate in non-motorized recreational boating on pubic waterways. The goal was to better understand current boating patterns and future needs from this rapidly growing sector in boating. Non-motorized boats include various watercraft that rely on paddles or oars for propulsion, including drift and row boating, canoeing, kayaking, white water rafting, and stand-up paddle boarding.

The survey included questions about use characteristics, boating locations, sought after experiences, and preferences, priorities, as well as cost drivers such as fees and how those fees are spent. Oregon State University was contracted to conduct the survey and analyzed the results, in conjunction with analyzing the data gathered from a 2011 survey for the 2013-2017 Oregon Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP) as it related to non-motorized boating. Survey respondents were also asked questions about Oregon's Scenic Waterways, existing water trails and future development.

Highlights from the report include:
Most survey respondents indicated strong support for the Oregon Scenic Waterways program with the three most popular suggestions for scenic waterway additions being the Crooked River, McKenzie River, and Willamette River.
With respect to facilities and services, public access and online information were rated most important.
Across potential management actions, support was greatest for restricting development along shores (apparently due to concern that development would reduce access), followed by "pack in, pack out" requirements, more public access points, and more water-accessible campsites.
Across various boating issues, car safety and increased access were rated as most important.
The majority of boaters were supportive or neutral with respect to an increased annual fee, but a significant minority opposed such a program.
The SCORP 2011 survey data, adjusted for removal of tubing and floating, indicate 4.4 million annual boater user days, which generated $114 million in expenditures across the state. In turn, this expenditure supported 1,084 jobs, $34 million in labor income, and was associated with another $54 million in value added spending. When out-of-state visitors are included, the estimated amounts increase to 1,258 jobs, $39 million in labor income, and $63 million in value added spending.
Survey results will help land and facility access managers better understand the needs of non-motorized boaters and will be used to help guide both state agencies in distributing grants to federal, state, and local government agencies who maintain and develop recreational boating opportunities.

To view the entire report, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/paddlecraft/NMStudies/OSU_Boater_Survey_Rpt27May2015.pdf.

###


Attached Media Files: Non-motorized boaters
Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet June 19 in Wilsonville
Oregon Health Authority - 06/15/15
June 15, 2015

Contact: Jennifer Uhlman, 739-5267 (meeting information or accommodations)

What: The Oregon Health Authority Metrics and Scoring Committee will meet in Wilsonville on Friday, June 19. The primary focus of the meeting will be to discuss measure selection framework and on-deck measures; and to select 2016 incentive measures. Public testimony will be heard at 9:40 a.m.

When: Friday, June 19, 9 a.m. to noon

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Room #211, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E, Wilsonville

Attendees can also join through a listen-only conference line at 1-888-808-6929, participant code 915042.

Agenda:

Welcome and consent agenda;
Updates;
Measure selection framework and retirement criteria checklist;
Public testimony;
On-deck measure discussion;
2016 measure selection.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at www.oregon.gov/oha/Pages/metrix.aspx.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Individuals requiring accommodation may request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations by calling the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

# # #
Oregon Joins in Recognizing World Elder Abuse Awareness Day
Oregon Dept. of Human Services - 06/15/15
June 15th is designated by the United Nations as International Elder and Vulnerable Abuse Awareness Day.

Governor Kate Brown has also proclaimed today Oregon Elder and Vulnerable Adult Abuse Awareness Day with a statewide proclamation (attached). Communities around the world and throughout Oregon are using this opportunity to raise awareness of elder abuse, neglect and exploitation.

"Last year, there were over 35,000 reports of adult abuse made in Oregon," said Marie Cervantes, Director of Oregon's Office of Adult Abuse Prevention and Investigations. "However, national research suggests that under-reporting of abuse is a very serious issue. According to a Cornell University study, only one in twenty three cases of adult abuse actually gets reported to authorities."

"Abuse reporting takes the collective efforts of everyone and understanding the issue is critical in order to reduce the problem," she said. "If you suspect a vulnerable person is being abused, we urge you to call your local Adult Protective Services screening line, law enforcement or Oregon's central number to report abuse: 1-855-503-SAFE."

"Education is the answer to curbing the problem of elder abuse," she added. "We can all help to prevent and reduce the abuse and mistreatment of our most vulnerable neighbors by becoming more involved and aware of what abuse looks like, taking thoughtful steps to prevent it, and reporting suspected abuse to law enforcement or Adult Protective Services (APS)."

Financial abuse and exploitation continues to be the largest segment of abuse investigated, while neglect is the second most investigated type of abuse in Oregon. Verbal and physical abuse also continue to be among the top reported forms of abuse.

Facts about Oregon Adult Abuse:

Last year, DHS received over 35,000 reports of possible abuse or neglect of vulnerable Oregonians;

3,273 people were determined to have been abused, some with multiple abuses or multiple incidents;

14,250 allegations of possible abuse were investigated for those over the age of 65 or who have a physical disability. Of those allegations, a total of 2,025 adults were determined to have been abused.

1,480 allegations of possible abuse were investigated for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. A total of 510 adults were determined to have been abused.

557 allegations of possible abuse for adults with mental illness were investigated. 150 adults were determined to have been abused.

212 allegations of possible abuse for children in licensed children's settings were investigated; 45 children were determined to have been abused.

2,609 assessments for possible self -neglect were investigated. Of those, 546 adults were determined to be self?neglecting.

Family members, intimate partners and/or trusted caregivers were the most common perpetrators across all settings in 2013.

DHS offers many resources on its website, including signs of abuse and where to call for help: http://www.oregon.gov/dhs/spwpd/adult-abuse/Pages/index.aspx

In addition, there are also many great resources through the National Center on Elder Abuse, including tips to prevent elder abuse, 12 things anyone can do to prevent elder abuse, the red flags of abuse and why should I care about elder abuse? All these resources and more can be found here: http://www.ncea.aoa.gov/Get_Involved/Awareness/Materials/index.aspx

# # #


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/973/85391/PROCLAMATION_2015.pdf
HWY 58 Crash Involving Four Vehicle Sends Twelve To The Hospital - Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/15/15
2015-06/1002/85389/IMG_0500.JPG
2015-06/1002/85389/IMG_0500.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-06/1002/85389/thumb_IMG_0500.JPG
On June 14, 2015 at about 6:30PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responding the report of a multiple vehicle crash on HWY 58 near milepost 2 (just east of I-5).

According to Sergeant Mike Brewster, a 2002 Acura MDX, operated by Hector G MONTOYA, age 26, of Keizer was stopped in the eastbound lane waiting to make a turn north into a private driveway when it was struck from behind by a 2014 Chevy Pickup operated by Russell B THOMAS, age 37, of Church Rock, New Mexico.

This collision forced the Acura into the oncoming (westbound) lane where it collided with a 2006 Volkswagen Jetta, operated by John A SUTTER, age 54, of Portland and then a 2007 Nissan Sentra operated by Lynn H MCKENZIE, age 21, of Creswell.

A total of 11 occupants were transported to Springfield Hospitals, one child was taken to Oregon Health and Sciences University for life threatening injuries.

HWY 58 was closed for hours as traffic was routed on alternate roads during the investigation. The investigation is still continuing and more information will be released when available.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1002/85389/IMG_0500.JPG , 2015-06/1002/85389/IMG_0498.JPG
06/14/15
Oregon Dept. of Forestry (ODF) Fire Update | Sunday, June 14, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/14/15
This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) fire update for Sunday, June 14, 2015.

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
Sunset Grade Fire
The Sunset Grade Fire, on primarily the Tillamook State Forest, started just before noon yesterday. Before firefighters finished building a trail around the fire, it grew to 30 acres. Alongside the ODF fire crews the Banks and Forest Grove rural fire departments pitched in fighting this fire. Crews will strengthen the trails creating a containment buffer. Unless warranted, this will be the only update.

For more information visit: http://www.fgdfire.com/?m=1

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS
No new fires were reported burning on other lands in Oregon.
Buckskin Fire
The Buckskin Fire near Cave Junction consumed 1,200 acres. More information is available at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/article/4286/25077/.

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015, through today:
Lightning-caused fires: 70 fires burned 166 acres
Human-caused fires: 156 fires burned 339 acres
Total: 226 fires burned 505 acres

10-year average (January 1 through the present date in the year):
Lightning-caused fires: 22 fires burned 20 acres
Human-caused fires: 113 fires burned 1,107 acres
Total: 135 fires burned 1,127 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.

When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Nick Hennemann, 503-945-7248 (office) or 503-910-4311 (Cell), any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

For information on Oregon Department of Forestry protected lands view:
the department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
the Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.
the Douglas Forest Protective Association Twitter feed.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.

OTHER LINKS
Fire weather

Wildfire smoke forecasts

Wildfire smoke and air quality

Keep Oregon Green


Follow us on Twitter & Facebook

###
06/13/15
Oregon Army National Guard welcomes home infantry unit from Afghanistan (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 06/13/15
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SALEM, Oregon - The Oregon Army National Guard is welcomed home approximately 400 Soldiers with the 2nd Battalion, 162nd Infantry Regiment, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team, in a demobilization ceremony, Saturday, June 13.

In attendance were U.S. Senator Ron Wyden; Oregon Secretary of State Jeanne P. Atkins, representing Oregon Governor Kate Brown; Maj. Gen. Daniel R. Hokanson, Adjutant General, Oregon; along with many other dignitaries.

The 2-162nd Infantry Battalion deployed as "Task Force Volunteer" to Kabul, Afghanistan in support of Operations Enduring Freedom and Freedom's Sentinel from August 14, 2014 through May 1, 2015. The battalion was divided into four separate missions in Afghanistan during the deployment.

The battalion's main mission was to provide force protection and mission command for bases and movements in support of the Train Advise Assist Command-Capital (TAAC-C) in Kabul and a quick reaction force (QRF) to reinforce the Afghan National Security Forces.

The battalion's second mission was the Base Operating Support Integrator (BOS-I) mission, which consisted of standardizing processes for base defense, QRF response, and security for movements throughout the area of operations.

The third mission assigned to the battalion was to provide a Police Advisory Detachment (PAD), supporting 30 Police Districts throughout the Kabul area. The PAD assisted with upgrading the capabilities, standards, and professionalism of the Afghan National Police.

The fourth mission assigned to the battalion, known as Guardian Angel support, was to provide security and protection for dignitaries as they moved throughout the area of operations.

The 2-162nd Infantry Battalion is headquartered in Springfield, Oregon, with companies also based in Corvallis, Gresham, and Hillsboro.

Photo Captions:
150613-Z-YP317-001: Soldiers from 2nd Battalion, 162nd Infantry Regiment, Oregon Army National Guard, stand in formation during a demobilization ceremony for their recent return from Afghanistan in Albany, Oregon, June 13. The 2-162nd Infantry Battalion spent approximately 10-months in Kabul, Afghanistan, performing various security duties and training Afghan National Police forces. (Photo by Christopher L. Ingersoll, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

150613-Z-YP317-025: Lt. Col. Michael Burghardt, commander of 2nd Battalion, 162nd Infantry Regiment, Oregon Army National Guard, and Command Sgt. Maj. Peter Heidt uncase the battalion colors, signifying the end of the unit's deployment and return home to Oregon during a demobilization ceremony in Albany, Oregon, June 13. The 2-162nd Infantry Battalion spent approximately 10-months in Kabul, Afghanistan, performing various security duties and training Afghan National Police forces. (Photo by Christopher L. Ingersoll, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

150613-Z-YP317-053: Maj. Gen. Daniel R. Hokanson (left), Adjutant General, Oregon, welcomes home Citizen-Soldiers of the 2nd Battalion, 162nd Infantry Regiment, Oregon Army National Guard, during a demobilization ceremony in Albany, Oregon, June 13. The 2-162nd Infantry Battalion spent approximately 10-months in Kabul, Afghanistan, performing various security duties and training Afghan National Police forces. (Photo by Christopher L. Ingersoll, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

150613-Z-YP317-013: Miss Oregon Rebecca Anderson sings the National Anthem during a demobilization ceremony in Albany, Oregon, June 13, for 2nd Battalion, 162nd Infantry Regiment, Oregon Army National Guard, to welcome the unit home from Afghanistan. The 2-162nd Infantry Battalion spent approximately 10-months in Kabul, Afghanistan, performing various security duties and training Afghan National Police forces. (Photo by Christopher L. Ingersoll, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

150613-Z-YP317-015: Soldiers from 2nd Battalion, 162nd Infantry Regiment, Oregon Army National Guard, render a salute during the National Anthem at their demobilization ceremony in Albany, Oregon, June 13. The 2-162nd Infantry Battalion spent approximately 10-months in Kabul, Afghanistan, performing various security duties and training Afghan National Police forces. (Photo by Christopher L. Ingersoll, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/962/85332/150613-Z-yp317-053.jpg , 2015-06/962/85332/150613-Z-yp317-025.jpg , 2015-06/962/85332/150613-Z-yp317-015.jpg , 2015-06/962/85332/150613-Z-yp317-013.jpg , 2015-06/962/85332/150613-Z-yp317-001.jpg
WOU names Health and Wellness Center in honor of Oregon State Senator Peter Courtney (Photo)
Western Oregon University - 06/13/15
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Monmouth, Ore. - Western Oregon University has announced the renaming of its Health and Wellness Center to the Peter Courtney Health and Wellness Center in honor of Oregon Senate President Peter Courtney, who worked at WOU for 30 years. WOU held a naming ceremony just before its Commencement ceremony, which had Courtney as its keynote speaker.

"Joining WOU a decade ago, Peter immediately advocated the need for new facilities that would serve the health of students' minds and bodies. His retirement from Western gives us the opportunity to honor him in a way that I believe is meaningful to his dedication to Western Oregon University and all Oregonians," said WOU president Mark Weiss. "Today's celebration was particularly meaningful through the attendance of both Governors Brown and Kulongoski, retired WOU president John Minahan, Dick Hughes of the Statesman Journal, and faculty and students participation."

The naming ceremony had remarks from Governor Kate Brown, former Governor Ted Kulongoski, WOU president Mark Weiss, former WOU President John Minahan, Dick Hughes of the Statesman Journal, WOU faculty Dr. Gay Timken, WOU student Evelyn Garcia, and the man of honor, Peter Courtney. In Courtney's remarks he commended the building's world-class facilities like the indoor running track, rock climbing wall and pool, adding, "this building is much more than that to me. This building is about health, it's about the mind, and it's about healing."

Announced at the naming ceremony was the creation of a scholarship endowment in Courtney's name. The Peter Courtney Legacy Scholarship Endowment will support WOU students' dreams of a college degree. It reinforces his dedication to the student experience and the value he places on an accessible, affordable public university education for all Oregonians. Gifts can be made at wou.edu/give.

Courtney joined WOU in 1984 as assistant to the president. Prior to his retirement in December 2014 he served as assistant to six presidents and held other roles including instructor of speech communication and Freshman Experience. He also chaired the Commencement Committee for approximately 20 years. His political career began in 1974 when he was elected to the Salem City Council. His public service career has blossomed and he is now serving a record setting seventh term as Senate President. At the conclusion of his current term he will be the longest sitting legislator in Oregon's history. Through both of these major roles in his life he has championed important issues like education and mental health in the state.

The Peter Courtney Health and Wellness Center opened in 2011 and earned gold certification from the United States Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) program. The building features 80,000 square feet of academic, recreational and athletic space, which includes the Wolverton Memorial Pool, a two-court gymnasium, elevated indoor track, two racquetball courts, three multipurpose rooms, rock climbing wall, a 6,000 square foot strength, cardiovascular and weight training area, and more.

# # #

About WOU
Western Oregon University (WOU), founded in 1856 and located in Monmouth, is Oregon's oldest public university. The university has received national recognition for excellence for its focus on student learning and success by the Education Trust, US. News and World Report, American Association of State Colleges and Universities, National Association of Academic Advisors, and Parade Magazine. In 2010 WOU was recognized by the Education Trust as being the top university in America at eliminating the Latino graduation gap. WOU is fully accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1107/85377/IMG_3949.JPG , Peter Courtney and a painting of his likeness by WOU emertitus faculty Elena Jameson , Former Governor Ted Kulongoski , Governor Kate Brown , New name of Peter Courtney Health and Wellness Center unveiled. Seated are Courtney (right) and his wife, Marge (left)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry (ODF) Fire Update | Saturday, June 13, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/13/15
This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) fire update for Saturday, June 13, 2015.

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
Powder House Canyon
This 25 acre fire started last night near Fossil. The cause remains under investigation. Overnight firefighters built a trail around 75 percent of the fire and will continue their work today. Unless warranted, this will be the only update.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS

Buckskin Fire
The Buckskin Fire near Cave Junction consumed 1,200 acres. This blaze is clearly visible from Cave Junction.

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015, through today:
Lightning-caused fires: 70 fires burned 166 acres
Human-caused fires: 154 fires burned 338 acres
Total: 224 fires burned 504 acres

10-year average (January 1 through the present date in the year):
Lightning-caused fires: 22 fires burned 20 acres
Human-caused fires: 113 fires burned 1,107 acres
Total: 135 fires burned 1,127 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.

When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Nick Hennemann, 503-945-7248 (office) or 503-910-4311 (Cell), any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

For information on Oregon Department of Forestry protected lands view:
the department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
the Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.
the Douglas Forest Protective Association Twitter feed.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.

OTHER LINKS
Fire weather

Wildfire smoke forecasts

Wildfire smoke and air quality

Keep Oregon Green


Follow us on Twitter & Facebook

###
Serious Motorcycle Crash, HWY 47 Near Forest Grove (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/13/15
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A Beaverton man was critically injured when his motorcycle collided with a pickup in Washington County.

According to Lieutenant Doug Shugart, on June 12, 2015 at about 3:50PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report a motor vehicle crash in the intersection of HWY 47 and Scoggins Valley Road.

Preliminary information is Tarik ALFADLI, age 22, of Beaverton was operating a 1988 Honda motorcycle east on Scoggins Valley Rd when he failed to stop for the stop sign at the intersection with HWY 47. ALFADLI colliding with a passing 2006 Ford F350 operated by William WISE, age 58, of McMinnville. ALFADLI collided with the rear portion of the pickup which ejected him from his motorcycle and caused him serious injuries. ALFADLI was taken by air ambulance to a Portland area hospital. WISE was not injured.

The investigation is continuing and more information will be released when it is available. OSP was assisted by Gaston Fire, the Washington County Sheriff's Office and the Oregon Department of Transportation.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1002/85375/257.jpg , 2015-06/1002/85375/232.jpg
06/12/15
Fatal Crash - HWY 38 MP 44 (West of Drain) (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/12/15
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On June 12, 2015, at about 4:23PM OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a single vehicle crash on HWY 38 near milepost 44 (west of Drain).

Preliminary investigation has revealed that a 2000 Pontiac Montana operated by Donna BREWSTER age 71, of Drain, Oregon, was traveling west on HWY 38 when it drifted off the north shoulder and down an embankment striking a tree.

Emergency personnel immediately responded and BREWSTER was pronounced deceased on scene.

Both lanes of Hwy 38 remained open during the investigation which is continuing. OSP was assisted by the Douglas County Sheriffs Office, Fire Dept personnel, and the Oregon Department of Transportation.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1002/85372/image2.JPG
Woman convicted of Manslaughter, Assault, and DUII after driving wrong-way on I-5 in November 2014
Marion Co. Dist. Attorney's Office - 06/12/15
Earlier today, before the Honorable David E. Leith, Audrey Maria Blivens, 49, pleaded guilty and was sentenced for the following crimes: manslaughter in the first degree, assault in the second degree, assault in the third degree, and driving under the influence of intoxicants. Judge Leith sentenced defendant to 156 months in Department of Corrections and 36 months of post-prison supervision.

According to an Oregon State Police investigation, on November 25, 2014, at approximately 2:50am, defendant drove her vehicle the wrong way on Interstate 5. Defendant crashed head-on into a vehicle driven by Juan Ledesma and occupied by Deana Deleon and a 7-year old passenger. Ms. Blivens caused the death of Deana Deleon, injured Juan Ledesma, and injured the 7-year old passenger. The victims were traveling for the Thanksgiving holiday when their vehicle was struck.
NW Oregon declares fire season June 16
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/12/15
The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) announced today that all of its districts in the Northwest Oregon Fire Protection Association will enter wildfire season on Tuesday, June 16.

"With the current and predicted weather, summer is here," said Columbia Unit Protection Unit Forester Malcolm Hiatt. "We want to get out in front of the situation, since fire danger is increasing." Many of our indices that determine fire danger are already at or above the levels that we were observing at the time of the Scoggins Creek Fire last year that started on September 19, 2014.

Entry into fire season chiefly addresses industrial forest operators. Logging operations, for example, are required to have a fire watch present after work activity ceases for the day, and fire suppression equipment must be positioned on site.

But if the warm, dry weather continues, additional restrictions may be added on recreation and other activities.

The ODF districts entering fire season on Wednesday include: Astoria, Forest Grove, and Tillamook.

For more information on the restrictions imposed by the fire season declaration, contact the nearest Oregon Department of Forestry office. Contact information for the Astoria, Forest Grove and Tillamook district offices can be found at: www.oregon.gov/ODF/offices.shtml.
South Cascade, Western Lane districts to declare fire season June 16
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/12/15
It's already dry, and the heat is on its way. Those two factors prompted the Oregon Department of Forestry's (ODF) Western Lane and South Cascade districts to declare wildfire season starting Tuesday, June 16.

"Conditions are setting up for increased fire danger," South Cascade District Forester Greg Wagenblast said. "We're in a cool-down period right now, but the hot weather is forecast to return soon."

A declaration of fire season imposes certain restrictions on recreational and work activities in the forest. Industrial operations are required to have firefighting equipment on site. Since restrictions may vary, it is advisable to check with the nearest ODF office for rules specific to the local area.

The Western Lane and South Cascade districts together encompass all of Lane County as well as eastern Linn County and portions of northern Douglas County.

Though backyard debris burning is still allowed through June 15, he advised extreme caution.

"Have a garden hose and shovel ready near your burn pile, and attend it at all times," he said.

Escaped debris burns are a common cause of wildfires every year in Oregon. These damaging fires often occur when the homeowner leaves the burn unattended to pursue some other activity. All it takes is a spark from the pile to drop into nearby dry grass, add a little wind, and it's game on.

The Keep Oregon Green Association offers practical wildfire prevention tips for around the home and in the forest at: keeporegongreen.com.
***Update #2*** OSP Continuing Fatal Crash Investigation As Result Of Speed Racing - Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/12/15
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On June 11, 2015, Oregon State Police Detectives arrested the two drivers involved in Tuesday's fatal pedestrian crash near Pleasant Hill.

According to Sergeant Andy Kenyon, the juveniles were arrested around 5PM on June 11, 2015 and lodged at Serbu Youth Detention Facility in Eugene. Arrested were two 17 year old males both of Springfield. Both were charged with Manslaughter in the 1st Degree, Reckless Driving and Recklessly Endangering.

The incident occurred on June 9, 2015 when, according to witnesses, a 2014 Chevrolet Camaro a 1994 Mitsubishi 3000GT were speed racing on Mathews Road. The drivers lost control of their vehicles and the Camaro struck VILETT which caused his death. The Camaro continued after striking VILETT and struck a tree.

No further information will be released this time.
End Update


Previous Releases:
The Oregon State Police is continuing yesterday's fatal crash investigation near Pleasant Hill.

According to Lieutenant Lang Hinkle, on June 9, 2015 just before 1:30PM, OSP Troopers and the Lane County Sheriff's Office responded to the report of a vehicle versus pedestrian death in front of 34817 Matthews Rd.

Preliminary information is that two vehicles were speed racing westbound on Matthews Road when one lost control and struck, Roland E VILETTE, age 45. Upon law enforcement and medics arriving on scene, VILETTE was pronounced deceased. The investigation revealed VILETTE's residence is located in front of the incident scene and it has not yet been confirmed where VILETTE was positioned when he was struck.

The two drivers involved in the speed racing are both juveniles and their identities will not be released at this time. The investigating is still continuing and any further release of information could compromise it's integrity. A future update will be released when it is appropriate to do so.
End Update


Previous Release:
OSP Troopers and the Lane County Sheriff's Office are on scene of a vehicle versus pedestrian crash in 34000 Block of Matthews Road near Pleasant Hill.

According to Lieutenant Lang Hinkle, on June 9, 2015, at about 1:08PM, two vehicles were allegedly speed racing westbound on Matthews Road when one lost control striking a pedestrian. The pedestrian was pronounced deceased on scene.

The investigation is continuing and more information will be released when it is available.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1002/85255/2449.jpg , 2015-06/1002/85255/2455.jpg , 2015-06/1002/85255/142622.jpg
Drug Related Search Warrant
Lebanon Police Dept. - 06/12/15
Nature of Crime or Event: Drug related Search Warrant
Date / Time Occurred: June 11th, 2015
Occurred Location: 795 E Elmore Street, Lebanon, OR
On 06/11/15 at approximately 1146 hours, the Lebanon Police Department and the Lebanon Fire Department were dispatched to 795 E Elmore Street, Lebanon, Linn County, Oregon for a report of an 18 year old female in cardiac arrest. This is the home of Jack Barnes DOB: 11/08/1986 and his mother. The paramedics were first to arrive on scene and found the 18 year old female in cardiac arrest and not breathing. The paramedics administered Narcan, which is a medication used to counter the effects of opioid overdoses. The administration of this drug resuscitated the female and she eventually regained consciousness. The female later disclosed to police that Mr. Barnes supplied her with Heroin and even injected her with the drugs with her consent.
The Lebanon Police Department served a search warrant on the residence with the assistance of the Linn County Sheriff's Office. During the search warrant, dealer amounts of Heroin were found along with cash, scales, packaging material, numerous syringes containing probable Heroin, and other drug related paraphernalia.
Mr. Barnes was taken into custody and lodged at the Linn County Jail for the charges of Unlawful Delivery of Heroin, Unlawful Possession of Heroin, Recklessly Endangering, and Frequenting a Place where Controlled Substances are Used.
If you have information on this case, you are asked to contact the Information Line at 541-451-1751 ext 4333
Come Visit With Our Team and See if a Career at MCSO is for You (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/12/15
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Tired of working job to job, looking for a rewarding career opportunity? Our large and diverse work force collaborates as a team to enhance the livability of our residents, which creates many different opportunities to work in a variety of positions from Accountant to Deputy Sheriff.

Saturday, June 20th, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., the Marion County Sheriff's Office Recruitment Team will be on hand at the Brooks Regional Training Facility, located at 4910 Brooklake RD NE. Come down, meet our deputies, talk with our Recruitment Team and see if one of our current job openings is right for you. In addition to staff being on hand, we will be offering the Oregon Physical Agilities Tests for free an $85 value. (First Come First Served)

For more information on joining our team go to www.GoMCSO.com or email Deputy Navarro at enavarro@co.marion.or.us


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1294/85360/Recruitment.jpg
***Name Correction*** Fatal Motor Vehicle Crash HWY 38 Near Drain - Douglas County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/12/15
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Name correction on both involved drivers:

Louis J CHAVES
Robert M ROOKARD

End Update

Previous Release:
On June 11, 2015, at about 5:21AM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a two vehicle crash on HWY 38 near milepost 44 (west of Drain).

Preliminary investigation has revealed that a 2010 Chrysler 300 operated by , age 68, of Cressey, CA, was traveling east on HWY 38 when it drifted across the center lane and into the path of 2000 Kenworth log truck (unloaded). The operator of the truck, Robert M ROOKLAND, age 57, of Dexter, OR was not injured in the crash.

After the collision, CHAVEZ's vehicle left the roadway and came to rest on its side down a small embankment. Emergency personnel immediately responded and CHAVEZ was pronounced deceased on scene.

The Westbound lane of Hwy 38 remained closed for approximately 5 hours for the investigation and removal of vehicles. Both lanes of Hwy 138 are now open.

OSP was assisted by the Douglas County Sheriffs Office, Fire Dept personnel, and ODOT.
End Update


Previous Release:
OSP Troopers are on scene of a fatal traffic crash involving two vehicles on HWY 38 at MP 44 (west of Drain). One lane is blocked but traffic is passing through. Expect delays for hours as investigators are on scene. Please visit www.tripcheck.com for travel status updates.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1002/85310/image2.JPG , 2015-06/1002/85310/image4.JPG
Shooting Investigation Underway In Josephine County
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/12/15
On June 12, 2015, just before 7:30AM, law enforcement responded to Selma to the report of a shooting at 156 Hogue Drive in Selma. Prior to law enforcement arrival, it was learned a victim with a gunshot wound was taken to the local fire department and then by ambulance to Three Rivers Hospital in Grants Pass. At the time of this release the victim has serious injuries but believed not to be life threatening.

The Oregon State Police and Josephine County Sheriff's Office continued to the incident location and made contact with three subjects who were subsequently detained. Detectives are currently working the scene and continuing their investigation.

Any additional release of information could compromise the integrity of the investigation. An update will be released when authorized by investigators.
Brian Ballou receives Bronze Smokey Award for fire prevention work
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/12/15
For southwestern Oregon residents, there are two reliable indicators that wildfire season has arrived: smoke in the air, and Brian Ballou on the evening news. Since 2004 the Oregon Department of Forestry fire prevention educator has taught homeowners, recreationists and forest operators common-sense ways to avoid accidentally starting fires while working or playing in the woods. In recognition of his efforts, Ballou recently received the coveted Bronze Smokey Award.

"This is the highest honor given to organizations or individuals for outstanding wildfire prevention service that is national in scope," Said Dan Thorpe, ODF district forester for SW Oregon. The Gold, Silver and Bronze Smokey Awards recognize individuals and organizations for "outstanding wildfire prevention service or projects rendered."

Ballou's innovative approach to educating the public about fire safety incorporates an array of tools, from mass media, to home visits, to social media. A wildfire blog he originated has become the go-to source for area residents seeking current fire information. During the record 2013 and 2014 seasons the blog exceeded 25,000 hits per day.

His brochures, "Wildfire! Are you prepared?" and "Will your home survive a wildfire?" have fostered awareness of the fire risk among thousands of rural homeowners and instructed them in how to make their houses and properties defensible in the event of an encroaching wildfire.

Hundreds of broadcast news media appearances each summer have cemented his reputation as the face of wildfire prevention in SW Oregon.

The fire educator's behind-the-scenes work has had no less of an impact on the public's awareness of wildfire risk. He was a key player in the development of Community Wildfire Protection Plans in two counties and five communities.

Willing to reach out even to non-traditional partners to promulgate the wildfire prevention message, Ballou worked with plant specialists, Oregon State University Extension, nurseries, landscapers and others to produce a local list of fire-resistant plants for rural homeowners. Some plants commonly used in landscaping, such as ornamental juniper, can actually carry a ground fire to structures, while the plants on his list resist the flames and also require less water to maintain.

Measuring the success of any type of prevention work can be challenging. But during his tenure in ODF's Southwest Oregon District, the trend in human-caused wildfires has declined from 200 a year to 165 annually - a significant impact in a fire-prone area with a population of 300,000.

In 1997, the Oregon Legislature passed landmark legislation that addressed the burgeoning threat to forests, life and property posed by developments near and in the forest. The Oregon Forestland-Urban Interface Fire Protection Act, which came to be known as "Senate Bill 360," broke new ground by encouraging rural residents to turn their fire-vulnerable urban and suburban properties into less-volatile zones where firefighters could better defend homes from wildfires. Ballou implemented the Act throughout Jackson and Josephine counties and statewide with passion and creativity, developing an entire suite of SB-360 aids, including a guidance manual for rural residents, certification training materials, and a property self-evaluation form.

His nomination for the Bronze Smokey Award received broad support from the community, with 31 letters of support submitted by organizations including the U.S. Forest Service, Oregon State Fire Marshal, The Nature Conservancy, Congressman Greg Walden, Southern Oregon Timber Industries Association and others.

Gwen Beavans, National Fire Prevention Coordinator with the U.S. Forest Service, described the high regard in which Ballou is held for his work:

"Brian is a longstanding stalwart representative in fire prevention and a household name in southern Oregon, just like Smokey Bear," she said.

Ballou works out of ODF's Southwest Oregon District office in Central Point, and he resides with his family in the area.
Burn Ban in Effect
Albany Fire Dept. - 06/12/15
A ban on all open and backyard burning will go into effect on June 12 in Linn, Benton and Marion counties. The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) and the fire defense boards of the three counties announced the ban, which aims to reduce the incidence of open debris burns escaping control. The restrictions will extend through Oct. 15 or later, depending on fire danger.

"The risk of fire is dangerously high this year due to the limited snowpack and hot, dry conditions we are already experiencing," said John Bradner, Linn County Fire Defense Board Chief. "Fire departments throughout our region are already responding to grass and wildland fires significantly earlier this summer than normal, which has prompted us to institute an earlier ban."

The June 12 debris burning prohibition applies to all lands in Linn and Benton counties, but only to ODF-protected lands in Marion County. However, on June 15 the burn ban will extend to all lands in Marion County as well.

The open burning restrictions coincide with the current air-quality rules set forth by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality. Those rules already forbid open burning within three miles of cities over 1,000 in population and six miles from cities over 50,000 in population after June 15. These burn restrictions expand the geographical scope to include areas outside the three- and six-mile limits.

Benton County Fire Defense Board Chief Rick Smith asked residents to think about other ways to dispose of their backyard debris.

"We encourage you to consider alternatives to burning such as the Community Wildfire Protection Plan chipping program, debris recycling, and Pacific Region Compost."

The fire defense board chiefs encouraged residents to increase their awareness of wildfires and take steps to help protect their property. The work that a homeowner does now to establish a defensible space around his/her property can make the difference between a home or structure burning or surviving intact.

Rural fire agencies and the Oregon Department of Forestry have the authority to enforce and regulate the burn ban. Under Oregon Revised Statute Chapter 477, the department may issue citations for violation of the burning restrictions.

For more information on the open burning restrictions as well as advice on safe debris disposal, contact the nearest Department of Forestry office or the local fire department.

###
06/11/15
Retail Marijuana Scientific Advisory Committee meets June 25
Oregon Health Authority - 06/11/15
June 11, 2015

What: The Oregon Health Authority's Retail Marijuana Scientific Advisory Committee's monthly meeting. The meeting is open to the public.

Agenda: Review purpose and agenda; review final charter; review and approve June 22 draft meeting minutes; discuss effects of marijuana use on developing fetus and breastfeeding infants; review relevant scientific literature; future topics; next steps; public comment.

When: Thursday, June 25, 3-5 p.m. The public comment period begins at 4:45 p.m. All comments are limited to two minutes, or can be submitted to marijuana.science@state.or.us.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1-B, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland.

Details: The Oregon Health Authority's Retail Marijuana Scientific Advisory Committee, based at the Public Health Division, provides scientific input to inform public health recommendations related to retail marijuana in Oregon. The committee is examining adverse health effects of retail marijuana use; and impacts of time, place, and manner of retail sale of potentially addictive substances.

For more information about the committee, visit the committee's website at http://public.health.oregon.gov/About/Pages/Retail-Marijuana-Scientific-Advisory-Committee.aspx.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Individuals requiring accommodation may request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations by calling the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

# # #
Burning ban starts June 12 in Linn, Benton and Marion counties
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/11/15
A ban on all open and backyard burning will go into effect on June 12 in Linn, Benton and Marion counties. The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) and the fire defense boards of the three counties announced the ban, which aims to reduce the incidence of open debris burns escaping control. The restrictions will extend through Oct. 15 or later, depending on fire danger.

"The risk of fire is dangerously high this year due to the limited snowpack and hot, dry conditions we are already experiencing," said John Bradner, Linn County Fire Defense Board Chief. "Fire departments throughout our region are already responding to grass and wildland fires significantly earlier this summer than normal, which has prompted us to institute an earlier ban."

The June 12 debris burning prohibition applies to all lands in Linn and Benton counties, but only to ODF-protected lands in Marion County. However, on June 15 the burn ban will extend to all lands in Marion County as well.

The open burning restrictions coincide with the current air-quality rules set forth by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality. Those rules already forbid open burning within three miles of cities over 1,000 in population and six miles from cities over 50,000 in population after June 15. These burn restrictions expand the geographical scope to include areas outside the three- and six-mile limits.

Benton County Fire Defense Board Chief Rick Smith asked residents to think about other ways to dispose of their backyard debris.

"We encourage you to consider alternatives to burning such as the Community Wildfire Protection Plan chipping program, debris recycling, and Pacific Region Compost."

The fire defense board chiefs encouraged residents to increase their awareness of wildfires and take steps to help protect their property. The work that a homeowner does now to establish a defensible space around his/her property can make the difference between a home or structure burning or surviving intact.

Rural fire agencies and the Oregon Department of Forestry have the authority to enforce and regulate the burn ban. Under Oregon Revised Statute Chapter 477, the department may issue citations for violation of the burning restrictions.

For more information on the open burning restrictions as well as advice on safe debris disposal, contact the nearest Department of Forestry office or the local fire department.
Oregon State Hospital Memorial Honored by Public Art Network Year in Review (Photo)
Oregon Arts Commission - 06/11/15
Photo by Steve Hanson
Photo by Steve Hanson
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-06/1418/85321/thumb_15_StateHospital_LeadPencilStudio_03_0.jpg
WASHINGTON, DC --Americans for the Arts, the nation's leading nonprofit organization for advancing the arts and arts education, honors 31 outstanding public arts projects created in 2014, including the Oregon State Hospital Memorial, through the Public Art Network (PAN) Year in Review program, the only national program that specifically recognizes the most compelling public art. The works were chosen from more than 300 entries across the country and recognized today at Americans for the Arts' 2015 Annual Convention in Chicago.

The Oregon State Hospital Memorial, honoring more than 3,000 individuals whose unclaimed remains are now a part of the memorial, was unveiled early summer 2014. Created by Annie Han, a University of Oregon alum, and Daniel Mihaylo, the memorial was also honored with an American Institute of Architecture Seattle 2014 Honor Award for public art. The project was funded by the Percent for Art in Public Places Program, administered by the Oregon Arts Commission.

"The best of public art can challenge, delight, educate and illuminate. Most of all, public art creates a sense of civic vitality in the cities, towns, and communities we inhabit and visit," said Robert L. Lynch, president and CEO of Americans for the Arts. "As these Public Art Network Year in Review selections illustrate, public art has the power to enhance our lives on a scale that little else can. I congratulate the artists and commissioning groups for these community treasures, and I look forward to honoring more great works in the years to come."

"This is a well-deserved honor for Han and Mihaylo," said Meagan Atiyeh, public art coordinator for the Oregon Arts Commission. "The Oregon State Hospital Memorial is the result of their exhaustive research and unending commitment to the prime goals of the people and events it represents. Artists document our cultural ethos and aspirations, and this story is a part of our state's historic and moral fiber."

The 2015 PAN Year in Review jurors were Peggy Kendellen, Public Art Manager, Regional Arts & Culture Council in Portland, Oregon; Laurie Jo Reynolds, Assistant Professor of Public Arts, Social Justice and Culture at the School of Art and Art History at the University of Illinois at Chicago; and Ernest C. Wong, Principal, site design group, ltd in Chicago.

The 31 public art works selected for the PAN Year in Review can be seen on this page. The presentation, which includes photos and descriptions of these works, are available through Americans for the Arts' store.

The Public Art Network (PAN), a program of Americans for the Arts, is designed to provide services to the diverse field of public art and to develop strategies and tools to improve communities through public art. The network's constituents are public art professionals, visual artists, design professionals, and communities and organizations planning public art projects and programs.

Americans for the Arts is the leading nonprofit organization for advancing the arts and arts education in America. With offices in Washington, D.C., and New York City, it has a record of more than 50 years of service. Americans for the Arts is dedicated to representing and serving local communities and creating opportunities for every American to participate in and appreciate all forms of the arts. Additional information is available at www.AmericansForTheArts.org.

See the full list of honorees, including three other Oregon projects: http://bit.ly/1IKvnXZ

###


Attached Media Files: Photo by Steve Hanson , Photo by Steve Hanson , Photo by Steve Hanson
Governor Kate Brown Declares August 3 - 7 as Oregon Private College Week (Photo)
Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges & Universities - 06/11/15
OPCW Logo
OPCW Logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-06/4829/85318/thumb_OPCW_IDtag2.jpg
PORTLAND, Ore. - Governor Kate Brown has declared August 3-7, 2015 to be Oregon Private College Week. The proclamation cites the indispensable contributions of the state's private, nonprofit sector of higher education to Oregon's communities and to the state's 40-40-20 education attainment goal.

Eleven private, nonprofit colleges and universities across the state are opening their doors to prospective students and their families during Oregon Private College Week. Students who visit at least four institutions during the week will receive application fee waivers. Students may use these fee waivers to apply to any Alliance member college or university.

Together, Alliance colleges and universities enroll 19% of Oregon's undergraduate students, award 23% of Oregon's undergraduate degrees and confer 24% of the bachelor's degrees awarded to minority students in the state, including high-need fields such as STEM (21%), health professions (35%), business (24%), and public administration and social service (27%).

Together, the private nonprofit sector offers degrees in more than 240 fields of study, such as engineering and computer science.

The majority of students enrolled in Alliance member institutions graduates within four years and begins to make an immediate contribution to Oregon's economy. Also cited in Governor Brown's proclamation is the economic contribution that Oregon's private, nonprofit colleges and universities make to the state's economy.

During Oregon Private College Week, prospective students and their families are invited to learn about academic programs and financial aid, meet experts in admission, and tour the campus. College officials will also address common myths about private higher education:
Thirty-two percent of Alliance undergraduates qualify for federal Pell Grants based on income.
The Alliance member institutions are cost effective. The average indebtedness of Alliance graduates is lower than the national average for private colleges and universities and similar to that of public institution graduates.
Ninety-two percent of first time, first year students receive financial aid, with an average grant and scholarship award of over $18,000.

Sessions will begin at 9 a.m. and 2 p.m., Monday through Friday. For more information about Oregon Private College Week, to view a list of participating colleges or to register, please visit www.oregonprivatecolleges.com.

The Matched College Savings Program (MCSP) and SALT are sponsors of Oregon Private College Week.

About The Alliance
The Alliance represents 18 of Oregon's regionally accredited, nonprofit private higher education institutions. Together, Alliance colleges and universities enroll more than 35,000 students and deliver approximately 30% of all baccalaureate degrees and higher awarded in Oregon. The Alliance intersects the needs of business and industry, private nonprofit colleges and universities, and the public good to create real solutions that build a more educated and skilled workforce for Oregon. For more information, visit www.oaicu.org.


Attached Media Files: OPCW Proclamation , OPCW Logo
Oregon Dept. of Forestry (ODF) Fire Update | Thursday, June 11, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/11/15
This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) fire update for Thursday, June 11, 2015.

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
No new fires were reported burning on ODF-protected lands.
Galls Creek Complex
These lightning caused fires around Medford were reported Tuesday afternoon and burned roughly 90 acres. The complex, multiple fires, consists of over a dozen fires. The largest fire consumed about 45 acres. Firefighters and equipment operators built trails around the fires and continued improving the buffers yesterday. Unless warranted, this is the last update for this fire.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS
No new fires were reported burning on other lands in Oregon.

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015, through today:
Lightning-caused fires: 36 fires burned 13 acres
Human-caused fires: 138 fires burned 327 acres
Total: 174 fires burned 341 acres

10-year average (January 1 through the present date in the year):
Lightning-caused fires: 22 fires burned 20 acres
Human-caused fires: 113 fires burned 1,107 acres
Total: 135 fires burned 1,127 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.

When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Nick Hennemann, 503-945-7248 (office) or 503-910-4311 (Cell), any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

For information on Oregon Department of Forestry protected lands view:
the department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
the Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.
the Douglas Forest Protective Association Twitter feed.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.

OTHER LINKS
Fire weather

Wildfire smoke forecasts

Wildfire smoke and air quality

Keep Oregon Green


Follow us on Twitter & Facebook

###
Have you checked out your trampoline lately?
Pacific Power - 06/11/15
Contact: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tom Gauntt, Pacific Power, June 11, 2015
503-813-7291

Have you checked out your trampoline lately?
Schools are out, but it is always a good time for lessons on staying safe around electricity

PORTLAND, Ore. -- Summer weather has arrived; and with warmer weather and longer days children are spending more time outdoors flying kites, climbing trees, playing ball and heading for playgrounds, open fields and parks.

And jumping on trampolines if they get a chance.

"Throwing things in the air, even yourself, is a natural part of youthful exuberance, but kids need to think about how close they are to power lines whether they are doing somersaults on a trampoline, tossing a ball around or remodeling a tree house," said Gene Morris, Pacific Power's director of health, safety and environment. "Keep an eye out for equipment on the ground as well. It may seem like a good place for hide and seek, but everyone needs to give this equipment a wide berth."

Pacific Power offers the following tips to enjoy a safe summer:

Ensure trampolines are never placed under power lines.
Check trees for overhead wires running near or through limbs and branches before climbing or building tree houses. Walk a full circle around the tree; if lines are present, do not climb the tree.
Never climb an electrical substation fence or wall, or attempt to enter a substation, even if a ball made it over the fence. High-voltage electrical equipment located in substations can be very dangerous, and only trained and authorized Pacific Power personnel are allowed inside.
Never poke, pry or climb on tan or green ground transformer boxes. They're safe while sealed, but pose a threat if tampered with.
Fly kites away from overhead power lines. If a kite becomes tangled in electrical wires, immediately let go of the string and make no attempt to remove the kite. Call Pacific Power toll free at 1-888-221-7070.

For additional electrical safety tips or to request a free "Power Lines - Stay Away to Stay Safe" brochure, call toll free at 1-800-375-7085 or visit pacificpower.net/safety.

###


About Pacific Power
Pacific Power provides electric service to more than 730,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. The company works to meet growing energy demand while protecting and enhancing the environment. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity providers in the United States, with almost 1.8 million customers in six western states. Information about Pacific Power is available on the company's website, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube pages, which can be accessed via pacificpower.net.
06/10/15
Marine Board Meeting in Salem June 23, 24
Oregon Marine Board - 06/10/15
The Oregon State Marine Board will hold its quarterly Board meeting on June 23 and June 24, in Salem. The June 23 Board meeting will be held at the Chemeketa Center for Business and Industry, 626 High Street NE, beginning at 9 am. The June 24 Board meeting will be held at the Marine Board office, 435 Commercial Street NE, beginning at 9 am.
The June 23rd meeting will consider Round One Grants as listed on the agenda, and the June 24th meeting agenda items are as follows:
Director's report
Consideration of Chapter 250 Division 011, 012 and 013 -US Coast Guard requirements and conformity to the Inland Navigation Rules
Consideration of a petition request to open rulemaking for Cape Kiwanda
Consideration of rulemaking for Chapter 250 Divison 021 -removal of the 5 mph reference to slow-no wake and PWC readability
Consideration to establish a Non-Motorized Boating Program
Consideration of rulemaking for Chapter 250 Divison 016 for the Outfitter and Guide Program
Election of Board officers
Staff reports

The meetings are accessible for persons with disabilities. For a communication aid request or agenda questions, please contact June LeTarte, Executive Assistant, at 503-378-2617 by Monday, June 22. The Board will accept public comment during the designated period at the beginning of each meeting for non-rulemaking or petition items.

To view the agenda and staff report, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/Pages/admin/members.aspx.


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State Forests Advisory Committee to meet June 15 in Philomath
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/10/15
The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) State Forests Advisory Committee will meet Monday, June 15, 2015 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The meeting will be held at the ODF West Oregon District office at 24533 Alsea Highway Philomath, OR 97370.

Members will receive updates on:
Threatened and endangered species surveys and policy
Oregon Administrative Rule related to recreation
Alternative Forest Management Plan process

The Committee will also receive updates on public comments submitted as part of the Annual Operations Planning process.

The Committee provides opportunity for and welcomes public comment on these and all issues related to its work.

The State Forests Advisory Committee (SFAC) is comprised of citizens and representatives of timber, environmental and recreation groups. The SFAC provides a forum to discuss issues, opportunities and concerns, and offer advice and guidance to ODF on the implementation of the Northwest Oregon State Forests Management Plan. The plan provides guidance for managing 616,000 acres within the Tillamook, Clatsop and Santiam State Forests, and several scattered state-owned forest tracts in Benton, Polk, Lincoln and Lane counties through a balanced approach to generate revenue while prioritizing environmental and social benefits.

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations for the meeting can be directed to the Oregon Department of Forestry at 503-359-7427.

Additional information about the State Forests Advisory Committee is available on the Oregon Department of Forestry's web site: www.oregon.gov/ODF/state_forests/state_forests_advisory_committee.aspx.

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Snake River Correctional Institution Reports Inmate Death
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 06/10/15
An inmate died unexpectedly early Wednesday morning at Snake River Correctional Institution (SRCI) in Ontario. As with all unanticipated deaths in state prisons, the Oregon State Police Criminal Investigations Unit is conducting an investigation.

At approximately 7:00 a.m., Wednesday, June 10, a Correctional Officer found James Papineau, 66, unresponsive in his cell, where he was the sole occupant. Medical staff began life-saving efforts to no avail. He was pronounced deceased at 7:15 a.m. No other details are available at this time.

Attempts to locate next of kin have not been successful. The department asks that anyone familiar with the deceased contact one of the numbers listed above.

Papineau originally entered DOC custody on August 20, 1988, on multiple charges, including robbery in the first degree, burglary in the first degree, and coercion. He paroled on May 3, 2004, later violated his parole, and returned to DOC custody on February 1, 2006, with multiple new charges. His earliest release date was June 4, 2030.

SRCI is a multi-custody prison in Ontario that houses approximately 3,000 male inmates. SRCI has multiple special housing units including disciplinary segregation, intensive management, infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care, and an administrative segregation unit. SRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including a contact center, laundry, and sign shop. SRCI specializes in incentive housing, specialized housing, inmates with mental health/medical vulnerabilities, education and trades programs, cognitive and parenting programs, and institution work programs. SRCI opened in 1991 and is the largest correctional institution in the state.

####
Capitol Auto Group Named a "Best Place to Work for Millennials" (Photo)
VanNatta Public Relations - 06/10/15
Bestoflogo
Bestoflogo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-06/1853/85292/thumb_Millennials_Best_Places_logo_Final.jpg
[Salem, OR] - June 10, 2015, Capitol Auto Group (CAG), in Oregon's Mid-Willamette Valley, has been named one of the Best Places to Work for Millennial Employees in America. The list, which comes on the heels of news that Millennials are now the largest workforce in America, is the first of its kind to identify companies that excel at recruiting, developing and retaining top millennial performers.

Scott Casebeer, President of CAG, said, "We care about our employees and the environment. It is an honor to be named as a Best Place to Work for Millennials." Casebeer lists CAG's innovative talent strategies and commitments to investing in its Millennial employees include:

ˇ Flexible work hours for work/life balance,
ˇ Get Fit - reimburse 50 percent of initiation costs up to $100 for gym memberships,
ˇ On-Campus Parking,
ˇ Capitol Street Team - ability to get involved with all stores on a grassroots level
ˇ Technology for managers (Pulse Managers) - iPads to keep in touch and keep notes. Five of CAG's top managers are Millennials,
ˇ Communication - communicate all company-related information daily to all employees,
ˇ Training - manufacturer, third party and in-house training in every department in every store.

"If you are a Millennial seeking a rewarding career or an employer who is managing or recruiting Millennials, the Best Places to Work for Millennial is your resource," said best selling Millennials author and Millennial expert Jason Dorsey of The Center for Generational Kinetics. "These are the companies that excel in creating a fulfilling work experience with what is now the largest workforce segment in the United States."

To find the best places to work for Millennials, The Center for Generational Kinetics partnered with the workplace excellence research firm Best Companies Group, who manages over 50 "Best Places to Work" programs around the globe. BCG analyzed data from the over 4,000 US organizations that participated in BCG's various programs. BCG included policy and benefit offerings from the employer questionnaires, as well as the employee engagement data from the over 500,000 employee surveys conducted in the last 12 months.

The full list of the Best Places to Work for Millennials and accompanying paper Unlocking Millennial Talent is available at is available at BestPlacesToWorkMillennials.com.

###
________________________________________________________
About Capitol Auto Group: Capitol Auto Group has served the greater Salem area for more than 80 years. Dealer Scott Casebeer opened the Toyota/Scion facility, 783 Auto Group AV NE, in Salem off the Parkway, in the fall of 2011 and the Subaru facility in June 2012 at 3235 Cherry AV NE. Chevrolet/Cadillac opened in late July 2012 at 2855 Maple AV NE. Capitol West Valley, pre-owned sales and service in Dallas, opened in 2013. The company has been: recognized by Oregon Business Magazine 8 times as one of the 100 Best Companies to Work for in Oregon; Recognized by Oregon Business Magazine 8 times as one of the 100 Best Green Companies in Oregon; 2012 Salem Chamber Business of the Year; Nine-time winner, Toyota President's Award, Recognized for Toyota Sales and Service Excellence, Recognized for Toyota Parts and Customer Relations; General Motors World Class Technician on staff. The company was EarthWISE Certified by Marion County in 2013 and nominated for EarthWiSE Certified Business of the Year and Sustainable Large Business of the Year. www.CapitolAuto.com

About The Center for Generational Kinetics: The Center for Generational Kinetics is the global leader in teaching companies to better employ and sell to Millennials. The Center leads original research that uncovers new Millennial and generational trends in the workplace and marketplace. The Center solves Millennial challenges through research, speaking and consulting. The Center's clients range from industry leaders such as Mercedes-Benz and Four Seasons Hotels to venture-backed technology startups. The Center works with over 120 clients per year. Learn more about The Center and its mission to bridge generations at www.GenHQ.com.

About the Best Companies Group: Best Companies Group works with national and local partners around the country and internationally to establish and manage "Best Places to Work," "Best Companies," and "Best Employers" programs on a national, statewide, regional and industry basis. Through its thorough workplace assessment, utilizing employer questionnaires and employee-satisfaction surveys, BCG identifies and recognizes companies who have been successful in creating and maintaining workplace excellence.


Attached Media Files: Bestoflogo , CapAutoLogo , ScottCasebeer
Benton County SHERIFF'S OFFICE SPONSORS DRUG TAKE-BACK EVENT
Benton Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/10/15
Free event will help residents protect kids and the environment

The public is invited to bring expired or unused prescription medications to a safe disposal event on Saturday, June 27th from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at the Benton County Fairgrounds in Corvallis, OR.

This drive-through event will take place in front of the Carriage House at the Fairgrounds. Benton County Sheriff's Office Reserve Deputies will collect expired or unused prescription medications, pet medications, medicine from deceased family members and other individual medications no longer wanted or needed. Medications can only be accepted from individual households, not from businesses such as nursing homes, doctor's offices or veterinary clinics.

For safety reasons, some items are not allowed. These include illegal drugs, thermometers, intra-venous solutions, injectables, syringes, needles, EpiPens(R), or medical waste of any kind.

"Our Reserve Deputies, Auxiliary Team members and Search and Rescue volunteers are volunteering their time to make this event possible," said Undersheriff Greg Ridler. "Additionally, we are partnering with the Philomath Police Department, the Benton County Fairgrounds and receiving support from the Benton County Health Department. Without these community partnerships we would not be able to offer this service."

The Benton County Sheriff's Office is offering this one-time event as a public safety service. The goal is to keep these medications away from youth or others who may misuse them. An added advantage is that it keeps these medications out of the water system.

More information about this event is available on the Benton County Sheriff's Office website at: www.co.benton.or.us/sheriff/enforcement/drug_take_back_event.php#Benton
Oregon Dept. of Forestry (ODF) Fire Update | Wednesday, June 10, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/10/15
This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) fire update for Wednesday, June 10, 2015.

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
Galls Creek Complex
Yesterday evening three fires caused by lightning were reported burning in remote wilderness areas around Medford. The complex, multiple fires under one command, grew to 90 acres. By this morning the firefighters had built trails around the fires. They will continue widening the trails and eliminating the hot spots along the fires' edges to strengthen the buffers today.

Corn Creek Fire
Started on June 8 and consumed 98 acres about 14 miles east of Canyonville. Yesterday crews completed the trail around the fire and began strengthening a buffer around it. Today crews will continue improve that buffer. Unless warranted, this is the last update for this fire.

Pictures and video from the fire are available at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/douglasfpa/sets/72157654275603061

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS
No new fires were reported burning on other lands in Oregon.

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015, through today:
Lightning-caused fires: 29 fires burned 9 acres
Human-caused fires: 130 fires burned 327 acres
Total: 159 fires burned 335 acres

10-year average (January 1 through the present date in the year):
Lightning-caused fires: 22 fires burned 20 acres
Human-caused fires: 113 fires burned 1,107 acres
Total: 135 fires burned 1,127 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.

When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Nick Hennemann, 503-945-7248 (office) or 503-910-4311 (Cell), any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

For information on Oregon Department of Forestry protected lands view:
the department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
the Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.
the Douglas Forest Protective Association Twitter feed.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.

OTHER LINKS
Fire weather

Wildfire smoke forecasts

Wildfire smoke and air quality

Keep Oregon Green


Follow us on Twitter & Facebook

###
Media Advisory: Governor Kate Brown Will Sign Landmark Birth Control Expansion
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon - 06/10/15
Oregon Governor Kate Brown will sign House Bill 3343 at a ceremony scheduled for 1:45pm Thursday, June 11th at the State Capitol. Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon, which introduced the measure, will be available for interviews, along with women's health champion legislators and allied organizations.

The law will make Oregon the first state in the nation to require health insurance companies to give a year's supply of the pill, the patch or the ring at the same time. Dispensing a one-year supply of birth control is associated with a 30 percent reduction in the odds of conceiving an unplanned pregnancy compared with dispensing for 30 or 90 days.

The signing ceremony comes on the heels of the 50th anniversary of Griswold v. Connecticut, the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision that provided the first constitutional protection for birth control and paved the way for the nearly unanimous acceptance of contraception that now exists in this country.

HOUSE BILL 3343 AT A GLANCE

It's significant: "While other states are restricting women's health care choices, Oregon stands alone in moving forward to improve reproductive health care," said Mary Nolan, Interim Executive Director of Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon. "This is the most significant leap forward for reducing unintended pregnancies in a generation."

It's convenient: A year's supply of birth control sure beats having to go back to the pharmacy every month.

It's accessible: Rural Oregonians often have long distances to travel and cannot make it to the pharmacy on a monthly basis.

It's effective: Studies have shown that the risk of an unintended pregnancy will go down by 30 percent when women are given a one-year supply of birth control.

It's bipartisan: "We were pleased to hear from several male legislators who testified that they deferred to their wives in seeking guidance on their vote," said Alicia Temple, Policy Director of Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon. "It was a clear illustration of why birth control decisions should stay between a woman and her doctor, not politicians."
Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission will meet June 23-24 in Joseph
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/10/15
News Release // Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. // FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE // June 10, 2015

Media Contact: Chris Havel, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department // Desk: 503-986-0722 // Cell: 503-931-2590


Joseph OR - The Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission will hold its third meeting of the year June 23-24 in Joseph, Oregon.

On June 23, Commissioners will gather at 8:30 a.m. to tour parks and sites in the Wallowa Lake area before attending workshops starting at 11:30 a.m. at the Hurricane Creek Grange #608, 63081 Hurricane Creek Road, Joseph, Oregon.

On June 24, Commissioners will convene an executive session at 8:30 a.m. at the same location to discuss real estate and legal issues. Executive sessions are closed to the public. A public business meeting will begin at 10:30 a.m. at the same location. The agenda includes an informational presentation from the Wallowa Lake Moraines Partnership, and several action items requested by staff:

+ Award $4.1 million in Lottery-funded local government recreation grants.
+ Designate two new state scenic bikeways in southwestern Oregon.
+ Make technical changes to an agreement related to a proposed Bandon State Natural Area exchange, updating the expiration date and changing contact names to reflect staffing shifts.
+ Approve a plan to complete $13.5 million worth of state park repair and improvement projects for the July 2015-June 2017 budget.

The full meeting agenda is available online at http://tinyurl.com/june2015agenda, and the meeting packet with information on each agenda item will be posted online by 3 p.m. Friday, June 12. People who plan to present testimony are requested to provide 12 copies of their statement to Commission Assistant Jen Busey at jen.busey@oregon.gov for distribution to the Commissioners before the meeting. Those needing special accommodations to attend should also contact Busey by email, or by calling 503-986-0719, at least three days in advance.

The Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission (www.oregon.gov/oprd/Pages/commission.aspx) promotes outdoor recreation and heritage by establishing policies, adopting rules, and setting the budget for the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. The seven members are appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. They serve four-year terms and meet several times a year at locations across the state.

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06/09/15
DOGAMI Governing Board to meet June 12
Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries - 06/09/15
PORTLAND, Ore. - The Governing Board of the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) will meet via teleconference from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. on Friday, June 12.

The public may listen to the meeting at DOGAMI's Portland offices, 800 NE Oregon St., Ste 965.

The meeting agenda is available here: bit.ly/1MmkKYX

The DOGAMI Governing Board sets policy and oversees general operations, and adopts a strategic plan every six years to guide DOGAMI's mission and objectives. The Board meets at least quarterly at sites around the state. As active members of their communities, Board members provide an important connection between Oregonians and DOGAMI's mission of providing earth science information and regulation to make Oregon safe and prosperous.
Update - Murder/Suicide Investigation in Ranier
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/09/15
The Oregon State Police, in conjunction with the Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office, the Columbia County DA's Office, The Columbia County Sheriff's Office and the Rainier Police Department wish to provide the following update on the investigation into the triple homicide in Rainier that was discovered late Sunday evening at 75379 Fern Hill Loop in Rainier, Oregon.

Dr. Larry Lewman of the Oregon State Medical Examiner has concluded, through post-mortem examinations of the three cutting and stabbing victims in Rainier Oregon, that two were victims of a homicide, and one of a suicide.

Danny ABBOTT Sr, age 48, died of self-inflicted cutting injuries. His death was ruled a suicide.

Laury ABBOTT, age 44, and Danny ABBOTT Jr, age 8, died of multiple cutting and stabbing wounds and their deaths were ruled homicides.

The continued investigation, by members of the Columbia County Major Crimes Team, has yielded the following additional information: that Danny ABBOTT, Sr and Laury ABBOTT were married but were undergoing marital difficulties and reportedly had not been living together for several months. Family members reported that Laury had expressed concerns for safety and was planning on filing for divorce.

The investigation is ongoing and no further information will be released at this time.

(Attached is a previous release by the Columbia County District Attorney's Office.)


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1002/85257/Press_Release_homicide.pdf
Major World War II Exhibition Opens June 26 at Oregon Historical Society in Portland; Features Enigma Machine
Oregon Historical Society - 06/09/15
On exhibit June 26 - December 7, 2015

Press Images: http://bit.ly/1cJk5EM
Please include credits listed in file name when used for publication.

Portland, OR - June 9, 2015 - World War II, considered the most momentous event of the twentieth century, will be the focus of World War II: A World at War, A State Transformed, a major exhibition opening at the Oregon Historical Society (1200 SW Park Ave., Portland 97205) on Friday, June 26, 2015. The exhibition will feature rare documents and artifacts from world and military leaders including Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, and Dwight D. Eisenhower, and will also share stories of the impacts of the war on Oregonians.

"World War II forever changed history in Oregon and across the globe," said OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk. "It is a fitting subject for the largest exhibition and program series ever hosted at the Oregon Historical Society."

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Media Preview Event
Media are invited to a private tour and preview of the exhibition on Wednesday, June 24 at 2pm at the Oregon Historical Society. Please contact Rachel Randles (rachel.randles@ohs.org) if you plan to attend or to set up an interview.

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A special preview and opening will be held Thursday, June 25 for OHS members, where historian David Eisenhower, the grandson of the late Dwight D. Eisenhower, will join the official ribbon cutting of this 6,000 square foot exhibit. Following the reception, all are welcome to attend a lecture with Eisenhower at the First Congregational Church (1126 SW Park Ave., Portland 97205) at 7pm. Tickets are on sale for $20 ($10 for OHS members) and can be purchased online through BoxOfficeTickets.com or at the door the night of the lecture.

Throughout the run of the exhibit, OHS will be hosting programs and lectures focusing on World War II. A complete list of these programs is available at www.ohs.org.

EXHIBITION OVERVIEW

From North Africa, to Europe, to the Pacific: A World at War

This original Oregon Historical Society exhibition presents the worldwide conflict through artifacts and manuscripts on loan from the Portland-based Mark Family Collection, including a very rare Nazi Enigma machine, the military uniforms of Gen. George Patton and Dwight D. Eisenhower, the only copy of the Atlantic Charter personally signed by Winston Churchill and Franklin Roosevelt, and a life preserver from the U.S.S. West Virginia, which was sunk at Pearl Harbor.

Letters and manuscripts provide a lens onto the many events of World War II, from prominent battles to critical political decisions. Notable documents include handwritten letters from General Eisenhower to his wife Mamie and letters from Senator Mark Hatfield, a Naval Lieutenant during the war, to his parents.

Oregon: A State Transformed

The exhibit also focuses on Oregon, a state transformed during the mid twentieth century. Items drawn from the Oregon Historical Society's archives and from collections across the state tell of events that dramatically changed Oregon, including the social impact of the Kaiser shipyards, the internment of Japanese Americans, and the only World War II casualties to occur in the continental U.S.--the result of a Japanese balloon bomb.

An Unparalleled Interactive Experience

Digital and hands-on components within the exhibit provide visitors with unique interactive experiences. Touch screens will feature an original code breaking game inspired by the Enigma machine. To get into the mindset of America's best military leaders, visitors can plot the movement of troops on a "war table." Multi-media experiences include screenings of WWII newsreels and military field phones playing radio newscasts from the era. Plus, visitors can take a "selfie" with Winston Churchill's wax doppelganger, originally on display at Madame Tussaud's in London.

Propaganda Posters, Canteens & Captain America

The Art of War: Propaganda Posters of World Wars I & II
Continuing in the museum's North Wing Gallery is a visually stunning exhibition of propaganda posters, which opened this past February. Also on loan from the Mark Family Collection, these posters provide a unique glimpse into an era before television and internet when artists and marketers were challenged to communicate to the general public in a way that would simply and enduringly convey important messages.

The Final Chapter: Peace and Reconciliation
The Oregon Historical Society is proud to also host a special display of Yosegaki Hinomaru flags. These World War II era Japanese national flags were customarily given to Japanese soldiers before they departed for battle and included signatures and words of encouragement from friends and family. These flags often became "treasures of war," and were taken as souvenirs back to the United States and other Allied nations. Pacific Northwest historian and author Rex Ziak and his wife Keiko Ziak have undertaken a project to reunite these flags with the families of the original owners. So far, the Ziaks have collected nearly 100 flags, of which 30 have been claimed by Japanese families. This special display at OHS will share the emotional story of this reunion effort.

Kilroy's Canteen
Named after the iconic WWII cartoon figure, Kilroy's pays tribute to USO clubs iconic of the era and features a variety of unique items ranging from a poker table used by Harry Truman during his presidency to a tribute to the 41st Infantry Division (also known as the "Sunset Division"). Composed of National Guard Units from Oregon, Washington, Montana, and Idaho, the 41st Division battled Japanese forces in New Guinea and the Philippines from 1943-45, where they became known as the "Jungleers." The war's enduring presence in popular culture is also highlighted with the shields used by actor Chris Evans in the 2011 movie Captain America: The First Avenger.

The Oregon Historical Society is open seven days a week, Mondays - Saturdays from 10am - 5pm and Sundays from 12pm - 5pm. Admission is $11, and discounts are available for students, seniors, and youth. OHS members and Multnomah County residents receive free admission every day. Thanks to a generous donation from Columbia Sportswear, all United States military veterans will receive free admission throughout the run of the exhibit.



About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state's collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon's history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon's cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.
Oregon Virtual Academy
Oregon Virtual Academy - 06/09/15
Regular meeting of the Board of Directors June 15, 2015.
Traffic Safety Team Wraps Up Several Campaigns in the Month of May (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/09/15
2015-06/1294/85251/Mustang_2nd_Angle.jpg
2015-06/1294/85251/Mustang_2nd_Angle.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-06/1294/85251/thumb_Mustang_2nd_Angle.jpg
In the month of May, deputies with the Marion County Sheriff's Office Traffic Safety Team participated in several events surrounding driving issues related to motor vehicle crashes, speeding vehicles, seatbelt usage and DUII. The events centered around the holidays of Cinco de Mayo, Memorial Day and a month long participation in the Click-it-or-Ticket campaign.
In the month of May Deputies arrested 22 DUII drivers, issued 76 seatbelt citations & warnings, 899 speed related citations & warning, cited 89 suspended drivers and made 4 felony arrests.

As a result of their hard work deputies contacted over 1100 drivers and spoke with them regarding their driving behavior. During one operation Sergeant Todd Moquin walked into the Safeway, located at Silverton Rd and Lancaster Dr, to buy something cool to drink. After walking into the store Sergeant Moquin found a loss prevention officer chasing a shoplifting suspect, Sergeant Moquin chased down and arrested Brian Osbourne, age 53, of Salem, for the crime of Theft II after stealing $161.00 in rib eye steaks. (The injuries pictured on Osbourne's face are not associated to our arrest.)

The Traffic Safety Team will continue adding extra patrols to our roadways throughout the summer months, beginning this Saturday; deputies will be out in force and focusing on impaired motorists. These patrols are made possible from grants provided by our partners at the Oregon State Sheriff's Association and the Oregon Department of Transportation.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1294/85251/Mustang_2nd_Angle.jpg , 2015-06/1294/85251/Reserved_ReportViewerWebControl.jpg
Job Fair for Homecare Workers and Personal Support Workers
Oregon Dept. of Human Services - 06/09/15
Homecare Workers and Personal Support workers serve a critical role in our society by helping people who are aged, experiencing a disability or who have a chronic illness maintain a high quality of life while still maintaining their independence in their own homes.

The Oregon Home Care Commission, Department of Human Services, the Workforce Investment Council serving Clackamas County and SEIU will be hosting two job fairs for individuals who may be interested in becoming Homecare Workers or Personal Support Workers.

If you have questions, you can contact Lindsay Vanderworker with the Oregon Home Care Commission. Phone: (503) 378-2661. Email: Lindsay.R.Vanderworker@state.or.us. Or, visit the Home Care Commissions website at: http://www.oregon.gov/dhs/spd/pages/adv/hcc/index.aspx

Applicants will need to register prior to the job fair by going to https://www.eventbrite.com/e/oregon-home-care-commission-job-fair-tickets-16966185317 .

Date and Time:
Wednesday, June 17, 2015 8:00am - Noon or 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Monday, June 22, 2015 from 8:00am - Noon or 1:00pm - 5:00pm

Location:
June 17 at Clackamas Community College, McLoughlin Hall, 19600 Molalla Avenue, Oregon City, OR.
June 22 at Clackamas Community College, Gregory Forum, 19600 Molalla Avenue, Oregon City, OR.
Salem Police to hold a #TrafficChat
Salem Police Dept. - 06/09/15
June 9, 2015 Salem, Oregon: The Salem Police Crime Prevention Unit is hosting an online traffic chat on Wednesday, June 10. Officers will be answering questions via Twitter and Facebook on the topic of traffic.

Followers are invited to join in the online discussion with officers from the Crime Prevention and Traffic Control Units from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

"It's been a while since we've done a traffic chat," said Lt. Dave Okada, "and we decided to do one due to the high interest in our pedestrian crosswalk safety campaign this summer." After the posting the safety campaign on social media, many citizens sent in suggestions for locations needing attention. "Along with suggestions for enforcement, citizens also sent in questions about traffic laws which gave us the hint that maybe a traffic chat was in order," Okada added, "People often forget that laws change over time, and they aren't aware of modifications made."

The event offers an opportunity for Salem citizens to ask their questions via social media, and join in a discussion about traffic safety in our community. The topic will be identified with the hashtag #trafficchat.

The department's Twitter handle is @salem_police, and can also be found on Facebook as @SalemPoliceDept.

For more information contact the Crime Prevention Unit at (503) 588-6175.

#S#P#D
Oregon's State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation Meets in Portland
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/09/15
Oregon's State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation will consider nominations to the National Register of Historic Places in a one-day meeting on Friday, June 19th at the Architectural Heritage Center at 701 SE Grand Ave, Portland. Sessions will begin at 1:15 and are open to the public.

The committee will review proposed nominations for the Henry Cyrus Barn in the Lebanon vicinity, Linn County; settlement-era Andrew Jackson Masters House in Hillsboro; and Portland's former Washington High School. An agenda and pdf copies of all meeting documents are available online at: http://www.oregonheritage.org/OPRD/HCD/NATREG/nrhp_sachphome.shtml.

Nominations recommended by the SACHP go to the National Park Service, which maintains the Register under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966. Members of the Committee hold credentials in many historic preservation-related fields.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting may be made by calling (503) 986-0655. More information about the National Register and Oregon properties listed in the Register is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on "National Register" at left of page).


Attached Media Files: Meeting Agenda , Press Release
North Bend School District Public Meetings - June 2015
North Bend Sch. Dist. - 06/09/15
Below are North Bend School District public meeting currently scheduled for June:

June 8, 2015
Regular School Board Meeting at 7:00 p.m.
North Bend City Council Chamber
835 California St., North Bend OR

June 11, 2015
Special School Board Meeting at 5:30 p.m.
North Bend School District Office
1913 Meade St., North Bend OR

The schedule is subject to change.
Visit www.nbend.k12.or.us for agenda information.
Participation in 401(k) Plans Rises as More Companies Automatically Enroll
Wells Fargo - 06/09/15
PORTLAND, June 9, 2015 - Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE: WFC) announced today an uptick in the percentage of employees participating in 401(k) plans administered by the firm. The number of eligible employees participating in Wells Fargo-administered plans rose 13% between 2011 and 2015. Wells Fargo administers 401(k) plans for 3.8 million eligible participants employed by U.S. companies. The increase in participation correlates to an increase in plan sponsors opting for automatic enrollment of their participants, which now stands at 40% of Wells Fargo-administered plans versus 30% in 2011.

The data show increasing participation rates among younger employees, new hires and lower-earning workers over the past four years. Participation in the 401(k) plan among millennials has reached 55% compared to 45% in 2011. For newly hired eligible employees (meaning those who have reached the one year mark of employment), participation has increased from 36% four years ago to 48% in 2015. In addition, employees in a pay range of $20,000 to $40,000 in salary are participating at a rate of 59% versus 47% four years ago.

"This is a great set of data demonstrating some very positive behaviors from participants. I get very excited when I see the percentage of employees enrolling in plans ticking up over the last four years because it tells me people understand that participation in their workplace retirement plan is vital," said Joe Ready, head of Wells Fargo Institutional Retirement and Trust. "We know that systematic, pre-tax savings and investing works. The first critical step along that journey is to get people in the plan. In addition, to see such gains among people who are historically the hardest to get saving for retirement is also quite encouraging. People are getting the message that their 401(k) is an important key to a viable retirement."

Savings rates, company match and average balances
Although participation rates are rising, the deferral rates are relatively flat in the four-year analysis, with 38% of participants saving a minimum of 10% of their salary (which may include employer match) in their 401(k) plan - a modest increase from 34% four years ago. Twenty-eight percent of millennials currently reach a total contribution of 10% of pay, compared to 35% of Gen X and 45% of boomers.

Sixty-two percent of all active participants are taking full advantage of their employer match. When analyzed by generational groups, this breaks down to 54% of millennials, 63% of Gen X, and 70% of boomers who are contributing enough to capture their full company match.

The average 401(k) balance is $93,015 - up from $69,802 four years ago, largely due to gains in the stock market.

The number of people with a loan from their 401(k) has remained flat; 19% have at least one loan.

"Participating in the plan is the first step, but what we really need to see is a more robust increase in how much people are saving," said Ready. "The reality is that people need to save their way to retirement. This is true for all generations, and especially so for the younger population that has time on its side and can take advantage of the compounding effect of time. At the very least, we like to see people reap the full benefit of their employer match because that's a nice boost for their savings that doesn't come out of their pocket."

Roth 401(k) popular among millennials
The Roth 401(k) usage is creeping up - with 12% of participants contributing to a Roth 401(k) compared to 8% four years ago. Millennials are the most significant users of Roth, with 16% contributing to a Roth 401(k), versus 11% of Gen X and 7% of boomers. The Roth 401(k) allows participants to contribute after-tax dollars, and withdraw in retirement on a tax-free basis.

"The decision to contribute after-tax money to a Roth 401(k) is an intentional one, because people typically are not automatically enrolled into Roth 401(k) plans," said Ready. "I am encouraged that the younger participant group is putting thought into what can be a tax diversification strategy when it comes time to take money out of plans in retirement."

Millennials are the most diversified in their 401(k) investment portfolio
Roth 401(k) usage is not the only category in which millennials have Gen X and boomers beat. Millennials are still the most diversified generation, and are making the biggest gains: 82% are meeting a minimum level of diversification - a minimum of two equity funds and a fixed income fund and less than 20% in employer stock - which is up from 72% four years ago. Gen X and boomers have also seen strong gains in this category, with 78% and 75% respectively meeting the minimum level of diversification (compared to 70% and 68% four years ago).

This improved diversification is most likely due to the broader use of managed investment products, which continue to gain in popularity. Overall, 76% of participants use a managed product (such as target-date funds, which is seeing specific gains from 47% to 62% of participants who have money in target-date funds), versus 65% four years ago. When comparing by generation, 83% of millennials, 75% of Gen X and 70% of boomers use some type of managed product in their 401(k) plan.

Women participate at higher rate than men
In a review of data compiled from 2,036 companies where gender is indicated, there are also some noteworthy differences. Women participate in their 401(k) plans at a slightly higher rate than men: 65% to 62%. The number of women saving at least 10% of their salary is slightly lower: 38% of women vs. 40% of men contribute at least 10% of their salary, and 64% of men are taking full advantage of their company match, compared to 61% of women. Women use managed products more than men - 77% of women compared to 74% of men - which might explain why they are better diversified. Eighty percent of women are meeting minimum diversification criteria compared to 78% of men.
EDITORS AND REPORTERS: Retirement Savings Tips

Get started saving today
If you have the option to join your employer's 401(k) plan, enroll today and contribute up to $18,000 per year; participants age 50 and older can make up to $6,000 in additional catch-up contributions each year (unless their plan has lower limits or doesn't offer catch-up contributions). Pay yourself first and save as much of your salary as you can on a tax-advantaged basis. If you do not have access to a workplace retirement plan, you can set up an automatic savings program and make systematic contributions of up to $5,500 if you are under age 50, or $6,500 if you are age 50 or older through regular contributions to a Roth IRA (with after-tax dollars) or a traditional IRA (with pre-tax dollars) if you meet eligibility requirements.

Get the company match -- if it's offered
If you are contributing to a 401(k), find out if there's a company match. If there is, consider taking full advantage of it. Remember that the money your employer contributes on your behalf can be added to the amount you're contributing, and combining the two contributions helps give your overall savings goal a boost.

Increase your rate of savings
Research shows that the #1 factor in saving for retirement is your contribution rate, and regular contribution rate increases. Find out if your employer's plan offers the option to increase your contribution amount automatically and on a regular basis. That's one less thing to remember and it's an easy way to help you gradually save more in preparation for retirement. You can always change the increase rate or limit for your automatic retirement plan contributions.

Find out what type of investor you are
Your asset allocation is the "big picture" -- the way you divide your investments among the three basic investment categories: stocks, bonds, and stable value investments. Knowing your investor type -- conservative, moderate, or aggressive -- can provide a good starting point for determining which asset allocation makes the most sense for you. Use an online tool like www.wellsfargo.com/riskquiz to help you determine your risk tolerance.

Leave your savings alone
It may be tempting to spend your savings if you change jobs or have an unexpected expense pop up, but it is important to keep these assets growing in a tax-favored retirement account. Withdrawing money from your employer-sponsored plan can erode your retirement savings to the point where you may jeopardize your financial security in retirement. Keep your money working for you!


About Wells Fargo
Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE: WFC) is a nationwide, diversified, community-based financial services company with $1.7 trillion in assets. Founded in 1852 and headquartered in San Francisco, Wells Fargo provides banking, insurance, investments, mortgage, and consumer and commercial finance through more than 8,700 locations, 12,500 ATMs, and the internet (wellsfargo.com) and mobile banking, and has offices in 36 countries to support customers who conduct business in the global economy. With approximately 266,000 team members, Wells Fargo serves one in three households in the United States. Wells Fargo & Company was ranked No. 30 on Fortune's 2015 rankings of America's largest corporations. Wells Fargo's vision is to satisfy all our customers' financial needs and help them succeed financially. Wells Fargo perspectives are also available at Wells Fargo Blogs and Wells Fargo Stories.


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OSP Conducting Death Investigation In Josephine County
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/09/15
According to Lieutenant Darin Lux, on June 8, 2015 at about 2:41PM, Oregon State Police Troopers and Josephine County Sheriff's Office responded to 930 Saratoga Way in Josephine County on the report of a subject down, unconscious and CPR was being administered. Upon medics and law enforcement arriving, Steve MESSER, age 53, of Grants Pass, was pronounced deceased.

Preliminary information indicates Steve MESSER and his brother, Donald MESSER, age 54, of Grants Pass, had been in some level of a physical confrontation when Steve collapsed. Donald was taken to Three Rivers Hospital in Grants Pass for treatment of injuries he sustained during the confrontation.

The investigation is still continuing and more information will be released when it is available.
Oregon's Community Hospitals Economic Output: $18.9 Billion
Oregon Assn. of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS) - 06/09/15
Lake Oswego - June 9, 2015 - Oregon community hospitals accounted for $18.9 billion in economic output in Oregon in 2013, according to a new study by ECONorthwest released today by the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS).

Nearly 60,000 Oregonians are directly employed by Oregon's community hospitals and another 52,000 jobs are directly associated with hospitals, showing that community hospitals are one of Oregon's key economic engines. Those 112,000 hospital-related jobs account for 4.9 percent of the state's total employment. On a county-by-county basis, hospital jobs and associated employment generally range between 3 and 6 percent of job totals--often trailing only government-supported jobs.

"Today's report shows the importance of Oregon's community hospitals to both the health of Oregonians and the health of Oregon's economy," said Andy Van Pelt, executive vice president of OAHHS. "Hospitals mean a great deal to their communities--from urban centers like Portland to rural places like Burns. They represent things like health, happiness and hope. Today's report shows they also represent jobs and economic stability."

"Hospitals are major employers across urban and rural Oregon," said John Tapogna, president of ECONorthwest. "And, importantly, they create large numbers of middle-skill, middle-wage jobs that are disappearing in other industries. Productive, well-run hospitals are a key to the state's economic future."

Other key findings from the report include:

-- Gross State Product: The direct and secondary economic activity linked to hospitals contributed approximately $8.4 billion to Oregon's Gross State Product (GSP) in 2013.

-- State and Local Taxes: Hospitals directly generated approximately $176.3 million in tax and fee revenue for state and local jurisdictions in 2013. The State and local governments collected another $276.5 million in taxes from businesses that supply goods and services to hospitals. This sums to a total tax revenue of about $452.8 million.

"Hospitals are at the center of the economic life of the communities they serve," added Van Pelt. "As some of the largest employers in the state, we know that many communities depend on their hospital. With family-wage jobs, hospitals drive much of the economic engine that fuels other parts of county economies. Hospitals do this while continuing to ensure that people have a place to go for care and treatment at any time and for any reason. Hospitals are proud to serve Oregon, and this new report quantifies another way that they are integral to our state."

The report found that rural hospitals play an outsized role in their communities. They are one of the steadiest sources of jobs and have relatively higher job totals as a percent of the total employment in those rural counties. Hospital and hospital-supported jobs did not decline during the recession and in rural counties this was a great source of economic stability.

As a function of their commitment to the health of their communities, in 2013, as tallied by the Oregon Health Authority, Oregon hospitals provided more than $1.8 billion in community benefit contributions. In Oregon, "community benefit" is defined in statute as health care-related services that nonprofit hospitals provide without the expectation of compensation. At the same time, Oregon community hospitals provided care for 336,153 inpatients, more than 9.9 million outpatients, and more than 1.2 million emergency room visits.

"Oregon community hospitals are deeply connected with the communities they serve," said Van Pelt. "From the family-wage jobs they provide, to the economic stability they furnish, to the community benefit they contribute, Oregon's hospitals are vital to our state."

The economic impact study--commissioned by OAHHS--was conducted by ECONorthwest using state-specific data from the American Hospital Association and using the IMPLAN economic modeling tool.

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About OAHHS: Founded in 1934, OAHHS is a statewide, nonprofit trade association that works closely with local and national government leaders, business and citizen coalitions, and other professional health care organizations to enhance and promote community health and to continue improving Oregon's innovative health care delivery system.


Attached Media Files: Executive Summary-Economic Impact , Full Report-Economic Impact
Oregon Dept. of Forestry (ODF) Fire Update | Tuesday, June 9, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/09/15
This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) fire update for Tuesday, June 9, 2015.

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS

Corn Creek Fire
The Corn Creek Fire, about 14 miles east of Canyonville, started yesterday afternoon and consumed grass, brush, and trees in steep, rocky terrain covering 98 acres. The firefighters and bulldozer operators quick response and work through the night to build a trail around the fire. Today crews will continue increasing the trail width to contain the fire.

Pictures and video from the fire are available at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/douglasfpa/sets/72157654275603061

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS
No new fires were reported burning on other lands in Oregon.

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015, through today:
Lightning-caused fires: 24 fires burned 8 acres
Human-caused fires: 129 fires burned 324 acres
Total: 153 fires burned 332 acres

10-year average (January 1 through the present date in the year):
Lightning-caused fires: 22 fires burned 20 acres
Human-caused fires: 113 fires burned 1,107 acres
Total: 135 fires burned 1,127 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.

When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Nick Hennemann, 503-945-7248 (office) or 503-910-4311 (Cell), any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

For information on Oregon Department of Forestry protected lands view:
the department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
the Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.

OTHER LINKS
Fire weather

Wildfire smoke forecasts

Wildfire smoke and air quality

Keep Oregon Green


Follow us on Twitter & Facebook

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Albany Area Credit Union Hit With ATM "Skimming" Fraud
Albany Police - 06/09/15
The Albany Police Department is asking for help in identifying a suspect involved in an elaborate ATM "Skimming" Fraud.

The fraud began during the early morning hours of Friday, May 29th, 2015, at the Central Willamette Credit Union located at 645 Waverly Drive SE in Albany. Surveillance video shows a male suspect approached the ATM machine and inserted a "skimming device" capable of capturing ATM card and Pin number information. The device was in place throughout the day and was removed by the same suspect during the evening. Surveillance video of the suspect is attached.

On Monday, June 8, 2015, the Albany Police Department took reports from 40 Central Willamette Credit Union members who reported their accounts had unauthorized ATM withdrawals made during the previous several days. The unauthorized ATM withdrawals totaled approximately $20,000. These transactions were made primarily in the Portland area; however, transactions were also noted in Medford and into California.

Anyone with information is asked to contact Albany Police Department at 541-917-7680.

####


Attached Media Files: Surveillance Video of Suspect
Prevent heat illness for workers in rising temperatures
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 06/09/15
(Salem) - Landscaping, construction, and agriculture are all labor-intensive activities that can raise the body temperature of workers in hot weather. This could lead to heat illness or even death, if precautions are not taken.

"Workers in Oregon aren't acclimated to working in this type of heat," said Penny Wolf-McCormick, health enforcement manager for Oregon OSHA. "Employers should provide drinking water, offer a shaded place for workers to take breaks, and watch for signs of trouble."

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, encourages employers and workers to learn the signs of heat illness and focus on prevention. Exposure to heat can lead to headaches, cramps, dizziness, fatigue, nausea or vomiting, and even seizures or death.

From 2010 through 2014, 28 people received benefits through Oregon's workers' compensation system for heat-related illnesses (at least three days away from work).

"Heat illness can be deadly, but it's preventable," Wolf-McCormick said.

To help those suffering from heat exhaustion:
Move them to a cool, shaded area. Do not leave them alone.
Loosen and remove heavy clothing.
Provide cool water to drink (a small cup every 15 minutes) if they are not feeling sick to their stomach.
Try to cool them by fanning them. Cool the skin with a spray mist of cold water or a wet cloth.
If they do not feel better in a few minutes, call 911 for emergency help.

Certain medications, wearing personal protective equipment while on the job, and a past case of heat stress create a higher risk for heat illness.

Heat stroke is a more severe condition than heat exhaustion and can result in death. Immediately call for emergency help if you think the person is suffering from heat stroke.

Here are some tips for preventing a heat-related illness:
Perform the heaviest, most labor-intensive work during the coolest part of the day.
Use the buddy system (work in pairs) to monitor the heat.
Drink plenty of cool water (one small cup every 15 to 20 minutes).
Wear light, loose-fitting, breathable clothing (such as cotton).
Take frequent short breaks in cool, shaded areas - allow your body to cool down.
Avoid eating large meals before working in hot environments.
Avoid caffeine and alcoholic beverages (these make the body lose water and increase the risk of heat illnesses).

Employers can calculate the heat index for their worksite with the federal OSHA heat stress app for mobile phones. The tool is available at
http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatillness/heat_index/heat_app.html. A number of other tools are available at http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatillness/index.html.

###

Oregon OSHA also has a pocket-sized booklet available, in both English and Spanish, with tips for working in the heat: http://www.orosha.org/pdf/pubs/4926.pdf (English version).

About Oregon OSHA:
Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, go to www.orosha.org.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter at www.twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on insurance, mortgages, investments, workplace safety, and more.
Trails and safe highway crossing in Honeyman State Park topic of public meeting (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/09/15
A pedestrian bridge at Honeyman State Park allows trail users to access both sides of the park.
A pedestrian bridge at Honeyman State Park allows trail users to access both sides of the park.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-06/1303/85217/thumb_Highway_overpass_at_honeyman.jpg
Florence, OR--Providing safe pedestrian crossing of Highway 101 at Honeyman State Park will be discussed at a public meeting set for 5:30-7:30 p.m. on June 18 at Siuslaw Valley Fire and Rescue's upstairs meeting room, 2625 Highway 101 N., Florence. The meeting is a follow-up to a May 27 meeting on the same topic.

Planners will share findings from the first meeting, summarized at honeymanstatepark.com. Alternatives for trail development and management, including alternatives for crossing Highway 101, will also be discussed.

Highway 101 bisects the park, with trails on both sides of the highway and a pedestrian overpass connecting them. Hikers and runners also use an unofficial trail that crosses the highway at road level. Planners are in the process of reviewing the entire trail system and how best to connect the two sides of the park.

The meetings are an opportunity for trail users to share ideas on safely crossing the highway, best routes, trailheads, destinations and recreation needs. Comments will be used to update and refine the concepts laid out for the trail system in the 2009 master plan.

The public is also invited to comment online and participate in a short survey at honeymanstatepark.com. Comments can be made by email at jaime.english@oregon.gov; by phone at 503-986-0723; or by mail to Jaime English, OPRD, 725 Summer St. NE, Suite C, Salem, OR 97301.


Attached Media Files: Honeyman State Park manager Daniel Schewlakow captures the experience of crossing Highway 101 using an unofficial trail. , A pedestrian bridge at Honeyman State Park allows trail users to access both sides of the park.
06/08/15
***Update*** Rollover Log Truck Crash on HWY 42 in Douglas County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/08/15
2015-06/1002/85202/42_mp45_2.jpg
2015-06/1002/85202/42_mp45_2.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-06/1002/85202/thumb_42_mp45_2.jpg
According to Sergeant Matt Bowersox, on June 8, 2015 at about 8:59AM, a 2005 Kenworth log truck registered to Youngs Trucking, was traveling eastbound on HWY 42 near milepost 45 when it failed to negotiate a curve. The driver, Jack E TAYLOR, age 54, of Coos Bay, lost control and rolled the truck spilling the load of logs onto the roadway.

At the same time the log truck was crashing, a 2005 Kenworth tractor and box trailer registered to Fed Ex was traveling westbound. The driver, James D METCALF, age 39, of Winchester, made efforts to avoid the crashing log truck, swerved towards the edge of the roadway and jackknifed the trailer, coming to rest across both lanes of the highway.

A third vehicle, a 2010 Ford Ranger, operated by Braden J GIBERSON, age 19, of Roseburg, was following the Fed EX truck when it jackknifed. GIBERSON drove his vehicle into the ditch to avoid the crash where the load of logs landed on his vehicle.

GIBERSON was able to exit his vehicle with only minor injuries. He was subsequently transported to Mercy Medical Center for those injuries.

TAYLOR was cited for failing to maintain a lane of travel and violation of the basic rule (speeding). The highway was blocked for hours as crews removed the vehicles and load of logs. No further information at this time.
End Update


Previous Release:
OSP Troopers and emergency personnel are on scene of a multiple vehicle crash on HWY 42 in Douglas County just east of the Douglas/Coos County Line. The crash involves an overturned log truck and two other vehicles. Only minor injuries are reported but the both directions of the highway are expected to be blocked for hours. Please visit www.tripcheck.com for road status updates. More information will be released when it is available.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1002/85202/42_mp45_2.jpg , 2015-06/1002/85202/42_mp45.jpg
BCSO Deputies Arrest Albany School Custodian for Sexually Abusing a Student (Photo)
Benton Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/08/15
2015-06/1505/85218/Docken_Photo.png
2015-06/1505/85218/Docken_Photo.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-06/1505/85218/thumb_Docken_Photo.png
On Friday, June 5, 2015, deputies from the Benton County Sheriff's Office received information an elementary student that attended Oak Grove Elementary School in North Albany may have been inappropriately touched by a school custodian. Detectives interviewed the 12 year old female victim and determined that a year prior, she had been sexually abused by Justin Mathews Docken, 32, of Albany at Oak Grove Elementary School. Detectives went to his residence and arrested him for three counts of Sexual Abuse in the First Degree. The Albany School District was notified of the arrest.
Deputies from the Benton County Sheriff's Office are continuing to investigate the incident and the Sheriff's Office is asking anyone who may have been a victim or know of anyone who may have been a victim or witnessed any other incidents to please contact Detective Sergeant David Peterson at 541-766-6820.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1505/85218/Docken_Photo.png
Grants fund new trail bridges on the Tillamook State Forest (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/08/15
Julies Trail Bridge in the Tillamook State Forest
Julies Trail Bridge in the Tillamook State Forest
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-06/1072/85216/thumb_JuliesTrailBridge1_TSF_IMG_1406.jpg
Grants fund new trail bridges on the Tillamook State Forest

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Distribution: Major Media
June 8, 2015

Contact: Randy Peterson, 503-359-7470,
Randy.A.Peterson@Oregon.gov


Off-road enthusiasts and salmon alike will benefit from new Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) bridges in the Tillamook State Forest, thanks to a Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative Grant.

ODF recently completed construction of two new off-highway vehicle (OHV) trail bridges on Julies Trail. The project was initiated to replace failing bridges and enhance stream habitat through trail and bridge relocation.

Both bridges cross Deyoe Creek, a tributary to the Devil's Lake Fork of the Wilson River, which is an important salmon stream in the mountains of Oregon's northern Coast Range.

The new 35-foot-long bridges replace two aging bridges that were failing and did not meet current bridge design specifications. As part of the project, trail- and bridge-crossing locations were also adjusted - specific additional actions focused on improving stream habitat.

The project was funded by a Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative GRANT (Guaranteeing Responsible Access to our Nation's Trails). The GRANT was awarded as part of the Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative promoting safe, responsible riding and open, sustainable riding areas.

"Bridge projects are particularly well-suited for funding from the Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative and the Julies Trail bridges addressed significant needs for the OHV trail system on the Tillamook State Forest," said Steve Nessl, Yamaha ATV/SxS marketing manager. "Putting the GRANT funds to work, the Oregon Department of Forestry protected both OHV riding access and an environmentally sensitive wildlife habitat area, creating an excellent example of the possibilities of partnership between OHV riders and land stewardship efforts."

Julies Trail is 2.1 miles long and is an important connector trail for the larger OHV trail network in the Browns Camp OHV area.

"Julies Trail is one of the more popular trails in the Browns Camp OHV area," said Jahmaal Rebb, OHV Program Specialist for the Tillamook State Forest. "This grant made it possible for us to maintain long-term trail access, as well as enhance critical stream habitat in the Wilson River watershed."

For more information about Yamaha's Outdoor Access Initiative, visit:
www.yamahamotorsports.com/oaigrants

ODF manages the 364,000-acre Tillamook State Forest for a wide variety of environmental, social, and economic benefits. Additional information about the Tillamook State Forest Recreation Program and forest management in Oregon is available on the agency's website at www.oregon.gov/ODF


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Attached Media Files: Julies Trail Bridge in the Tillamook State Forest , Julies Trail Bridge in the Tillamook State Forest
PacifiCorp long range energy plan calls for less coal, more energy efficiency
Pacific Power - 06/08/15
PacifiCorp long range energy plan calls for less coal, more energy efficiency
The company's Integrated Resource Plan, now filed in six western states, forms a blueprint for how 1.8 million customers will get their electricity over next 20 years
PORTLAND, Ore. - PacifiCorp envisions an energy future with the bulk of new electricity usage met by energy efficiency savings, a more responsive transmission system that maximizes intermittent renewable resources and a significantly reduced reliance on coal-fired power plants.
The details that make up this vision are contained in PacifiCorp's Integrated Resource Plans, filed recently in the six states the company serves. The 500-page document, now before regulators in Oregon, Washington, California, Utah, Wyoming and Idaho, outlines a "preferred portfolio" of how the company plans to meet the energy needs of its 1.8 million customers in the western U.S. The company updates the plan every year and files a formal update every two years.
"Customers depend on us to provide safe, reliable, affordable power every day," said Stefan Bird, CEO and president of Pacific Power, which serves 730,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. "The IRP represents our plan of how, going forward, we will keep meeting those essential needs while factoring in market realities, regulatory uncertainties and changing technology. Getting to this point has involved a great deal of public involvement and we welcome more discussions on this important issue."
Highlights of the preferred portfolio include:
Less reliance on coal. The IRP anticipates ending coal generation at 10 units, totaling 2,800 MW of generating capacity, by 2029. This is already happening. The company closed two units at the Carbon Plant on April 15. PacifiCorp plans to convert unit 3 at the Naughton plant to natural gas by 2018 and close or convert Cholla 4 by 2024. Dave Johnston units 1 through 4 will reach the end of their depreciable life in 2027, and Naughton units 1 through 3 will do the same in 2029.
More energy efficiency. The expansion of energy efficiency programs is projected to meet 86 percent of projected increase in usage over the next decade. In 2014 alone, working with customers, PacifiCorp saved more than 553,200 megawatt-hours of electricity, enough to power nearly 59,000 homes for a year. That is about the number of homes in the Bend, Ore. area. Because of these savings, the company doesn't envision building another major thermal power plant until 2028.
Renewable resources. PacifiCorp has invested heavily in expanding its portfolio of renewable resources, both directly and through power purchase agreements with renewable developers. PacifiCorp is the second largest owner of wind generation assets among rate regulated utilities in the United States. Renewable and non-carbon resources currently make up 25 percent of PacifiCorp's owned and contract generation capacity. Within the next two years, PacifiCorp plans to add even more new wind and solar capacity via purchase power agreements with independent power producers.

"PacifiCorp is also taking a leadership role in the creation of a more responsive and efficient way of operating the west's transmission system," said Bird. "In partnership with the California Integrated System Operator, we are leading the way to a lower-cost, lower-emissions future by using advanced technology to change the way that we generate, manage and dispatch power on the grid. Working with the ISO and other utilities that are joining us in this transformation, we are able to maximize the use of intermittent renewables, enhance reliability and lower costs to our customers."

For a full version of the Integrated Resource Plan, go to: http://www.pacificorp.com/es/irp.html
####
About PacifiCorp
PacifiCorp is one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, serving 1.8 million customers in the West. PacifiCorp operates as Pacific Power in Oregon, Washington and California, and as Rocky Mountain Power in Utah, Wyoming and Idaho. With a generating capability of more than 11,136 megawatts from thermal, hydro, and renewable wind, solar and geothermal power, the company works to meet growing energy demand while protecting and enhancing the environment.
Expect delays on Oregon 42 between Roseburg and Coos Bay (photos) (Photo)
ODOT: SW Oregon - 06/08/15
2015-06/1202/85208/3_LogTruckFedExCrash.jpg
2015-06/1202/85208/3_LogTruckFedExCrash.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-06/1202/85208/thumb_3_LogTruckFedExCrash.jpg
Traffic is still under single lane control with flaggers on Oregon 42 (Coos Bay-Roseburg Highway) this afternoon at the Douglas-Coos County line (mile post 45) after an earlier crash involving a log truck, Fed-Ex truck and a pick-up.
Drivers should expect single lane traffic and delays until the highway is cleaned up later this afternoon.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1202/85208/3_LogTruckFedExCrash.jpg , 2015-06/1202/85208/2_LogTruckFedExCrash.jpg , 2015-06/1202/85208/1_LogTruckFedExCrash.jpg
Oregon Passes Landmark Bill to Protect Patient Privacy in Insurance Communications
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon - 06/08/15
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon today praised the Oregon Senate for passing a landmark bill to protect patient privacy.

House Bill 2758 allows patients to ask insurance carriers to send communications directly to the member receiving services, not the primary policyholder. Unwanted disclosure of health information through insurance communications affects all people enrolled as a dependent in a health plan, especially minors and young adults insured on their parents' plan, survivors of domestic abuse and individuals seeking mental health care, substance abuse treatment and other sensitive services.

"Without clear confidentiality protections, teens and young adults insured on their parents' health plan may be deterred from seeking care, and this presents serious public health concerns," said Senator Laurie Monnes Anderson (D-Gresham), chair of the Senate Health Care Committee and a retired public health nurse. "This bill will also be especially valuable for victims of domestic violence. During our committee hearing, we heard numerous stories about vulnerable patients who needed this key confidentiality protection."

The bill passed the House of Representatives last month with a 34-25 vote, and was adopted 17-12 by the Senate today.

"Private should mean private," said Mary Nolan, Interim Executive Director of Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon. "A national poll shows that 78% of Americans feel that it is very important that their medical records be kept confidential. We know that strong protections around confidentiality will ensure that all plan members patients can access the health care they need - leading to healthier people, healthier families and a healthier Oregon."

House Bill 2758 also has the support of Basic Rights Oregon, Sexual Assault Task Force, American Civil Liberties Union of Oregon, Oregon Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence, Cascade AIDS Project, Oregon Latino Health Coalition, Oregon Nurses Association, Cambia Health Solutions and Providence Health and Services.

It now goes to Governor Kate Brown for her consideration.
Albany Hebrew Cemetery listed in the National Register of Historic Places (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/08/15
Albany Hebrew Cemetery
Albany Hebrew Cemetery
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-06/1303/85201/thumb_OR_Linn_County_Albany_Hebrew_Cemetery_WEB.JPG
The 1878 Albany Hebrew Cemetery, now known as the Waverly Jewish Cemetery, is located northeast of downtown Albany, Oregon, and occupies approximately two acres within the larger Waverly Memorial Park Masonic cemetery. When founded, it was the only Jewish cemetery between Portland and San Francisco. The earliest grave within the cemetery is dated 1877, and belongs to the daughter of the Isaac and Bertha Senders, an early merchant family in Albany. By the 1880s, Albany had the largest Jewish population in Oregon outside Portland. The town hosted 15 Jewish families, a cemetery, a benevolent society, and a B'nai Brith lodge in 1888. By 1924, however, the congregation recognized that their numbers were declining and came to an agreement with the Masons to take over and care for the cemetery. The Waverly Jewish Cemetery remains an active burial ground today, the only Jewish cemetery between Portland and Eugene.

Oregon's State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the cemetery's nomination in their February 2015 meeting. It is one of twenty historic properties in Albany individually listed in the National Register, and one of approximately 30 cemeteries in Oregon listed in the Register. The National Register is maintained by the National Park Service under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon lists is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on "National Register" at left of page).


Attached Media Files: Albany Hebrew Cemetery National Register nomination , Press Release , Albany Hebrew Cemetery
Shooting Investigation Ongoing in Crook County
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/08/15
According to OSP Sergeant Roberto Robles, on June 7, 2015, at about 8:00PM, the Crook County Sheriff's Office responded to the report of a shooting at a residence north of Prineville. An adult male was transported to St Charles Medical Center for treatment of a gunshot wound.

The Tri-County Major Crime Team was activated to assist with the investigation which went through the night. All involved parties in the incident have been contacted and there is no threat to the community.

The Tri-County Major Crime Team consists of members from the Crook County Sheriff's Office, the Crook County District Attorney's Office, the Oregon State Police, the Bend Police Department, the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, the Redmond Police Department, and the Warm Springs Police Department.

The investigation is continuing. The names of those involved and location of the incident will be released when doing so does not interfere with the investigation. No further information will be released at this time.
Bear Creek Greenway closed today for truck recovery (Photo)
ODOT: SW Oregon - 06/08/15
2015-06/1202/85192/damagedguardrail.jpg
2015-06/1202/85192/damagedguardrail.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-06/1202/85192/thumb_damagedguardrail.jpg
MEDFORD - The Bear Creek Greenway (Medford area) between U.S. Cellular Park and Highland Ave. and Barnett Rd. will be closed to bicycle and pedestrian traffic through most of the day for recovery of a crashed semi-truck. The southbound semi- carrying rolls of paper - ran off the road about 11:45 p.m. last night. All lanes of I-5 are open to traffic.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1202/85192/damagedguardrail.jpg , 2015-06/1202/85192/4crashedSemi.jpg , 2015-06/1202/85192/3CrashedSemi.jpg , 2015-06/1202/85192/2I5TruckCrash.jpg
Wolf Creek Inn temporarily closed for construction (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/08/15
Wolf Creek Inn
Wolf Creek Inn
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-06/1303/85189/thumb_WolfCreek174.jpg
Oregon Parks and Recreation Department // News release // FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE // June 8, 2015

Contact: Ross Kihs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department District Manager, 541-388-6015

Wolf Creek OR -- The historic Wolf Creek Inn State Heritage Site will be closed for construction during the 2015 season. The project, to install a climate control system designed to protect the historic integrity of the late 1800s building, will coincide with the search for a new concessionaire to operate the Inn. The park is located in the town of Wolf Creek at Exit 76 on Interstate 5, 20 miles north of Grants Pass.

The former concession, Quist Hospitality, chose not to continue their operation after five years of service at Wolf Creek.

"We love what Margaret and Mark Quist did at Wolf Creek," says State Park Manager Perry Salvestrin. "They were passionate about the Inn and serving park visitors, and we hope we are as lucky with the next concessionaire."

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department will explore ideas for the future Wolf Creek Inn contract. A "Request for Proposals" may be issued in the fall/winter of 2015 which could lead to a contract with a new concessionaire for the 2016 season.

The climate control system will allow better management of temperature and humidity in the Inn, believed to have been built between 1873 and 1880 as one of many similar way stations serving travelers and explorers on the early roads and trails in western Oregon. The estimated cost of the project is $400,000, funded by the share of Oregon Lottery profits dedicated to state park repairs, and includes accessibility improvements to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act. The Inn was also closed in late 2014 and early 2015 to install a fire suppression system.

While the building will be closed until the construction work is finished and a new concessionaire is in place, the grounds remain open. Picnic tables, a portable restroom, electric vehicle charging station, and rose garden are available at the park. The nearby Golden State Heritage Site is also open.

People interested in receiving notice when the re-opening date is set can send their contact information to wolfcreek.inn@oregon.gov.

# # #


Attached Media Files: Wolf Creek Inn
06/07/15
Cascades Region Red Cross Responders Assisting After Two Weekend Fires
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 06/07/15
The American Red Cross Cascades Region is providing immediate emergency assistance after two weekend fires In Lane and Washington County.

One adult was affected by a residential fire June 6 in the 70000 Block of Fire Road in Lorane, Lane County.

The Red Cross provided food, clothing, and information about disaster mental health and disaster health services.

Two adults were affected by a June 7 residential fire in the 20000 block of SW Camanche Terrace in Tualatin, Washington County.

The Red Cross provided recovery information.
OSP Investigating Crash Involving Jackson County Deputy Sheriff and Pedestrian
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/07/15
According to Sergeant Jeff Allison, on June 6, 2015 at about 10:11PM, a Jackson County Sheriff's Office Deputy was traveling northbound on Interstate 5 near milepost 40 when something struck the right side of his patrol car. Thinking that he struck a deer, the Deputy stopped on the east shoulder of the freeway. Once stopped on the shoulder the deputy realized he had struck a person.

OSP Troopers responded and assumed the investigation. Preliminary information indicates Eliso L ARIAS, age 35, of Medford, was walking down the center of the interstate between the slow lane and fast lane when he was struck by the patrol vehicle. This section of I-5 is tree-lined and not lit. Further investigation revealed ARIAS had been camping in the area and had been in a disturbance. He left the campsite and began to walk home down the center of the interstate.

ARIAS, who was intoxicated, was transported to Providence Medical Center in Medford for serious injuries, none of which were considered life threatening. A portion of Interstate 5 was closed for about one hour during the investigation. OSP was assisted by the Jackson County Sheriff's Office, Rogue River Fire, Mercy Flights and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

The investigation is ongoing by OSP and more information will be released when it becomes available.
06/05/15
***Update*** Fatal Traffic Crash, HWY 26 Near Warm Springs
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/05/15
According to Sergeant Dave Pond, on June 4th, 2015 at about 9:02PM, a 1995 Subaru Wagon, operated by Steven C RANKIN, age 73, of Madras, was traveling eastbound on HWY 26 near milepost 97 when it crossed over the centerline. RANKIN's vehicle struck a 2014 Freightliner Commercial Vehicle, operated by Tressie H BELCHER, age of 46, of Heppner, head on.

OSP Troopers and the Warm Springs Police Department responded and upon arrival, found RANKIN deceased. His passenger, Lisbet F HORNUNG, age 60, of Madras, was taken by air ambulance to St Charles Medical Center in Bend for serious injuries. BELCHER was not injured.

Initial investigation appears that fatigue is believed to be a contributing factor to crash. HWY 26 was closed for approximately five hours while the investigation was conducted. OSP was assisted by the Warm Springs Police Department and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

Further information will be released when it is available.
End Update

Previous Release:
Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel are on scene of a fatal vehicle crash on HWY 26 near Milepost 97. Both directions of travel are expected to be blocked for hours. Please visit www.tripcheck.com for road status updates. More information will be released when it is available.
Oregon State Library Board Meeting, June 19, 2015
Oregon State Library - 06/05/15
The Oregon State Library Board of Trustees will meet at the Beaverton City Library in Beaverton on June 19, 2015 from 10:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Aletha Bonebrake of Baker City will chair the meeting.

The Board will consider a recommendation from the Library Services and Technology Act Advisory Council for a database purchase and from the Talking Book and Braille Library Advisory Council about expenditure of donation funds in 2015-2016. An open forum is scheduled for 12:30 p.m. Any one may address the Board on any topic at the open forum.

Sign language interpretation will be provided for the public if requested prior to 48 hours before the meeting; notice prior to 72 hours before the meeting is preferred. Handouts of meeting materials may also be requested in alternate formats prior to 72 hours before the meeting. Requests may be made to Jessica Rondema at (503)378-2464.

-30-

OREGON STATE LIBRARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES MEETING
June 19, 2015
Beaverton City Library
Aletha Bonebrake, Chair

Agenda

10:30 a.m. Approval of the Minutes of the April 15, 2015 Meeting Bonebrake

10:45 Reports of Board Chair and Trustees Bonebrake
Executive Committee Report
Nominating Committee Report
Other Board Reports

11:15 Reports of the State Librarian Dahlgreen
Activities since the Last Meeting
Operational Progress Update

Noon Lunch

12:30 p.m. Open Forum Bonebrake

1:00 New Business:
Recommendation of the Library Services and Technology Act Advisory Council Westin
Recommendations of the Talking Book and Braille Library
Advisory Council Westin
HB 3523 Implementation Dahlgreen
State Librarian Performance Management Process Bonebrake/Dahlgreen
Board Self Evaluation Bonebrake

2:30 Tour of Beaverton City Library Abigail Elder

3:00 Plans for next meeting
Adjournment Bonebrake



Any person may address the Oregon State Library Board of Trustees at this meeting on any topic.

NOTE: The times of all agenda items are approximate and subject to change.
Pacific Power to issue request for proposals for two Oregon voluntary renewable program options
Pacific Power - 06/05/15
Contact:
Tom Gauntt, Pacific Power
503-813-7291

Pacific Power to issue request for proposals for two Oregon voluntary renewable program options

PORTLAND, Ore. --Pacific Power is soliciting proposals from qualified suppliers interested in providing the company an integrated package of services to keep gaining new subscribers and supporting more renewable energy in the West.

The package of services should include renewable energy education, marketing, community outreach and customer acquisition/retention programs and the sourcing of renewable energy certificates (RECs) This work would be supporting two of Pacific Power's Oregon green power options: Blue Sky Usage and Blue Sky Habitat.

The request for proposals will be issued June 8, 2015 and all proposals are due July 10, 2015 before 5 p.m.

Pacific Power's Blue Sky program gives customers a way to support newly developed renewable energy and increase the demand for clean, renewable energy above and beyond the company's existing renewable procurement efforts.

Oregon residential and small non-residential customers can choose Blue Sky Usage, in which customers support renewable energy equivalent to their monthly energy usage, or Blue Sky Habitat, in which customers also support renewable energy equivalent to their monthly usage plus make an additional $2.50 monthly donation to help fund Oregon native fish habitat preservation and restoration projects managed by The Freshwater Trust.

The Blue Sky Usage and Blue Sky Habitat options have been available to Oregon residential and small business customers since March 1, 2002. A total of 39, 599 customers were enrolled in these two programs as of May 31 2015. Demand over the past year averaged 27,134 megawatt-hours per month for the Blue Sky Usage and Blue Sky Habitat options combined.

To view the Blue Sky Usage and Blue Sky Habitat RFP in its entirety, after June 8 go to www.pacificpower.net/oregonblueskyrfp. For more information about Blue Sky, visit www.pacificpower.net/bluesky. For RFP inquiries, e-mail OregonSB1149RFP@pacificorp.com


About Blue Sky
The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has ranked Blue Sky fifth or better in the nation for the 12th consecutive year in the number of customers buying renewable power. The Blue Sky Block, Usage and Habitat products are Green-e Energy certified; More than 56,000 Pacific Power customers currently participate in the Blue Sky program across Oregon, Washington and California. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net/bluesky.

About Pacific Power
Pacific Power provides electric service to more than 730,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. The company works to meet growing energy demand while protecting and enhancing the environment. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with almost 1.8 million customers in six western states Information about Pacific Power is available on the company's website, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube pages, which can be accessed via pacificpower.net.


.

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Health advisory lifted June 5 for water contact at Sunset Bay State Park Beach
Oregon Health Authority - 06/05/15
June 5, 2015

Testing shows fecal bacteria levels have subsided

The Oregon Health Authority today lifted a public health advisory for contact with marine water at Sunset Bay State Park Beach, located in Coos County. The health authority issued the advisory June 3 after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from later samples taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality showed contamination had subsided and the water no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk associated with water contact activities. However, officials recommend staying out of large pools on the beach that are frequented by birds, and runoff from those pools, because the water may contain increased bacteria from fecal matter.

State officials continue to encourage other recreational activities at all Oregon beaches, suggesting only that water contact be avoided when advisories are in effect.

Since 2003, state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are OHA, DEQ and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

For more information, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program's website at www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0400, or call the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767.

# # #
Suspect Arrested In Drive By Shooting
Salem Police Dept. - 06/05/15
Salem Police Detectives have arrested a suspect in a drive-by shooting that occurred early in the morning hours of June 4 in the 4300 block of Kale St NE.

Working in conjunction with the Keizer Police Department, Marion County Sheriff's Office and Marion County Sheriff's Office Parole and Probation, Salem Police Detectives and Gang Enforcement Officers conducted follow up investigation into the shooting incident. Injured in the shooting was a 34-year old male who was standing outside of his residence and his 14-year old son who was inside of the residence asleep in his bed. Both of the victims are expected to make a full recovery.

As a result of the investigation, a 17-year old Salem youth has been arrested on charges of Attempted Murder, Assault in the First Degree and Recklessly Endangering Another Person. The suspect was lodged at the Marion County Juvenile Department. The weapon that is believed to have been used in the shooting has also been recovered. This incident appears to be gang-related, and the investigation is on-going. Anyone with further information is asked to call the Salem Police Department Gang Enforcement Team at 503-588-6360
State declares start of fire season in Central Oregon District
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/05/15
Anticipated warmer and drier weather is prompting officials with the Oregon Department of Forestry to declare the start of Fire Season with ODF's Central Oregon District to declare the start effective Saturday morning, June 6. This is about the same time as in 2014 but the June 6 date is still about three weeks ahead of what is considered normal. The devastating Two Bulls Fire west of Bend started on June 7 of last year.

The weather in the first part of spring was much warmer and drier than normal and officials anticipated fire season could begin as early as mid-May. Fortunately, May's cool weather and above normal rainfall delayed the onset of severe burning conditions.

Forecasters are calling for the return of much drier and warmer beginning this weekend and which will remain for the foreseeable future. With the change in the weather, fire danger will increase very rapidly.

"The cool and unsettled weather of the past several weeks has kept fuel moistures in small fuels such grasses, needles, and twigs relatively high," says George Ponte, Central Oregon District Forester. "But we have not received enough precipitation to significantly change the ongoing drought conditions and the larger fuels remain dry with fuel moistures that are below average. The smaller fuels will dry out very quickly with the return of hot and dry conditions and this will result in the rapid increase of fire danger levels."

"Most people in Central Oregon are aware of the predictions for a very severe fire season and I hope those conditions do not come true but we will be ready in any case. Ultimately the severity of this season will be determined by three factors: how much lightning we get, how much rain comes with those storms, and, most importantly, how much help we get from folks in preventing human-caused fires," Ponte continued.

"Fire Season" is a legal designation which imposes certain restrictions on the public, forestland owners and people working in state and private forests. The use of fireworks, exploding targets, tracer ammunition, or any bullet with a pyrotechnic charge at its base is prohibited. Forest operators are required to have firefighting equipment on site. Outdoor burning is prohibited without a permit issued by ODF or a local fire department. However, most local fire departments have already suspended or will soon suspend issuing such permits.

Wildfire prevention restrictions can change quickly during the season and vary from one jurisdiction to another. National Forests, Bureau of Land Management or other federal lands fall under different restrictions and recreationists visiting or operators working on those public lands are advised to check with those federal offices for information on current restrictions.

Note to Editors: ODF's Central Oregon District provides wildfire protection on 2.2 million acres of private and public forest and rangeland in 10 counties (Crook, Deschutes, Gilliam, Grant, Harney, Hood River, Jefferson, Morrow, Wasco and Wheeler) in the north-central portion of Oregon. Offices are located in Prineville, Sisters, John Day, The Dalles and Fossil.
Marine Board Seeks Public Comments on Proposed Rulemaking
Oregon Marine Board - 06/05/15
The Oregon State Marine Board seeks written public comment on proposed rulemaking for two Divisions of boating rules that require updating. The agency is proposing to amend the Personal Watercraft rules to remove the words "maximum 5 mph" for consistency with recent changes to other small watercraft rules and to improve the readability of the rules. The proposed changes will not change the scope or the intent of the rules.

The agency is also proposing to adopt, amend, re-number and repeal rules in Divisions 11, 12 and 13. This proposed action will bring Oregon rules into conformance with the US Coast Guard Inland Navigation Rules and will consolidate Rules of Right-of-Way, Lights and Shapes, Sounds and Light Signals into one rule Division.

Written comments may be submitted by June 22, 2015 by 5 pm and can be submitted via email to osmb.rulemaking@state.or.us or by U.S. mail to: June LeTarte, Administrative Rules Coordinator, 435 Commercial Street NE, Suite 400, P.O. Box 14145, Salem, OR 97309-5056. Comments via telephone will not be accepted.

To view the proposed language, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/Pages/admin/OSMB_Rulemaking_Newpage.aspx.


###


Attached Media Files: Audio file
Victim's Family Comments on DOJ Report
Marion Co. Dist. Attorney's Office - 06/05/15
To: All Media
From: Sister of Cody Myers, Brittany Klein
RE: Oregon DOJ Advisory Review

The sister of Cody Myers, Brittany Klein, makes the following statement regarding the Oregon DOJ Advisory Review Report:


I have reviewed the Oregon DOJ Advisory Review Report regarding the Oregon State Police.

While it is evident that mistakes were made during the investigation, I still believe that Law Enforcement personnel worked diligently to do their jobs and had only the best of intentions. It should not be overlooked that the individuals ultimately responsible for this case are the two people who murdered Cody. Joey Pedersen and Holly Grigsby have been held accountable for their actions and for that we are grateful.


No further information is available. Please respect the family's privacy as no further comments to the media will be forthcoming.


The Marion County District Attorney's Office has merely facilitated this release as part of on-going victim services to the family at their request.
06/04/15
Washington Man Arrested Following Pursuit On I-5 Near Woodburn (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/04/15
2015-06/1002/85133/DSCF0109.JPG
2015-06/1002/85133/DSCF0109.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-06/1002/85133/thumb_DSCF0109.JPG
According to Sergeant Jason Lindland, on June 4, 2015 at about 11:09AM, the Oregon State Police began to receive multiple driving complaints of a blue Dodge Neon that was traveling southbound on Interstate 5 at a high rate of speed and passing on the shoulder in the Wilsonville area.

An OSP Trooper set up to intercept the vehicle near milepost 279 (Donald/Aurora Interchange). The vehicle, a 2003 Dodge Neon with Washington plates, passed by the trooper who attempted to stop it. The vehicle failed to yield and a pursuit ensued. The vehicle continued southbound at a high rate of speed and was using both shoulders to pass traffic.

When the suspect vehicle neared Woodburn, it attempted to pass traffic on the shoulder when it lost control and struck another southbound vehicle as it began to enter a highway work zone. The suspect vehicle struck the work zone warning sign and crashed into some roadside shrubbery where two OSP Troopers attempted to block it from leaving the scene. The suspect drove into an OSP patrol vehicle, and after a short confrontation, was arrested.

The driver, Jonathan OSON, age 33, of Vancouver, WA, was arrested for Felony Criminal Mischief, Attempted to Elude in a Vehicle, Reckless Driving, Reckless Endangerment and DUII- Controlled Substance. The suspect admitted to troopers he had smoked methamphetamine and marijuana prior to driving. Oson was lodged at the Marion County Jail.

No further information available for release at this time.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1002/85133/DSCF0109.JPG , 2015-06/1002/85133/DSCF0130.JPG
9-1-1 Operators to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy
Oregon Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 06/04/15
The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 94th Basic Telecommunications Class.

The two-week course includes emergency call handling techniques, stress management, civil liability, ethics, criminal law, overview of fire-rescue and law enforcement operations, and a number of other topics. Upon completion of the course, students will return to their employing agency to continue their training for a number of months with a field training officer.

The 9-1-1 training program began in 1993 when the Oregon Legislative Assembly enacted legislation which requires that individuals who receive emergency calls for assistance from the public meet professional standards for training and certification. There are approximately 950 men and women across the state who work in this profession in city, county, tribal, regional, and state public safety communications centers.

Basic Telecommunications #BT94 Graduation will be held at 11:00 a.m., on Friday, June 12, 2015 at the Oregon Public Safety Academy, 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. Telephone: 503-378-2100

DPSST would like to invite you to join us in observing the ceremony and congratulating Basic Telecommunications #BT94 on their successful completion of basic training.

The graduating students appreciate the family, friends and guests who make graduation an appropriate conclusion to their basic training at the Oregon Public Safety Academy.

Reception immediately following.

Members of Basic Telecommunications Class #94
Class Coordinator: Tamara Atkinson

Dispatcher Megan Ayers - Portland Bureau of Emergency Communications
Dispatcher Bradley Baldwin - Willamette Valley Communications Center
Dispatcher Nicole Boggs - Florence Police Department
Dispatcher Angelina Boliek - Portland Bureau of Emergency Communications
Dispatcher Rachael Cox - Deschutes County 9-1-1
Dispatcher Juanita Daggett - Umatilla Tribal Police Department
Dispatcher Jassy Doebler - Central Lane Communications Center
Dispatcher Benjamin Gilbert - Grants Pass Dept of Public Safety
Dispatcher Jacob Leonard - Portland Bureau of Emergency Communications
Dispatcher Sarah Liggett - Portland Bureau of Emergency Communications
Dispatcher Carla MacNeil - Portland Bureau of Emergency Communications
Dispatcher Kate Perry - Portland Bureau of Emergency Communications
Dispatcher Bridget Rhodes - Portland Bureau of Emergency Communications
Dispatcher Emily Robertson - Deschutes County 9-1-1
Dispatcher Christina Rodenbiker - Deschutes County 9-1-1
Dispatcher Bryan Russell - Portland Bureau of Emergency Communications
Dispatcher Katherine Segura-Whitman - Deschutes County 9-1-1
Dispatcher Courtney Shadder - Portland Bureau of Emergency Communications
Dispatcher Hilary Sletmoe - Linn County Sheriff's Office
Dispatcher Dupree Stubblefield - Portland Bureau of Emergency Communications
Dispatcher Marilyn Tiburski - Willamette Valley Communications Center (Salem)
Dispatcher JeRon Tucker - Portland Bureau of Emergency Communications
Dispatcher Daniel Wardle - Grants Pass Dept of Public Safety
Dispatcher Kevin Watson- Grants Pass Dept of Public Safety


## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 230 acres in Salem. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Chief Kent Barker of the City of Tualatin Police Department serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for training and certification of more than 41,000 constituents that includes city, county, tribal and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers. DPSST provides training to more than 20,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.
OSP Releasing Internal Documents Relating To Former Detective Dave Steele
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/04/15
The Oregon State Police released the internal investigative reports on former Detective Dave Steele today as a result of requests by the Oregonian.

Starting January of 2014, criminal investigations were launched by the Salem Police Department at the request of OSP, which led to Steele's conviction for Forgery and Official Misconduct (pled guilty in December of 2014). He subsequently resigned from the Oregon State Police and surrendered his police officer credentials to the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standard and Training.

In August of 2014, the Oregon State Police requested the Oregon Department of Justice review the procedures of OSP Criminal Investigations Division and Detective Dave Steele's involvement in the Pedersen/Grigsby murder investigation. OSP also worked with the Department of Justice to review Detective Steele's past investigations that resulted in convictions, and sent letters to the defense attorneys who handled those cases and the local public defense consortiums alerting them to Judge Haggerty's opinion, and offering them the opportunity to inspect OSP's case files.

The Oregon State Police withheld the release of the personnel investigation so it would not hamper the Oregon Department of Justice review related to the supervisory opinion issued by retired Judge Ancer Haggerty. The Department of Justice recently completed its review and OSP has chosen to release DOJ's report in addition to the release of the internal investigative reports. A copy of DOJ's review has been attached to this press release.

The Oregon State Police prides itself with integrity and public trust and in response to this incident, OSP is committed to making necessary changes and has reviewed policies and training that may directly or indirectly be related to this matter.

Inquiries should be directed to the OSP Public Information Officer.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1002/85127/Advisory_Review.pdf
Hollywood fantasy/seismic activity good reminder of scientific reality (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 06/04/15
2015-06/3986/85123/130826-FS713-8.jpg
2015-06/3986/85123/130826-FS713-8.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-06/3986/85123/thumb_130826-FS713-8.jpg
With recent seismic activity near Oregon and the release of the Hollywood film "San Andreas", now is good time to think about earthquake threats in Oregon and earthquake preparedness. "San Andreas" depicts several exaggerated earthquakes striking California and Nevada.

The reality of recent earthquakes that occurred along the Blanco Fracture Zone, about 300 miles off the Oregon coast, is an example of normal seismic activity.
"Magnitude 4 to 5 earthquakes occur fairly frequently in that fracture zone," said Ali Ryan, Earth Science Information Officer for the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries. "Like the Cascadia Subduction Zone, it's an area where tectonic plates are interacting."

While much of "San Andreas" is inaccurate scientifically, it has some parts that get it right compared to many disaster movies in terms of earthquake safety and science. An example is the mention of Drop, Cover, and Hold On, the motto of the Great ShakeOut, the largest earthquake drill in the U.S. The Southern California Earthquake Center provides facts versus fiction, and more about the "San Andreas" film at http://earthquakecountry.org/sanandreas/.

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management is encouraging Oregonians to learn about earthquake threats, be prepared, and participate in the Great Oregon ShakeOut earthquake drill. To register for the Great Oregon ShakeOut go to: http://shakeout.org/oregon/


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/3986/85123/ShakeOut_Poster_DCH_Protect.pdf , 2015-06/3986/85123/130826-FS713-8.jpg
Tualatin man joins $1 million Keno winners select club
Oregon Lottery - 06/04/15
June 3, 2015 - Salem, Ore. - Greg Kern of Tualatin joined a very small club Tuesday when he claimed his $1 million Keno jackpot.

Since April 4, 1999, there have only been three $1 million winners, and now Kern is the fourth. The odds of winning $1 million in Keno are 1 in 8,911,711.18.

Kern played Special Keno 10-Spot and said that he immediately started checking numbers against his ticket after he scanned it. The minute he knew he won, he called his step-mother, who is an accountant, to come up with a plan before claiming his prize.

"I just can't believe how lucky I am," Kern said. "This is really going to help."

Kern is a landscaper and said he was going to save the money for retirement, but was going to purchase some new clothes. Kern opted to take the 25-year annuity.

The winning ticket was sold at the Tualatin Food Store, on Nyberg Road in Tualatin.

In January 2011, John Planton of West Linn won the last $1 million top Keno prize.
Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.
Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned over $9 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

(The lottery does not have a picture of Mr. Kern)
###
Corvallis solar project heats up city savings
Pacific Power - 06/04/15
Corvallis solar project heats up city savings
Large solar array made possible by Pacific Power's Blue Sky customers and Energy Trust of Oregon

Corvallis, Ore --More than 700 solar panels have been generating electricity since the dark days of December and have so far produced enough power to run 20 average homes over the same time.

"Corvallis is committed to living as a sustainable community and this new solar array reinforces that commitment," said Mayor Biff Traber. "The new system adds to the City's other two arrays located on Fire Stations 1 and 4 increasing our local power generation capacity. The array also supports the community's efforts in competing for the Georgetown University Energy Prize. Further, as partners on this endeavor, Pacific Power, and the Energy Trust have demonstrated their continued support to sustainable communities and renewable power. The City looks forward to partnering with both Pacific Power and the Energy Trust on future projects."

The 208-kilowatt capacity project is adjacent to the Corvallis Public Works facility. On an annual basis, the project will supply 80 percent of the electricity needed by the public works facility and the nearby fire training facility.

The project was made possible by a $400,000 award from Pacific Power's Blue Sky customers and a $93,750 incentive payment from Energy Trust of Oregon.

"Corvallis is a strong leader in renewable energy," said Doris Johnston, Pacific Power's regional community manager. "Nearly 20 percent of its residents participate in Blue Sky and their support is being put right back to work in their own community."

Previous Blue Sky customer funded projects in Corvallis include solar arrays at two other fire stations as well at the Coho condominium development. Three renewable research projects at Oregon State University have also been funded.

"This is a great example of the opportunity municipalities have to generate electricity for their public facilities," said Lizzie Rubado, Energy Trust's senior project manager. "We're thrilled to help the City of Corvallis save energy and generate renewable power and be an example for the rest of the community."

CITY OF CORVALLIS: Corvallis is nestled in the heart of Oregon's Willamette Valley, within 90 minutes of the Portland Metropolitan area. Corvallis has a residential population of 56,535 and is home to Oregon State University. Corvallis is an award-winning City that has been recognized as one of the best college towns, one of the top ten places to live, and as having the highest Peace Corps volunteers per capita, the most green buildings per capita, and was ranked No.1 in patents per capita. The City was recognized for exceeding standards established by the International City Manager's Association Center for Performance Measurement and was ranked #1 on the Environmental Protection Agency's national list of Green Power Communities.

BLUE SKY: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has ranked Blue Sky fifth or better in the nation for the 12th consecutive year in the number of customers buying renewable power. The Blue Sky Block, Usage and Habitat products are Green-e Energy certified; About 55,000 Pacific Power customers currently participate in the Blue Sky program across Oregon, Washington and California. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net/bluesky.

PACIFIC POWER: Pacific Power provides electric service to more than 730,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. Our goal is to provide our customers with value for their energy dollar, and safe, reliable electricity. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with almost 1.8 million customers in six western states. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net.

ENERGY TRUST:
Energy Trust of Oregon is an independent nonprofit organization dedicated to helping utility customers benefit from saving energy and generating renewable power. Our services, cash incentives and energy solutions have helped participating customers of Portland General Electric, Pacific Power, NW Natural and Cascade Natural Gas save more than $1.3 billion on energy bills. Our work helps keep energy costs as low as possible, creates jobs and builds a sustainable energy future. Learn more at www.energytrust.org or call 1-866-368-7878.

# # #

Link to monitoring http://datareadings.com/client/moduleSystem/Kiosk/site/bin/kiosk.cfm?k=3mwGjtm2

Link to City website http://www.corvallisoregon.gov/index.aspx?page=1051
Albany Police Department - Pedestrian Safety Crosswalk Enforcement Operation
Albany Police - 06/04/15
The Albany Police Department is dedicated to enhancing the safety of its citizens. On Tuesday, June 9, 2015, the Albany Police Department will be conducting a targeted crosswalk enforcement detail at two different locations. One location will be at the crosswalk on Waverly Drive between Grand Prairie Road and 34TH Avenue and the other will be near Fred Meyer in the 2500 block of Santiam Highway.

The primary focus of the detail is to raise pedestrian safety awareness of drivers and pedestrians through education and enforcement of pedestrian right of way laws. The detail will be conducted between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 12:00 p.m.. Warning signs will be posted prior to entering the pedestrian safety operation zones.

Motorists must stop and yield to pedestrians who are crossing the roadway. Motorists are also required to stop at all crosswalks when there is a vehicle already stopped in a lane adjacent to the lane they are traveling in. Refer to Oregon Revised Statue (ORS) 811.028 Failure to Stop and Remain Stopped for Pedestrian, for specifics on the law.

Funding for this pedestrian safety detail is made possible through a grant from Oregon Department of Transportation Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety Division and Oregon Impact.

####
Oregon State Library Government Information and Library Services Advisory Council Meeting, 6/9/15
Oregon State Library - 06/04/15
Government Information and Library Services Advisory Council Meeting
Tuesday, June 9, 2015
2:00pm to 4:00pm
Oregon State Library, Rm. 103


AGENDA
1) Introduction and welcome to new members (5 min) Julie Curtis
2) Update from the State Librarian (15 min) MaryKay
3) Advisory Council vacancies (10 min) Margie
4) Reports from Government Services staff (10 min) Jerry
a) eClips
5) New subscriptions (20 min) Kate
a) JSTOR
b) Historic Oregonian
6) Trial databases (15 min) Kate
a) Safari Books
b) PolicyMap
7) Embedded Librarian Project - agency communication channels & how we find out about your issues (10 min) Jerry
8) Questions to the Council (10 min) ALL
a) What is going on within your agency this session?

There will be a special tour of the State Library following the meeting.
06/03/15
Red Cross Responders Assisting Albany Family After Home Fire
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 06/03/15
The American Red Cross Cascades Region is assisting two adults affected by a single family fire June 3 in the 5000 block of Columbus, Albany, Linn County.

The Red Cross provided food, clothing, seasonal garments and recovery information.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and suggests taking a few moments to review your family's exit plan should there be a fire in your home. Know what to do before, during and after a home fire. This information, and more, is available at www.redcross.org or in a free Prepare! Resource Guide published by the American Red Cross Cascades Region. The guide can be downloaded at http://rdcrss.org/1zq8XW6.
District Attorneys Announce Prosecutorial Decision Regarding Michael Rodgers
Marion Co. Dist. Attorney's Office - 06/03/15
To: All Media
From: Walt Beglau, Marion County District Attorney
Brad Berry, Yamhill County District Attorney

The Marion County District Attorney and the Yamhill County District Attorney have completed their assessment of any potential criminal charges against Michael Rodgers. A review of the thorough investigation conducted by the Oregon State Police, revealed the following:

Rodgers is employed with the State of Oregon as the Deputy Administrator of Enterprise Technology Services in the Department of Administrative Services (DAS). At the time of the printing of a Willamette Week Article titled, "What He Left Behind" on February 18, 2015, which referenced emails of then Governor Kitzhaber that were not authorized for release, Rodgers was the acting Administrator of his department. As part of his duties as Administrator, Rodgers was contacted in an email chain that began on February 5, 2015. That email referenced a request from the Governor's office to remove personal emails from the state server. Rodgers went to then DAS director, Michael Jordan, to discuss the request and Jordan noted a need to review the matter further with the Governor's office.

By this time, it was evident that the Governor had two personal email accounts inadvertently forwarded to his state account, a fact discovered during the processing of a valid public records request made by the Oregonian on February 2, 2015, for a log of the Governor's official emails. It was then understood that it was likely that non-public records existed on the state server and would need to be culled prior to any future release of information.

Rodgers was requested by Michael Jordan and Matt Shelby (the DAS communication strategist) to identify and copy all emails from the two identified personal email accounts belonging to the Governor. Rodgers directed a technology engineer to do just that and the emails were delivered to Rodgers on two thumb drives. The emails were then to be delivered to Shelby who would in turn deliver them to the Governor's office. The personal emails were then to be reviewed by the Governor and his staff in two separate checks in order to separate any official emails from those discussing personal matters or privileged state business.

The emails were in fact placed on two thumb drives that were delivered to Rodgers. Instead of delivering them immediately to Shelby, Rodgers copied them all onto his own separate thumb drives. Rodgers did this knowing that the emails were not pending destruction but rather pending further review prior to any possible valid future release. Further, the emails themselves were not removed or deleted from the server. In fact, it would have been virtually impossible to accomplish such a task as the state server is backed-up as a matter of protection in two separate locations. Rodgers should have been aware of these back-up measures as the Administrator of the State's Technology Services.

Rodgers eventually delivered the original email thumb drives to Shelby. He delivered his unauthorized copies to the Willamette Week. Rodgers never admitted or explained this decision to State Police detectives despite having at least two opportunities to do so. To the investigator's knowledge, the only time he has discussed his conduct in full was to defend it to the Willamette Week in a recent article published Wednesday May 27, 2015.

After fully assessing all the facts in this investigation, DA Walt Beglau and DA Brad Berry have formed the opinion that Michael Rodgers violated the law. Specifically, Rodgers released both public and private emails that were previously contained on a State server and preserved as a State Public Record prior to the processing of any valid public records request. In doing so, he exceeded his authority as a public servant and acted independently outside of any governmental processes in place to ensure the proper dissemination of potentially sensitive information. Rodgers did this despite having other options to bring his concerns to the authorities. Additionally, he should have known that the emails themselves were further backed-up on redundant state servers and, contrary to his claim, could not be destroyed.

It is the opinion of DA Walt Beglau and DA Brad Berry that this improper conduct violated state policies and is a violation of the Class C Misdemeanor crime of Official Misconduct in the Second Degree found in ORS 164.405:

A public servant commits the crime of official misconduct in the second degree if the person knowingly violates any statute relating to the office of the person.

Official Misconduct in the Second Degree is punishable by a maximum of 30 days in jail and a $1,250 fine for each violation.

Official Misconduct in the Second Degree is distinguished from Official Misconduct in the First degree, in part, because no intent to gain a personal benefit is required.

The goal of any District Attorney in any case is to obtain a just result. In deciding whether to pursue a criminal case, it is the duty of the District Attorney to consider whether it can be proven beyond a reasonable doubt, whether the resource allocation required to do so is appropriate as measured against the offense, and whether a conviction is necessary to obtain justice.

Under the totality of the circumstances in this case and after a thorough review of the above factors, the mutual decision of these two District Attorneys is that justice would not be served by filing criminal charges against Mr. Rogers.

There is no actual "whistle-blower" defense in Oregon criminal statutes. Even so, the conduct of Mr. Rodgers appears precipitated by a perceived rational that stems from extraordinary circumstances seemingly unparalleled in the Oregon political landscape.

The proper venue for any potential criminal charge in this case lies in Marion County, however DA Beglau chose to exercise his discretion to request peer-review from an outside District Attorney. While there is no actual, statutory, or ethical conflict that prohibits Marion County from making a charging decision, DA Beglau's staff does include an employee who is related to former Governor Kitzhaber. As such, and in recognition of the complex nature of this case, DA Beglau determined that it simply made good sense to request the assistance from another District Attorney to ensure sound decision-making and avoid even the appearance of any impropriety. All decisions and communications regarding this matter were made with the collaboration of both District Attorneys.

The reports containing the full investigation may be obtained by making the proper request to the custodian of records at the Oregon State Police.
Coos Bay Public Schools Public Meetings Schedule for June 2015
Coos Bay Sch. Dist. - 06/03/15
Below is the list of Coos Bay Public Schools Public Meetings currently scheduled for the month of June 2015. All meetings are held at Milner Crest Education Center, 1255 Hemlock Ave., Coos Bay, unless otherwise noted. The schedule is subject to change. For a list of all public meetings scheduled, go to http://cbd9.net/public-meetings-schedule

Facilities Planning Committee - June 3 at 5:30 PM at Milner Crest Education Center. A quorum of the board may be in attendance at the meeting but will not be acting on district business as a board.

Policy Committee - June 8 at 9:30 AM at Milner Crest Education Center. For more information, contact Adrian DeLeon at adriand@coos-bay.k12.or.us or 541-297-8115.

Regular School Board Meeting and Budget Hearing - June 8 at 6:00 PM. The agenda is posted and the packet will be posted at http://cbd9.net/schoolboard/agendas by Friday, June 5.

Special Board Meetings with Executive Sessions - June 9, 10 & 11 at 1:00 PM - based on ORS 192.660(2)(b) to consider the dismissal or disciplining of, or to hear complaints or charges brought against, a public officer, employee, staff member or individual agent who does not request an open hearing and ORS 192.660(2)(f) To consider information or records exempt by law from public inspection.

All Coos Bay School District Board Meetings are subject to the Public Meetings Law (ORS 192.610-192.710). The public is welcome to attend. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. Request for other accommodations should be made to Peggy Ahlgrim at 541-267-1310, 541-269-5366 (fax) or peggya@coos-bay.k12.or.us
Deputies Negotiating With Suicidal Male (Update) (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/03/15
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After nearly two hours, SWAT personnel and an OSP robot were used to enter the residence and check on the male. Sadly the male was found deceased from a self-inflicted gunshot wound. Deputies are opening up the scene and no further delays are expected.



Deputies are currently on scene and attempting to negotiate with a suicidal male in the 3800 block of Auburn Road NE. Today's incident began at 1040 a.m., when the Sheriff's Office attempted to contact the male to check on his welfare and a shot was heard from inside of the residence. Mental Health Specialists, Negotiators and Marion County SWAT has arrived and are attempting to negotiate with the male.

Currently the only person in the residence is the male and we are not aware of any injuries associated to the shot being fired. The west side of Auburn Road NE is closed and traffic on Lancaster has slowed as a result of the scene.

We are asking residents and commuters to avoid the area if possible. Additional information will be released as soon as it becomes available.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1294/85084/Scene_Auburn.jpg
OSP Continuing Death Investigation At Mongold State Park - Marion County
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/03/15
On June 2, 2015 at about 11:06AM, OSP Troopers and Detectives responded to Mongold State Park in eastern Marion County for a death investigation.

According to OSP Criminal Investigations Sergeant Gregg Withers, a male identified as Richard L POSEKANY JR, age 62, of Detroit, was found unconscious and unresponsive in a picnic area near the Mongold boat ramp. Medics responded and pronounced POSEKANY deceased.

Foul play is not suspected and OSP Detectives are continuing the investigation. No autopsy is scheduled. Next of kin were notified by OSP Detectives on June 2, 2015.

A large portion of the park was closed during the investigation. OSP was assisted by the Oregon State Parks, Detroit Fire, Marion County Medical Examiner, Marion County District Attorney's Office and United State Department of Agriculture.

Please contact Detective Carlos Barrientos at 503-934-0353 with any information on this investigation. No further information will be released at this time.
NW Natural customers to receive a credit on their June gas bill
NW Natural - 06/03/15
Funds come from efficient use of storage and pipeline facilities

PORTLAND, Ore. -- Northwest Natural Gas Company, dba NW Natural (NYSE:NWN), will issue an interstate storage credit to its Oregon customers on their June bills for the 14th year in a row.

This year's total credit is for approximately $9.6 million. The average residential customer's credit will equal about $10, and the average commercial customer's will be nearly $43.

The credit results from efficient pipeline capacity management and effective use of the company's underground natural gas storage facility in Mist, Oregon, during 2014. The technique used to make the most of these resources is called "optimization."

In the last 14 years, customers have received more than $101 million in bill credits from optimized pipeline and storage capacity.

About NW Natural
NW Natural (NYSE:NWN) is headquartered in Portland, Ore., and provides natural gas service to about 707,000 residential, commercial, and industrial customers in Oregon and Southwest Washington. It is the largest independent natural gas utility in the Pacific Northwest. Additional information is available at nwnatural.com.
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Health advisory issued June 3 for water contact at Sunset Bay State Park Beach
Oregon Health Authority - 06/03/15
June 3, 2015

The Oregon Health Authority issued a public health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Sunset Bay State Park Beach, located in Coos County.

Water samples indicate higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria, which can result in diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. Direct contact with the water should be avoided in this area until the advisory is lifted, especially by children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources, such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at Sunset Bay State Park Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0400, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk, even during an advisory. Neighboring beaches are not affected by this advisory.

Since 2003, state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state organizations participating in this program are the Oregon Public Health Division, Department of Environmental Quality and Parks and Recreation Department.

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Tennessee Man Arrested In Lake County After 61 Pounds Of Marijuana Seized (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/03/15
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On June 2, 2015 at about 11:14AM, an Oregon State Police Trooper stopped a 2005 Subaru Legacy on HWY 140E MP 1 near Lakeview for failure to drive within lane and impeding traffic. The operator was identified as Bodhi C THIEL, age 35, of Cookeville, TN.

A search of the vehicle led to the discovery of 31 individually sealed packages of marijuana in the trunk, totaling 61 pounds. THIEL was arrested and lodged at the Lake County Jail for Possession of Marijuana, Delivery of Marijuana and Manufacture of Marijuana.

The investigation is continuing. No further information at this time.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1002/85074/Thiel_Photo.jpg , 2015-06/1002/85074/HWY_140.jpg
Roseburg Community Targeted for Red Cross Home Fire Preparedness Campaign (Photo)
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 06/03/15
Trevor Covington, Red Cross disaster program manager, reviews home fire safety with Newport resident LeeAnn B. The Red Cross installed two smoke alarms in her home.
Trevor Covington, Red Cross disaster program manager, reviews home fire safety with Newport resident LeeAnn B. The Red Cross installed two smoke alarms in her home.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-06/1190/85064/thumb_Trevor_and_LeAnn_B_square_-_HFPC_Newport.jpg
The American Red Cross and the City of Roseburg Fire Department will install free smoke alarms and provide fire safety education for residents in Roseburg's 97470 ZIP code on June 13. Volunteers are needed for this outrech event.

The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington responds to an average of two home fires every day. After these fires, residents had to face finding a place to stay, purchasing food and clothing, replacing lost possessions, notifying loved ones and navigating insurance. Importantly, more than 60 percent of fire deaths occur in homes without a working smoke alarm.

On Saturday, June 13, between the hours of 11 a.m. and 6 p.m., trained Red Cross volunteers will be canvassing neighborhoods in the 97470 ZIP code to inquire if there is a working smoke alarm in the home, to install smoke alarms free of charge, review a fire safety and home hazard checklist, and provide information about creating a fire escape plan. In addition, volunteers will share additional home fire and other emergency-preparedness information with residents.

Residents in any part of the 97470 ZIP code may also schedule an appointment by calling
(503) 528-5783. Residents will receive a two-hour appointment window.

Volunteers are needed and training will be provided at 10 a.m. on June 13. Individuals, faith-based groups, local business and organizations are welcome to participate. For additional info or to register to volunteer, visit. www.redcross.org/cascadeshfpc.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and suggests taking a few moments to review your family's exit plan should there be a fire in your home. Know what to do before, during and after a home fire. City of Roseburg Deputy Fire Marshal Monte Bryan echoes this advice. "Fire-related deaths and injuries happen all too often," he says. "This is an excellent opportunity to save lives."

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About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies more than 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit www.redcross.org/cascades. Or, read about Red Cross volunteers at http://redcrosscascade.blogspot.com/.


Attached Media Files: Trevor Covington, Red Cross disaster program manager, reviews home fire safety with Newport resident LeeAnn B. The Red Cross installed two smoke alarms in her home. , Red Cross volunteer Nora Alvarez installs a smoke alarm at a home in Newport in April when the Red Cross Home Fire Preparedness Campaign visite the Oregon coast.
06/02/15
Red Cross Helping Families Affected by Two-Alarm Fire in Springfield
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 06/02/15
Disaster action team volunteers with the American Red Cross are assisting response efforts on a two-alam fire in the 1000 Block of Q St in Springfield, OR. This multi-family fire affected 12 adults and several pets. Red Cross is providing lodging, food, comfort kits, and information about disaster mental health and disaster health services.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in communities across Oregon and southwest Washington. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 to schedule an appointment.

Know what to do before, during and after a home fire. Take a few moments to review your family's exit plan should there be a fire in your home. This information, and more, is available at www.redcross.org or in a free Prepare! Resource Guide published by the American Red Cross Cascades Region. The guide can be downloaded at http://rdcrss.org/1zq8XW6.
Oregon National Guard Soldiers and Airmen compete in marksmanship competition (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 06/02/15
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WARRENTON, Oregon - Oregon National Guard Soldiers and Airmen from across the state gathered at Camp Rilea in Warrenton, Oregon, May 30-31, for The Adjutant General marksmanship competition, known as "TAG Match."

Service members competed in the annual competition as teams and as individuals for a chance to move on to national level competitions where teams from the Army, National Guard and Reserves will compete against each other.

"TAG Match is a friendly shooting competition amongst all the [Oregon National Guard] units in Oregon," Master Sgt. Geoffrey Miotke, state ammunition and training manager with Joint Force Headquarters. "It just hones their skills in shooting. We shoot a variety of guns here, so it produces a well-rounded Soldier for the different types of weapon systems we have."

This year's winning team was from 2nd Battalion, 162nd Infantry Regiment, based in Springfield, Oregon. The team members included Sgt. Benjamin Checkoff and Sgt. Christopher Sobremonte, both of Alpha Company, Spc. Kamryn Batt and Sgt. Jeremy Heisler, both of Headquarters and Headquarters Company.

Spc. Daro Powlison, with Charlie Company, 41st Special Troops Battalion, based in Clackamas, Oregon, was the overall individual winner of the rifle competition. Chief Warrant Officer-3 Devin Wickenhagen, of Charlie Company, 7-158th Aviation, based in Salem, Oregon, was the overall individual winner of the pistol competition.

PHOTO CAPTIONS:
150530-Z-FS713-012:
Maj. Gen. Daniel R. Hokanson, Adjutant General, Oregon, engages targets with an M4 rifle on the gun competition course during The Adjutant General marksmanship competition, known as "TAG Match," at Camp Rilea in Warrenton, Oregon, May 30. The gun competition was a three-stage, time-based competition that was one of five total events during the two-day marksmanship match. The Oregon National Guard TAG Match is held annually to promote marksmanship training. (Photo by Sgt. Cory E. Grogan, 115th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

150530-Z-FS713-021:
Oregon National Guard State Command Sgt. Maj. Shane Lake hits a target with an M2 shotgun on the gun competition course during The Adjutant General marksmanship competition, known as "TAG Match," at Camp Rilea in Warrenton, Oregon, May 30. The gun competition was a three-stage, time-based competition that was one of five total events during the two-day marksmanship match. The Oregon National Guard TAG Match is held annually to promote marksmanship training. (Photo by Sgt. Cory E. Grogan, 115th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

150530-Z-FS713-050:
Oregon Army National Guard Sgt.1st Class Scott Mansfield (right) instructs Staff Sgt. Derek Turner (left) during the M14 rifle distance competition in which contestants fire ten rounds of ammunition at a 500-meter course during The Adjutant General marksmanship competition, known as "TAG Match," at Camp Rilea in Warrenton, Oregon, May 30. The Oregon National Guard TAG Match is held annually to promote marksmanship training. (Photo by Sgt. Cory E. Grogan, 115th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

150530-Z-FS713-062: Oregon Army National Guard Staff Sgt. Derek Turner prepares to fire the M14 rifle for a distance competition in which contestants fire ten rounds of ammunition at a 500-meter course during The Adjutant General marksmanship competition, known as "TAG Match," at Camp Rilea in Warrenton, Oregon, May 30. The Oregon National Guard TAG Match is held annually to promote marksmanship training. (Photo by Sgt. Cory E. Grogan, 115th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

150530-Z-FS713-063: An Oregon Army National Guard Soldier prepares to fire the M14 rifle for a distance competition in which contestants fire ten rounds of ammunition at a 500-meter course during The Adjutant General marksmanship competition, known as "TAG Match," at Camp Rilea in Warrenton, Oregon, May 30. The Oregon National Guard TAG Match is held annually to promote marksmanship training. (Photo by Sgt. Cory E. Grogan, 115th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

150530-Z-FS713-067:
Oregon National Guard Soldiers fire M9 pistols during The Adjutant General marksmanship competition, known as "TAG Match," at Camp Rilea in Warrenton, Oregon, May 30. The Oregon National Guard TAG Match is a two-day competition held annually to promote marksmanship training. (Photo by Sgt. Cory E. Grogan, 115th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/962/85002/150530-Z-FS713-067.jpg , 2015-06/962/85002/150530-Z-FS713-063.jpg , 2015-06/962/85002/150530-Z-FS713-062.jpg , 2015-06/962/85002/150530-Z-FS713-050.jpg , 2015-06/962/85002/150530-Z-FS713-021.jpg , 2015-06/962/85002/150530-Z-FS713-012.jpg
Two alarm fire in Springfield displaces several occupants
Eugene/Springfield Fire Dept. - 06/02/15
A two alarm fire did extensive damage to a two story, eight unit apartment complex at 1550 Q St. in Springfield. The fire was reported at 12:32p.m. and 4 engines, 2 trucks, 2 chief officers, and 1 medic unit initially responded. Upon arrival, flames were shooting out of an upstairs apartment unit and was rapidly spreading to adjoining units and into the attic. All occupants were able to self-evacuate but one occupant was treated on scene by Fire Medics for smoke inhalation. A second alarm was called at 12:47p.m. which brought in two additional engine companies. The fire and smoke damage impacted all eight units and all occupants will be displaced. Red Cross is on scene assisting the residents. There were no reported firefighter injuries. Fire Marshals are on scene and have begun their investigation into the fire origin and cause.
Oregon Lottery to Award $1,500 Scholarship to SWOCC Student
Oregon Lottery - 06/02/15
- The Oregon Lottery's Patrick Johnson will present a $1,500 scholarship to Southwest Oregon Community College student Leah Bolle-Van Loo at the school's Student Awards Ceremony.

This is the second of two Lottery-sponsored $1,500 scholarships at SWOCC. Last week the Lottery awarded $1,500 to Jacob Buffington, who attends the Curry Campus of the college.

"Oregon community colleges make an important economic and social impact in their communities," said Lottery Deputy Director Roland Iparraguirre, who was raised in the Coos Bay/North Bend area. "By offering the many specialized, associate degrees that allow many adult Oregonians to improve their lives, they are helping students of all ages acquire new skills or potentially change careers."

The event will be held tomorrow, June 3, beginning at 6 p.m. at the Hales Center for the Performing Arts located at 1988 Newmark Ave. in Coos Bay.

The Oregon Lottery is taking part in community college events across the state to help communicate its message about funding education, and the importance that Oregonians place on education.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned over $9 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

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Oregon Will Be First State to Guarantee 12-Month Birth Control Access
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon - 06/02/15
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon today praised the Oregon Senate for unanimously passing a landmark bill to expand birth control access.

House Bill 3343 guarantees access for women to a full 12-month supply of contraception at one time. Dispensing a one-year supply of birth control is associated with a 30 percent reduction in the odds of conceiving an unplanned pregnancy compared with dispensing for 30 or 90 days.

The bill passed the House of Representatives last month with a 55-2 bipartisan vote, and was adopted unanimously by the Senate today. This will make Oregon the first state in the nation to require health insurance companies to give a year's supply of the pill, the patch or the ring at the same time.

"With this bill, Oregon will lead the nation - once again - in improving women's health care and reducing the cost of health care," said Mary Nolan, Interim Executive Director of Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon. "This is the most significant leap forward for reducing unintended pregnancies in a generation."

Making contraception more accessible also saves money: Medical research shows that having a full 12-month supply of birth control all at once can reduce the chance of unintended pregnancy by 30 percent. By preventing just one unintended pregnancy, an insurer will save the cost of a delivery - a minimum of $17,400. That is enough savings to pay for 29 additional years of contraception.

"Prescriptive contraceptives are highly effective and an important part of family planning for many Oregonians, but they need to be used consistently," said Senator Elizabeth Steiner Hayward (D-Beaverton), who carried the bill on the floor and is a family physician. "Ensuring that women have access to 12 continuous months of birth control will improve consistent use and better serve women juggling demanding schedules."

Senator Laurie Monnes Anderson (D-Gresham), chair of the Senate Health Care Committee, added: "99 percent of women will use some form of birth control at some point in their lives. With House Bill 3343, Oregon will be the first state in the country to ensure that women have reliable and steady access to a full year of oral contraceptives."

The bill now goes to Governor Kate Brown for her consideration.
New maritime guide for tsunami response, readiness
Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries - 06/02/15
NEWPORT, Ore. - A new guide aims to help Oregon boaters, fishermen and mariners in Newport and Toledo respond to and get ready for distant tsunamis.

The Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) today released "Oregon Maritime Tsunami Response Guidance for the Ports of Newport and Toledo," which offers operators of small craft such as recreational sailing and motor vessels and commercial fishing vessels guidance in the event of a distant tsunami. Distant tsunamis are caused by great earthquakes far away from the Oregon Coast and will strike approximately four or more hours after the earthquake.

"Many tsunami hazards exist for boats," says George Priest, a geologist in DOGAMI's coastal field office. "Dangers might include grounding of vessels as water level suddenly drops, capsizing from incoming surges, strong and unpredictable currents, and collision with other boats, docks and debris."

The largest, most damaging distant-source tsunamis in Newport area have come from large earthquakes in the Alaska-Aleutian Islands region, including the 1964 magnitude 9.2 earthquake that caused damage to many parts of the Oregon coast and killed campers on Beverly Beach in Newport.

The guide is part of ongoing efforts to increase tsunami awareness and preparedness in Oregon's maritime community. Statewide maritime guidance for all types of tsunamis can be found in the brochure titled "Tsunami! What Oregon Boat Owners Need to Know." The brochure offers information about statewide response and readiness for a local Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake and tsunami, which would strike the coast in as little as 10 minutes. Both the statewide brochure and new guide for Newport and Toledo are available for download at www.OregonTsunami.org on the Boaters page, along with information about broadcasts during a tsunami event and a map of offshore safe zones.

Development of the guide was funded by the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program and supported by DOGAMI, the Oregon Office of Emergency Management, the Virginia Institute of Marine Sciences, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and members of the Oregon Marine Advisory Council.
Planned Parenthood of Southwestern Oregon announces new President & CEO Lisa Gardner
Planned Parenthood of Southwestern Oregon - 06/02/15
Press Release
For release June 2, 2015

Planned Parenthood of Southwestern Oregon announces new President & CEO Lisa Gardner.

Eugene, OR
Anne Mattson, Chair, Board of Directors of Planned Parenthood of Southwestern Oregon (PPSO) announced today that Lisa Gardner has been selected as the new president and chief executive officer, effective August 2015. She is replacing Cynthia Pappas, who is retiring after almost nine years in the role.

Ms. Gardener has more than 20 years of public sector leadership experience, most recently as the Intergovernmental Relations Manager at the City Manager's Office in Eugene. Prior to that she held the position of Planning Director for six years.

Ms. Gardner joins PPSO with an extensive background in state and federal legislative affairs, community collaboration, and problem-solving. As the Planning Director for the City of Eugene, she led the Envision Eugene process that created a values-based framework for growth. Recently, she was instrumental in passing legislation to create the Pacific Northwest Manufacturing Partnership, a bi-state coalition with 117 cities in Oregon and southwest Washington aimed at increasing the state's manufacturing base and economic prosperity. Ms. Gardner served six years on the PPSO Board of Directors from 2003 to 2009.

"I am excited to be able to align my professional skills and experience with my values and passion for the mission of Planned Parenthood. PPSO is a leader in women's reproductive health care and education in our community and across our state," Ms. Gardner said. "I am honored to have the opportunity to lead this exceptional organization."

Ms. Gardner's new role includes oversight of the affiliate's six health centers, which serve nearly 23,000 individuals in an eight county region, and their education and training programs that serve over 9,000 people each year.

"Lisa brings professional experience in planning and policy development, passion for the mission of Planned Parenthood, and strategic leadership skills," said Anne Matson, PPSO Board Chair. "She is a proven leader who is well positioned to serve as a dynamic and visionary President and Chief Executive Officer of PPSO during this transformative time in our nation's health care system."

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Planned Parenthood of Southwestern Oregon (PPSO) has been dedicated to providing expert reproductive health care and sexuality education in Southwestern Oregon for over 48 years. PPSO sees 23,000 patients each year at six health centers. PPSO is also the region's most respected provider of medically accurate sexuality education for young people and adults, as well as training programs for professionals who work with youth and families. Education and training programs make over 25,000 contacts each year, transforming the lives of young people in southwestern Oregon. PPSO's essential health services include breast and cervical cancer screenings, well-woman annual exams, birth control, STD prevention, testing and treatment, pregnancy testing, abortion, and HPV vaccinations. For more information, visit www.ppsworegon.org.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/3747/85039/PPSO_Press_Release-_new_CEO.pdf
Land Board to consider Central Oregon land sale and Filled Lands Advisory Group recommendations at June 9 public meeting
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 06/02/15
Agenda also includes annual Land Board Awards, an update on the Elliott State Forest Alternatives Project, and other informational reports

Note: this meeting will be held at the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Commission Room, 4034 Fairview Industrial Way SE, Salem. The meeting begins at 9:30 a.m.

Salem - At the beginning of the meeting, the annual State Land Board Awards will be presented:

1) Wetland Project Award: Boeckman Road -Tooze Road Mitigation Project (City of Wilsonville) for enhancing nearly 17 acres of wetlands and creating an innovative wildlife passage for amphibians and reptiles.

2) Stream Project Award: Derry Dell Stream Enhancement Project (Clean Water Services and City of Tigard) for rehabilitating and relocating an urban creek during a sewer main replacement project.

The State Land Board Awards were established in 2004 to recognize worthy projects and efforts that promote responsible, sustainable stewardship of state natural resources. Awards have been presented to more than 25 exemplary projects across all regions of Oregon.

The State Land Board will be asked to approve a direct sale of 39.9 acres of isolated timberland in Deschutes County to the U.S. Forest Service. The Board gave initial approval for the sale at the October 2014 meeting. The parcel is an "in-holding" surrounded by Forest Service land, slated for divestment because of the difficulty in managing the property for Common School Fund revenue.

The Board also will consider recommendations from the Filled Lands Advisory Group which met from October 2013 through June 2014 to provide input into the process for settling historically filled land claims throughout Oregon. Members of the FLAG represented landowners, ports, fisheries, recreationists, education beneficiaries and the legislature.

Department of State Lands staff will present an update on the Elliott State Forest Alternatives Project to the Land Board. The update will include follow-up information on the Land Board's requests to the Department at the December 2014 meeting.

Public Comments:
Comments may be presented to the Land Board at the meeting either orally or in writing. People interested in presenting oral input will need to sign in. A maximum of 3 minutes will be given to each speaker. Due to potential time limitations, people are encouraged to bring written copies of comments for the official record.

The meeting also includes the annual Trust Property Report, which includes the unclaimed property and estates units; and a legislative update.

The agenda is posted on June 2: http://www.oregon.gov/dsl/SLB/Pages/2015_slb_meeting_schedule.aspx

This meeting will be held in a facility that is accessible for persons with disabilities. If you need assistance to participate in this meeting due to a disability, please notify Lorna Stafford at (503) 871-4323 or lorna.stafford@state.or.us at least two working days prior to the meeting.

The State Land Board consists of Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of State Jeanne P. Atkins and State Treasurer Ted Wheeler. The Department of State Lands administers diverse natural and fiscal resources. Many of the resources generate revenue for the Common School Fund, such as state-owned rangelands and timberlands, waterway leases, estates for which no will or heirs exist, and unclaimed property. Twice a year, the agency distributes fund investment earnings to support K-12 public schools. The agency also administers Oregon's Removal-Fill Law, which requires people removing or filling certain amounts of material in waters of the state to obtain a permit.

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www.oregonstatelands.us
Oregon Parks and Recreation Department to accept comments on Veterans and War Memorial Grant rule changes
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/02/15
The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department(OPRD) will accept comments on the proposed changes to the state rules governing Veterans and War Memorials Grants.

Those who wish can submit comment prior to 5 p.m. June 30 at: OPRD.publiccomment@oregon.gov Written comments can be sent Attn: Kuri Gill, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, 725 Summer St. NE, Suite C, Salem, OR 97301.

Once the public comment period has closed, OPRD staff will prepare the final rules text and submit it to the Oregon Parks and Recreation Commission for consideration and approval of final text prior to permanent adoption.

The proposed revisions will enable the Veteran and War Memorial Grant Program to efficiently implement current legislation and requirements. The revisions would also allow for more siting options for memorials funded by the program.

The grant advisory committee has reviewed the proposed changes and considers the changes an improvement for the program. OPRD does not anticipate the rule changes to have a significant economic or fiscal impact. Information about the proposed rule changes may be found at http://1.usa.gov/1AIDx01 .
All In 1 Day - Red Cross Giving Day is June 2
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 06/02/15
NOTE to reporters/assignment editors - Interviews with Red Cross CEO Amy Shlossman and other organization representatives are available.

Today - June 2 - the American Red Cross kicks off its first nationwide, "All in One Day" fundraising campaign. The 24-hour event is designed to rally the American public to support the Red Cross mission to ensure that it can deliver help and hope to people in need. People think of the Red Cross during major disasters, but may not realize we are there every day, around the country, helping care for people affected by emergencies and preparing communities to be more resilient for future disasters.

June 2 is our day to celebrate all the good that the Red Cross does each day. Generous public support allows the Red Cross to be there for those in need, to help them get back on their feet and know they are not alone.

A sample of what does the Red Cross does in just one day in the Cascades Region (OR/SW Washington), and where the money goes:
Two Portland-area Red Cross volunteers are departing for Texas today to assist with disaster relief efforts in the flood-ravaged state. This brings the total to 12 volunteers from our region who are serving residents affected by severe flooding

On average, the Cascades Region responds to two home fires every day. In the past 10 days alone, Red Cross volunteers have been to 17 homes in 9 different counties across Oregon and SW Washington and provided assistance to 45 people and several pets.

This past weekend in Salem more than 240 regional volunteers gave up personal time to participate in a multi-day training event, taking classes in a variety of classes in disaster fundamentals, first aid/CPR, public affairs, government affairs, international services and more. The training concluded with an all-hands disaster exercise simulating response to a 6.0 earthquake in Portland

Present disaster preparedness classes to youth in 3-5 grades through the Red Cross/Disney Pillowcase Project, reaching more than 8,000 students this academic year.

As part of the Red Cross Home Fire Campaign, Red Cross volunteers installed 1,300 free smoke alarms in 9 different communities across the region, and helped families create fire escape plans.

Every day the Red Cross supplies lifesaving blood products, teaches lifesaving skills through health and safety classes, and supports military members and their families.

Even when you don't see a disaster on the news, Red Cross volunteers still working hard - every day - to help people facing emergencies. These are your neighbors, members of every community around the country to who come to the aid of those in need. You can help them by making a donation today: www.redcross.org/givingday.
06/01/15
Dallas Man Cited For Game Violations In Lincoln County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/01/15
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Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Troopers issued criminal citations to a Dallas subject for Unlawful Hunting Bears with the aid of Bait and Hunting outside of Unit Boundaries.

According to Lieutenant Casey Thomas, on Sunday May 24th, Trooper Heather VanMeter located an active bear bait site near Logsden, Or in Lincoln County.

On May 26th, Fish and Wildlife Troopers from the Newport Office were back in the area. At approximately 2:30 PM, John HAMBLIN, age 50 from Dallas, Oregon, was contacted as he was entering the bait site on foot. HAMBLIN was in possession of a rifle, compound bow, and a gallon bag of grain and tallow. HAMBLIN was also in possession of a SW Oregon Spring Bear Tag. HAMBLIN was cooperative and was cited and released criminally for Unlawful Hunting Bear with the Aid of Bait and Spring Bear Hunting Outside Unit Boundary. A compound bow, trail camera, rifle and tree stand were seized as evidence. Also seized were a 55 gallon plastic barrel and a 5 gallon can full of bait material.

Using bait to attract black bear is illegal in Oregon, as is the use of dogs to locate and tree black bear. The public is asked to notify the Oregon State Police if a bear baiting site is located by calling the Turn in Poachers (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888. The TIP hotline can be used to report all wildlife violations.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1002/85020/100_1301.jpg , 2015-06/1002/85020/100_1280.jpg , 2015-06/1002/85020/100_1279.jpg
OSP Continues Investigation Of Serious Injury Crash - HWY 213 North of Molalla (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/01/15
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OSP Troopers are continuing their investigation on this afternoon's serious injury crash on HWY 213, north of Molalla that sent three adults to the hospital.

According to Sergeant Scott McLeod, On June 1, 2015 at about 3:44PM, a 2003 Honda Civic, operated by Jason M SHAW, age 30, of Molalla, was traveling southbound on HWY 213 when the vehicle crossed the center line striking a 2008 Chevy Impala operated by Janet J WOLLAM, age 68, of Portland head on.

SHAW was taken by air ambulance to Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) for potentially life threatening injuries. WOLLAM and her passenger, Barbara MENDENHALL, age 68, of Vancouver (WA), were taken by ground ambulance to OHSU for minor injuries.

Preliminary information indicates alcohol was not a factor but SHAW told investigators he fell asleep at the wheel.

OSP was assisted by the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office, Molalla Fire, American Medical Response, and the Oregon Department of Transportation. Both directions of HWY 213 were closed for about an hour.

Enforcement action is pending the conclusion of the investigation which is continuing. No further information at this time.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1002/85019/20150601_161414.jpg , 2015-06/1002/85019/20150601_161247.jpg
***Update*** Investigation Continuing - Officer Involved Shooting in Josephine County
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/01/15
On May 29, 2015 at approximately 10:27 p.m., two Oregon State Police Troopers responded to a 911 call at 108 Fir Canyon Road in rural Josephine County near Wilderville on the report of a domestic disturbance.

Initial information is that Kelsie BOX, age 23, called 911 to report her father, Robert BOX, age 55, was physically assaultive and causing her injury.

Oregon State Police Trooper Heather West and Trooper Gregor Smyth responded to the address. When the Troopers arrived at the location they made contact with Robert BOX in the driveway. Robert BOX was armed with a handgun. Shortly after making contact, the Troopers reported via radio to dispatch that shots had been fired and the subject was down. A handgun was recovered during the investigation.

The Troopers provided emergency medical care to Robert BOX on scene. Robert BOX was then transported to Three Rivers Medical Center in Grants Pass for emergency medical treatment. Robert BOX was pronounced deceased a short time after arrival.

Troopers West and Smyth were not injured. As is standard protocol in officer-involved shooting investigations, they were placed on paid administrative leave pending the ongoing investigation and review by the Josephine County District Attorney's Office. West, age 41, joined OSP in 2007 and is currently assigned in the Patrol Services Division at the Grants Pass Worksite. Smyth, age 46, also joined OSP in 2007 and currently assigned in the Patrol Services Division at the Central Point Area Command.

Pursuant to Senate Bill 111 - Use of Deadly Force investigations - a multi-agency investigation coordinated by the Josephine County District Attorney is ongoing. This includes agencies from the Grants Pass Department of Public Safety, Josephine County District Attorney's Office, the OSP Criminal Investigations Division and the OSP Forensic Services Division.

All above information was approved for release by the Josephine County District Attorney's Office. No other information is anticipated for release unless approved Josephine County District Attorney's Office.

End Update

Previous Release:
On May 29, 2015 at approximately 10:27 p.m., two Oregon State Police Troopers responded to a 911 call at an address in rural Josephine County near Wilderville on the report of a domestic disturbance.

When the Troopers arrived at the location they made contact with a male subject later identified as Robert BOX, age 55. Shortly after making contact, the Troopers reported that shots had been fired and the subject was down.

BOX was transported to Three Rivers Medical Center in Grants Pass for emergency medical treatment but was pronounced deceased a short time after arrival.

Pursuant to Senate Bill 111 - Use of Deadly Force investigations - a multi-agency investigation coordinated by the Josephine County District Attorney is ongoing. This includes agencies from the Grants Pass Department of Public Safety, Josephine County District Attorney's Office, the OSP Criminal Investigations Division and the OSP Forensic Services Division are assisting.

More information will be released when it is available. Any media questions should be directed to the Josephine County District Attorney's Office.
Red Cross Giving Day is June 2; 5 Things to Know (Photo)
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 06/01/15
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Tomorrow, the American Red Cross is conducting its first-ever all-day fundraising event - Giving Day. (#Allin1Day). The money raised will support Red Cross services across our region, and our nation, to help those in need, including:

Two Portland-area Red Cross volunteers departing for Texas tomorrow to assist with disaster relief efforts in the flood-ravaged state.
Local home fire response to 17 home in the past 10 days. These responses covered nine different counties in Oregon and Southwest Washington, and provided assistance to 45 people and several pets.
The participation of more than 240 regional volunteers in a three-day training event in Salem, this past weekend, including an earthquake disaster exercise.
Disaster preparedness classes to youth in 3-5 grades through the Red Cross/Disney Pillowcase Project.
As part of the Red Cross Home Fire Campaign, Red Cross volunteers installed nearly 300 free smoke alarms in Bend, Lebanon and Tillamook during the month of May, and volunteers helped families create fire escape plans for their homes. (Since October, more than 1,200 alarms have been installed in eight communities across the state including the 97203 and 97266 ZIP codes in Portland.)

Please support Giving Day (http://givingday.redcross.org/). Donations can now be placed at http://www.redcross.org/givingday. They will be processed on June 2.

# # #
About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies more than 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit www.redcross.org/cascades. Or, read about Red Cross volunteers at http://redcrosscascade.blogspot.com/.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1190/85003/ARC_Countdown_1Day.jpg , 2015-06/1190/85003/#Alliin1Day.jpg
Black Bear Spotted in West Salem, Residents Advised to Steer Clear
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 06/01/15
The Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division in conjunction with the Salem Police Department is issuing a bear sighting notice to the residents of West Salem.

There were several reports of residents spotting a black bear cub over the weekend. The bear acted very timid and has avoided people when seen.

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife placed a live trap in the area in an effort to catch the bear. OSP is asking the public to stay clear of the trap if encountered and notify the Salem Police Department or the Oregon State Police if a bear is spotted in that area.

Black bear attacks are uncommon. In most cases, a bear will avoid human contact. It is never safe to approach a bear.

Give any bear you encounter a way to escape.
Step off the trail and slowly walk away.
If you see bear cubs, steer clear and leave the area.
If you encounter a bear, stay calm. Do not run or make sudden movements. Back away slowly as you face the bear.
Avoid direct eye contact with the bear.
If a bear stands on his hind legs, he is trying to detect scents; he is not necessarily behaving
aggressively.
In the unlikely event you are attacked, fight back. Shout, be aggressive, use rocks, sticks, and hands to fend off an attack.

Homeowner Checklist
Bear proofing your yard and neighborhood can help avoid potentially dangerous bear encounters and keep Oregon's bears safe and where they belong - in the wild.

Most problems are caused by people feeding bears, either actively or inadvertently. Once habituated to finding food near homes, bears can become a threat to human safety and must often be euthanized. Follow these guidelines to protect both humans and bears.
Keep pet food indoors. Feed pets in the house, garage or enclosed kennel.
Hang bird feeders from a wire at least 10 feet off the ground and 6 to 10 feet from the trunk of tree.
Remove fruit that has fallen from trees.
Add lime to compost piles to reduce odors ??- do not compost meat, bones, fruit, dairy products or grease.
Secure garbage cans in a garage, shed or behind a chain link or electric fence.
Put garbage cans out just before pick-up time, not the night before.
Purchase bear-proof garbage cans if necessary.
Take garbage with you when leaving your vacation home.
Clean garbage containers regularly with bleach or moth balls to reduce odors.
Use electric fencing to keep bears from orchards, gardens, compost, beehives and berries.
Store livestock food in a secure place.
Don't leave scented candles, soap or suntan lotions outdoors or near open windows.
Keep barbecues clean. Store them in a shed or garage.
Talk to neighbors to encourage everyone in the neighborhood to remove attractants.
Stay indoors and allow a snooping bear to move on.
Never, ever feed a bear.
Teach children about bear safety.

For more information about living with black bears, visit the ODFW Web site http://www.dfw.state.or.us/wildlife/living_with/black_bears.asp. If you are involved in a face-to-face encounter with a bear, call the nearest office of ODFW or Oregon State Police.
John Hairston rounds out BPA's executive office
Bonneville Power Administration - 06/01/15
PR 13 15
BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, June 1, 2015
CONTACT: Mike Hansen, 503-230-4328/503-230-5131

John Hairston rounds out BPA's executive office

Portland, Ore. - John Hairston, who has worked at the Bonneville Power Administration since 1991, has been named its Chief Administrative Officer. He takes over after managing a number of key business, compliance and executive functions at BPA.

"John has the right skill set and well-rounded experience to help move BPA forward," BPA Administrator Elliot Mainzer said. "He understands how our business works and will lead our efforts to build world-class human capital management, safety and other programs that will equip BPA's employees to continue to provide excellent service to our customers."

The newly established CAO position elevates the functions previously overseen by the former executive vice president of Internal Business Services that ensure that each work group receives the attention and leadership it needs from BPA's executive office. The chief administrative officer is responsible for providing policy and strategic guidance concerning BPA's internal operations.

Since June 2013, Hairston has served as acting executive vice president of Internal Business Services. While serving in that role, he oversaw BPA's Supply Chain organization, Human Capital Management, the Safety Office, Workplace Services, and Security and Continuity of Operations.

"I have worked in and managed a variety of external business and internal service functions at BPA," Hairston said. "That experience will serve me well as I take on this exciting new challenge. I am honored to have this opportunity to continue to serve BPA and our customers."

Hairston joined BPA in 1991 as an economist in the Rates Forecasting and Rate Design organizations. In 1997, he joined BPA's Energy Efficiency group, where he served as a performance manager responsible for several energy efficiency offices on the east side of BPA's service territory. In 1999, Hairston began serving as Energy Efficiency's Peak Load Management program manager. During his tenure, he led BPA's effort to develop the Demand Exchange program, focused on the use of load curtailment and back-up generation as tools for peak load management. In 2002, Hairston was assigned to implement and manage the BPA Power Services product, Slice. The Slice product accounts for a sizeable portion of BPA's annual sales with a portfolio of its largest public customers.

In May 2006, Hairston was named BPA's Chief Compliance Officer, leading the development and implementation of the Agency Compliance and Governance Organization, which provides overall coordination and management of systems and processes established to assure agency compliance with applicable external and internally driven regulatory rules and standards.

Hairston holds a bachelor's degree in economics from The Southern University, a master's degree in Urban Studies from Portland State University and a Juris Doctorate from the Lewis & Clark Northwestern School of Law. He also holds the certification of Compliance and Ethics Professional from the Society of Corporate Compliance and Ethics.

The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Ore., is a nonprofit federal power marketing agency under the U.S. Department of Energy that sells wholesale renewable hydropower from federal dams in the Columbia Basin and one nuclear plant to more than 140 Northwest utilities. BPA operates a high-voltage transmission grid comprising more than 15,000 circuit miles of lines and associated substations in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Montana with more than 480 customers. It funds one of the largest wildlife protection and restoration programs in the world, and, with its partners, pursues cost-effective energy savings in all sectors of the economy. BPA also pursues breakthroughs that can increase efficiencies, solve operational challenges and reduce costs -- all of which help maintain affordable, reliable electric power for the Northwest and lessen impacts to the environment. For more information, contact us at 503-230-5131 or visit www.bpa.gov.

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Skydiving Event Honors Vets on 71st Anniversary of D-Day (Photo)
Historical Outreach Foundation (HOF) - 06/01/15
Party with a Purpose Foundation/Skydiving for Veterans 2015
Party with a Purpose Foundation/Skydiving for Veterans 2015
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Portland, Oregon -- On Sat., June 6, the 71st anniversary of the invasion Europe on D-Day, more than 35 tandem skydiving teams will fill the skies over Molalla. Jumpers, veterans organizations and members of the community will come together at Skydive Oregon on Highway 211 to take part in a day of excitement honoring American veterans.

The Skydiving for Veterans program is open to the public and will begin at 11 a.m. with a flyover and special recognition for the veterans in attendance. Participants have been raising donations in order to earn an opportunity to jump at the event. The net proceeds from all pledges and donations will go to support local veteran causes. There is no cost to spectators, but donations are welcome.

Exactly 71 years after D-Day, World War II veteran and Army Combat Engineer, Elwin Swigart of Molalla will be presented three medals he earned during that time. They include the Bronze Star, World War II Victory Medal, and the French Croix de Guerre. Brigadier Gen. John S. Kem, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Northwest Division commander, will present the medals to Swigart.

"This is the first time we've held a skydiving event for PWAPF," said Connell, "and as exciting as the jumping will be, I am really looking forward to seeing one of our veterans finally receive a medal he was awarded for his service in World War II."

Swigart was among the first to land on Omaha Beach during the Normandy Invasion, but after the war he never received the medals. His family, including his son and grandson, who are also Army veterans, will be in attendance.

Expected guests at the event include veterans of World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Desert Storm, Iraq, and Afghanistan. Residents of the Oregon Veterans Home in Lebanon will arrive by bus and police escort. Retired Brig. Gen. James B. Thayer, the namesake for the Oregon Military Museum at Camp Withycombe, is also expected to attend the ceremony. Thayer, 94, led a group of U.S. Army soldiers that liberated a German concentration camp at the end of World War II.

The beneficiaries of this first annual event will be the Historical Outreach Foundation (HOF), Team Red, White & Blue, and VFW Post 1324, Oregon City. All three organizations will be represented at the event.

Food and non-alcoholic beverages will be available for purchase. Organizations and other veteran causes will be present with displays for public to learn more about each. A silent auction will be held to help with fundraising efforts.

Event Website: www.jump4vets.org

Event Address: Skydive Oregon, 12150 OR-211, Molalla, OR 97038
Phone: (503) 829-3483

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS:

10:15 a.m. - Spectators and veterans arrive.
11 a.m. - Flyover; WWII VETERAN ELWIN SWIGART's MEDAL CEREMONY; Tribute to Veterans.
11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. - Skydiving for Veterans!

Food and non-alcoholic beverages available for purchase
The event is free and open to the public. Donations appreciated.

PWAPF contact: Evan Connell, (503) 201-8839, info@pwapf.org
HOF/ OR Military Museum: Rachael Mortensen, (503) 550-9463, Rachael@historicaloutreach.com


Attached Media Files: Party with a Purpose Foundation/Skydiving for Veterans 2015 , Historical Outreach Foudation (HOF)
Public Health Advisory Board meets June 12 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 06/01/15
June 1, 2015

Program contact: Brittany Sande, 971-673-1291; brittany.a.sande@state.or.us

What: The Public Health Advisory Board is holding its quarterly public meeting.

Agenda: Announcements; approval of December 2014 and March 2015 minutes; Public Health Division update; legislative update; Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant; meet-and-greet with OHA director; HB 3100 and public health modernization.

When: Friday, June 12, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. A 15-minute public comment period is at noon; all comments are limited to three minutes. The last 15 minutes will be for preparation for the September PHAB meeting, including discussing the September agenda and appointing executive workgroup members.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland.

Oregon's Public Health Advisory Board advises the Oregon Health Authority on policy matters related to public health programs, reviews statewide public health issues and participates in public health policy development.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Individuals requiring accommodation may request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations by calling the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

# # #
Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Update for Monday, June 1, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/01/15
This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) fire update for Monday, June 1, 2015.

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
No fires 10 acres or larger have been reported during the past 24 hours on forestlands protected by ODF.

Lightning, mostly accompanied by precipitation - heavy in some areas, moved through much of Oregon (western Oregon from south to north, Willamette Valley, Columbia Gorge/northern Oregon, north- and central-eastern Oregon, and central Oregon) during the evening of May 31 and early morning on June 1. As a few examples, the South Cascade District (Linn and western Lane counties) estimates receiving approximately 50 strikes; last night, Douglas Forest Protective Association estimated they received approximately 800 strikes; and dozens of strikes were reported by the Southwest Oregon District in the Josephine County area. Numerous small lightning-start fires were and are still being reported on various forestland ownerships, none of which at this time are near 10 acres or larger, and initial attack of those fire starts has been ongoing since the onset of the lightning. ODF will be continuing to use all available detection resources today, from engine patrols to camera detection where available, to seek out any possible additional fire starts from this recent lightning storm.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS
No new fires were reported burning on other lands in Oregon.

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015, through today:
Lightning-caused fires: 8 fires burned 7 acres
Human-caused fires: 111 fires burned 303 acres
Total: 119 fires burned 310 acres

10-year average (January 1 through the present date in the year):
Lightning-caused fires: 9 fires burned 5 acres
Human-caused fires: 82 fires burned 392 acres
Total: 91 fires burned 397 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.

When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Jeri Chase, 503-945-7201 (office) or 503-931-2721 (Cell), any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.

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Benton County Sheriff's Office arrest suspect in Encouraging Child Sexual Abuse Investigation (Photo)
Benton Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/01/15
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On Saturday, May 30, 2015, the Benton County Sheriff's Office, along with the assistance of the Linn County Sheriff's Office, Corvallis Police Department, and Albany Police Department, executed a search warrant in the 2800 block of NW Polk Avenue. The search warrant was part of an investigation into the illegal distribution of child pornography. Numerous computer and electronic devices were seized. Daniel Pacey Felman (DOB: 7/18/1991) was arrested and booked into the Benton County Jail on ten counts each of Encouraging Child Sexual Abuse in the First Degree, Encouraging Child Sexual Abuse in the Second Degree, and Encouraging Child Sexual Abuse in the Third Degree.


Attached Media Files: 2015-06/1505/84983/Felman_Photo.png