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Eugene/Spring/Rose/Alb/Corv News Releases for Thu. Aug. 25 - 6:08 am
Thu. 08/25/16
Two vehicle fatal car crash in the 13000 block of Buena Vista Road, Independence
Polk Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/25/16 1:43 AM
On Wednesday, August 24, 2016 at about 4:49 p.m., the Polk County Sheriff's Office responded to a two vehicle head on collision in the 13000 block of Buena Vista Road, Independence. It was discovered that Mr. Daniel Chico Hernandez, 37 year old resident of Monmouth Oregon, was killed when an oncoming vehicle crossed into his lane of travel and struck his vehicle. The other motorist was identified as Mr. Kester Harry of Albany Oregon, who was transported by ambulance to Good Samaritan Hospital in Corvallis and was then transported to the Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, due to the extent of his injuries. There were no other occupants in either vehicle. The investigation is ongoing with the assistance of the Oregon State Police, Polk County District Attorney's Office and Medical Examiner's Office.
Wed. 08/24/16
Telephone Scam
Roseburg Police Dept. - 08/24/16 7:00 PM
Over the past several days law enforcement agencies in Douglas County have been receiving reports about possible abductions for ransom. These calls are a scam and if you receive one of these calls please contact your local police department.

Citizens in our community have been receiving random phone calls from someone who indicates that a family member of the victim has been kidnapped or abducted, and if the victim does not pay a "ransom", then that family member will be harmed. The suspect(s) have been requesting that the victim purchase re-loadable gift cards and then they request the victim read the numbers off the card. All of these cases have been unfounded and all of the alleged abducted family members have been accounted for and are safe. The suspect(s) have been making muffled sounds in the background, which the suspect says is the family member, to make the call seem more realistic.

Please be aware that this is a scam, the calls are fraudulent, and the sole intent of the suspect is to strike fear into the victim and get them to pay the ransom before thinking about it. Law enforcement should be immediately notified if someone receives a call of this nature. Please do not purchase money orders or gift cards to pay for these fake ransoms, but instead contact your local police department.
Receptacle Fire Scorches Home (Photo)
Sweet Home Fire Dist. - 08/24/16 6:33 PM
2016-08/5505/97177/IMG_0915[1].JPG
2016-08/5505/97177/IMG_0915[1].JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/5505/97177/thumb_IMG_0915[1].JPG
At 4:06 pm this afternoon Sweet Home Fire and Ambulance District was dispatched to a possible house fire at 1141 43rd Avenue. They arrived to find the home owner using a garden hose to douse the remnants of a fire that started in a disposal receptacle and had begun to burn the outside of the home. He stated that he had gone outside and found his garbage and yard debris receptacles engulfed in flames up against his house. He grabbed his garden hose and began to spray water on the fire as someone else called 911. The fire damaged the exterior cement siding and a window on the west side of the residence. The fire is believed to have started from some rags and cardboard in the receptacle that were used to clean up deck stain earlier in the day. The cement siding and the home owner's quick reaction were contributing factors in the stop of fire spread. This event serves as a reminder that care should be taken when disposing of rags used to clean wood stains and treatment oils. With linseed oil and other oils used to finish wood, including some exterior deck sealers and wood stains, heat is generated during the drying process. This heat is a result of oxidation and will cause spontaneous combustion. Spontaneous combustion of oil soaked rags can be avoided by following these steps: 1)Immerse item(s) in water in a metal container and seal with an air tight lid. 2)After soaking in water, allow item(s) to fully air dry by laying FLAT on a non-combustible surface. (Be sure to air dry safely away from any buildings or other combustible items.) 3)Once air dry, the item can be safely stored or discarded.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/5505/97177/IMG_0915[1].JPG
Come On Down to the 9th Annual BCSO Chili Cook-Off!
Benton County Sheriff's Office - 08/24/16 3:25 PM
PRESS RELEASE -- For Immediate Release

The Benton County Sheriff's Office (BCSO) 9th Annual Chili Cook-Off is the HOTTEST event of the year! Teams from public safety and community organizations compete for the honor of "Benton's Best Rootin' Tootin' Shoot'em Up Chili!"

This year's BCSO Chili Cook-Off is on Sunday, September 11, 2016 at the Benton County Fairgrounds, 110 SW 53rd Street, Corvallis, Oregon. Doors open at High Noon and the event closes at 4:00pm. Entry fee is $5 at the door, 1/2 off with military ID. Kids under 5 are free.

This family-friendly event includes live music, raffle prizes, the REACH Air-Medical Services helicopter (when it's not in service), demonstrations by public safety professionals, Sheriff's Mounted Posse, activities for the kids, and chili tasting! Soda, hotdogs, ice cream, and beer by Block 15 will be available.

A different local non-profit is chosen as a recipient each year. This year's proceeds will benefit Benton County 4-H Programs and the Benton County Sheriff's Mounted Posse.
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Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1505/97173/Chili_Cookoff_16_4H_MP.pdf
Vietnam War veteran to receive the Purple Heart, 51 years later (Photo)
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 08/24/16 2:30 PM
Purple Heart and other medals.
Purple Heart and other medals.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/1082/97172/thumb_Purple_Heart.jpg
The Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and the Walla Walla VA Medical Center, will present the Purple Heart tomorrow to a disabled veteran who was severely injured during the Vietnam War over 50 years ago.

Pfc. Ron Esselstyn, of Pendleton, was a 22-year-old Army military policeman when he was struck in the head by a moving helicopter blade while attempting to engage a Viet Cong sniper in a rice paddy in Soc Tran Province on Aug. 27, 1965. He was promptly medevacked to a field hospital, where he was stabilized, and later transferred to Madigan Army Hospital at Fort Lewis, Wash.

Medically discharged from the Army, Esselstyn recovered from his wounds, completed his education and began a new career as a tax appraiser for Umatilla County. He even became a marathon runner. But he was never awarded the Purple Heart.

It's not entirely clear why, but Esselstyn may have been considered ineligible due to a misunderstanding of Army regulations. Policy prohibits the Purple Heart from being awarded for wounds related to vehicular accidents, if the accident was not caused by enemy action, but that was not the case here.

Whatever the reason, ODVA Director Cameron Smith learned of the issue after meeting Esselstyn at a Veterans Day event last year. ODVA Operations Director Ed Van Dyke researched Esselstyn's case and, in March, sent a letter on his behalf to the secretary of the Army.

The request was forwarded to the Army Awards and Decorations Branch, which determined Esselstyn was eligible not only for the Purple Heart, but four other medals he had never received.

Van Dyke will present the awards to Esselstyn during a ceremony at 4 p.m. tomorrow at the Jonathan M. Wainwright Memorial VA Medical Center in Walla Walla, Wash. Esselstyn and his family will be in attendance, along with Medical Center Director Brian Westfield, state Sen. Bill Hansell and other dignitaries.

"I think it's just a shame that an Army veteran who was wounded while serving his country had to wait 50-plus years to get his Purple Heart," Van Dyke said. "I have a soft spot in my heart for those guys."

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Attached Media Files: Purple Heart and other medals. , Pfc. Ron Esselstyn.
Financial Donations Urgently Needed to Aid Louisiana
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/24/16 2:14 PM
Relief Effort Expected to Cost at Least $30 million; Thousands Still in Shelters

The American Red Cross remains on the ground in Louisiana, with volunteers helping the thousands of people who have lost everything they own in the devastating flooding. Twenty-seven local responders from Oregon and Southwest Washington are assisting relief efforts by delivering food, water and relief supplies such as cleaning items, and providing overnight stays in 18 Red Cross shelters.

To date, the Red Cross has received approximately $7.8 million in donations and pledges designated to support Louisiana -- but recovery costs are expected to exceed $30 million.

"The devastating flooding in Louisiana has changed tens of thousands of people's lives forever," said Amy Shlossman, CEO of the Red Cross Cascades Region. "The people of Louisiana truly need our help and with the generosity of our donors, the Red Cross will continue to provide relief and long-term recovery assistance to a devastated region."

Red Cross volunteers are also providing emotional support to help people cope. Health services volunteers are monitoring the health needs of people in shelters and replacing things like lost wheelchairs, eyeglasses and medications. Others are going out into neighborhoods to personally deliver supplies to affected communities.

Theresa Grimes, a volunteer from Bend, Oregon has been on the ground for two days. She is serving meals to people in some of the neighborhoods hit hardest by flooding. "A woman came up to me and asked me where I was from. I told her, 'I'm from Bend, Oregon,' and she started to cry. "She said 'You came all this way to help us. I can't believe it.' She was so moved she couldn't stop crying. It told her, 'It's my honor to be here to help you and I wouldn't miss it," Grimes said.

It's been more than a week since the floodwaters destroyed and damaged thousands of homes and together with local, state and national partners, the Red Cross has:
Served more than 260,000 meals and snacks
Distributed more than 60,000 relief items
Provided more than 40,000 overnight stays in emergency shelters - Sunday night, 3,000 people were still seeking refuge in 18 Red Cross and community shelters
Handled more than 17,000 calls from people seeking information and help

HOW TO HELP
Help people affected by the Louisiana Floods by visiting redcross.org or calling 1-800-RED CROSS Donations enable the Red Cross to prepare for, respond to and help people recover from these disasters.

Community Invited to Learn More about Volunteering with the Red Cross
The American Red Cross is looking to recruit additional volunteers to help local and national disaster response efforts.

A volunteer information session and new volunteer registration will be held this coming Friday, August 26, from 12 -- 1 p.m. at the Eugene Red Cross office, located at 862 Bethel Dr. Eugene, OR. RSVPs are encouraged but not required: volunteer.cascades@redcross.org

INTERNATIONAL RED CROSS RESPONSES
Italy -- Earthquake
Today, August 24, a 6.2 magnitude earthquake took place southeast of Norcia, Italy at 3:30 a.m. local time. An hour later a 5.5 magnitude aftershock hit the same region. Initial reports show severe damage in other towns such as Amatrice and Accumoli. Initial reports indicate at least 38 people killed with many others missing.

The Italian Red Cross and the Italian Civil Defense are coordinating search and rescue activities and focused on finding survivors. Twenty ambulances have been sent to the area by the Italian Red Cross. Red Cross volunteers are in the affected communities providing aid and psychological first aid for survivors. Mobile kitchens are also being set up in the area for people who have been forced to leave their homes. The Red Cross is providing earthquake information and advice in the area as aftershocks continue to rock the region. At this time, preliminary efforts are focused on search and rescue and providing aid to affected communities near the epicenter. Meanwhile the American Red Cross continues to monitor the response in close coordination with our global Red Cross partners.

About the American Red Cross
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org/Cascades or visit us on Twitter at @RedCrossCasc.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1190/97171/Financial_Donations_Urgently_Needed_to_Aid_Louisiana;_Volunteer_Recruitment_Event_in_Eugene.pdf
Remains identified at Mill Beach State Park in Curry County
Oregon State Police - 08/24/16 1:02 PM
UPDATE

In November of 2015, human remains were located at the Mill Beach State Park. On August 18, 2016 the University of North Texas (UNT) identified the remains as Mr. Derick W. Christie (age 23 from Brookings).

Due to the level of decomposition of the body, when located, no identity could be established from the autopsy and no cause & manner of death could be determined. Sample tissues were obtained and sent to UNT for analysis. Through the tissue and DNA samples UNT was able to positively identify the remains.

Mr. Christie has been reported to Brooking Police Department, by his parents, as missing/endangered on November 28, 2015. No suspicious circumstances surrounded his disappearance but Mr. Christie had recently had displayed changes in his behavior.

Individuals who are experiencing mental health crisis or family members seeking assistance can locate services in Oregon through https://www.oregon.gov/oha/amh/Pages/mentalhealth.aspx or
http://www.currych.org/services/behavioral-health/mental-health/



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OSP CONTINUING DEATH INVESTIGATION AT MILL BEACH STATE PARK - CURRY COUNTY

News Release from Oregon State Police
Posted on FlashAlert: December 8th, 2015 8:29 PM

Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers and Brookings Police Department are continuing their investigation into a deceased male found at Mill Beach State Park in Curry County.

According to Sergeant Dave Aydelotte, on December 8, 2015 at 11:04 a.m., a body was reported washed ashore on the beach at the Mill Beach State Park within Brookings. Brookings PD and Oregon State Police (Gold Beach) responded to scene.

The Curry County Major Crime Team was activated by Curry County District Attorney with OSP as the lead. Curry County Sheriff Department sent a detective to assist as well. The investigation is continuing into an attempt to identify the deceased male found on the beach and also to determine cause and manner of death.

Please contact the Oregon State Police Gold Beach Office at (541) 247-6641 with any information on this investigation. No further information will be released at this time.

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Public Health Advisory Board Incentives and Funding Subcommittee meets August 31 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 08/24/16 11:16 AM
August 24, 2016

What: A public meeting of the Incentives and Funding Subcommittee of the Public Health Advisory Board

Agenda: Review subcommittee work plan; discuss three funding formula models; and subcommittee business

When: Wednesday, August 31, 2-3 p.m. A five-minute public comment period is scheduled at 2:55 p.m.; comments may be limited to two minutes.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 918, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. A conference call line is also provided at 1-877-873-8017, access code 767068#.

Oregon's Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon's governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon's State Health Improvement Plan. The Incentives and Funding Subcommittee develops recommendations for consideration by the Public Health Advisory Board.

Program contact: Sara Beaudrault, 971-673-0432; sara.beaudrault@state.or.us

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Fifth Annual Portland Mini Maker Faire at OMSI Celebrates Creativity:
OMSI - 08/24/16 10:18 AM
New Marquee Activities will Combine with Returning Favorites to Take Over OMSI's Entire Campus

PORTLAND, Ore. (August 24, 2016) - In what has become a Portland tradition, OMSI will present the fifth annual Portland Mini Maker Faire, a family-friendly showcase of creativity and cool DIY technology taking place on Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 10 and 11, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Among the anticipated highlights:
? Needybot: The Lodge at Wieden+Kennedy developed this fuzzy, friendly robot as an experiment to see if they could entice people to connect with a robot the same way they connect with other humans. Meet Needybot and find out how you can help him learn.
? Supersonic Ping Pong Ball Launcher: It set a new world record of 806 meters per second (1,803 mph) in May; come see if it can beat its own record as it launches ping pong balls through plywood.
? Nemotoad: Made out of plywood, Styrofoam and fiberglass, this steampunk hovercraft is powered by a riding lawnmower engine which allows it to reach speeds of about 20 mph on water.
? Innovation Stage, with confirmed speakers that include LAIKA, Portland Apparel Lab and BB-8 Builders.
? Workshops and activities in all six of OMSI labs.
? More than 115 Makers, including returning favorites such as da Vinci Days, Yarn Car, and 3D printing.

Exhibits, talks, demonstrations and performances will bridge arts, crafts, science and engineering. Hands-on activities are designed to inspire and stimulate the Maker within.

"Portland has such a robust creative community and we have been honored to be able to showcase their many talents these past five years," said Andrea Edgecombe, OMSI events director. "Every year the event grows with more amazing makers and projects. We are always excited to see the innovation and ingenuity that exists in our region."

The Portland Mini Maker Faire is presented by OMSI and Intel, supported by OSH Park, Century Link, and Rockwell Collins, and is in partnership with Make: Magazine. It celebrates the Maker movement and brings together Makers of all fields with the goal of supporting grassroots innovation in the community.

Makers of all ages and backgrounds range from tech enthusiasts to crafters, educators, tinkerers, hobbyists, engineers, artists, science clubs, students, authors, homesteaders, garage tinkerers and even commercial exhibitors. Maker Faire's mission is to entertain, inform, connect and inspire these Makers and aspiring Makers.

OMSI invites anyone who embraces the do-it-yourself (or do-it-together) spirit and seeks to share their accomplishments with an appreciative audience.

The Portland Mini Maker Faire's 115+ exhibitors will run the gamut from demonstrations of 3D printers and steampunk computers; to rocket-making, sustainable art and much more.

Visitors can watch demonstrations of everything from historic European martial arts to metal forging and get hands on with projects that include clay making, wood working, computer programming, leather making, and a variety of upcycled art projects.

"Maker Faire is an excellent way to get students excited about making things, innovating, and engaging with science, technology, engineering and math outside of the classroom," said Jill Eiland, NW regional public affairs director at Intel. "Intel is a proud supporter of the Maker Movement nationally, and we are pleased to help bring the Mini Maker Faire to Portland."

Other selected demonstrations from the broad array being presented include:

? HAM Radios, which will allow visitors to talk to people around the country and world. Find out why this old-fashioned technology is still crucial: amateur radio works long after cell and telephone systems fail.
? Intel will feature demonstrations and activities designed to inspire and empower the Maker community showcasing products such as: Arduino 101, Intel(R) Galileo Gen 2, Intel(R) Edison(TM) and their newest innovator product the Intel(R) Joule(TM) compute module.
? Da Vinci Days Kinetic Sculptures, used in the "Kinetic Challenge," a two-day race that covers a 10-mile course over roads, through mud, sand and on water.
? Portland Children's Museum with "Get Rolling," which allows visitor to explore 3D space, problem solving and physics as they work together to build a large-scale marble run.
? Lumina Lab/Stoicheia Elements with its dodecahedron, each side of which depicts the iconography of one of the Twelve Olympians. Whimsical images, centered in a stained-glass rosary design, remain static and unchanging, while 2,000+ LEDs continuously morph and change, making every moment unique.
? CNC Router Parts will offer a "pinewood derby," where participants can create their own car on a digital tablet, which will then be made into a real car on a desktop CNC machine; or choose a predefined car from the larger fabrication machine. After assembling and racing the cars, visitors can take them home.

The event will take place throughout the OMSI campus, in the north parking lot and inside the museum. Admission details:

? Regular admission: $15 adults, $10 youth (3-17) and seniors (63+).
? Two-day passes are available for $25 adults, $15 youth and seniors
? OMSI members receive 50% off all tickets.

A food cart pod will be serving up local food and flavor, with Full Sail beer, Union Wine Co. wine, and Reverend Nat's hard cider, and DRY Sparkling soda available at the bar. OMSI's restaurant, Theory, will also be open with wood-fire pizza, salads, sandwiches, and Salt & Straw ice cream.

Portland Mini Maker Faire would not be possible without the support of presenting sponsor Intel and supporting sponsors OSH Park, Century Link, and Rockwell Collins. It is presented in partnership with Make: Magazine.

For more information on the many participants, visit www.makerfaireportland.com.

About OMSI
Founded in 1944, the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) is one of the nation's leading science museums, a world-class tourist attraction, and an award-winning educational resource for the kid in each of us. OMSI is located at 1945 SE Water Avenue, Portland, OR 97214. For general information, call 503.797.4000 or visit www.omsi.edu.

About Maker Faire
Maker Faire is the Greatest Show (and Tell) on Earth-a family-friendly showcase of invention, creativity and resourcefulness, and a celebration of the Maker Movement. It's a place where people show what they are making, and share what they are learning.

Makers range from tech enthusiasts to crafters to homesteaders to scientists to garage tinkerers. They are of all ages and backgrounds. The aim of Maker Faire is to entertain, inform, connect and grow this community.

The original Maker Faire event was held in San Mateo, CA and in 2016 celebrated its eleventh annual show with some 1,250 makers and 150,000 people in attendance. World Maker Faire New York, the other flagship event, has grown in five years to 900+ makers and 90,000 attendees. Twenty-three other larger scale Maker Faires occur in cities around the world-Detroit, Atlanta, Berlin, Paris, Rome, Tokyo, and Shenzhen to name a few- and over 120 community-driven, independently organized Mini Maker Faires are now being produced around the United States and the world.

About MAKE Magazine
MAKE is the first magazine devoted entirely to Do-It-Yourself (DIY) technology projects. MAKE unites, inspires, informs, and entertains a growing community of resourceful people who undertake amazing projects in their backyards, basements, and garages. MAKE celebrates your right to tweak, hack, and bend any technology to your will.

The Portland Mini Maker Faire is independently organized and operated under license from Maker Media, Inc.
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2500 Road Fire update - 08-24-16
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/24/16 9:28 AM
INCIDENT AT A GLANCE

Cause: Under investigation

Total personnel: 276

Hand crews: 16

Helicopters: 2

Fire engines: 16

Bulldozers: 2

Water Tenders: 6

Total acres: 222

Containment: 0%

Estimated suppression cost: $175,000

For More Information:

Facebook --
https://www.facebook.com/oregondepartmentofforestry

Depoe Bay Fire & Rescue-
www.depoebayfire.com

Lincoln County Emergency Management-
http://www.co.lincoln.or.us/emergencymanagement

UPDATE
Crews continued to make good progress yesterday, and through the night. Clearing conditions allowed aircraft to work the fire into the evening.

Today crews will work to establish containment lines around the perimeter of the fire. They will focus on mop up efforts for areas of the fireline that have been constructed either by hand or dozer. Crews continue to patrol for spot fires throughout the fire area.

The weather today will be different compared to yesterday. The fog is expected to lift earlier, and temperatures will be higher. The wind is expected to shift to the NW by this afternoon, with gusts up to 10 mph. When the fog lifts there will be a good opportunity to use aircraft on the fire. The fire could also become more active as temperatures rise. Smoke may become more visible to the public.

Over the next 24 hours the objective will be to establish containment lines around the fire while continuing to mop up inside the fire perimeter. "Mop up" -Extinguishing or removing burning material near control lines, felling snags, and trenching logs to prevent rolling after an area has burned, to make a fire safe, or to reduce residual smoke.This will prepare the fire to be tested by higher temperatures and east winds that are predicted to be here tomorrow.

During the morning briefing for the firefighters the agency administrator Mike Totey said "It's different at the coast" several times while he was explaining to them that the vegetation is different than what they are used to when fighting fires. The mop up efforts will be different, and fighting fire is different than what fire crews are used to.

Citizens are encouraged to be mindful of the heavy traffic in and around Depoe Bay.

Fogarty Creek State Park will temporarily remain closed to the public while fire crews are utilizing it for fire camp. The incident command post is located at the Depoe Bay Fire & Rescue station.

There are no evacuations currently in effect.

Evacuation levels are explained as:

Level 1 indicates that residents should be "ready" for potential evacuations. Residents should be aware of the danger that exists in their area, monitor emergency services websites and local media outlets for information.

Level 2 indicates that residents should be "set" for a potential evacuation. Residents must be prepared to leave at a moment's notice.

Level 3 evacuation means "GO" evacuate now leave immediately. Danger to your area is current or imminent, and you should evacuate immediately.
Tue. 08/23/16
Death Investigation
Roseburg Police Dept. - 08/23/16 9:44 PM
On Tuesday, August 23rd, 2016 just after 5:00 P.M. Officers and medical personnel responded to a report that an adult male had fallen from an apartment window of the Grand Apartments, 730 SE Cass in Roseburg. First responders arriving on scene found an adult male deceased, laying on the sidewalk.

A subsequent investigation revealed that the male lived in an apartment on the 5th floor of the building, and that he fell from his own apartment. There was no indication of foul play and no indication that anyone else was in his apartment when the incident occurred. Evidence at the scene and on the decedent indicated the male intentionally jumped from the window.

The victim male was 59 years of age and next of kin were notified.
Be the eyes and ears to help curb arson fires
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/23/16 4:05 PM
Aug. 23, 2016

Contact:
Jeff Bonebrake
503-945-7445
Jeff.c.bonebrake@oregon.gov


Oregon's wildland fire agencies typically battle fires started by lightning or by people's carelessness. But in recent weeks, they've found themselves chasing down fire starts set by arsonists. Dozens of wildfires have broken out in recent weeks across Oregon -- many of them under suspicious circumstances.

Law enforcement and wildfire protection agencies at all levels are working hard to solve these crimes and prevent future arsons. Vigilance is high among Oregon State Police troopers, county sheriff's deputies, and state and federal forestry agencies' field personnel. Oregon's forests are expansive -- 30 million acres -- and they could use the public's help to put a stop to this rash of deliberately set fires.

Thousands of recreationists enjoying the forests this summer can serve as eyes and ears to report suspected illegal activity in the woods. Call the Oregon State Police Tip Line, 503-375-3555, to confidentially report tips.

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Fatal Crash Highway 42 and I-5 Interchange - Douglas County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/23/16 3:26 PM
Photo2
Photo2
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/1002/97146/thumb_IMG_0674.JPG
Oregon State Police (OSP) are continuing the investigation into Tuesday morning's fatal crash on Highway 42 and the I-5 Interchange.

On August 23, 2016 at about 11:50 a.m., OSP troopers and emergency responders were dispatched to a two-vehicle fatal crash on Highway 42 and the I-5 Interchange.

Preliminary information indicates that a 2005 Isuzu straight truck, operated by Christopher Bennett, age 33, from Roseburg, was southbound on I-5 and was on the off ramp to Highway 42. For unknown reasons Bennett's truck left the off ramp traveling down an embankment and up a steep incline and onto Highway 42, where it crashed into an eastbound 2007 Toyota Corolla, operated by Marsha Wright, age 62, from Roseburg.

Wright was declared deceased at the scene of the crash. A passenger in the Toyota Corolla, Patricia Van Arsdale, age 22, from Roseburg was transported to Mercy Medical Center with critical injuries. Bennett was transported to Mercy Medical Center with minor injuries.

All involved were wearing safety belts at the time of the crash. The highway was closed for about 4 hours.

OSP troopers from the Roseburg Area Command are continuing the investigation into the cause of the crash. Investigators are requesting any witnesses that may have not contacted Law Enforcement to please do so by calling OSP at 541-440-3334. Senior Trooper Mark Moore is the lead investigator.

OSP was assisted at the scene by the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT), Winston-Dillard Fire Department, Douglas County Fire District 2, Bay Cities Ambulance and Douglas County Sheriff's Office.

Photographs provided by OSP.

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Attached Media Files: Photo2 , Photo1
Marine Board Seeks Boaters' Feedback for Strategic Planning
Oregon Marine Board - 08/23/16 12:49 PM
The Oregon State Marine Board, working with their Boat Oregon Advisory Teams, has created an online survey in hopes of gathering more feedback from recreational boaters.

The agency's 2017-2022 strategic plan is being developed and the purpose is to outline initiatives that will address issues, emerging concerns and gaps in "the way things are" and "the way boaters want things to be" when they're out recreating.

"It's our mission to serve recreational boaters through education, enforcement, access and environmental stewardship so everyone can have a safe and enjoyable experience," says Director Scott Brewen. "Feedback that we received in developing the last plan gave us tremendous insights on what we can do to improve services and fulfill our mission. A lot of progress was made, and now we'd like to build upon that work with this next strategic plan."

A short survey is available on the Marine Board's website and social media sites. This six question survey should take roughly five minutes to complete. To go directly to the survey, visit https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/OSMBStratPln.

To review the 2011-2016 Strategic Plan Accomplishments Report, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/info/Documents/AccomplishmentsReportStratPln2011-2016_Final.pdf.
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Deadline extended for Benton County Sheriff's Office Citizen's Academy
Benton County Sheriff's Office - 08/23/16 10:20 AM
The Benton County Sheriff's Office is extending the deadline for applications to its 2016 Citizens' Academy. The new deadline is August 30th. Although the class is filling up, some space remains for those interested in learning about Benton County Sheriff's Office operations.

The Academy begins September 6th and meets for ten sessions ending October 25th. The class will meet each Tuesday evening from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. and on two Saturdays from 8:30 a.m. -- 2:30 p.m. The Saturdays are scheduled for October 1st and October 22nd.

This free program provides Benton County residents with an opportunity to learn more about what their Sheriff's Office does. Most of the sessions are taught by sworn Deputies who share their experiences with the class. The program includes presentations, tours, demonstrations, and hands-on simulations. All aspects of the Sheriff's Office responsibilities are covered including law enforcement, emergency management, search and rescue, parole and probation, jail operations and the support service and command responsibilities of the Office.

Most participants report that their understanding of the Sheriff's Office greatly improved over the course of the program. A recent graduate noted, "Overall, I am very glad that I had the opportunity to be a part of this program. It's very hands-on, enlightening and enjoyable."

Applications are available online at: www.co.benton.or.us/sheriff/page/2016-citizens-academy or in person at the Law Enforcement Center, 180 NW 5th Street, Corvallis. For more information, contact the Benton County Sheriff's Office at 541-766-6858.
Don't let down your guard on wildfires
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/23/16 9:31 AM
Temperatures may have moderated somewhat but Governor Kate Brown and State Fire Marshal Jim Walker want you to remain vigilant in preventing wildfire and reporting arsonists.

The Oregon Department of Forestry has reported that since January 1, 2016, there have been 486 wildfires caused by humans with at least one due to arson. This is an increase over our ten-year average.

Fourteen fires that have broken out in central Oregon over the past few weeks are being investigated as arson, including the Withers Fire north of Paisley that has scorched more than 3,400 acres.

"Oregon continues to experience extremely dry conditions where any stray spark could spell disaster in any area of the state," said State Fire Marshal Jim Walker.

"While you and your family are enjoying Oregon's great outdoors, I encourage you to not only be fire safe but be alert to any suspicious behavior and report it to local law enforcement officials," said Governor Kate Brown.

Tips can also be made by calling the Oregon State Police at 503-375-3555 or 911 in case of an emergency.
New Safety Standards for BLM and Partner Organizations' Fire Response
Bureau of Land Management Oregon & Washington - 08/23/16 9:18 AM
Portland, Ore. -- New standards for training, equipment and communication established this week will enhance the safety and efficiency of the partnership between the Bureau of Land Management and Oregon's Rangeland Fire Protection Associations (RFPA). The intent is to ensure a cohesive, safe and efficient response when firefighters from RFPAs are working alongside state and Federal employees.

"The RFPAs are an important element in initial response to wildfire starts on more than 13 million acres managed by the BLM in eastern Oregon," said acting Oregon/Washington State Director Ron Dunton. "The BLM is committed to strengthening our local partnerships," continued Dunton.

The RFPAs are comprised primarily of ranchers in an area who have come together to respond to wildfires. Given the size and remoteness of many Western rangelands, local RFPAs are often the first to respond to a fire start, gaining valuable time until BLM crews arrive. Cooperation among these groups and the BLM, in Oregon as elsewhere, has been improving in recent years.

The new standards, which set minimum age and training requirements as well as communication protocols and personal protective gear needs, also designate the Incident Command System as the management structure that will be used. All elements of the standards are designed to enhance the safety of all firefighters at an incident and facilitate efficient operations.

"This summer, the communication, collaboration and cooperation has been phenomenal between the agencies and the RFPAs," said Marvin Vetter, ODF rangeland fire protection coordinator. "The interactions have all been great." Vetter said after a recent lightning storm in Baker County. The RFPAs responded on initial attack to 15 lightning fires along with the State of Oregon Department of Forestry, BLM, and U.S. Forest Service firefighters, and everything went smoothly. Similarly the Juntura RFPA responded to the 24,000-acre Juntura Complex of fires on the BLM Vale District, providing much-needed resources and support.

A copy of the RFPA guidance is available online at: www.blm.gov/or/resources/fire
-BLM-
The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land, the most of any Federal agency. This land, known as the National System of Public Lands, is primarily located in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The BLM's mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America's public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. In Fiscal Year 2015, the BLM generated $4.1 billion in receipts from activities occurring on public lands.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/5514/97133/RFPA_Guidance_News_Release_8-22-16.pdf , RFPA Guidance -- August 2016
Time running out on Oregon taxpayers with expired refund checks
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 08/23/16 9:07 AM
SALEM, Oregon--Thousands of taxpayers across Oregon have tax refund money awaiting them, but it'll soon be harder to get. After state checks expire, two years from their issuance date, there's a limited window of time to get them reissued before additional requirements apply.

"We still have more than 5,000 taxpayers with almost $1 million in expired checks," said Steve Bergmann, Oregon Department of Revenue accounting manager. "We want these taxpayers to get their money before they have to take additional steps."

Revenue sent letters to nearly 7,000 taxpayers in July, warning them that their checks are expired and they need to request a new check before the amount is transferred to the Department of State Lands (DSL). Some have already asked for a reissued check, claiming their portion of almost $1.5 million in expired refunds that Revenue identified in July. If you got a notification letter from Revenue, Bergmann said you should sign the notification letter and return it as soon as possible to have your check reissued.

Each October, Revenue has to send any expired check amounts to the Unclaimed Property Program at DSL. To claim property from DSL, taxpayers need a notarized claim and copies of identity-verifying documents.

Bergmann said the most common reasons for not cashing a refund check are misplacement of the check and having an incorrect mailing address on file with Revenue. He said taxpayers should notify Revenue of any address changes to ensure receipt of all tax-related correspondence.

Visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments; call 1 (800) 356-4222 toll-free (English or Spanish) or (503) 378-4988; or email, questions.dor@oregon.gov. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), call 1 (800) 886-7204.
- 30 -
Mon. 08/22/16
Teen Driver Rescued From Submerged Vehicle In Canal - Crook County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/22/16 5:43 PM
2016-08/1002/97126/20160822_084433.jpg
2016-08/1002/97126/20160822_084433.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/1002/97126/thumb_20160822_084433.jpg
On August 22, 2016 at about 7:50AM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a car that had crashed into an irrigation canal on Highway 370 near milepost 10, (six miles west of Prineville).

Preliminary investigation revealed a 2003 Ford Taurus was traveling eastbound on Highway 370 (O'Neil Highway) when the vehicle drifted off the roadway and onto the shoulder. The driver attempted to bring the vehicle onto the highway but lost control, crossing both lanes of travel. The car rolled over after it left the north side of the highway, upside down into an irrigation canal. The vehicle was submerged in the canal which had approximately 18" of water in it.

Two other motorists stopped and quickly began efforts to free the driver from the vehicle. The witnesses had to recline the driver's seat and use a knife to cut the driver from her seat belt. The driver, a sixteen year old female from Redmond was taken by private vehicle to an area hospital for minor injuries.

According to the driver's father, Denis FAST, he credits the quick measures the motorists who stopped at the crash scene by saving his daughter from drowning.

No further information.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1002/97126/20160822_084433.jpg , 2016-08/1002/97126/20160822_083406.jpg
Disturbance
Lebanon Police Dept. - 08/22/16 5:14 PM
Nature of Crime or Event: Disturbance
Date / Time Occurred: 08-22-16 / 1115 hours
Occurred Location: Lebanon Safeway, 1983 South Main Street

Lebanon Police Officers responded to a disturbance located at 1983 South Main Street (Safeway) in Lebanon, Oregon. The caller reported that a male hit him in the face and threatened to shoot him. The suspect was last seen in a blue Dodge Neon driving northbound on South Main Street

Lebanon Police spotted the suspect vehicle in Lebanon at West Oak Street and South 5th Street. Officers attempted a traffic stop, but the suspect vehicle rapidly sped away through residential neighborhoods, running through multiple stop signs. The pursuit continued west onto Highway 34, where speeds exceeded 110 miles per hour. The suspect drove northbound on Interstate 5 where Lebanon Police discontinued the pursuit. Oregon State Police assisted in the search for the vehicle.

The Linn County Sheriff's Office located the vehicle and detained the driver of the motor vehicle with help from the Albany Police Department. The suspect, later identified as 31-year old Robert Kay Brady of Lebanon, was taken into custody without incident on 08 22 16, in Albany, at approximately 1237 hours. Lebanon Police then responded to Albany and took Brady into custody for harassment, disorderly conduct, attempt to elude police in a vehicle and reckless driving. Brady was later transported to the Linn County Jail.

Although a report of a firearm had been made, further investigation revealed that no firearms were seen, located or otherwise involved.
Sheriff's Office Launches Summer Driving Campaign (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/22/16 3:22 PM
2016-08/1294/97120/DUII_Stock.jpg
2016-08/1294/97120/DUII_Stock.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/1294/97120/thumb_DUII_Stock.jpg
Last Friday the Marion County Sheriff's Office Traffic Safety Team launched two separate driving campaigns focused to create a safe traveling experience for our visitors and residence. Beginning August 19th and ending September 5th deputies will be working our roadways focusing on impaired and distracted driving.

Our partners at the Oregon Department of transportation have offered eleven tips to "ditch the distractions."

1. Turn it off and stow it. Turn your phone off or switch it to silent mode before you get in the car. Then stow it away so that it's out of reach.
2. Spread the word. Record a message on your phone that tells callers you're driving and will get back to them when you're off the road, or sign up for a service that offers this feature.
3. Install an app. Apps can help you avoid texting while driving. Go to your app store and search for "distracted driving."
4. Pull over. If you need to make a call, pull over to a safe area first.
5. Use your passengers. Ask a passenger to make the call or respond to a text for you.
6. X the text. Don't ever text and drive, browse online or read your email while driving. It's dangerous and against the law in most states. Even voice-to-text isn't risk-free.
7. Know the law. Familiarize yourself with state and local laws before you get in the car. Oregon prohibits the use of hand-held cell phones in addition to texting.
8. Prepare. If using a GPS device, enter your destination before you start to drive. If you prefer a map or written directions, review them in advance. If you need help while driving, ask a passenger to assist you or pull over to a safe location to change your GPS or review your map/directions.
9. Secure your pets. Unsecured pets can be a big distraction in the car.
10. Mind the kids. Pull over to a safe place to address situations involving children in the car.
11. Focus on driving. Multi-tasking behind the wheel is dangerous. Refrain from eating, drinking, reading, grooming, smoking, and any other activity that takes your mind and eyes off the road.

The Sheriff's Office would like to remind our motorist to drive safe and sober, extra patrols are made possible by grants through the Oregon State Sheriff's Association and the Oregon Department of Transportation.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1294/97120/DUII_Stock.jpg
***Update - Name Correction**** Lapine Man Killed In Highway 97 Crash - Deschutes County
Oregon State Police - 08/22/16 2:32 PM
Obrien not Obrian

Previous Release:
On August 22, 2016 at about 8:15AM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a head-on collision on Highway 97 near milepost 145 (south of Bend).

Preliminary investigation revealed a 2008 Chevrolet Malibu was traveling northbound on Highway 97 (in the fast lane) when it rear-ended a 2016 Ford F350, also traveling northbound. After this impact, the Chevrolet slid out of control, crossing the center yellow line and was struck on the passenger side by a southbound 2009 Honda Accord.

The driver of the Chevrolet, Joshua S MATTHES, age 25, of La Pine, was pronounced deceased on scene by emergency personnel. The driver of the Honda, Ashley S OBRIEN, age 24, of Oak Park, California, was seriously injured and taken to Saint Charles in Bend for medical treatment. The driver of the Ford, John NORRIS, age 59, of Bend was not injured.

Highway 97 was closed for one hour for the investigation to be conducted. OSP was assisted on scene by the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, Sunriver Fire, Bend Fire and the Oregon Department of Transportation. This is an ongoing investigation; more information will be released as it becomes available.
Department of Revenue releases marijuana tax collection numbers
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 08/22/16 1:24 PM
SALEM, Ore.--As of July 31, the Department of Revenue has processed $25.5 million in marijuana tax payments this year. Medical marijuana dispensaries started collecting a 25-percent tax on their recreational marijuana sales in January.

Dispensaries' second quarter returns were due August 1, 2016. Any dispensary that collected taxes on the sale of recreational marijuana products is required to file a quarterly return. Dispensaries can be penalized for failing to file these returns in a timely manner. The quarterly return form and instructions are available at www.oregon.gov/dor/marijuana. If dispensaries have any questions about filling out the form or their filing obligation, they can contact the Marijuana Tax Program at (503) 947-2597 or marijuanatax.dor@oregon.gov.

Visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments; or call 1 (800) 356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish); (503) 378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon; or email, questions.dor@oregon.gov. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), call 1 (800) 886-7204.
More Local Red Cross Responders Head Out to Help Louisiana Flood Relief Efforts
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/22/16 12:49 PM
Twenty-seven Red Cross responders from Oregon and Southwest Washington are on the ground in Louisiana helping with the flood relief efforts; Red Cross has served more than 200,000 meals/snacks and provided 39,000 overnight stays.

PORTLAND, Ore., August 22, 2016 -- The American Red Cross Cascades Region (Oregon and Southwest Washington) has deployed additional responders to Louisiana to help with flood relief efforts.

To date, 27 responders from Bend, Tigard, Monmouth, Wood Village, Medford, Silverton, Florence, Salem, Portland, Lake Oswego, Wolf Creek, Keiser, Williams, and Turner, Oregon, as well as Longview and Vancouver, Washington are either on the ground or heading to Louisiana. They are assisting affected communities by managing shelters, providing emergency financial assistance, health and mental health services, transportation services, and coordinating with local government entities to help deliver assistance.

Volunteers on the ground describe the damage as "catastrophic". Patty Albin and her husband Chuck, from Medford, Oregon, are among the 1,700 Red Cross responders from throughout the nation helping people who have lost everything.

"This morning a family from Baton Rouge came to us to get help -- a woman, man and two small children." Patty Albin said. "They told us they had stayed at a hotel until their money ran out and since then have been living in their car. We helped to make sure they got to a Red Cross shelter. Just before they left, the woman mentioned today is the little boy's birthday. He is turning seven. We brought him a stuffed Mickey Mouse toy and he lit up. This is why we're here. To give comfort and help people connect with the resources they need," Patty said.

The Albin's have family members in Baton Rouge who were affected by the storm. Chuck's brother and his family lost everything in the widespread flooding. The Albin's volunteer with the Red Cross for as many as 12 hours per day and then head to Chuck's brother's home to help their family with clean-up efforts.

THE SITUATION IN LOUISIANA:
The flooding in Louisiana is the worst natural disaster to hit the United States since Superstorm Sandy in 2012. Early estimates predict the massive Red Cross relief effort could cost at least $30 million, although the cost estimate may grow as we learn more about the scope and magnitude of the devastation. Local officials are estimating that more than 40,000 homes have been damaged. This is the second time in five months that Louisiana has seen more than 24 inches of rain during a single storm.

Red Cross workers are providing shelter, food and comfort right now, and will continue to be there in the weeks and months as ahead, helping residents recover from this disaster. Each day, the Red Cross is able to get into more and more neighborhoods, and volunteers are working tirelessly to provide assistance. In some areas, residents are still experiencing flooding, while other neighborhoods are facing the challenge of cleaning up.

Here are some of the ways the Red Cross is helping people affected by flooding:
Distributing food: since the onset of the flooding, the Red Cross and partners have served more than 200,000 meals and snacks.
Providing shelter: on Saturday night 3,000 people were still seeking refuge in 20 Red Cross and community shelters in Louisiana. At the peak of the floods, more than 50 shelters provided safety for more than 10,000 people. The Red Cross has provided more than 39,000 overnight shelter stays since the flooding began.
Distributing relief supplies: Red Cross has distributed more than 32,000 relief items. Dozens of disaster response vehicles and trailer-loads of relief supplies are in Louisiana. Some of these supplies include water, personal hygiene items, insect repellant, cleaning kits and bleach.
Connecting people to resources: the Red Cross call center has handled more than 16,000 calls from people seeking information and help since the floods began.
Shelter volunteers are providing emotional support and helping to replace items like lost eyeglasses and medications.

HOW TO HELP:
Donations are urgently needed. To help people affected by the Louisiana Floods or the California Wildfires visit redcross.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS. These donations enable the Red Cross to prepare for, respond to and help people recover from disasters big and small.

About the American Red Cross
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org/Cascades or visit us on Twitter at @RedCrossCasc.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1190/97112/News_Release_-_More_Local_Responders_Head_to_Louisiana;_Thousands_Still_Staying_at_Red_Cross_Shelters.pdf
Crescent Hill Brush Fire (Photo)
Sweet Home Fire Dist. - 08/22/16 12:08 PM
Crescent Hill Photo
Crescent Hill Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/5505/97111/thumb_20160822_102605.jpg
Sweet Home Fire District and the Oregon Department of forestry responded to a reported brush fire in the area of hwy 228 and Cresent Hill. Four apparatus from Sweet Home fire and six from ODF found a .12 acre brush fire burning up hill in tall grass and brush. The fire was extinguished rapidly and ODF remained on scene for mop up and to complete a fire line. No civilian or Firefighter injuries occurred.


Attached Media Files: Crescent Hill Photo
Oregon Credit Unions Can Help Relieve Financial Stress
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 08/22/16 11:40 AM
TIGARD, OR. -- The top cause of financial stress for Oregonians is paying debt, according to a new, nationwide survey by GoBankingRates. Key factors contributing to that stress in the Beaver State are credit card debt and high housing costs.

Credit unions can help, because they offer better interest rates on credit cards, loans, and savings accounts than most banks. For example, Oregon credit union members saved a collective $31 million in credit card interest rates last year vs. what they would have been charged by banks. Credit unions charged 5.63% lower interest rates than banks on classic credit cards. Oregon's credit unions also generally offer better interest rates on 15 and 30-year mortgages and home equity loans. Most credit unions also provide free financial counseling to help you manage your money.

How is all of this possible? Credit unions are not-for-profit cooperatives, owned by their members. With no stockholders to pay, earnings are reinvested in the members.

Find out more about credit union membership by visiting http://www.asmarterchoice.org.
The GoBankingRates survey on financial stress can be found here: https://www.gobankingrates.com/personal-finance/financial-stress-state/

Source: Informa Resource Services, National Credit Union Association and Credit Union National Association analysis for the year ending March 31, 2016.




Attached Media Files: 2016-08/4992/97110/Oregon_credit_unions_can_help_relieve_financial_stress.docx
Magazine Salesman Arrested for Harassment
Corvallis Police - 08/22/16 11:32 AM
On August 21, 2016, at 3:22 pm Corvallis Police Department officers responded to an address on SE Bayou Place after a female resident reported a door-to-door magazine salesman touched her in an offensive manner and made sexually suggestive statements to her. The suspect, 20-year-old Laderrick McCray of Mississippi, came to the victim's residence as an employee of an out of state magazine sales company. McCray was very pushy and flirtatious, and led the victim from the doorway of her residence by putting his arm around her lower back. He then insisted that she let him come inside the residence, which she refused to do. His demeanor and comments made the victim uncomfortable and concerned for her personal safety.

McCray ultimately left the residence after the female returned inside her house, locked the door, and called police. Based on the suspect description, McCray was later located and arrested on the crime of Harassment. He was lodged at the Benton County Correctional Facility on that charge with a bail of $12,500.

Below is a link to McCray's booking photo:
https://www.co.benton.or.us/sheriff/inmate_detail?inmate=1600001438
UPDATED: Arjun Chagarlamudi, M.D., Joins Cascade Cardiology (Photo)
VanNatta Public Relations - 08/22/16 11:11 AM
chagarlamundi
chagarlamundi
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/1853/96850/thumb_dr.arjun.chagarlamundi.jpg
Salem, OR, (Aug. 22, 2016) - Arjun Chagarlamudi, M.D., has joined Cascade Cardiology. Chagarlamudi comes to Salem from Greenville, NC, where he recently completed his Interventional Cardiology Fellowship at East Carolina University.

Chagarlamudi graduated from St. George's University School of Medicine in 2008. Originally from Canada, he will be joining Cascade Cardiology and treat Medicaid patients among all other insured.

"I'm looking forward to joining Cascade Cardiology and being part of a team that treats patients across a wide spectrum of stages and conditions. In addition to seeing patients with advanced disease, I'd like to see and treat active, healthy patients from a preventative perspective in order to mitigate cardiovascular risk," said Chagarlamudi.

While completing his Internal Medicine Residency and Cardiovascular Disease Fellowships, Chagarlamudi participated in medical missions in developing countries. During his trips to Haiti, Nicaragua and Palestine he provided care to those who usually don't have the opportunity to receive quality treatment. "The most rewarding part of participating in medical missions is being able to bring the highest standard of U.S. medicine to an underserved population, who are often in dire need of this care," he said.

Chagarlamudi will join Maziar Azadpour, M.D., FACC, FSCAI, Ashit G. Patel, M.D., FACC, FHRS and Harminder P. Gandhok, M.D., FACC, FSCAI in the practice. Cascade Cardiology is headquartered in Salem, Oregon at the Meridian at 777 Commercial ST SE and has two additional locations to serve patients at Woodburn Health Center at 1475 Mount Hood AVE, Woodburn and at Silverton Health at 400 Welch ST, Silverton. www.CascadeCardiology.com or 503-485-4787.

________________________________________________________________________
ABOUT CASCADE CARDIOLOGY: Cascade Cardiology is headquartered in Salem, Oregon at the Meridian at 777 Commercial ST SE and has two additional locations to serve patients at Woodburn Health Center at 1475 Mount Hood AVE, Woodburn and at Silverton Health at 400 Welch ST, Silverton. Cascade Cardiology is a member of the Salem Health's Cardiology CIN. They offer comprehensive, noninvasive and invasive cardiovascular care that includes interventional, peripheral vascular, cardiac rhythm management, advanced heart failure and arrhythmia care. The clinic manages complex cardiac patients including treating advanced heart failure patients as inpatient and/or outpatient. Cascade Cardiology is accredited in the area of adult Transthoracic by the ICAEL (The Intersocietal Commission for the Accreditation of Echocardiography Laboratories). Accreditation means that Cascade has undergone a thorough review of its operational and technical components by a panel of experts. The ICAEL grants this widely respected accreditation only to those facilities found to be providing quality patient care in compliance with national standards, a comprehensive application process and review.

###


Attached Media Files: chagarlamundi
Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Update: August 22
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/22/16 10:40 AM
Fires on ODF-Protected Lands
The weather service issued a red flag warning effective through today in South Central Oregon.

NEW

Shed Fire
The 12-acre Shed Fire about 10 miles east of Chiloquin started yesterday evening. The cause is under investigation.

UPDATE

Withers Fire
The 3,424-acre Withers Fire one mile north of Paisley is 85 percent contained. Evacuation notices lifted. For more information click here https://www.facebook.com/scofmpfireinfo.

An arsonist started the fire. Officials are conducting a criminal investigation. Specific details will not be released during the investigation. Anyone with information is asked to call 541-947-2504. For information on any other suspicious activity on public lands call Oregon State Police at 503-375-3555. For emergencies call 911.

Fires on Other Jurisdictions

For more info on these fires visit the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center.

NEW

Cherry Road Fire
The 14,500-acre Cherry Road Fire burning 7 miles southwest of Adrian is 5 percent contained.

UPDATES

Rail Fire
The 30,273-acre Rail Fire burning 5 miles west of Unity is 35 percent contained.

Sheridan Fire
The 191-acre Sheridan Fire burning 13 miles north of La Pine is 80 percent contained. Evacuation notices lifted.

Fire Statistics

Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. When fire activity increases, the latest information might not be included in the statistics.

January 1, 2016, through yesterday:
Lightning-caused fires: 61 fires burned 2,338 acres
Human-caused fires: 486 fires burned 1,964 acres
Total: 547 fires burned 4,302 acres

10-year average (for this period of the year):
Lightning-caused fires: 261 fires burned 28,675 acres
Human-caused fires: 465 fires burned 4,480 acres
Total: 726 fires burned 33,155 acres

For info on breaking fires, go to the department's wildfire blog.
Sun. 08/21/16
Red Cross Responds to Fire in Lane County
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/21/16 11:20 PM
Disaster responders with the American Red Cross Cascades Region responded to a home fire disaster on August 21, 2016 at approximately 8:30 p.m. in the 500 block of West 18th Ave in Eugene. The multi-family fire affected two adults. The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits, health services, and information about recovery services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross Cascades Region (Oregon and Southwest Washington) responds to an average of two home fires every day. We provide hope and comfort to people affected, helping victims anywhere and anytime. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.
Red Cross Responds to Fire in Coos Bay
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/21/16 10:19 PM
Disaster responders with the American Red Cross Cascades Region responded to a home fire disaster on August 21, 2016 at approximately 7:00 p.m. in the 60000 block of Harmony Road in Coos Bay. The fire affected two adults. The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits, and information about recovery services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross Cascades Region (Oregon and Southwest Washington) responds to an average of two home fires every day. We provide hope and comfort to people affected, helping victims anywhere and anytime. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.
The Future of the Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum Campus Secure! New Investors close deal with bankruptcy court on MKS property.
Evergreen Aviation and Space Museum - 08/21/16 9:36 PM
McMinnville, OR (Aug. 19, 2016) -- The Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum and Wings & Waves Waterpark (EASM), a 501c3 entity, is pleased to announce that an investor group - The Falls Event Center LLC - has delivered the funds to purchase assets formerly owned by the Michael K. Smith Foundation, which had filed for bankruptcy in January of this year. Judge Dunn acknowledged the sale at a hearing that took place Friday morning, August 19th in Portland. The completion of the sale is expected within a few days. EASM is confident that The Falls Event Center LLC will be a supportive and collaborative landlord and will help to foster the growth of the Museum's mission "to inspire and educate, promote and preserve aviation and space history, and honor the patriotic service of our veterans".

The Falls Event Center LLC, partially owned by Steve Down, an Oregon native, has provided the funds needed to complete the purchase of these assets, which include: Wings & Waves Waterpark, the Evergreen Chapel and the Evergreen Space Museum. The EASM will continue to operate these facilities with normal hours and procedures and will work with a transition team on future enhancements. In addition to the buildings listed, nine artifacts and the land surrounding the current museum facilities were acquired through the sale. At this time, there is no plan to move any of the artifacts off-site.

"It is outstanding that with the court settlement today, the Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum with its new partners, will be able to enhance our community, state and nation far into the future. As it strives to become a destination that will encompass a world class museum and education center for everyone to enjoy," stated John Rasmussen, Museum Board President.

"We are excited to become a part of the community of McMinnville, OR and the surrounding Willamette Valley through this purchase. We know that the Museum is a tourism draw for the region and we are planning to support and to grow the campus as originally envisioned by the founder, Delford M. Smith. We intend to help the Museum become Oregon's top destination within a few years," said The Falls Event Center CEO Steve Down.

The Museum management team is working closely with The Falls Event Center LLC to ensure a seamless transition of the Wings & Waves waterpark in the new year. EASM will continue to operate and enhance programs, events and activities as tenants on the campus. EASM continues to be the home of Howard Hughes' Flying Boat, "Spruce Goose," and over 150 other air and space artifacts. EASM educational programs are offered on location and at regional satellites, including the Pierson Air Museum in Vancouver, WA.
Come! Be Inspired!

####

Evergreen Museum Campus:
Located in the heart of Oregon's Willamette Valley wine country, the Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum ("EASM") is the home of the world's largest wooden flying boat, the "Spruce Goose," the SR-71 "Blackbird," and the Titan II SLV Missile. Located on over 200 acres and encompassing four massive and magnificent buildings, the EASM exhibits more than 200 historic aircraft, spacecraft, accessible to visitors of all ages and enhanced with artwork and traveling exhibits. The Museum values its educational mission "to inspire and educate" and it's partnerships with the Academy of Model Aeronautics, the NASA Jet Propulsion Lab, the Oregon Space Consortium and the Civil Air Patrol Cadet Program, and scores of regional educational institutions.

The Museum facility is located at 500 NE Captain Michael King Smith Way, across the highway from the McMinnville Airport and about three miles southeast of the charming town of McMinnville, Ore., on Highway 18. The Museum is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Regular visitor admission is required. Call 503-434-4180 or visit www.evergreenmuseum.org for more information.
Sheriff's Office Seeking Public's Help In Locating Possible Kidnap Victim ***Update***
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/21/16 8:13 PM
Today at 7:30 p.m., deputies arrested Alfredo Lopez-Almonte, age 29, for Kidnapping x 2, Assault IV x 3, Menacing x 2 all of which are related to domestic violence. Deputies were able to obtain probable cause after releasing a video capturing an instance where Lopez-Almonte kidnapped his then girlfriend.

The victim came forward after seeing herself on the news, the Sheriff's Office is not releasing the name of the victim in this case. In addition to his new charges Lopez-Almonte also had warrants for his arrest for Assault IV Domestic, DUII and Alien Unlawfully Present Due to Order of Removal from USA, Lopez-Almonte was arrested at his Salem home without incident. Please watch our web page for the booking image of Lopez-Almonte it will be available once he has been booked at the Marion County Jail.




On July 24th at 7:00 p.m., deputies with the Marion County Sheriff's Office were called to the 100 block of Lancaster Drive SE in Salem. A witness reported to deputies that a male and female were in a physical argument and the male was chocking the female.

Deputies arrived in the area within 7 minutes of the call and could not locate the couple or their vehicle. Although they could not locate the vehicle deputies continued with their investigation attempting to retrieve video images from a local business.

On August 18th deputies obtained the video which clearly showed an older, white, Ford Expedition being driven by a male. The male exits the vehicle and forces a female back inside after she attempts to run away. Deputies believe the male and female are possibly Hispanic and may live in south east Salem. Deputies are seeking any information on the location of the vehicle or the identity of its occupants.

If you have any information regarding the vehicle or its occupants please call Sergeant Don Parise at 503-932-8483, you may remain anonymous.

The video can be viewed and obtained by following this link; https://youtu.be/EY-V4BVDOJs
Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Update: August 21
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/21/16 10:00 AM
Fires on ODF-Protected Lands
The weather service issued a red flag warning effective through today.


NEW

None.

UPDATE

Withers Fire
The 3,424-acre Withers Fire one mile north of Paisley is 65 percent contained. An arsonist started the fire. Officials are conducting a criminal investigation. Anyone with information is asked to call 541-947-2504. Evacuation notices in effect. For more information go to https://www.facebook.com/scofmpfireinfo.

Fires on Other Jurisdictions

For more info on these fires visit the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center at http://gacc.nifc.gov/nwcc/.

NEW

None.

UPDATES

Rail Fire
The 29,097-acre Rail Fire burning 5 miles west of Unity is 30 percent contained.

Sheridan Fire
The 191-acre Sheridan Fire burning 13 miles north of La Pine is 60 percent contained. Evacuation notices lifted.

Rim Reservoir Fire
The 669-acre Rim Reservoir Fire burning 23 miles east of Burns Junction is 80 percent contained. This is the last report, unless significant activity occurs.

Fire Statistics

Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. When fire activity increases, the latest information might not be included in the statistics.

January 1, 2016, through yesterday:
Lightning-caused fires: 61 fires burned 2,338 acres
Human-caused fires: 486 fires burned 1,964 acres
Total: 547 fires burned 4,302 acres

10-year average (for this period of the year):
Lightning-caused fires: 256 fires burned 28,234 acres
Human-caused fires: 449 fires burned 4,393 acres
Total: 705 fires burned 32,627 acres

For info on breaking fires, go to the department's wildfire blog.
Deputies Seeking Help In Locating Hit and Run Driver
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/21/16 8:22 AM
Early this morning around 1:00 a.m., a motorcyclists was traveling north on Lancaster Drive NE near the intersection of Devonshire Avenue NE in Salem. According to witnesses a newer, gray or silver Honda passenger car was traveling south on Lancaster when it turned in front of the motorcycle resulting in the two vehicles colliding.

The motorcyclists was transported from the scene to Salem Hospital with non-life threatening injuries, the driver of the Honda left the scene of the crash and fled north on Lancaster Drive. The Sheriff's Office is seeking any information regarding the vehicle and its occupants, deputies' believe the Honda sustained damage to the passenger side of the vehicle. Anyone with information is asked to call the Sheriff's Office at 503-588-5032 you can remain anonymous.
Sat. 08/20/16
Rogue River Woman Loses Life In Early Morning Crash - Jackson County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/20/16 9:46 AM
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On August 20, 2016 at about 3:30AM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel to a report of a single vehicle crash in Highway 99 near milepost 7.5 in Jackson County (near Rogue River).

Preliminary investigation revealed a 2000 Mitsubishi Montero was traveling south on Highway 99 when it partially drove off the roadway on the southbound right shoulder. The vehicle then crossed both lanes of travel, left the highway and went down a steep embankment crashing into a tree on the east side of the highway.

The driver, Barbara Jean HOLLAND-MORROW, age 52, of Rogue River, was found deceased on scene (still seat belted in the vehicle) upon emergency personnel arrival. HOLLAND-MORROW was the vehicle's only occupant.

OSP was assisted by the Rogue River Fire, American Medical Response, Jackson County Sheriff's Office and the Oregon Department of Transportation. More information will be released when it becomes available.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1002/97082/20160820_052338.jpg
Fri. 08/19/16
Red Cross Responds to Home Fire Affecting Linn County Residents
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/19/16 10:52 PM
Disaster responders with the American Red Cross Cascades Region responded to a home fire disaster on August 19, 2016 at approximately 6:00 p.m. in the 700 block of 7th Street in Harrisburg, OR. The fire affected three adults, one child, and a dog perished. The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits, health services, mental health services, and information about recovery services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross Cascades Region (Oregon and Southwest Washington) responds to an average of two home fires every day. We provide hope and comfort to people affected, helping victims anywhere and anytime. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.
3 Alarm Fire (Photo)
Jefferson Fire Dist. - 08/19/16 7:42 PM
Barbara Irish with Penelope
Barbara Irish with Penelope
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On Friday August 19, 2016 at 3:34 p.m. Jefferson Fire District was dispatched to a high risk grass fire at 2232 NE Millersburg Drive, Albany Oregon. Upon arrival Incident Commander, Jon Zeilman saw that the fire was approximately 1/2 acre and was within a few feet of a barn and a house. The fire quickly escalated to a third alarm fire. High winds blowing towards the structures made it very difficult in fighting the fire. Firefighters were unable to save the barn however they did save the house. The outside wall of the garage did receive some damage. There was also a chicken coop with two chickens. One chicken named Penelope has been located and is doing well. They are still trying to locate the other chicken. The home is owned by John and Barbara Irish. The fire quickly moved around the house and down the field until firefighters were able to stop the fire. It appears that the fire started from a spark near the railroad tracks. Albany, Tangent, Scio, and Turner were also dispatched to assist with the call.

The fire was deemed under control at 5:19 p.m. Crews continue to mop up for several hours after. There were no injuries to firefighters.


Attached Media Files: Barbara Irish with Penelope , 2016-08/1180/97076/IMG_5208.JPG
Grove of the States to be restored in time for 50th birthday (Photo)
Oregon Travel Experience - 08/19/16 4:56 PM
Grove of the States Sponsorships Available
Grove of the States Sponsorships Available
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Oregon Travel Experience is pleased to announce the initial phase of the Grove of the States Restoration Project will begin on Monday, August 22, 2016, at the southbound French Prairie Rest Area (I-5 Milepost 281, south of Wilsonville). French Prairie is Oregon's busiest rest area, with approximately 2 million travelers a year stopping on each side.

The Grove of the States is believed to be the oldest arboretum of state trees in the US and was originally a collection of trees from 53 US states and territories. The Grove was conceived and implemented by former Oregon Attorney General Robert Thornton in the mid-1960s as a way to honor Lady Bird Johnson's Highway Beautification Act.

"Friends of Trees is truly excited to be part of this tree-themed educational project, as well as to contribute to this unique bit of Oregon history," said Kris Hikari, regional program manager at Friends of Trees. "I mean, how neat will it be to stretch your legs by strolling through a forest of trees from every state?" she added.

As the Grove nears its 50th birthday next summer, project partners agree that a full restoration is needed to ensure this unique historical resource is retained for future generations.

Restoration project partners---Friends of Trees and the Oregon Department of Forestry---are sourcing new and replacement trees that will be planted in early 2017. The Grove will be re-dedicated for its 50th anniversary in August 2017.

"Unfortunately, the original planting-plan did not allow adequate space for the state trees to reach maturity," said Paul Ries, an urban forester with the Oregon Department of Forestry.

"As a result of their canopies being suppressed by adjacent Douglas-fir trees, many of the original state trees have died or are in extremely poor health and will not survive without additional room to grow," Ries added.

The restoration effort will correct the spacing between specimens, replace lost or dying trees, expand the arboretum footprint, construct new walking paths, and install Grove of the States interpretive signs within the rest area. New individual tree signs also will be installed.

Due to the initial phase of contractor work on the Grove, southbound French Prairie Rest Area may experience intermittent closures or partial lane closures (along the rest area ramp) during the day from August 22 - 26.

Approximately 40 Douglas-fir trees of the more than 900 in this part of the rest area will be removed; several for public safety reasons (trees deemed hazardous) others thinned to promote overall tree health and the Grove's survival.

Sponsorships and in-kind contributions will help to pay for this project. Corporate, small business, non-profit and individual tree sponsors will be recognized on Grove signage, promotional materials and on the Travel Information Council website.

For more information about the Grove of the States, the full media packet, sponsorship package, and our one page fact sheet, connect to the OTE website homepage at www.ortravelexperience.com, and the Grove of the States Restoration page. Materials and images are available to the press by email request to admin@oregonte.com.

<<>> About OTE

The Oregon Travel Information Council (doing business as Oregon Travel Experience) is a semi-independent state agency. Our mission is to create a great visitor experience by providing direction to destinations, connecting travelers with Oregon resources, and ensuring safe and convenient travel. We collaborate with local communities to showcase Oregon's history through the official Oregon Heritage Tree and Historical Marker Programs. We manage 29 rest areas at 17 locations across the state--and issue permits for our state's highway business signs and travel information kiosks.


Attached Media Files: Grove of the States Sponsorships Available , Oregon's Grove of the States
Red Cross Responds to Home Fire Affecting Four People in Washington County
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/19/16 3:03 PM
Disaster responders with the American Red Cross Cascades Region responded to a home fire disaster on August 19, 2016, at approximately 11 a.m. in the 12000 block of SW Canvasback Way in Beaverton, Oregon. The fire affected a single family, including two adults and two children. The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross Cascades Region (Oregon and Southwest Washington) responds to an average of two home fires every day. We provide hope and comfort to people affected, helping victims anywhere and anytime. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.
Linn County Deputy District Attorney Receives Award - Wildlife Prosecutor Of The Year (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/19/16 2:13 PM
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On August 18, 2016, Linn County Deputy District Attorney Keith Stein was presented the 2015 Wildlife Prosecutor of the Year Award at the Oregon District Attorney's Association summer conference. DDA Stein received the award in front of hundreds of his peers and colleagues.

The 2015 Wildlife Prosecutor of the Year Award was presented by Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division Captain Jeff Samuels and Lieutenant Casey Thomas, along with Steve Marx, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) West Region Manager, on behalf of the Oregon Sportsmen's Coalition.

One example of a successful prosecution by DDA Stein:
A Sweet Home resident was recently sentenced in Linn County Circuit Court. The sentencing was stemming from a 2014 investigation involving Fish and Wildlife Troopers and an OSP aircraft. Late at night in October of 2014, the Aircraft Sergeant located a vehicle south of Sweet Home actively casting a spotlight from a motor vehicle and notified responding ground Troopers of its location and direction of travel. A trooper responded to the location to discover the suspect had fled the vehicle and was hiding in the thick forest. The suspect ultimately obeyed commands and revealed himself and his juvenile son. The suspect had concealed a rifle and spotlight in the nearby brush which troopers later located. The suspect was charged with Felon in Possession of a Firearm and Hunt with Aid of Artificial Light, and was ultimately convicted on both counts. Below is the sentence the suspect received:
1 month and 2 days in the county jail
13 months in prison
Hunting privileges permanently revoked
Fined $400.00
When released, will have 24 months of Post-Prison Supervision
Rifle and spotlight seized as evidence was forfeited

In a nomination letter, an OSP Fish and Wildlife Trooper wrote: "DDA Stein is clearly an outstanding professional, mentor, and colleague, but I believe he should be viewed first as an outstanding prosecutor with respect to fish and wildlife laws. In many ways exceeding the challenging requirements and expectations for the award, DDA Stein's ambitions, intelligence and accomplishments complement precisely the stellar community of past recipients and make him highly deserving of the honor bestowed of this award... DDA Stein welcomes the diverse issues fish and wildlife offenses create with charging, forensics, ... he appreciates the challenges fish and wildlife cases present, and understands the importance and value of each case. DDA Stein has been the leader of the Linn County District Attorney's Office for prosecuting high-profile wildlife cases for approximately a decade."

ODFW West Region Manager Steve Marx said "ODFW commends DDA Stein for his commitment to prosecuting fish and wildlife cases. Effective enforcement of wildlife laws is a critical component to protecting population health and species conservation needs, and supporting wildlife associated recreation and quality outdoor experiences."

The Oregon Sportsmen's Coalition, which consists of volunteer outdoor enthusiast organizations opposed to the unlawful and unethical taking of wildlife to include the Oregon Hunters Association, sponsored the award. This is the ninth annual presentation of the Wildlife Prosecutor of the Year Award.

Pictured (left to right): ODFW West Region Manager Steve Marx, OSP Captain Jeff Samuels, DDA Keith Stein, Lieutenant Casey Thomas


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1002/97060/DDA_Stein.jpg
ADVISORY: State education and health officials to present webinar August 24 on new rules to support healthy school environments
Oregon Health Authority - 08/19/16 1:21 PM
August 19, 2016

Oregon state education leaders have adopted new rules for lead test planning in schools. Tune in to a live webinar to learn how these steps help Oregon students and families, and what state agencies are doing by joining us online at noon, August 24 at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F9bBd0vmQHU. The Oregon Health Authority will co-host with the Oregon Department of Education. The webinar will be available live and posted to the new OHA Healthy Schools website at http://www.healthoregon.org/healthyschools following the live presentation.

What: The Healthy School Facilities webinar presentation will recap what has happened to date to support healthy school facilities; clarify what the new rules mean; and outline next steps as the new school year begins. Questions related to school testing and new education rules can be emailed to HealthySchool.Facilities@state.or.us, and will be answered in the order they're received during the webinar.

When: Noon, August 24. Tune in live at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F9bBd0vmQHU

Who: The webinar is open to everyone, and aims to support school administrators, principals, staff, parents and families and others interested in learning more about state solutions.

More information:
-- Oregon Department of Education rule adoption page: http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/page/?id=5565

-- OHA website for lead exposure and testing: https://public.health.oregon.gov/HealthyEnvironments/HealthyNeighborhoods/LeadPoisoning/Pages/index.aspx

-- OHA website for radon testing in schools: http://public.health.oregon.gov/HealthyEnvironments/HealthyNeighborhoods/RadonGas/Pages/index.aspx

-- Information on statewide plan for reducing student exposure to lead in drinking water: https://public.health.oregon.gov/HealthyEnvironments/HealthyNeighborhoods/LeadPoisoning/ChildCareSchools/Documents/schools-lead-in-drinking-water.pdf

# # #
Traffic Safety Campaign
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/19/16 1:01 PM
The Douglas County Sheriff's Office is partnering with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) as well as other State Law Enforcement agencies across the state, from August 22 thru September 4, 2016 for the national "click it or ticket" campaign. This enforcement period comes ahead of the Labor Day holiday, the last major holiday of the summer.

Deputies will be working special overtime, federally funded, and administered by the Oregon Department of Transportation. Deputies will be focusing on enforcing various traffic violations that will include, but are not limited to: seatbelt use in motor vehicles, violating the "hands-free" cellphone law, texting, and speed.

According to the US Department of Transpiration, consistent safety belt use is the single most effective way to protect people and reduce fatalities in motor vehicle crashes. In 2014, nearly half of the 21,022 passenger vehicle occupants killed in crashes was unrestrained, according to NHTSA. During the nighttime hours of 6 pm to 05:59 am., that number increased to 57 percent of those killed.

Oregon law requires belts be used and maintained in working order. A child weighing less than 40 pounds must be restrained in a child safety seat. A child under one year of age or weighing less than twenty pounds must be restrained in a rear-facing child seat. A child over forty pounds, but under age eight, or less that 4'9" tall must be restrained in a booster seat that elevates them so the lap/shoulder belts fit correctly. For help with child safety seats, refer to the seat manufacturer's instructions, vehicle owner's manual or call ACTS Oregon Child Safety Seat Resource Center at 1-800-772-1315.

You can find out more about the Click It or Ticket campaign at www.nhtsa.gov/.

###
Board of Forestry to interview candidates for State Forester position Aug. 24 in Salem
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/19/16 12:01 PM
The Oregon Board of Forestry will meet in executive session Wednesday, Aug. 24, to interview candidates seeking the position of State Forester, which heads the Department of Forestry. In May, Doug Decker, the current State Forester, announced his plan to retire in October at the end of this fire season.

Under the Oregon Revised Statutes - ORS 192.660(2)(a) and 192.660(7) - the executive session will be closed to the public. No decision will be made, and a second set of interviews for the finalists is planned for Sept. 7, also in executive session.

The executive session will run from noon to 4:30 p.m. at ODF headquarters, the Clatsop Room, Building C, 2600 State St., in Salem.
Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Advisory Executive Committee will meet Wednesday, August 24 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/19/16 11:58 AM
The Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Advisory Executive Committee will meet Wednesday, August 24, 2016 from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. at the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, Room 165, 500 Summer St. NE, Salem. The meeting is open to the public.

The agenda includes: committee business; co-chair election; update on the interpreter Request for Proposals; deaf culture training; and new partnerships.

People also can call into the meeting: 1-888-808-6929; participant code: 4517555.

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Kelsey Gleeson at 503-947-5104 or Kelsey.Gleeson@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the event.

For questions about the meeting, please contact: Theresa Powell, policy analyst, at Theresa.A.Powell@state.or.us
# # #
Beat the heat and prevent wildfires this weekend (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 08/19/16 11:40 AM
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As the ongoing heat event continues through this weekend, the Oregon Office of Emergency Management (OEM) is reminding the public that heat-related illness is a serious threat, especially for elderly, youth, and those without air conditioning in addition to those working or exercising outdoors.

Furthermore, fires have the potential to rapidly spread due to the combination of hot, dry and windy conditions. The National Weather Service predicts that east winds will increase today particularly through the Western Columbia River Gorge, north Willamette Valley and Clark County, and Coast Range of Northwest Oregon.

"According to the National Weather Service heat is one of the leading weather related killers in the United States, resulting in hundreds of fatalities each year and even more heat related injuries, so we want people stay safe by being aware of conditions and surroundings" said Andrew Phelps, OEM director. "It is very important to check on neighbors and family members who may be susceptible to problems with extreme heat, and make sure outdoor pets have plenty of water and shade."

Here are some helpful tips for heat safety and to prevent wildfires:
Heat Safety: http://www.nws.noaa.gov/os/heat/
Wildfires: https://www.ready.gov/wildfires



PHOTO CAPTIONS:
20160819_PublicRAPTORWatchesWarnings
The Real Time Assessment Planning to for Oregon (RAPTOR) displays the current weather watches and warnings and active fires.

20160819_PublicRAPTOROverview
The Real Time Assessment Planning to for Oregon (RAPTOR) displays details for the excessive heat warning in effect for the Willamette Valley.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/3986/97055/5015865_OEM_Logo_Design_2014-COLOR.jpg , 2016-08/3986/97055/20160819_PublicRAPTOROverview.JPG , 2016-08/3986/97055/20160819_PublicRAPTORWatchesWarnings.JPG
Sex Crime
Lebanon Police Dept. - 08/19/16 11:27 AM
Nature of Crime or Event: Sex Crime
Date / Time Occurred: August 18, 2016 / 1545 hours
Occurred Location: 300 Block of Tangent Street, Lebanon, Oregon

After an ongoing investigation, Lebanon Police Department detectives arrested Cameron Charles Rhamy (D.O.B. 09/30/97), 18 years of age, who is a registered sex offender. Rhamy was arrested and lodged in the Linn County jail for one count of Sodomy in the first degree and one count of Sex Abuse in the first degree, after allegations by the victim of inappropriate contact. The victim, who was related to Rhamy by marriage, is a minor and will not be identified. Although Rhamy was a Lebanon resident, he did not have a lengthy history with the Lebanon Police Department. Rhamy was arrested in Albany.

This investigation is continuing and anyone with additional information is asked to contact Detective Ryan Padua at 541-258-4325.
Counterfeit Bill Investigation - Arrests Made (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/19/16 11:06 AM
Claughton, R
Claughton, R
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Since late July of 2016, the Douglas County Sheriff's Office had been receiving information of counterfeit $100.00 dollars being passed in various locations in Douglas County.

The Sheriff's Office Detectives Division began an investigation into the information, and during the investigation developed information that 36 year old Corey R. Roland of Glide, along with others, was involved in the production and passing of the bills.

On 08-15-16, the Sheriff's Office served a search warrant at Corey Roland's residence, located in the 200 Block of Estella, Glide. Contacted at the residence at the time the warrant was served was; Corey Roland, 27 year old Cory L. Williams of Idleyld Park, and 25 year old Rochelle M. Claughton of Glide. Also at the residence was a child under the age of five.

Sheriff's Detectives located and seized numerous items from the residence which related to the investigation. Also seized were narcotics.

All three subjects were arrested and lodged at the Douglas County Jail. The child at the residence was taken into protective custody from the scene by Department of Human Services.

Charges include:

Roland -- Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine, Endangering Welfare of a Minor, Forgery I, Criminal Possession of a Forged Instrument I, Theft II and DWS -- Felony.

Williams -- Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine

Claughton -- Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine, Endangering Welfare of a Minor.

The Sheriff's Office Detectives are in contact with the United States Secret Service, and more arrests from the investigation are expected.


Attached Media Files: Claughton, R , Willams, C , Roland, C
Health advisory issued August 19 for Agency Lake
Oregon Health Authority - 08/19/16 10:45 AM
August 19, 2016

High blue-green algae and toxin levels found in Klamath County lake

A health advisory was issued today for Agency Lake. Agency Lake is located just north of Upper Klamath Lake near Klamath Falls along Highway 97 in Klamath County.

Water monitoring on the lake has confirmed the presence of high levels of blue-green algae and associated toxins that can be harmful to people and animals.

Swallowing water while swimming or inhaling water droplets as a result of high-speed water activities, such as water skiing and power boating, should be avoided in areas where blooms are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, contact with cells from a bloom can cause skin irritation and a red, puffy rash in individuals with skin sensitivities, or those who develop rashes easily.

Drinking water directly from Agency Lake is especially dangerous at this time. Oregon Public Health officials advise campers and other recreational visitors that toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating the water with camping-style filters.

Oregon health officials recommend that people who choose to eat fish from waters where algae blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, because toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water. Public health officials also advise people to not eat freshwater clams or mussels from any freshwater source affected by a bloom and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations do not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

Exposure to toxins in some cases can produce symptoms very similar to food poisoning such as weakness, cramps, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and fainting. If these symptoms persist or worsen you should seek medical attention. Other toxins can produce numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems, and require immediate medical attention for you or your pet. There is no antidote for these toxins but supportive care can treat symptoms and other concerns.

Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to areas where blooms are identified should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in the water.

The public will be advised when the concern no longer exists.

With proper precautions to avoid water contact, people are encouraged to visit Agency Lake and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

For health information or to report an illness in people or pets, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0400.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website. To find out if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://www.healthoregon.org/hab and select "algae bloom advisories," or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767.

# # #
Health advisory issued August 19 for Willamette River's Ross Island Lagoon
Oregon Health Authority - 08/19/16 10:09 AM
August 19, 2016

A health advisory is being issued today for the Ross Island Lagoon and the mouth of the lagoon as it connects to the Holgate Channel. Ross Island Lagoon is located about one river mile south of downtown Portland in Multnomah County.

The advisory is being issued due to visual confirmation of a blue-green algae bloom in the lagoon. Water monitoring has been completed to confirm the type of blue-green algae present, and the level of any potential toxins that may be produced; however, shipping and analysis of the sample will take time. It is expected that data from the analysis of the bloom sample will be available by the middle of next week. At that time, depending upon the level of toxins found in the sample, Oregon Public Health officials will determine if the advisory can be lifted, or if it will continue in place until the bloom is gone.

Because sample analysis is needed to determine if a bloom is producing toxins, and because of the extreme heat predicted over the weekend and through next week, Oregon Public Health officials believe in order to protect the public health, that an advisory based on visual observation and extent of the bloom is warranted until data is available. This is because if toxins are being produced by the bloom, they can be potentially harmful to people, and even at low levels can be very harmful to pets.

Although the advisory is confined at this time to the Ross Island Lagoon and its mouth, the lagoon is influenced by the dynamics of the river which can cause bloom creep as the water in the lagoon rises and recedes. Always be aware that blooms can develop on any waterbody under the right environmental conditions. The Willamette is a big river and blooms can develop in areas along its course where low flow and slow moving water can be found.

If you see areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish-red, follow the motto "When in doubt, stay out."

Oregon Public Health officials advise people to avoid swallowing or inhaling water droplets as a result of swimming or high-speed water activities, such as water skiing and power boating in areas where blooms are identified.

Drinking water directly from the river where a bloom is identified is especially dangerous since any toxins produced cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating the water with camping-style filters. People who may draw water directly out of this area for drinking or cooking are advised to use an alternative water source. No public drinking or potable water systems are affected.

Oregon health officials recommend that people who choose to eat fish from waters where algae blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, because toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water. Public health officials also advise people to not eat freshwater clams or mussels from any freshwater source affected by a bloom and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations do not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

Exposure to toxins in some cases can produce symptoms very similar to food poisoning such as weakness, cramps, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and fainting. If these symptoms persist or worsen you should seek medical attention. Other toxins can produce numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems, and require immediate medical attention for you or your pet. There is no antidote for these toxins but supportive care can treat symptoms and other concerns.

Contact with cells from a bloom can cause skin irritation and a red, puffy rash in individuals with skin sensitivities or those who develop rashes easily.

Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to areas where blooms are identified should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in the water.

People may still visit the lagoon and enjoy activities allowed in the area such as bird watching and boating at low speeds. However, in all areas where a bloom has been identified or an advisory is in place, people should avoid any activities that might expose them to ingestion and inhalation.

For more information, or to report a human or pet illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0400.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website. To find out if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://www.healthoregon.org/hab and select "algae bloom advisories," or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767.

# # #
National Aviation Day, Friday, August 19, 2016 (Photo)
Oregon Civil Air Patrol - 08/19/16 9:43 AM
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On National Aviation Day, August 19, the nation celebrates the anniversary of the birthday of Orville Wright.

Starting this Friday, NASA invites you to join the celebration of flight and everything it makes possible by taking our Orville flying squirrel along with you and posting a picture with the hashtag #WhereIsOrville.
Our heritage in aviation research goes back more than 100 years. We've helped air travel become a safe, reliable form of transportation. But we're not finished. We're working to transform aviation into something even better by perfecting new technologies, including those that could lead to shape-shifting wings, electric propulsion and the return of commercial supersonic flight.
Every U.S. commercial aircraft and every U.S. air traffic control tower has NASA-developed technology on board.
NASA is with you when you fly!
Where Is Orville?
It's National Aviation Day on August 19. Use social media to tell us where your Orville is on the day we celebrate flight.
Print me!
Write in your location, take a photo and post starting August 19.
Take a selfie with Orville, or a regular photo of him in your location. Be sure to write in where you are.
1. Download and Print Your Orville
Follow this link to download your Orville: (http://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/thumbnails/image/orville_selfie_sign_final.jpg)
Print him out. We recommend printing a few copies so that you can post pictures from several different locations if you want!
Use the entire sheet in your photo, or, cut along the dotted line to release Orville from the page.
2. Starting Friday, August 19, take photos.
Are you going to be at an airport? Are you already on vacation at a place that you reached by air? Do you work in the aviation community -- at a company, organization or agency that has something to do with flight? Are you at school for aeronautics or aerospace? Are you a pilot or member of a flight crew? Do you work at an airport?
On the "@" line, write where you are and then take a selfie or regular photo while holding your Orville.
3. Post, and be sure to tag your posts with #WhereIsOrville.
4. Watch NASA Aeronautics social media accounts to see if we like your post.
Twitter: @NASAAero
Facebook: like us at "NASA Aeronautics"
Sondra Geddes
Education Specialist, AERO Institute
NASA Armstrong Educator Resource Center
38256 N. Sierra Highway, Suite A
Palmdale, CA 93550
(661) 276-2359 (Office)
(661) 276-5522 (ERC)
(661) 265-9548 (Fax)
sondra.l.geddes@nasa.gov
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Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1184/97046/75_anniversary_logo.jpg
County Trust Land Advisory group to meet Aug. 26 at Forestry Department in Salem
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/19/16 9:03 AM
The Forest Trust Land Advisory committee will meet Aug. 26 from 9:30 a.m. to noon at the Oregon Department of Forestry's Headquarters, Tillamook Room, Building D, 2600 State St., Salem. Items on the agenda include an update on the Trask River watershed study and briefings from Department of Forestry districts on state forest efforts, such as forest management and recreation, throughout Oregon.

The Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee is comprised of seven county commissioners representing 15 Oregon counties where state forestlands are located. The FTLAC is a statutorily established committee that advises the Board of Forestry on matters related to forestland managed by ODF.

An opportunity for public comment will be provided and recorded audio will be available following the meeting. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations for the meeting can be directed to the Oregon Department of Forestry at 503-945-7248.

Find the meeting agenda and learn more about the FTLAC here.

More background on state forest management and county relationships is outlined in Council of Forest Trust Lands Counties annual report here.
Thu. 08/18/16
Corps seeks comments on permit application for work in Benton County
US Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District - 08/18/16 2:49 PM
US Army Corps of Engineers
Portland District

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is accepting comments on a permit application from Kent Aldrich for a proposed project in Benton County, Oregon.

Public notice NWP-2014-307-1 is available at http://www.nwp.usace.army.mil/Missions/Regulatory/PublicNotices.aspx.
NOAA Grant Helps Remove Sunken F/V Western from Coos Bay (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 08/18/16 2:43 PM
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The Oregon State Marine Board was recently awarded a $55,000 NOAA Marine Debris Removal grant to assist with the removal of the F/V Western from Coos Bay. The Western is a 69.9 foot long, 78 gross ton, wood-hulled fishing vessel that was built in 1934. In January 2015, after breaking free from her mooring from the dock and from anchor several times, the Western ultimately sank near a row of pilings near the Empire Boat Ramp, in water deep enough for complete submersion. The vessel was deemed a priority to remove by several agencies and community groups because its large, near a busy navigation channel, and sunk in a sensitive fish and invertebrate habitat. However, adequate funding was not available for the approximately $95,000 cost of removal and disposal.

The project, titled, "A partnership for the removal and prevention of abandoned and derelict fishing vessels along the Oregon Coast", includes $17,500 matching cash from the Marine Board and $22,500 from the Department of State Lands as well as in-kind services from Oregon SeaGrant, South Slough NERR, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Department of Environmental Quality, and staff from the coastal public ports and marinas. The Marine Board will contract with a salvage company for removal of the F/V Western from the water and dispose of the vessel through approved methods on land. The work will begin in October, 2016.

The grant also stipulates that in addition to removal of the Western, the Marine Board initiate and lead an Abandoned and Derelict Vessel Task Force with participation from Oregon coastal ports, law enforcement, commercial vessel owners, and other stakeholders to strategize and implement actions that will help prevent future abandoned and derelict vessels along the coast. A majority of coastal ports struggle with commercial fishing vessels that are no longer in use and have not been maintained for seaworthiness, left abandoned or in derelict condition. A goal of this task force will be developing an inventory of abandoned and derelict commercial vessels along the Oregon coast and develop plans and prioritize actions for future removal efforts.

The NOAA Marine Debris Program's "Community-based Marine Debris Removal" federal funding program provides funding to support locally-driven, marine debris assessment and removal projects that benefit coastal habitat, waterways, and NOAA trust resources. Projects awarded through this grant competition implement on-the-ground marine debris removal activities, with priority for those targeting medium- to large-scale debris, including derelict fishing gear and abandoned and derelict vessels.
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Attached Media Files: 2016-08/4139/97029/FV_Western_Oct_5_2014.JPG
Explosive Device Found in Lyons
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 08/18/16 2:38 PM
Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley reports his office received a report of an explosive device on August 17, 2016 from City of Lyons Public Works employee Richard Birky. Richard reported he found a homemade explosive device the day before in the roadway near the Lyons Library located at 279 8th Street. Richard stored the device in his vehicle and met with a deputy today to turn it over to law enforcement.

Deputies immediately placed the device on the ground, cleared a safe area and notified the Oregon State Police Bomb Squad for assistance, where they rendered the device safe for disposal. State Police Bomb Technician Sgt. Kevin Del Grande advised that this homemade explosive device was capable of taking off a hand if it would have detonated while someone was holding it. The device was about two inches in length, wrapped in tape and had a fuse.

Sheriff Riley asks anyone that comes across any suspicious looking device to not touch it, clear a safe area around the device and immediately report it to local law enforcement.

No suspect(s) have been identified at this point. The investigation is continuing. Anyone with information that may help with identifying the involved individuals please, contact Deputy Russell Williams at the Linn County Sheriff's Office (541) 967-3950.
Corps seeks comments on permit application impacting wetlands in Polk, Marion, Linn and Benton counties
US Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District - 08/18/16 2:10 PM
US Army Corps of Engineers
Portland District

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is accepting comments on a permit application from Bonneville Power Administration for a proposed project in Polk, Marion, Linn and Benton counties in Oregon.

Public notice NWP-2016-57 is available at http://www.nwp.usace.army.mil/Missions/Regulatory/PublicNotices.aspx.
State fire marshal urges vigilance and extreme care against wildfires
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/18/16 1:38 PM
With Oregon's hottest temperatures and driest conditions occurring throughout the next few days, Oregon State Fire Marshal Jim Walker is urging all residents to take the utmost care and thorough caution to prevent wildfires.

"A majority of this year's wildfires have been human caused," says State Fire Marshal Jim Walker. "This demonstrates that all of us need to take responsibility for protecting ourselves and our neighbors by preventing wildfires in these extreme conditions."

The Oregon Department of Forestry has reported that since January 1, 2016, there have been 466 wildfires caused by humans. And due to the extreme temperatures, much of Oregon is under a burn ban.

Currently, Oregon has several active wildfires that have put people and homes at risk, and a number of families have received evacuation warnings.

"Our office is in constant communication with the Oregon Department of Forestry and our other wildland partners to assist with firefighting efforts if called upon, said Walker.
BLM, USGS Publish Data and Visualization Site for Sagebrush Geospatial Data
Bureau of Land Management Oregon & Washington - 08/18/16 1:32 PM
The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have published a hub to enable easy visualization and access to geospatial data about the west's "sagebrush sea." This will help guide sagebrush conservation efforts during the 2016 fire season and beyond.

"We have the benefit of a tremendous amount of scientific information to help us conserve the sagebrush ecosystem that hasn't always been organized in a way that makes it easy to find." said Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Land and Minerals Management Janice Schneider. "This hub provides a simple way to reach the most definitive information from the USGS, the BLM, the Natural Resources Conservation Service and the Fish and Wildlife Service, all in one place. It will provide the many groups working to conserve the sagebrush sea and Greater Sage-Grouse with a shared understanding of this landscape to help facilitate coordination in setting priorities for conservation and fire prevention at all levels."

The sagebrush geospatial framework includes a catalog of geospatial data for the entire sagebrush ecosystem, as well as a series of visualization tools. The hub allows users to view or create printable maps, download Geographic Information System (GIS) data, and compare local data sets with larger regional data sets. The wildland fire community can, for example, use the free online tools to help select areas for preventative actions that will reduce the potential for future fires in sagebrush habitat.

The new common access point for this sagebrush data is the Secretarial Order 3336 tab at https: //www.landscape.blm.gov/geoportal. Additional entries to the data catalog and analysis and decision support tools will be added to the framework as they become available.

"Geospatial data is critical for understanding how local conditions fit into the overall landscape." said Steve Hanser, USGS Sage-Grouse Specialist. "The data access, visualization, and decision support tools developed through this effort will help provide a landscape-scale understanding and context for decision makers, which are important when dealing with the vast area of the sagebrush biome."

This geospatial framework is a component of the comprehensive, science-based strategy announced by Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell in January 2015 to address the more frequent and intense wildfires that are damaging vital sagebrush landscapes and productive rangelands in the Great Basin. The goals of this strategy include reducing the size, severity and cost of rangeland fires, addressing the spread of cheatgrass and other invasive species, and positioning wildland fire management resources for more effective rangeland fire response.

Schneider noted that the hub will provide access to the data used to develop the Conservation and Restoration Strategy, another element of the Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy called for by Secretary Jewell in 2015. This strategy is intended to inform a multi-year plan for conservation and restoration actions across the sagebrush ecosystem.

The accelerated invasion of non-native grasses and the spread of pinyon-juniper, along with drought and the effects of climate change, increased the threat of rangeland fires to the sagebrush landscape and the more than 350 species of plants and animals, such as Greater Sage-Grouse, mule deer and pronghorn antelope, which rely on this critically important ecosystem. The increasing frequency and intensity of rangeland fire in sagebrush ecosystems has significantly damaged the landscape on which ranchers, livestock managers, hunters and outdoor recreation enthusiasts rely. This unnatural fire cycle puts at risk their economic contributions across this landscape that support and maintain the Western way of life in America.


The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land, the most of any Federal agency. This land, known as the National System of Public Lands, is primarily located in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The BLM's mission is to manage and conserve the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations under our mandate of multiple-use and sustained yield. In Fiscal Year 2014, the BLM generated $5.2 billion in receipts from public lands.

USGS provides science for a changing world. Visit USGS.gov, and follow us on Twitter @USGS and our other social media channels. Subscribe to our news releases via e-mail, RSS or Twitter.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/5514/97025/Geospatial_Data_PR_8-17-2016.pdf
Explore Oregon's rich mining history with new online collections
Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries - 08/18/16 11:23 AM
New online collections of Oregon mining records are opening up the state's rich history.

The records span decades, from the gold rush of the mid-1800s to modern-day aggregate mining operations. The new collections include Baker County Mining Claim Records, mining records held by the Josephine County, Gold Hill, and Woodville historical societies, and a Mining Permit Viewer.

Putting the documents online is part of an ongoing effort by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) to increase access to the Agency's scientific publications, records and historic collections, says Ali Ryan Hansen, DOGAMI communications director. The project was funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services through the Library Services and Technology Act, administered by the Oregon State Library.

"So many people will find these mining records interesting and useful," Hansen says. "And now, those historians and genealogists and gold panners and mine operators can look through these books and files wherever they happen to be, instead of travelling to where paper copies are held."

Creating digital copies also preserves irreplaceable information. A flood at the Baker County Courthouse in 2010 put mining claim record books--as well as other priceless historic real estate, tax, and court records--in peril.

Claim books were photographed page-by-page and assembled into PDFs. An 1862 book of mining laws, water rights and claims for the Pioneer District is the oldest book digitized as part of the project, and one of the oldest books of the gold rush era.

"Mining districts were kind of the first local governments in Oregon," says geologist Tom Wiley. "Their laws show us a lot about the lives and livelihoods of early Oregonians."

ABOUT THE COLLECTIONS
Baker County Mining Claim Records: Baker County's booming gold days are captured in more than 50 volumes that include records of claims bought and sold, claim locations, mining district meeting minutes and laws, claim maintenance records and more. Records span from 1862 to 1964. Find records here: bit.ly/bakerclaims

Historical Society Records: The project created online access to the mining and mineral records held by the Josephine County Historical Society, the Gold Hill Historical Society, and the Woodville Historical Society. Collections are wide-ranging, and include everything from a 1904 mining map of southern Oregon to Josephine County Sourdough Gazette mining newspapers of the 1960s. Among the holdings are maps, letters, photographs, news articles, publications and more. Find records here: bit.ly/societymining

Mining Permit Viewer: The interactive viewer offers easy access to permit files--which include site permits and inspections, maps, photos, and correspondence--for aggregate mining sites, most of which are no longer in operation. The viewer includes records for Baker, Benton, Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Coos, Crook, Curry and Deschutes counties. Some records are also available for mines in Douglas, Lincoln, Marion, Polk and Washington counties. Find the viewer here: bit.ly/MLRRviewer
Local Red Cross Sends Eight Responders to Help With California Wildfires; Others Continue to Help in Louisiana
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/18/16 11:19 AM
Eight Red Cross disaster responders from Oregon and Southwest Washington deploy to California to help people affected by massive wildfires; Eighteen others still on the ground in Louisiana helping flood relief effort.

PORTLAND, Ore., August 18, 2016 -- The American Red Cross Cascades Region (Oregon and Southwest Washington) is responding to the massive wildfires in California by deploying eight volunteers to help with relief efforts.

Responders from Nehalem, Beaverton, Portland, Keizer, Gresham and John Day, Oregon as well as Battle Ground, Washington are assisting affected communities by managing shelters, providing emergency financial assistance, health and mental health services, transportation services, and coordinating with local government entities to help deliver assistance.

Two of the responders include Cascades Region CEO, Amy Shlossman and Regional Disaster Officer, Cara Sloman.

"Communities across Louisiana and California have been devastated by fires and floods and many families have lost everything," said Amy Shlossman, CEO of the Red Cross Cascades Region. "Our ability to respond and help people when they need it most depends upon the generosity of our donors. Please help support our disaster response efforts across the country by visiting redcross.org."

THE SITUATION IN CALIFORNIA:
Explosive brush fires have ripped through more than 30,000 acres in San Bernardino County. More than 86,000 people have been forced to leave their homes. An unknown number of homes could be destroyed, and there is no containment in sight. Two Red Cross shelters provided refuge to 173 individuals affected by the Blue Cut Fire. In Lake County, three additional shelters are open to support families in need of lodging and support services. And in Kern County, the Red Cross is ready to open an evacuation center should it be needed. For all these wildfires, Red Cross shelters are providing for the immediate needs of those affected. Services include a safe and clean place to stay, food, hydration, emotional support and health services. All facilities will remain open for as long as there is a need.

THE SITUATION IN LOUISIANA:
The Red Cross continues to help thousands of people impacted by the flooding in Louisiana where the situation remains dire. On Wednesday night, more than 4,100 people were still seeking refuge in 30 Red Cross and community shelters. At the peak of the floods, more than 50 shelters provided safety for more than 10,000 people. The Red Cross and partners have served nearly 138,000 meals and snacks since the onset of the flooding. Mental health disaster workers are visiting shelters to offer comfort. Health services volunteers are helping with things like lost eyeglasses and medications. The flooding danger is not over. More rain is falling in Louisiana and flood waters are moving down-river, which could cause damage in new areas. The Red Cross is closely monitoring the situation to be ready to mount an additional response if necessary. According to meteorologists, more than 6.9 trillion gallons of rain -- enough water to fill 10.4 million Olympic pools -- deluged Louisiana this week.

HOW TO HELP:
Donations are urgently needed. To help people affected by the Louisiana Floods or the California Wildfires visit redcross.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS. These donations enable the Red Cross to prepare for, respond to and help people recover from disasters big and small.

About the American Red Cross
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org/Cascades or visit us on Twitter at @RedCrossCasc.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1190/97020/Local_Red_Cross_Sends_Eight_Responders_to_Help_with_California_Wildfires;_Others_Help_With_Louisiana_Floods_8-18.pdf
Excessive heat and Red Flag Warning call for extra precautions!
Eugene Springfield Fire Dept. - 08/18/16 9:14 AM
Fire crews are preparing for the increased risk of fire and heat related injuries and illnesses as record high temperatures are predicted in the area.

As you look for ways to beat the heat, please keep in mind:
Wear loose fitting comfortable clothes.
Stay hydrated. Drink lots of water and make sure animals have access to plenty of
water as well.
If you are headed to the river, lake or pond to cool down, be sure to wear a life
jacket!
Make sure pools have dedicated adult supervision.
Keep a close eye on children and they are more susceptible to the effects of heat.
Check in on older family, friends or neighbors.
Exercise early in day before it heats up.
Stay indoors or seek a public cooling place during the hot afternoon.

The hot, dry conditions increase the risk of fires starting. It also increases the hazards to those called upon to fight them.

Do not use any spark producing equipment. If you must mow or trim, early in the day is
best.
Be VERY careful with smoking materials! Make sure items are fully extinguished and
disposed of in noncombustible containers.
Follow ALL restrictions in recreation areas.
Do not drive or park on dry grass.
Wet down dry grass and bark areas.
Have your emergency kit ready.

Interviews on fire or heat related medical emergencies upon request
Fire danger rising to extreme: high temperatures, low humidity and gusty winds
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/18/16 8:29 AM
The heat is on! A wave of hot dry windy weather is expected to hit the region Thursday and last through Saturday. Just a single spark under these conditions could lead to a significant and costly wildfire. Fire managers are reminding the public to be extra careful with fire as they seek ways to stay cool.

"Everyone will be looking for ways to beat the heat. Remember to take extra precaution with fires or anything that could start a wildfire," said Oregon Department of Forestry Unit Forester Michael Curran.

The National Weather Service in Portland has issued a fire weather watch for high temperatures, gusty winds and low relative humidity. The fire weather watch will be in effect from late Thursday night through late Friday night.

Fire season is in effect and fire managers have raised the fire danger level to extreme. Normal summer weather has dried forests, brush and grasses. The impending heat wave poses a significant fire weather threat and any fire starts could spread rapidly. Curran says, "We don't experience extreme fire danger very often. When it's this hot and dry, we need everyone to think twice before using anything that might emit a spark."

The following activities are prohibited during extreme fire danger.

Smoking is prohibited while traveling, except in vehicles on improved roads, in boats on the water, and other designated locations.
Open fires are prohibited, including campfires, charcoal fires, cooking fires and warming fires, except at locations designated by the forester. Portable cooking stoves using liquefied or bottled fuels are allowed.
The use of powersaws is prohibited during extreme fire danger.
Cutting, grinding and welding of metal is prohibited.
The mowing of dried, cured grass is prohibited.
Motor vehicles, including motorcycles and all-terrain vehicles, are only allowed on improved roads free of flammable vegetation, except for the culture and harvest of agricultural crops.
Possession of the following firefighting equipment is required while traveling, except on state highways, county roads and driveways: one shovel and one gallon of water or one 2-?1/2 lb.or larger fire extinguisher. All-terrain vehicles and motorcycles must be equipped with one 2-?1/2 lb. or larger fire extinguisher.
Use of fireworks is prohibited.
Wed. 08/17/16
AARP Gives 'Champion of the 50+' Award to U.S. Senator Ron Wyden for Important Work on Issues Impacting Age 50+ American Families (Photo)
AARP Oregon - 08/17/16 8:11 PM
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Clackamas, OR -- Today AARP announced US Senator Ron Wyden as a recipient of the 2016 "Champion of the 50+" legislative leadership award for his significant achievements during the 114th Congress that benefit the lives of the 50+ and our families. Senator Wyden received the award for preserving financial security through passage of legislation that addressed the shortfall in the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) trust fund, ensuring that children, veterans, older workers, families and others who receive disability insurance benefits would not face a 20% cut in their benefits.

"Senator Wyden deserves this award because he worked to improve financial security for millions of American families," said AARP Oregon state president Elaine Friesen-Strang. "Passing legislation to protect benefits for disabled workers has demonstrated leadership qualities to help Americans achieve greater financial security."

AARP Oregon has 500,000 members in Oregon representing people 50+! We believe that age and experience can enhance your possibilities.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/5564/96997/FullSizeRender_(1).jpg
Red Cross Still Sheltering 7,000+ in Louisiana; Local Volunteers on Standby to Help With California Wildfires
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/17/16 6:28 PM
Louisiana hit by 6.9 trillion gallons of rain; California fires burn thousands of acres

PORTLAND, Ore., August 17, 2016 -- The American Red Cross continues to help thousands of people affected by disastrous floodwaters in Louisiana. Additionally, local volunteers are on standby to deploy to California to assist in the wildfire relief efforts there. The Red Cross is holding two volunteer training sessions tomorrow to recruit new volunteers interested in helping at local and national disaster responses.

Louisiana Floods
More than 7,000 people remained in Red Cross and community shelters Tuesday night and thousands more are without power in hot, humid conditions.
According to state officials, at least 11 people have died, and more than 30,000 have been rescued from flood waters by emergency crews--with more than 40,000 homes damaged. Relief efforts have been hampered by impassable roads and widespread power and communications outages.

The Red Cross has more than 1,000 volunteer on the ground, including 18 from Oregon and Southwest Washington. Local responders from Medford, Silverton, Florence, Salem, Portland, Lake Oswego, Wolf Creek, Eugene, Keiser, Williams, and Turner, Oregon as well as Vancouver, Washington are helping by managing shelters, providing emergency financial assistance, health and mental services, transportation services, and coordinating with local government entities to help deliver assistance.

The flood danger is not over in Louisiana. More rain is possible and flood waters are moving downriver, which could cause damage in new areas. The Red Cross is closely monitoring the situation, and will be ready to mount an additional response if necessary.

California Wildfires
Local Red Cross responders are on stand-by to help in California. On Tuesday, the Blue Cut Fire started in San Bernardino County and has burned 30,000 acres. Additionally, the Clayton Fire in Lake County has burned 4,000 acres and has destroyed more than 175 structures. An additional 380 structures are threatened.
The Red Cross continues to support communities affected by wildfires in California. More than 86,000 people have been forced to leave their homes due to wildfires. On Tuesday night, two Red Cross shelters provided safe refuge to 173 people affected by the San Bernardino County Fire. Additional shelters have been placed on standby as needs grow.


Community Invited to Learn More about Red Cross Volunteer Work; Attend Free Training
The American Red Cross is looking to recruit additional volunteers to help local and national disaster response efforts. Psychological First Aid is one of several courses Red Cross volunteers must take in order to support disaster relief efforts across the nation. The Psychological First Aid course helps others cope in the face of stressful events. For disaster survivors and workers, it involves providing a compassionate environment, assessing a person's needs and providing immediate support in stressful situations.
The Red Cross is holding two Psychological First Aid training sessions, tomorrow, Thursday August 18 in Portland and Medford, OR. Members of the community are invited to attend and learn more about volunteering with the Red Cross.

Portland Training: 5 p.m. at Red Cross Regional Headquarters - 3131 N. Vancouver Ave Portland, OR 97227.
Medford Training: 5 p.m. at the Medford Red Cross office - 60 Hawthorne Street Medford, OR 97504.

A volunteer information session and new volunteer registration will be held before both trainings (show up between 4 and 5 p.m.) and again immediately after the training for those interested in volunteering with the American Red Cross.

About the American Red Cross
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org/Cascades or visit us on Twitter at @RedCrossCasc.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1190/96992/News_Release_-_Red_Cross_Sheltering_7000+_in_Louisiana;_Local_Volunteers_on_Standby_to_Help_in_California.pdf
Deputies Investigating Fatal Traffic Crash North Marion County (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/17/16 4:44 PM
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The Sheriff's Office has completed its investigation of the crash that left one person dead and another in critical condition at OHSU. Deputies believe a semi-truck being driven by Joey McMaster, age 43, of Portland was west bound on McKay Road near Gearin Road when it collided head on with an SUV being driven by Marissa McConnell, age 43, of Newberg.

According to witness statements Ms. McConnell left her lane of travel striking the truck head on. The Sheriff's Office has not been able to determine why Ms. McConnell left her lane of travel but they have ruled out cell phone use.

McKay Road remains closed while crews remove the massive amount of wreckage and fuel spilled during the collision, it is estimated the road will reopen just after 5:30 p.m. The Sheriff's Office would like to take the time to remind drivers on our rural highways to please be attentive and use caution while traveling to your destination.




The Marion County Sheriff's Office is on scene of a two car motor vehicle crash involving a semi-truck and an SUV. The initial investigation is showing that a semi-truck hauling waste water was west bound on McKay Road NE when an east bound SUV drifted into the oncoming lane and impacted the semi-truck head on.

The driver of the semi-truck has been taken by Life Flight to OHSU with serious injuries and tragically the driver of the SUV was killed on impact. The Sheriff's Office will have the road closed for the next 4 to 6 hours while they complete their investigation. This release will be updated as details become available.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1294/96963/20160817_094630.jpg , 2016-08/1294/96963/20160817_094656.jpg , 2016-08/1294/96963/20160817_092312.jpg
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is hosting a dedication ceremony for two new survey vessels.
US Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District - 08/17/16 4:33 PM
US Army Corps of Engineers
Portland District

MEDIA ADVISORY
Not Intended for Public Release

Monday, Aug. 22, 2016
10 a.m. to noon
Chinook Landing Boat Ramp
22300 NE Marine Drive
Fairview, OR 97204

PORTLAND, Ore. - The Graham and Hopman were built in Roseburg, Oregon, by North River Boats. Their design allows for exceptional maneuverability and a stable platform to monitor channel and harbor conditions and provide high quality, precise surveys of areas that need dredging. The new survey vessels' primary mission is to measure waterway depths and pass the information to the dredge crews who maintain the region's federal navigation channels.

The Graham, based in Coos Bay, Oregon, is 27 feet long and surveys small harbors and channels on the Oregon Coast, from Tillamook to Gold Beach. The Hopman is 25 feet long and based at the U.S. Moorings in Portland, Oregon. It provides hydrosurvey data for areas along the Columbia and lower Willamette rivers.

The Portland District has worked for more than a century to keep Oregon's waterways navigable. Corps survey vessels are essential tools in accomplishing that mission.
Portland District survey boats travel from Cape Disappointment on the southern Washington coast, to the Chetco River on the southern Oregon coast and east from the Pacific Ocean up the Columbia River to McNary Dam, providing vital data to the dredge crews who maintain the state's water channels.

-- 30 --
NEWS RELEASE: Corps seeks comments on Regional General Permit
US Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District - 08/17/16 2:45 PM
US Army Corps of Engineers
Portland District

News Release

Release No. 16-029

Contact:

Jeffrey Henon
503-808-4510
Jeffrey.m.henon@usace.army.mil

For Release: Aug. 17, 2016

CORPS SEEKS COMMENTS ON REGIONAL GENERAL PERMIT

Permit would allow certain maintenance activities on the south coast of Oregon

PORTLAND, ORE. --The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is asking the public to review and comment on a proposed Regional General Permit authorizing certain maintenance activities in waters of the United States within Douglas, Coos and Curry counties. The proposed RGP would be applicable along the south coast of Oregon from the Umpqua River, in Douglas County, to the California border and within the limits of Oregon's designated coastal zone.

Regional general permits speed up the authorization of recurring activities that are similar in nature, and can include very specific conditions to ensure minimal individual and cumulative adverse impacts on the aquatic environment.

The proposed RGP contains provisions intended to protect the aquatic environment, endangered species and cultural resources. Work that would not comply with the provisions of the RGP would not be authorized by this permit. Activities that appear to comply with the RGPs provisions but would have an unacceptable adverse impact on the public interest would not be authorized by this permit. These activities may be evaluated for Department of the Army authorization by other available permit tools.

Public Notice NWP-2015-402 and the draft Regional General Permit for Maintenance Activities along the south coast of Oregon are available for review at http://www.nwp.usace.army.mil/Missions/Regulatory/Notices/Article/916314/nwp-2015-402/.

For questions or comments, call Judy Linton at 503-808-4382 or email Judy.L.Linton@usace.army.mil. Comments can also be submitted by mailing them to:

District Engineer
Portland District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Attn: Judy Linton, CENWP-OD-G
P.O. Box 2946
Portland, OR 97208-2946

Comments must be postmarked by Sept. 15, 2016, and should reference Public Notice NWP-2015-402.

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127 arts organizations receive more than $1.2 million in Operating Support Grants from the Oregon Arts Commission
Oregon Arts Commission - 08/17/16 2:32 PM
Whether designing giant sea sculptures from ocean trash or raising the bar for contemporary dance choreography, creative minds at 127 Oregon arts organizations will be empowered by $1,214,638 in fiscal year 2017 Operating Support Grants from the Oregon Arts Commission.

Ranging from $3,500 to $44,096, the grants are available to nonprofit organizations with arts at the core of their mission and budgets over $150,000.

"We often hear that these are the most important grants we award," said Arts Commission Chair Libby Unthank Tower. "They alleviate some of the economic pressure and allow Oregon arts organizations to focus on their missions."

For the first time, applications were reviewed by discipline rather than budget size. The new approach enabled panelists to focus on grants in a category where they have expertise, said Tower.

In an effort to streamline the application process, organizations also are now required to undergo full application review every other year, she said. Organizations with full review for fiscal year 2017 were in the disciplines of Media Arts, Dance, Music and Interdisciplinary. Arts Services, Literary, Theatre and Visual Arts organizations underwent interim review and will have a full review in fiscal year 2018.

Organizations with budgets under $150,000 are eligible to apply for Small Operating Grants.

Fiscal Year 2017 Operating Support Grants were awarded to:

Central Oregon
Arts Central, Arts Services, Bend: $7,287
Atelier 6000, Visual, Bend: $6,373
BendFilm, Inc., Media. Bend: $4,820
Tower Theatre Foundation, Inc, Interdisciplinary, Bend: $3,500
Sisters Folk Festival Inc., Music, Sisters: $6,792
Sisters Outdoor Quilt Show, Visual, Sisters: $3,500
Sunriver Music Festival, Music, Sunriver: $4,151
The Museum At Warm Springs, Visual, Warm Springs: $4,175

Coast
Artula Institute for Arts & the Environment, Visual, Bandon: $3,500
Astoria Music Festival, Music, Astoria: $7,380
Coos Art Museum, Visual, Coos Bay: $5,397
Lincoln City Cultural Center, Arts Services, Lincoln City: $3,500
Neskowin Coast Foundation, Interdisciplinary, Otis: $10,832
Newport Symphony Orchestra, Music, Newport: $3,848
Oregon Coast Council for the Art, Arts Services, Newport: $17,869

Eastern Oregon
Arts Council of Pendleton, Arts Services, Pendleton: $16,441
Columbia Arts, Arts Services, Hood River: $9,725
Crossroads Carnegie Art Center Inc, Arts Services, Baker City: $3,557
Crow's Shadow Institute of the Arts, Visual, Pendleton: $7,200
Eastern Oregon Regional Arts Council, Arts Services, La Grande: $3,500
Fishtrap, Inc, Literary, Enterprise: $10,451
Josephy Center for Arts & Culture, Arts Services, Joseph: $3,500
Oregon East Symphony, Music, Pendleton: $3,500
Playa, Interdisciplinary, Summer Lake: $9,118

Southern Oregon
Ashland Art Center, Arts Services, Ashland: $3,500
Chamber Music Concerts, Music, Ashland: $6,678
Oregon Shakespeare Festival, Theatre, Ashland: $44,096
Peter Britt Gardens Music & Arts Festival, Music, Medford: $5,771
Rogue Gallery & Art Center, Visual, Medford: $7,083
Rogue Valley Chorale, Music, Rogue River: $4,115
Rogue Valley Symphony Association, Music, Ashland: $3,868
Ross Ragland Theater, Theatre, Klamath Falls: $18,094
Southern Oregon Film Society, Media, Ashland: $5,391
Umpqua Valley Arts Association, Arts Services, Roseburg: $9,621
Youth Symphony of Southern Oregon, Music, Medford: $5,341

Willamette Valley
Arts & Business Alliance of Eugene, Arts Services, Eugene: $3,500
Ballet Fantastique, Dance, Eugene: $4,750
Corvallis Arts Center, Inc., Arts Services, Corvallis: $10,148
Cottage Theatre, Theatre, Cottage Grove: $4,644
Eugene Ballet Company, Dance, Eugene: $15,468
Eugene Concert Choir, Music, Eugene: $7,798
Eugene Opera, Music, Eugene: $5,689
Eugene Symphony, Music, Eugene: $25,004
Eugene-Springfield Youth Orchestras, Music, Eugene: $6,714
Hallie Ford Museum of Art, Visual, Salem: $9,405
Joint Forces Dance Company, Inc., Dance, Eugene: $7,631
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, Visual, Eugene: $10,524
Lane Arts Center, Arts Services, Eugene: $19,983
Lord Leebrick Theatre Company, Theatre, Eugene: $3,710
Oregon Bach Festival, Music, Eugene: $20,034
Oregon Mozart Players, Music, Eugene: $5,882
Oregon Symphony Association in Salem, Music, Salem: $8,096
Salem Art Association, Arts Services, Salem: $15,828
Salem Multicultural Institute, Interdisciplinary, Salem: $9,795
The John G. Shedd Institute for the Arts, Music, Eugene: $11,700
Willamette Art Center, Visual, Salem: $3,500

Portland Metro Area
All Classical Public Media, Inc, Music, Portland: $9,069
Artists Repertory Theatre, Theatre, Portland: $6,093
Bag & Baggage Productions, Theatre, Hillsboro: $6,680
BodyVox, Dance, Portland: $18,830
Broadway Rose Theatre Company, Theatre, Tigard: $10,996
Caldera, Interdisciplinary, Portland: $11,752
Cappella Romana, Music, Portland: $9,811
Chamber Music Northwest, Music, Portland: $16,837
Circus Project, Interdisciplinary, Portland: $7,083
Clackamas County Arts Alliance, Arts Services, Oregon City: $12,569
Clackamas Repertory Theatre, Theatre, Oregon City: $3,500
CoHo Productions, Theatre, Portland: $3,500
Curious Comedy Productions, Theatre, Portland: $3,500
Disjecta, Visual, Portland: $16,554
Echo Theatre Company, Theatre, Portland: $3,500
Ethos, Music, Portland: $4,644
Film Action Oregon, Media, Portland: $6,660
Friends of Chamber Music, Music, Portland: $11,069
imago Theatre, Theatre, Portland: $3,643
Independent Publishing Resource Center, Literary, Portland: $11,020
Lakewood Center for the Arts, Arts Services, Lake Oswego: $10,672
Literary Arts, Inc., Literary, Portland: $18,908
Live Wire Radio, Inc., Media, Portland: $10,223
Metropolitan Youth Symphony, Music, Portland: $9,173
Miracle Theatre Group, Theatre, Portland: $26,985
My Voice Music, Music, Portland: $6,556
Newspace Center for Photography, Visual, Portland: $8,752
Northwest Children's Theater & School, Theatre Portland: $7,664
Northwest Dance Project, Dance, Portland: $9,692
Northwest Documentary Arts & Media, Media, Portland: $6,102
Oregon Ballet Theatre, Dance, Portland: $11,725
Oregon Bravo Youth Orchestras, Music, Portland: $7,399
Oregon Center for Photographic Arts, Visual, Portland: $7,083
Oregon Children's Theatre, Theatre, Portland: $16,825
Oregon College of Art & Craft, Visual, Portland: $3,500
Oregon Repertory Singers, Music, Portland: $3,500
Oregon Symphony, Music, Portland: $29,727
Pacific Northwest College of Art, Interdisciplinary, Portland: $8,742
Pacific Youth Choir, Music, Portland: $9,785
Pendulum Aerial Arts, Dance, Portland: $3,848
PHAME, Interdisciplinary, Portland: $5,999
PlayWrite, Theatre, Portland: $10,049
Polaris Dance Theatre, Dance, Portland: $8,762
Portland Art Museum, Visual, Portland: $39,094
Portland Baroque Orchestra, Music, Portland: $13,642
Portland Center Stage, Theatre, Portland: $14,755
Portland Childrens Museum, Interdisciplinary, Portland: $12,542
Portland Gay Mens Chorus, Music, Portland: $8,071
Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, Interdisciplinary, Portland: $17,561
Portland Jazz Festival, Music, Portland: $3,500
Portland Opera Association, Inc., Music, Portland: $33,123
Portland Piano International, Music, Portland: $5,112
Portland Playhouse, Theatre, Theatre, Portland: $11,146
Portland Symphonic Choir, Music, Portland: $5,442
Portland Youth Philharmonic Association, Music, Portland: $4,730
Profile Theatre, Theatre, Portland: $4,641
Regional Arts & Culture Council, Arts Services, Portland: $29,912
Stumptown Stages, Theatre, Portland: $3,500
The Art Gym, Visual, Marylhurst: $8,606
The Old Church, Music, Portland: $7,147
The Portland Ballet, Dance, Portland: $7,773
Third Angle New Music Ensemble, Music, Portland: $5,109
Third Rail Repertory Theatre, Theatre, Portland: $12,948
triangle productions, Theatre, Portland: $9,290
Western Arts Alliance, Arts Services, Portland: $3,500
White Bird, Dance, Portland: $8,986
Write Around Portland, Literary, Portland: $14,768
Young Audiences of Oregon & SW Washington, Arts Services, Portland: $4,948
Young Musicians & Artists, Music, Portland: $7,066
Youth Music Project, Music, West Linn: $10,003
YU Contemporary, Visual, Inc, Portland: $5,465
Oregon Disabilities Commission to meet August 22 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/17/16 1:46 PM
The Oregon Disabilities Commission will meet Monday, August 22, 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, Room 137 A, 500 Summer St. NE, Salem. The meeting is open to the public.

Agenda items include: announcements; public comments; business and liaison reports; and discussion of the Governor's Commission on Senior Services and the Oregon Disabilities Commission joint meeting.

For those who can't attend in person there is a toll-free phone number: 1 888-808-6929; Participant Code: 4517555.

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Jeffrey Puterbaugh at 503-947-1189 or Jeffrey.L.Puterbaugh@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the event.
For questions about this meeting, please contact: Jeffrey Puterbaugh, 503-947-1189, Jeffrey.L.Puterbaugh@state.or.us.
State agencies to update short-term risk levels for air toxics
Oregon Health Authority - 08/17/16 12:57 PM
August 17, 2016

OHA recommends lower short-term levels for chromium in glassmaking

PORTLAND, Ore. -- State environmental quality regulators and health experts will review and update established 24-hour screening levels for air toxics as part of the state's Cleaner Air Oregon program. State agencies use the 24-hour levels to determine whether emissions from nearby sources pose an immediate health risk to people.

In advance of the full review, scientists at the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) have recommended to the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) a reduced short-term level for hexavalent chromium as part of rules governing art glass manufacturing, which DEQ will propose to the Environmental Quality Commission for adoption.

Reviewing levels for assessing immediate health risks

The process for re-evaluating the 24-hour screening levels is set to begin this month and is planned to be completed by the end of the year. The purpose of the review is to ensure Oregon has rigorously reviewed 24-hour screening levels as the state expands air monitoring near industrial sources of air toxics. In addition, DEQ and OHA scientists will consider establishing levels for toxics that may not have 24-hour levels in place now. All of the 24-hour screening levels will be rigorously reviewed by third-party, independent toxicologists and subject to public comment.

"Short-term screening levels are an important tool that help regulators and health experts know if air emissions cross a line that could put the public at risk," said OHA Director Lynne Saxton. "They give us the data we need to take immediate action if neighbors are in jeopardy."

DEQ and OHA developed current screening levels for certain metals in February to compare data on heavy metal concentrations detected by air monitors in southeast Portland, near Bullseye Glass Co., and in north Portland, near Uroboros Glass. However, these preliminary screening levels were developed rapidly and without external scientific peer review.

After several months of using the standards to assess air quality data, the agencies' toxicology experts believe some of the current 24-hour screening levels may be too conservative, such as in the case of selenium. Others--such as levels identified for hexavalent chromium--may not be conservative enough. In addition, the existing screening list also doesn't include other non-metal air toxics produced by industrial emissions around the state.

"The current 24-hour screening levels were developed in just a few days to respond to an immediate need, using the most stringent, health-protective values we could find from our peers in other states in that short time frame, in response to intense community concern about emissions from Bullseye and Uroboros," said David Farrer, Ph.D., toxicologist with the OHA Public Health Division Environmental Public Health Section. "We now have the opportunity to take the time needed to get appropriate review by external scientists and people in the community."

The current list of air toxics includes arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, total chromium, chromium +6--also known as hexavalent chromium--cobalt, lead, manganese, nickel and selenium. The new list will add acetone, hydrogen sulfide, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), naphthalene, and styrene. The agencies also have proposed a provisional 24-hour screening level for naphthalene, which will be evaluated in the new review.

Farrer said the re-evaluation of the 24-hour screening levels "is necessary to ensure these values are up to date, and reflect what existing data tell us about their effects on human health. An important part of the scientific process is to allow other scientists to check your work. We are glad that we now have the time to allow that to happen."

OHA recommends revised short-term standard for hexavalent chromium in new glass rules

OHA health experts also are recommending a more health-protective 24-hour provisional screening level for one metal: hexavalent chromium. Since the agency won't complete the 24-hour screening level review process before DEQ proposes new art glass rules to the Environmental Quality Commission, OHA scientists have submitted public comment to DEQ recommending it modify a section of the rules that revises the daily acceptable source impact level for hexavalent chromium, which was based on OHA's original 24-hour screening level, from 36 nanograms per cubic meter (ng/m3) of air to 5 ng/m3. The change would "ensure that the daily acceptable source impact level in the permanent rule is protective of health," according to the comment OHA submitted July 29.

Review process

OHA and DEQ are recommending the following timeline for reviewing the revised list of 24-hour screening levels and gathering public input:
-- Early September 2016--OHA and DEQ toxicologists review list, develop proposed revisions and recruit external scientific peer reviewers.

-- Mid-September 2016--External scientific review by EPA, academic and other toxicology peers.

-- September-October 2016--OHA and DEQ incorporate feedback from external scientific peer reviewers.

-- October-November 2016--Public comment period.

-- November 2016--OHA and DEQ incorporate and prepare responses to public comment.

-- December 2016--Revised 24-hour screening levels are released to the public.

The current comparison values for metals in air can be viewed on the OHA Public Health website at http://public.health.oregon.gov/HealthyEnvironments/TrackingAssessment/EnvironmentalHealthAssessment/Documents/metals/comparison-values-metals-in-air.pdf. The proposed peer reviewed 24-hour screening levels will be posted, and public comment can be made, starting Oct. 6 at CleanerAir.Oregon.gov.

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Scholarship awards boost student achievement
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 08/17/16 12:48 PM
(Salem) -- Workplace deaths and life-changing injuries send shockwaves through families, including throwing into doubt their capacity to finance higher education. That is why the State of Oregon provides the Workers' Memorial Scholarship program, which helps surviving family members achieve their educational goals.

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, will honor 2016 recipients of the Workers' Memorial Scholarship awards during a public ceremony at noon on Friday, Aug. 19, in Room 260 of the Labor and Industries Building in Salem.

The recipients are:

Nicole Beck, Gold Hill

Beck graduated in 2015 from Crater Academy of Health and Public Services. She is studying nursing at Rogue Community College.

Beck lost her father to a logging accident and is receiving a $1,250 award.

Laura Dewey, Hermiston

Dewey is a 2016 graduate of Hermiston High School. She plans to study agriculture and marketing at Blue Mountain Community College, with a goal of becoming an animal scientist.

Dewey's father died as the result of a fire inside a tanker truck. She is receiving a $1,250 award.

Laura Dittman, Newberg

With her GED completed, Dittman is attending Portland Community College. She is studying health care and hopes to work in aging services and gerontology. She is receiving a $500 award.

Dittman's father died of a heart attack while doing his job as an insurance claims adjuster.

Daisy Maldonado Dominguez, Wilsonville

Maldonado Dominguez is a 2014 graduate of Wilsonville High School. She plans to study English and psychology at Oregon State University. She aspires to be a lawyer.

Maldonado Dominguez's father lost both arms in an agricultural machinery accident. She is receiving a $1,250 award.

Adelaine Prinz, West Linn

A 2015 graduate of St. Mary's Academy, Prinz is studying graphic design at Boise State University. She hopes to become a graphic designer.

Prinz's father died in an airplane crash while doing his job as a corporate controller. She is receiving a $1,250 award.

"These young people have faced the loss of loved ones and the challenges that brings," said Oregon OSHA Administrator Michael Wood. "While we can do little to address their loss, these awards do offer us an opportunity to support them as they pursue their future goals."

Award recommendations are made by Oregon OSHA's Safe Employment Education and Training Advisory Committee, an advisory group with members from business, organized labor, and government. Oregon OSHA presents the awards annually to help in the postsecondary education of spouses or children of permanently and totally disabled or fatally injured workers.

The 1991 Legislature established the Workers' Memorial Scholarship at the request of the Oregon AFL-CIO, with support from Associated Oregon Industries.

The Workers' Memorial Scholarship is open to any high school graduate, graduating high school senior, GED recipient, or current college undergraduate or graduate student who is a dependent or spouse of an Oregon worker who has been fatally injured or permanently disabled while on the job. For more information about the program, go to http://osha.oregon.gov/workers/Pages/workers-memorial-scholarship.aspx.


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About Oregon OSHA:
Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, go to www.orosha.org.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.
Second annual Veteran Benefit Expo offers access to 'full range of earned benefits' (Photo)
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 08/17/16 11:59 AM
2016-08/1082/96970/2016_Veteran_Benefit_Expo_Ad.jpg
2016-08/1082/96970/2016_Veteran_Benefit_Expo_Ad.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/1082/96970/thumb_2016_Veteran_Benefit_Expo_Ad.jpg
The Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs' second annual Veteran Benefit Expo will be held Sept. 8 at the Veterans Memorial Coliseum, bringing together close to 100 federal, state and local providers of programs and services that benefit veterans and their families.

This free and unique event, open to the public from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., is the largest veteran benefit expo of its kind in the state of Oregon and is being hosted in Portland for the first time.

"The 2016 Veterans Benefit Expo is a one stop shop event for veterans and their families to learn about the full range of their earned benefits," said Cameron Smith, director of the Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs. "This is an opportunity to connect with over 85 service providers under one roof. We are excited to host in Portland this year and continue to take this approach to communities across Oregon going forward."

All veterans and active service members are invited to tap into valuable resources and connect with experts in the areas of veteran claims, education benefits, health care, business, employment, home loans, long-term care, mental health, recreation and more.

The 2015 Veteran Benefit Expo, which an estimated 500 people attended at the Salem Convention Center, was considered a huge success. And with a new venue and location, organizers hope this year's event will be even bigger and better.

Free on-site parking for this event has been made available by the Rose Quarter, and all parts of the Expo will be ADA-accessible. For more information, visit www.expo.oregondva.com, or call 503-373-2389.

If you are unable to attend the Expo, assistance on a wide variety of services can be found at Veteran Service Offices across the state. A complete list is available on the ODVA's website at www.oregon.gov/ODVA/VSODIRECT/pages/locator.aspx.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1082/96970/2016_Veteran_Benefit_Expo_Ad.pdf , 2016-08/1082/96970/2016_Veteran_Benefit_Expo_Ad.jpg
Public Health Advisory Board Accountability Metrics Subcommittee meets August 25 by webinar
Oregon Health Authority - 08/17/16 11:26 AM
August 17, 2016

What: A public meeting of the Public Health Advisory Board's Accountability Metrics Subcommittee. The meeting will be held by webinar only.

Agenda: Discuss applicability of child and family well-being, Healthy People 2020, Oregon's State Health Improvement Plan, Winnable Battles and NACCHO Profile measures to state and local health departments; review accountability measure public input survey draft; discuss next steps.

When: Thursday, August 25, 2-3 p.m. A 10-minute public comment period is scheduled at 2:50 p.m.; comments may be limited to three minutes.

Where: By webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6661354190155385345. The public also may attend by a telephone conference call line at 888-251-2909, access code 8975738#.

Oregon's Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon's governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon's State Health Improvement Plan. The Accountability Metrics Subcommittee develops recommendations about public health quality measures for consideration by the Public Health Advisory Board.

More information, including agendas, meeting packets and minutes, is available on the board's website at http://public.health.oregon.gov/About/Pages/ophab.aspx.

Program contact: Cara Biddlecom, 971-673-2284; cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us

# # #
Lebanon Fire District responds to 2 car motor vehicle crash on Hwy 34 (Photo)
Lebanon Fire District - 08/17/16 10:30 AM
2016-08/1191/96961/20160817_074138.jpg
2016-08/1191/96961/20160817_074138.jpg
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Lebanon Fire District responded to a two car motor vehicle accident at 0655 this am at the intersection of HWY34 and Goltra Roads with one person seriously injured. Upon arrival crews found the east bound lanes of Hwy 34 totally blocked with two midsized cars. The driver of one of the vehicles was a seriously injured female patient that was extricated with the "Jaws of Life", and then flown via REACH helicopter to a Portland area hospital with unknown injuries. A second male patient, the driver of the other vehicle was taken by ground ambulance to a local area hospital with non-life threatening injuries. Lebanon Fire District would like to remind motorist to take caution at this intersection because of the danger when entering the HWY. Lebanon Fire District was assisted by Tangent Fire, OSP, LCSO and REACH 8 along with ODOT. Lebanon Fire District responded with three chiefs, one engine, one heavy rescue and one medic unit with a total of 13 personnel.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1191/96961/20160817_074138.jpg , 2016-08/1191/96961/IMG_0950.JPG , 2016-08/1191/96961/IMG_0953.JPG
Tue. 08/16/16
Request for Comments: Proposal to Amend Community First Choice State Plan Option (K Plan)
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/16/16 3:39 PM
Public Notice: REQUEST FOR COMMENTS
Proposal to Amend Community First Choice State Plan Option (K Plan)

The Oregon Department of Human Services is proposing an amendment to the Community First Choice Option (K Plan) in order to more accurately reflect current state policies and align the K Plan with existing waiver authorities.

The proposed amendment is posted online at:
http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/SENIORS-DISABILITIES/KPLAN/Pages/public-notice-comment.aspx

COMMENTS DUE: October 1, 2016.

The proposed amendment includes the following changes:
Technical changes to the institutional level of care language to better reflect current processes and procedures and align with currently-approved 1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services waivers.
Removal of language referring to the "Live-in" program and "24 hour availability" of homecare workers and personal support workers to align with DHS-program changes enacted to address the requirements of Federal Department of Labor regulations.
Technical changes to Oregon Administrative Rule citations.
Update language relating to functional needs assessment tool used by the Office of Developmental Disabilities Services (ODDS).
Add language clarifying Group Care Homes operated by ODDS and Group Care Homes operated by contracted entities.
Revise language to reflect current provider qualifications and verification of qualifications process.
Update quality assurance performance measures, including the removal of one performance measure, to align with current performance measures in 1915(c) HCBS waivers.
Revise language in rate-setting methodology section to address current process and rate-setting tools used.
Technical changes to remove dates for compliance that have already passed.

There is no change expected in the annual aggregate expenditures.

HOW TO COMMENT
Send written comments by fax, mail or email to:
Jesse S. Anderson, State Plan Manager
Health Policy and Analytics
500 Summer Street NE
Salem, Oregon 97301
Fax: 503-947-1119
Email: jesse.anderson@state.or.us

NEXT STEPS: The Oregon Health Authority will consider all comments received. A State Plan Amendment will be submitted to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid.

The Oregon Department of Human Services is currently seeking public comment regarding the proposed amendment to the Community First Choice Option (K Plan). We are required by CMS to offer people an electronic and non-electronic format to access the information. To address the non-electronic format we are asking you to post the attached public notice in your offices and have a copy of the Community First Choice Option (K Plan) available for people upon request.

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Local Red Cross Continues to Send Disaster Responders to Louisiana; 17 Volunteers Deploy to Aid Massive Relief Effort (Photo)
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/16/16 3:01 PM
Red Cross Response in Louisiana
Red Cross Response in Louisiana
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More Red Cross disaster responders from Oregon and Southwest Washington deploy to Louisiana. Cost estimates increase to $30 million as responders learn more about the scope and magnitude of the devastation.

PORTLAND, Ore., August 16, 2016 -- The American Red Cross Cascades Region (Oregon and Southwest Washington) is deploying additional responders to Louisiana to help with the flood relief effort. Thus far, 17 responders from Medford, Silverton, Florence, Salem, Portland, Lake Oswego, Wolf Creek, Keiser, Williams, and Turner, Oregon as well as Vancouver, Washington are either on the ground or heading to Louisiana. They are assisting affected communities by managing shelters, providing emergency financial assistance, health and mental health services, transportation services, and coordinating with local government entities to help deliver assistance.

THE SITUATION IN LOUISIANA:
The current flooding in Louisiana is the worst natural disaster to strike the United States since Superstorm Sandy. The Red Cross is mounting a massive relief operation, which is anticipated to cost at least $30 million. This number may grow as responders learn more about the scope and magnitude of the devastation. Hundreds of American Red Cross disaster workers and volunteers are working tirelessly to provide food and shelter to thousands of people forced from their homes.
On Monday night, more than 8,400 people sought refuge in at least 35 Red Cross and community shelters in Louisiana.

The Red Cross has mobilized over 60 disaster response vehicles, nearly 40,000 ready-to-eat meals, and more than two dozen trailer loads of shelter and kitchen supplies that began arriving on Monday. Some of the supplies arriving include water, personal hygiene items, insect repellant, cleaning kits, bleach and other important supplies.

Local officials have reported making more than 20,000 water rescues, and are estimating that more than 25,000 homes -- at least 75,000 people -- have been affected. The flooding danger is not over as weather experts predict more rain is possible. This is the second time in five months that Louisiana has seen more than 24 inches of rain during a single storm.

HOW TO HELP:
The Red Cross urgently needs the public to help people who have lost everything and support the Louisiana flood relief effort by making a donation.
Visit redcross.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS to make a donation.

Donations enable the Red Cross to prepare for, respond to and help people recovery from these disasters.


"Seventeen local volunteers from Oregon and Southwest Washington have deployed to Louisiana, leaving the comforts of home to help people in need half way across the country," said Amy Shlossman, CEO of the Red Cross Cascades Region. "You can help support communities devastated by disasters by donating at redcross.org. A financial gift is the fastest and most efficient way to assist the people who need help now."

About the American Red Cross
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org/Cascades or visit us on Twitter at @RedCrossCasc.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1190/96944/News_Release_-_Local_Red_Cross_Sends_More_Responders_to_Massive_Louisiana_Flood_Relief_Effort.pdf , Red Cross Response in Louisiana , Red Cross Response in Louisiana , Red Cross Response in Louisiana , Red Cross Response in Louisiana
Inmate walkaway from Shutter Creek Correctional Institution back in custody (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 08/16/16 2:21 PM
Jose Toscano
Jose Toscano
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An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) inmate is back in custody after walking away from a Shutter Creek Correctional Institution (SCCI) work crew that was working in Coos Bay in the area of the Educational Services District (ESD) offices.

SCCI staff discovered inmate Jose Ramon Toscano missing at approximately 12:30 p.m., Tuesday, August 16. An off-duty SCCI staff member observed Toscano in the area and contacted local law enforcement who apprehended the inmate at approximately 1:00 p.m.

Toscano entered DOC custody on January 28, 2016, on one count of delivery of methamphetamine out of Multnomah County. His earliest release date is April 6, 2019.


SCCI is a minimum-security prison in North Bend that houses approximately 286 male inmates who are within four years of release. SCCI serves as a transition and re-entry facility and is focused on cognitive programming, work programs, ad preparing inmates for return to the community. Inmates work on the institution site in the physical plant, kitchen and dining hall, warehouse, receiving and discharge, laundry, and prison grounds. Inmates also work on outside crews, primarily with the Department of Forestry, providing services throughout the year as trained wildland firefighters. Originally an Air National Guard radar station, the facility was converted into a prison in 1990.

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Attached Media Files: Jose Toscano
See If You Have Trash Or Treasure at the Oregon Historical Society's 3rd Annual "What's It Worth?" Event (Photo)
Oregon Historical Society - 08/16/16 1:19 PM
OHS ED Kerry Tymchuk with member Susan Emmons Poss and her Howdy Doody marionette
OHS ED Kerry Tymchuk with member Susan Emmons Poss and her Howdy Doody marionette
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Portland, OR -- August 16, 2016 -- Have you ever wondered if you had a hidden treasure buried in your closet? Then join the Oregon Historical Society for What's It Worth?, an annual event where local experts estimate the value of your collectibles.

WHEN:
Sunday, August 21, 2016
12pm -- 4pm

WHERE:
Oregon Historical Society
1200 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

For $10 per item (plus regular museum admission) you could discover if the knick knack from your Aunt Gertrude is actually a valuable collectible! All proceeds raised from this special event support the Oregon Historical Society's mission.

In 2015, over 100 visitors brought items for evaluation. Some notable discoveries included a 37-star American flag, a 1956 Chicago Cubs baseball signed by the entire team, a collection of WWII propaganda posters, and a painting by George de Forest Brush of his father, Alfred Clark Brush, estimated around $18,000!

"Each year, it is exciting to see what sorts of items will walk through our doors. While many items already have great sentimental value attached, it is fun to see the delighted looks on the owners' faces when they find out that their item is also very monetarily valuable!" said OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk.

Items that can be evaluated include books, manuscripts, fine and decorative art, Asian antiquities, American Indian baskets and bags, jewelry, military items (no firearms or weapons), sports memorabilia, toys, comics, coins, stamps, and more! The local specialists who will be joining us include:

John Henley, John V. Henley, LLC
Specialties: Books, Manuscripts, Documents, Prints, Illustrations

Shirley Sanders, Red Sign Estate Sales & Appraisals, LLC
Specialties: Decorative Art, Personal Property, Jewelry,

Roger Anthony, Communication That Counts
Specialties: Sports Memorabilia

Robert A. Beale, Robert A. Beale, Stamp Appraisals Northwest
Specialty: Stamps, Coins

Billy Galaxy, Billy Galaxy Vintage Toys and Collectibles
Specialties: Toys, Comics, Pop Culture

Dr. Terry Kneisler, Kneis Cards
Specialty: Sports Memorabilia

Natalie Linn, Linn-Tucker Indian Baskets
Specialties: American Indian Baskets and Bags

Jason Marden, Major League History
Specialty: Sports Memorabilia

Mona Miller, Pacific Gemological Laboratory
Specialties: Gems, Jewelry, Silver

Michael Parsons, Michael Parson Fine Art
Specialties: Fine Art

Lucinda Pierpont, An Asian Affair
Specialties: Asian Antiquities

Richard Richter, Clean Sweep Estate Services, Inc.
Specialties: Military Items, Toys, General Antiques and Collectibles

Ticket sales end at 3:30pm and there is a 5 item limit per person. All items presented for evaluation must be able to be carried by hand and weapons and firearms are prohibited. Evaluations given at this event are provided as auction estimates and are not considered legally binding paid appraisals.

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About the Oregon Historical Society
For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state's collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon's history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon's cannot be contained within a single story or point of view


Attached Media Files: OHS ED Kerry Tymchuk with member Susan Emmons Poss and her Howdy Doody marionette , 37 star America flag , Richard Richter examines WWII propaganda posters , Shirley Sanders, 2015 What's It Worth Event , Mona Miller, 2015 What's It Worth Event
Corps seeks comments on Jackson County permit application
US Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District - 08/16/16 12:49 PM
US Army Corps of Engineers
Portland District

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is accepting comments on a permit application from the Oregon Department of Transportation for a proposed project in Jackson County, Oregon.

Public notice NWP-2010-593-2 is available at http://www.nwp.usace.army.mil/Missions/Regulatory/PublicNotices.aspx.
Small Operating Grant Deadline for FY2017 grants Sept. 16 (Photo)
Oregon Arts Commission - 08/16/16 12:19 PM
Inland Northwest Musicians performing in Echo, Oregon
Inland Northwest Musicians performing in Echo, Oregon
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More than 100 of the 700 residents of Echo, Oregon attended both concerts performed by the visiting Inland Northwest Musicians last December. Still, despite the enthusiastic reception the volunteer musicians receive in the rural communities they tour, it remains a constant challenge to offset travel expenses.

In 2015, when the Inland Musicians became one of the first recipients of an Oregon Arts Commission Small Operating Grant, the ensemble's future became more stable. "The $1,000 we received allowed us to continue to offer free concerts to our audiences," says programs director Lori Johnson. "We continue to reach communities that rarely have access to fine arts."

The grants are designed to provide operating support to arts organizations with budgets under $150,000. Eligibility is limited to organizations who have operated as an IRS recognized 501(c)(3) nonprofit for two years or more.

"This grant program was developed to increase the Commission's support of Oregon's small arts providers," says Commission Chair Libby Tower. "These organizations frequently represent the only arts presenter for remote and underserved regions of the state."

Applications for FY2017 Small Operating Grants are due at 5 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 16.

For more information about the grant program, contact Brian Wagner at (503) 428-1981 or via email at brian.wagner@oregon.gov

FY2016 grant recipients were:
Applegate Regional Theater Inc, Veneta, $1,000
Astoria Visual Arts, Astoria, $1,000
Bach Cantata Choir, Portland, $1,000
Bandon Showcase Inc, Bandon, $1,000
Camerata Musica, Salem, $1,000
Cannon Beach Arts Association Inc, Cannon Beach, $1,000
Cascadia Chapter of NACUSA, Portland, $1,000
Ceili of the Valley, Salem, $1,000
Center for Architecture, Portland, $1,000
Chamber Music Amici, Eugene, $3,000
Cinema Project, Portland, $1,000
Colored Pencils Art & Culture Council, Portland, $1,000
Columbia Gorge Orchestra Association, Hood River, $1,000
Conduit Dance Inc, Portland, $4,200
Confluence: The Willamette Valley LGBT Chorus, Salem, $1,000
Corvallis Repertory Singers, Corvallis, $1,000
Dancing People Company, Ashland, $3,000
Desert Arts Council, Hermiston, $1,000
Florence Performing Arts Association, Florence, $1,000
Florence Regional Arts Alliance, Florence, $1,000
Free Arts NW, Portland, $1,000
Grande Ronde Symphony Association, La Grande, $1,000
Hand 2 Mouth, Portland, $3,150
Heidi Duckler Dance Theatre Northwest, Portland, $1,000
High Desert Chamber Music, Bend, $1,000
In Mulieribus, Portland, $1,000
Inland Northwest Musicians, Hermiston, $1,000
Inspirational Sounds Inc, Eugene, $1,000
Jacobs Gallery, Eugene, $1,000
Kukatonon, Portland, $3,000
Friends of Latimer Quilt & Textile Center, Tillamook, $1,000
Little Theater on the Bay Inc, North Bend, $1,000
Lord & Schryver Conservancy, Salem, $1,000
Materials Exchange Center for Community Arts, Eugene, $1,000
Monday Musical Club of Tillamook, Tillamook, $1,000
Northwest Print Council Inc, Portland, $1,000
Obo Addy Legacy Project, Portland, $1,000
Opal Center for Arts & Education, Cottage Grove, $1,000
Opera Bend, Bend, $1,000
Oregon Artists Series Foundation, Salem, $1,000
Oregon City Children's Theatre, Oregon City, $1,000
Oregon Writers Colony, Portland, $1,000
The Orlo Foundation, Portland, $1,000
Palisades Childrens Choir, Lake Oswego, $1,000
Performance Works NorthWest Inc, Portland, $1,000
Piano Santa Foundation, Portland, $1,000
Portland Chamber Orchestra Association, Portland, $1,000
Portland Child Art Studio, Portland, $1,000
Portland Jazz Composers' Ensemble, Portland, $1,000
Risk-Reward, Portland, $1,000
Salem Concert Band, Salem, $1,000
Salem Pops Orchestra, Salem, $1,000
Salem Youth Symphony Association, Salem, $1,000
Signal Fire, Portland, $1,000
The Dalles Art Association, The Dalles, $3,000
Upstart Crow Studios, Eugene, $1,000
Valley Repertory Theatre, Newberg, $1,000
Vibe of Portland, Portland, $1,000
Westside Cultural Alliance, Beaverton, $1,000
Willamette Jazz Society, Eugene, $1,000
Woodburn Art Center, Woodburn, $1,000
Zenazezza Inc, Portland, $1,000

- ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?
The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of the Oregon Business Development Department in 1993 in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon
The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature, federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts and funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust.
? 30 ?


Attached Media Files: Inland Northwest Musicians performing in Echo, Oregon
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon Endorses Ballot Measure 97
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon - 08/16/16 10:04 AM
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon today announced its endorsement of Ballot Measure 97, which would provide stable, adequate funding for healthcare services and education programs by increasing the minimum tax for large and out-of-state corporations with more than $25 million in annual Oregon sales.

PPAO is the political arm of the organization, advocating on behalf of Oregon's 12 health centers and the 61,672 women, men and young people who count on Planned Parenthood services every year. PPAO strongly believes every Oregonian deserves health care, regardless of their race, income, geography, immigration status, sexual orientation or gender identity.

"As advocates for affordable health care and comprehensive sex education in public schools, Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon know the importance of protecting funding that ensures all Oregonians can access the services they deserve to help them stay healthy," says Mary Nolan, Executive Director of Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon. "About 1 in 10 Oregonians remain uninsured - disproportionately people of color, the LGBT community and low-wage workers. Many of them are patients at Planned Parenthood. For all of them across Oregon, vital treatment is out of reach without stable, adequate public revenue. That's why we endorse Ballot Measure 97, which would make large and out-of-state corporations pay their fair share in taxes and direct new revenue to health care, education and senior services."

Sarah Johnson, a 24-year-old Portland resident, adds: "As a woman who has turned to Planned Parenthood for affordable health services, I think it's time working Oregonians pay less out of pocket so that health care is affordable for everyone. Family planning is a smart investment, and our state budget shouldn't be balanced on the backs of the most vulnerable Oregonians. It's time for corporations to pay their fair share, so I'm voting yes on Ballot Measure 97."
Oregon's Unemployment Rate Rises to 5.2 Percent in July, Job Growth Continues
Oregon Employment Dept. - 08/16/16 10:00 AM
Oregon's unemployment rate was 5.2 percent in July, an increase from June's rate of 4.8 percent. The rate has risen from a record low of 4.5 percent in the three months of March, April and May. Oregon's labor force, which reached a record high of 2,058,000 in July, has grown rapidly in recent months as the number of people employed grew along with growth in the number of unemployed. Oregon's unemployment rate remained close to the U.S. unemployment rate, which was unchanged at 4.9 percent in July.

Oregon's payroll employment added 3,800 jobs in July after a revised gain of 1,900 in June. Several service-providing industries expanded rapidly, while the two major goods-producing industries contracted. July gains were largest in health care and social assistance (+2,100 jobs); professional and business services (+1,600); leisure and hospitality (+1,200); transportation, warehousing and utilities (+1,100); and other services (+1,000). Meanwhile, the industries with the biggest declines in July were manufacturing (-1,200 jobs) and construction (-1,100).

July's job gains were a bit weaker than the average job gains of the past 12 months. This may have to do with recent months' weaker trends in manufacturing and construction. Manufacturing lost 800 jobs, or -0.4 percent, over the past year. Despite July's losses, construction still added 7,500 jobs, or 9.2 percent, since July 2015. Professional and business services grew rapidly as well, adding 15,700 jobs, or 6.9 percent, over the past 12 months. Other services was third fastest, growing by 4,100 jobs, or 6.7 percent. Four other industries each expanded by between 3.4 percent and 4.1 percent over the past 12 months: transportation, warehousing and utilities (+2,400 jobs or 4.1%); leisure and hospitality (+7,100 jobs or 3.7%); health care and social assistance (+7,600 jobs or 3.4%) and private educational services (+1,200 jobs or 3.4%).

Next Press Releases
The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the July county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, August 23rd, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for August on Tuesday, September 13th.??NLG


Notes:
All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted.

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources.

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this Official Oregon Series data unless noted otherwise. This month's release incorporates the January, February and March 2016 tax records data. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS.



The pdf version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon Centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program -- auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For the Deaf and Hard of Hearing population, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/930/96932/charts_for_press_release.xlsx , 2016-08/930/96932/CLFIE_8-16-2016.xlsx , 2016-08/930/96932/employment_in_Oregon_--_July_2016_--_press_release.pdf
Daily Fire Update: August 16, 2016
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/16/16 9:37 AM
Fires on ODF-Protected Lands

Corey Road Fire
The 12-acre Corey Road Fire just north of Forest Grove was contained yesterday. As the summer heats up this becomes more difficult to do because the grass, sticks, trees and other fuels dry out so quickly.
As temperatures reach triple-digits this week, please help prevent wildfires. Preventing wildfires helps protect forests and firefighters. You can do this by following the fire prevention laws and industrial fire precaution level restrictions. This map shows fire restrictions: https://geo.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=41424358763949deb16e3f513e748844

Redwood Highway Fire Final Update
The Redwood Highway Fire burned 54 acres. Crews contained the fire yesterday and continue cooling hot spots to strengthen the containment lines.

Fires on Other Jurisdictions

More info on the following fires: http://gacc.nifc.gov/nwcc/information/fire_info.aspx

Porcupine Butte
The 280-acre Porcupine Butte Fire burning 10 miles East of Clarno and is 30 percent contained.

Rail Fire
The 16,349-acre Rail Fire burning 5 miles west of Unity is 15 percent contained.

Juntura Complex Final Update
The 24,301-acre Juntura Complex burning 30 miles SW of Vale is contained.


Fire Statistics

Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2016, through Monday, Aug. 16, 2016:
Lightning-caused fires: 59 fires burned 2,218 acres
Human-caused fires: 466 fires burned 541 acres
Total: 525 fires burned 2,759 acres

10-year average (for this period of the year):
Lightning-caused fires: 231 fires burned 28,050 acres
Human-caused fires: 434 fires burned 4,233 acres
Total: 665 fires burned 32,283 acres

For information on breaking fires, go to:
http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/
Conclusion of Oregon State Police Forensic Division Investigation
Oregon State Police - 08/16/16 7:42 AM
During the summer of 2015 we initiated an investigation into missing controlled substances that had been removed from two of our crime labs. Our detectives subsequently established and documented a pattern of theft by employee Nika Larsen, an OSP scientist, who used her position to remove controlled substances from two of the five OSP crime labs.

We promptly notified all Oregon District Attorney Offices and turned the results of our investigation over to the Oregon Department of Justice for additional investigation and independent evaluation. The Oregon Attorney General and the United States' Attorney's office subsequently conducted their own investigations which confirmed OSP's findings and built a successful criminal case against Larsen.

We profoundly regret our scientist's behavior and any adverse impact it has had on our professional partners or the administration of justice. We are redoubling our commitment to delivering the consistently professional service that built our hard-earned reputation for excellence.

As part of our efforts moving forward we participated in and look forward to any recommendations from the workgroup established by Governor Brown to evaluate policies and procedures utilized with our crime labs. No human system can guarantee perfection, but we have underscored our commitment to integrity, reliability, security and transparency by updating lab security policies, procedures and equipment.
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The OSP Forensic Services Division provides Oregon's only full service forensic laboratory system. Our analysts provide technical assistance and training, evaluate and analyze evidence, interpret results, and provide expert testimony related to the full spectrum of physical evidence recovered from crime scenes.
Mon. 08/15/16
Update***back in custody***Inmate walks away from Columbia River Correctional Institution work crew (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 08/15/16 9:23 PM
Jasson Ray
Jasson Ray
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UPDATEAT APPROXIMATELY 8:52 P.M. INMATE JASSON RAY WAS TAKEN INTO CUSTODY BY U.S. MARSHALLS IN LANE COUNTY


An inmate walked away today from a Columbia River Correctional Institution (CRCI) work crew near the Pittock Mansion in Portland. Oregon State Police and local law enforcement are investigating.

CRCI staff discovered inmate Jasson Ray missing at approximately 10:45 a.m., Friday, August 12. Ray is a 37-year-old Caucasian male, 5'9" tall, 260 pounds, with brown hair and blue eyes. He is most likely wearing blue jeans with the word "inmate" and the DOC logo stenciled on the knee, in orange or red shorts, and a blue t-shirt with the word "inmate" and the DOC logo stenciled in orange on the front and back.

Ray entered DOC custody on December 24, 2015, on three counts of felon in possession of a weapon out of Lane County. His earliest release date is February 15, 2019.

Anyone with information regarding Ray's whereabouts is asked to call Oregon State Police at
1-800-452-7888.

CRCI is a minimum-security facility that houses approximately 595 male inmates who are within four years of release. Located in the largest metropolitan area of the state, this facility is focused on cognitive programming, work programs, and preparing inmates for return to the community. CRCI is home to a 50-bed cognitive restructuring Alternative Incarceration Program (AIP). Individuals who successfully complete this 180-day in-prison program are released to the community for a 90-day transitional leave period. Individuals who successfully complete the transitional leave period are granted a reduction in their sentence and move to post-prison supervision. CRCI is located on a 26-acre site in northeast Portland and officially in opened in September 1990.


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Attached Media Files: Jasson Ray
Local Red Cross Sends Disaster Responders to Louisiana to Help with Worst Disaster Since Superstorm Sandy
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/15/16 5:55 PM
Fourteen Red Cross disaster responders from Oregon and Southwest Washington are deploying to Louisiana to help people affected by the worst natural disaster since Superstorm Sandy.

PORTLAND, Ore., August 15, 2016 -- The American Red Cross Cascades Region is responding to devastating flooding in Louisiana. Red Cross disaster workers are providing shelter, food and comfort to those affected and more help is on the way.

Responders from Medford, Silverton, Florence, Salem, Portland, Lake Oswego, Wolf Creek and Keizer are either on the ground or heading to Louisiana. They are assisting affected communities by managing shelters, providing emergency financial assistance, health and mental health services, transportation services, and coordinating with local government entities to help deliver assistance.

"We depend on the generosity of the public to make sure we can help people in need -- anytime and anywhere," said Amy Shlossman, CEO of the Red Cross Cascades Region. "It costs the Red Cross approximately $1,650 to send a volunteer to a relief operation for 11 days -- the average length of a disaster deployment."

THE SITUATION IN LOUISIANA:
The flooding in Louisiana is likely the worst natural disaster since 2012's Superstorm Sandy. Sunday night more than 10,600 people sought refuge in nearly 50 Red Cross and community shelters in Louisiana. Local officials have reported making more than 20,000 water rescues, and are estimating that 10,000 homes have been damaged. Many areas are still inaccessible. The flooding danger is not over as weather experts predict more rain is possible.

HOW TO HELP:
Preliminary estimates indicate that Red Cross response efforts could cost more than $10 million. Donations are urgently needed. To help people affected by the Louisiana Floods visit redcross.org, call 1-800-RED CROSS or text the word LAFLOODS to 90999 to make a $10 donation. These donations enable the Red Cross to prepare for, respond to and help people recover from disasters big and small.

OTHER RED CROSS RESOURCES:
SAFE AND WELL: Register on the Red Cross Safe and Well website so loved ones can see if you are safe and well. Those who can't access a computer can call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) and a Red Cross operator can help them register. They can also update their Facebook and Twitter status through the Safe and Well website or visit www.redcross.org/safeandwell on their smart phone and click on the "List Yourself as Safe and Well" or "Search for friends and family" link.

EMERGENCY APP: Download the free Red Cross Emergency App to receive emergency alerts and information about what to do in case of flooding, wildfires and other disasters, as well as locations of shelters. The App also includes emergency first aid information and a Family Safe feature which allows people to instantly see if loved ones are okay. The free Emergency App is available in app stores by searching for the American Red Cross or going to redcross.org/apps.

About the American Red Cross
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org/Cascades or visit us on Twitter at @RedCrossCasc.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1190/96924/News_Release_-_Local_Red_Cross_Sends_14_Disaster_Responders_to_Louisiana.pdf
Drive-by shooting in Roseburg (Update) (Photo)
Roseburg Police Dept. - 08/15/16 5:09 PM
Ryan Macart
Ryan Macart
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/5489/96921/thumb_macart.jpg
On Sunday, August 14th, 2016 at approximately 1122 hours, Officers responded to the report of several gunshots being fired from a vehicle in the 2700 block of Edenbower in Roseburg. The vehicle was described as a silver colored 2 door sedan, occupied by at least two people. Witnesses said they observed the occupants of the vehicle speak to a female in the parking lot of Applebee's, just prior to the shooting. Witnesses also stated it appeared the female and the occupants of the vehicle were having an argument, as the female started walking away.

As the vehicle pulled onto Edenbower, witnesses said someone in the vehicle fired a gun several times out the window, in the direction of the female. The vehicle then fled the area, driving south on Edenbower. Officers checked the area but did not locate the suspect vehicle.

Once on scene, Officers checked the surrounding area and were unable to find anyone who had been struck by the gunshots. There was one gunshot hole found on the side of a shed that was near the female.

On Monday, August 15th, Detectives continued working on the case and during the course of the investigation, 26 year old Ryan Lucas Macart of Winston was developed as a suspect. Macart was located at approximately 10:30 A.M. and was arrested without incident. Macart was lodged at the Douglas County Jail on the charges of Unlawful Use of a Weapon, Reckless Endangering, and Felon in Possession of a Firearm. A firearm was recovered during the investigation.


Attached Media Files: Ryan Macart
Crime Stoppers Offers Reward of up to $1,000 for Arrest of Fugitive Jasson Ray (Photo)
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 08/15/16 3:03 PM
2016-08/5183/96917/Jasson_Ray_Photos.jpg
2016-08/5183/96917/Jasson_Ray_Photos.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/5183/96917/thumb_Jasson_Ray_Photos.jpg
The Oregon Department of Corrections, in cooperation with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for the public's help to locate an escaped fugitive.

On Friday August 12, 2016, at 10:37 a.m., Portland Police Bureau Central Precinct officers responded to assist the Oregon Department of Corrections in the area of Pittock Mansion in Northwest Portland to find an inmate that walked away from a work crew.

The fugitive, 37-year-old Jasson Lewis Ray, is described as a white male, 5'8" tall, 260 pounds, shaved head, blue eyes, goatee, with lots of tattoos.

After his escape, Ray sought medical treatment at a Portland hospital but did not remain to see a doctor.

Ray may have returned to the Lane County area where he is from originally.

Ray is reported to be suicidal and may be armed with a gun.

Photos of Ray are being released to aid in his capture, including a Facebook photo, his Oregon driver's license photo and hospital surveillance.

Ray was serving time with the Oregon Department of Corrections on firearm and theft charges. Ray has prior convictions for assault and has criminal history in California and Arizona.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Information about unsolved homicides can lead to a reward of up to $2,500 cash. All other unsolved felony crimes are eligible for cash rewards of up to $1,000.

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects. Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers.

Submit an anonymous tip:

Text CRIMES (274637) - Type 823HELP, followed by the tip.

Online at http://crimestoppersoforegon.com/submit_online_tip.php

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

Visit http://www.tipsoft.com to download the TipSubmit app for the iPhone or Droid.

###CSO###


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/5183/96917/Jasson_Ray_Photos.jpg
Linn County Sheriff's Office Participates in Boating Under the Influence of Intoxicants Saturation Patrol
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 08/15/16 2:26 PM
Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley reports from August 12, through August 14, 2016, his office participated in a Boating Under the Influence of Intoxicants (BUII) saturation patrol with the Oregon State Marine Board (O.S.M.B.) targeting intoxicated boaters at Foster Lake.

In partnership and funding received from the O.S.M.B., Marine Deputies from Josephine County and Klamath County assisted the Linn County Sheriff's Office Marine program for the three day event. As a result five people were arrested for BUII of a motorized boat and one person was arrested for BUII of a non-motorized boat.

Sheriff Riley would like to thank those agencies who assisted with the patrols on Foster Lake.

Sheriff Riley would also like to remind citizens, that Oregon Law prohibits anyone from boating while intoxicated. Boating while intoxicated causes impaired balance, blurred vision, poor coordination, impaired judgment, and slower reaction times. Mixing alcohol while operating a boat is a major contributor to boating accidents and fatalities. Please boat responsibly.
OHA Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet August 19 in Wilsonville
Oregon Health Authority - 08/15/16 1:40 PM
August 15, 2016

Jennifer Uhlman, 503-739-5267 (meeting information or accommodations)

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority Metrics and Scoring Committee

When: Friday, August 19, 9 a.m. to noon. Public testimony will be heard at 10:15 a.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Room 210, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E, Wilsonville

The public also can join through a listen-only conference line at 1-888-204-5984, participant code 1277166.

Agenda: Welcome and consent agenda; updates; public testimony; finalize 2017 benchmarks; Review 2018 measure selection work plan; revisit equity measure concepts; select 2017 challenge pool; wrap up and adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/analytics/Pages/Metrics-Scoring-Committee.aspx.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. To request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations, call the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

# # #
Deputies Arrest Man After Late Night Elude East Marion County (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/15/16 12:54 PM
2016-08/1294/96911/REINER_MATTHEW_MUG_SHOT.jpg
2016-08/1294/96911/REINER_MATTHEW_MUG_SHOT.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/1294/96911/thumb_REINER_MATTHEW_MUG_SHOT.jpg
This morning, deputies arrested Matthew Reiner, age 29 of Bend Oregon after he allegedly eluded deputies overnight in East Marion County.

Last night around 11:30 p.m., a deputy with the Marion County Sheriff's Office attempted to stop an Audi A3 for driving 80 in a 55 mile per hour zone on Highway 22 near Lyons. When the deputy activated his lights the vehicle drove away on a gravel road at a high rate of speed. Due to the large amount of dust the deputy slowed but soon found the vehicle abandoned in a driveway in the 11000 block of Riverhaven Lane SE near Stayton. A canine attempted to locate the driver but was unsuccessful, deputies later towed the vehicle as evidence.

At 6:30 a.m. this morning a resident where the car had been abandoned called the Sheriff's Office to report a male was on his property searching for the Audi. Deputies caught up with Mr. Reiner as he was walking away from the residence. Deputies described Mr. Reiner as dirty, wet, scrapped up and in possession of a key to an Audi. As deputies investigated they determined Mr. Reiner was the registered owner of the Audi and a Deputy District Attorney for the Crook County District Attorney's Office. It is unclear why Mr. Reiner chose not to stop for the deputy.

Mr. Reiner was taken to the Marion County Jail for the crimes of Attempt to Elude the Police in a vehicle and on foot, he was booked into the Marion County Jail and later released. Mr. Reiner is scheduled to appear at the Marion County Circuit Court Annex on September 12th at 9:30 a.m.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1294/96911/REINER_MATTHEW_MUG_SHOT.jpg
SUSPICIOUS PACKAGE AT ROSEBURG CITY HALL (Update) - 08/15/16
Roseburg Fire Dept. - 08/15/16 12:46 PM
The suspicious items have been disposed of by the Oregon State Police Explosives Unit and all roadways around Roseburg City Hall are now clear.

It is unknown at this time who placed the suspicious items, or if there was any intent to cause public alarm. The investigation will be ongoing.
SUSPICIOUS PACKAGE AT ROSEBURG CITY HALL (Update)
Roseburg Police Dept. - 08/15/16 12:42 PM
The suspicious items have been disposed of by the Oregon State Police Explosives Unit and all roadways around Roseburg City Hall are now clear.

It is unknown at this time who placed the suspicious items, or if there was any intent to cause public alarm. The investigation will be ongoing.
Streamside (Riparian) Rulemaking Advisory Committee meets August 19
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/15/16 11:24 AM
The Riparian Rulemaking Advisory Committee will meet by conference call on Aug. 19 from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Oregon Department of Forestry's Salem Headquarters, 2600 State St. The committee plans to acknowledge their consensus for the final draft of the Riparian Rules to be submitted to the Board of Forestry on Sept. 7. They will also acknowledge the final version of the meeting facilitator's summary report.

The committee provides input to the agency for drafting rules the Board of Forestry will consider as it implements its decision to increase streamside shade buffers along some fish-bearing streams in western Oregon.

This is a public meeting, however there will not be an opportunity to provide comments. Members of the public can attend and listen to the conference call at the Department of Forestry, 2600 State St., Santiam Room.
Struggling Homeowners may Receive up to $35,000 in Foreclosure Assistance from State Program
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 08/15/16 11:00 AM
SALEM, OR -- The state of Oregon announces a foreclosure prevention program that will launch statewide on Wednesday, August 17th at noon. The program is called "Home Rescue" and will provide assistance to homeowners struggling to pay their mortgage. Home Rescue will provide struggling homeowners with monthly mortgage payments for up to one year (12 payments with a total maximum benefit of $20,000) and can also provide a reinstatement benefit to bring a mortgage current (up to $15,000).

Homeowners interested in the program can apply online by visiting www.OregonHomeownerHelp.org. The website has an eligibility questionnaire and instructional video to help homeowners learn more about the program and guide them through the application process.

To qualify, applicants must be able to demonstrate at least a 10% reduction in projected 2016 income compared to any tax year between 2009 and 2015. Additional information about eligibility requirements and the application process can be found at www.OregonHomeownerHelp.org. Every two weeks at noon the program opens a limited number of new opportunities to apply and will continue this cycle until all program funds have been exhausted.

The Home Rescue program aims to provide assistance to approximately 3,500 homeowners across Oregon. Funding for Home Rescue is provided by the United States Treasury's Hardest Hit Fund, which allocated $220 million to Oregon in 2010 and an additional $94.5 million in 2016 for the administration of foreclosure prevention programs.

Oregon Housing and Community Services administers Hardest Hit Fund programs through the Oregon Homeownership Stabilization Initiative (OHSI). To date, OHSI has provided more than $200 million in assistance to more than 12,000 homeowners. Performance reports for OHSI are available online at www.OregonHomeownerHelp.org.

OHSI customer service can be reached via email at Homeowner.Help@oregon.gov or by phone at 503-986-2025. OHSI partners with local housing nonprofits throughout the state to provide program delivery.

###


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1810/96894/Home_Rescue_Press_Release_-08152016.pdf
Suspicious Package at Roseburg City Hall - 08/15/16
Roseburg Fire Dept. - 08/15/16 10:47 AM
Suspicious Package at Roseburg City Hall - 08/15/16

Just before 0800 hours this morning, a City of Roseburg employee arrived to City Hall and located a suspicious item on one of the exterior stairwells to the building. The employee notified the Police Department, and Officers checked the item. The Oregon State Police Explosives Unit was called to further investigate and as of the time of this release, we are awaiting their arrival.

Roseburg City Hall has been evacuated as a precautionary measure and the section of SE Jackson Street from Douglas to Court has been closed. Please avoid the area until updated.
Native American biface cache found in Willamette Valley (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/15/16 10:34 AM
Assistant State Archaeologist John Pouley shows the Native American bifaces found in the cache. The bifaces are made of obsidian sourced from Obsidian Cliffs in the Central Oregon Cascade Mountains. Pouley led the excavation that uncovered the fifteenth b
Assistant State Archaeologist John Pouley shows the Native American bifaces found in the cache. The bifaces are made of obsidian sourced from Obsidian Cliffs in the Central Oregon Cascade Mountains. Pouley led the excavation that uncovered the fifteenth b
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/1303/96899/thumb_Biface-collection.JPG
UPDATED WITH ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Editors Note: video available on Youtube:
https://youtu.be/uykpM12iSdE
https://youtu.be/jkoNCyXuvZs

Obsidian pieces found by a Willamette Valley landowner have been identified as a collection of Native American artifacts currently estimated to be 1,000-4,000 years old. The landowner has asked that his name not be shared.

The cache of 15 bifaces is important for several reasons, said Assistant State Archaeologist John Pouley with the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO).

"For starters, we wouldn't know the site existed if the landowner hadn't reached out to our office to report the find," Pouley said. "Aside from the importance of his stewardship, the biface cache is additionally a rare type of archaeological site.

"Of approximately 35,000 recorded archaeological sites in Oregon, few, likely less than 25, consist of biface caches, he added. "Of the known biface cache sites, it is believed to be the first recorded in the Willamette Valley."

The cache is primarily comprised of what appear to be blank trade bifaces: hand-sized, unfinished stone tools, largely unmodified from when first created by early Native Americans flintknapping at the distant quarry. The Willamette Valley obsidian bifaces have been sourced to Obsidian Cliffs in the Central Oregon Cascades and were roughly shaped at the Cliffs, likely for easier transport. Once traded, they would be worked into a finished tool, or provide an expedient source for making sharp flakes. Most of the previously documented cache sites in Oregon contain finished tools such as knives, spears, or arrowheads, according to Pouley.

"The archaeological site provides information on not only what prehistoric biface blanks brought into the Willamette Valley looked like, but also on the knappable properties of the stone, which may assist with developing hypotheses on their intended use," he said. "Unmodified trade items of any kind typically do not survive in the archaeological record."

Information gathered from the cache will add to the knowledge of prehistoric trade networks. To obtain a better understanding of the context of the cache, Pouley led an archaeological excavation at the site in June 2016.

"We were pleased to find one biface in possibly its original position, referred to as 'in situ," he said. "Many times things are moved beneath the ground, whether by later human impacts, burrowing animals or repetitive freeze/thaw cycles. A biface in situ assists with establishing context, which allows for comparison with other items recovered during the process of a controlled excavation. The information can help us address a number of research questions, such as possibly refining the estimated age of the site."

Because of the importance of the site, Pouley received support from the archaeological community including local universities, private archaeology firms, and Native American tribes. The site is in the traditional territory of the Santiam Band of the Kalapuya. The Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde, the Confederated Tribes of the Siletz and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation were consulted. The contributions include completed analyses; donated time and expertise to identify the source of the obsidian, 3-D scanning, replication studies to better understand how the bifaces were made, ethnographic references that includes a tribal place name in the immediate vicinity, a magnetometer survey to provide data to assist with the excavation, illustrations and donated gear for the excavation.

"This site makes you wonder how many archaeological sites with the potential to shed light on the history of human occupation within Oregon have been found before, and never reported, Pouley said. "We encourage anyone that finds artifacts on their property to contact us."

Archaeological sites found on private land are owned by the landowner and the land remains in the owner's possession. At the conclusion of any state permitted archaeological excavation, all recovered artifacts remain the property of the landowner unless they consist of Native American human remains, burials and associated funerary objects, and objects of cultural patrimony. Often, landowners choose to donate recovered artifacts to a museum or tribe. No one is allowed on private land without owner consent, regardless of the presence of an archaeological site.

After the excavation and analyses are completed, Pouley will produce a professional archaeological report on his findings with the intent to have it later converted into a peer-reviewed publication. Pouley and many of the archaeologists that contributed to the study plan to present their findings at a symposium during the 2017 Northwest Anthropological Conference in Spokane, Wash.

He and others involved in the excavation also will share their findings with Abiqua Academy, a pre-kindergarten through 12th-grade independent school. Middle school students watched a portion of the excavation at the request of the landowner, who is associated with the school. The curriculum challenges students to think critically and creatively and teaches students the concepts of honor, empathy, accountability, respect and teamwork (HEART).

The cache gave them a tangible piece of history, said a teacher who accompanied the students to the site. Adding, "When we study the history of ancient native peoples of this area, we can now speak more fully to a complexity of culture--trade routes, the manufacturing of goods, migratory patterns--and then point to artifacts like those found here and show our students the evidence."

The State Historic Preservation Office is part of the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. Visit www.oregonheritage.org for more information about programs and services.


Attached Media Files: Assistant State Archaeologist John Pouley shows the Native American bifaces found in the cache. The bifaces are made of obsidian sourced from Obsidian Cliffs in the Central Oregon Cascade Mountains. Pouley led the excavation that uncovered the fifteenth b , Megan Wonderly, a volunteer archaeologist at the excavation, records the vertical and horizontal position of the biface. , Volunteer archaeologist Megan Wonderly found an in situ biface biface during the excavation. The biface could help researchers better understand early trade routes. , Matt Diederich (right) shows a visiting middle school student how to sift soil and look for small artifacts. Diederich is an archaeologist with the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office.
Suspicious Package at Roseburg City Hall
Roseburg Police Dept. - 08/15/16 9:53 AM
Just before 0800 hours this morning, a City of Roseburg employee arrived to City Hall and located a suspicious item on one of the exterior stairwells to the building. The employee notified the Police Department, and Officers checked the item. The Oregon State Police Explosives Unit was called to further investigate and as of the time of this release, we are awaiting their arrival.

Roseburg City Hall has been evacuated as a precautionary measure and the section of SE Jackson Street from Douglas to Court has been closed. Please avoid the area until updated.
Paving on OR99E north of Hubbard to start
ODOT: Valley, No. Coast - 08/15/16 9:43 AM
Maintenance crews working for the Oregon Department of Transportation will be paving OR 99E (mileposts 27-29)between Hubbard and the OR 551 cutoff road. The paving is scheduled for the next two weeks, Tuesday to Thursday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day.

During the paving operation, one lane will be open with two-way traffic controlled by flaggers. Travelers should expect delays.
Sun. 08/14/16
Deputies Arrest Two Women for Burglary
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 08/14/16 9:31 PM
Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley reports today at 10:14 a.m., Linn County 9-1-1 Dispatch Center received a call of a burglary in Halsey. The caller said a female came to their front door asking to use the telephone, claiming her car had broken down. While at the front door, a second female entered the residence through the back door and stole the home owner's purse from the kitchen.

Deputies responded to the area and located two females and a male walking near the residence. Deputies recovered an empty wallet from one of the females that belonged to the victim. This eventually led to the arrest of Timeka Marie Betts, 23, of Lebanon and Kylee Irene Glover, 25, of Harrisburg.

During the investigation it was discovered that the females had arrived in the area in a silver 1993 cargo van, which was parked nearby in Halsey. Deputies learned through the Reedsport Police Department, that the van was reported stolen. Still missing from the burglary is $200.00 in cash, identification and several credit cards.

Betts and Glover were lodged at the Linn County Jail on charges of Burglary I, Theft II and Criminal Trespass I. Betts was also charged with Unlawful Use of a Vehicle and had multiple outstanding warrants. Glover also had multiple outstanding warrants.

The male that was found walking with Betts and Glover was released at the scene after being interviewed.

The investigation is continuing.
Deputies Arrest Salem Woman For Animal Neglect After 3 Week Investigation (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/14/16 8:16 PM
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/1294/96884/thumb_Solorzano.jpg
On July 29th, Deputies were alerted by neighbors of a horse that appeared neglected in the 7400 block of Conifer Street NE near Salem. When deputies arrived on scene they were instantly concerned for the horses wellbeing as its ribs and hips were clearly showing.

During their investigation deputies learned the horse was aged 20 and named Doug. The owner Randi Solorzano, age 46 knew of the horse's condition and she told deputies that Doug was under the care of a veterinarian for a dental condition that was preventing him from eating.

The deputies contacted the veterinarian who confirmed the horse was under their care, placed on medication and a specific diet to gain weight. Deputies worked closely with the veterinarian and drove by the pasture regularly to watch the horse's condition.


After missing veterinarian appointments and the horses condition worsening, on August 13th deputies executed a search warrant seized Doug and arrested Ms. Solorzano for Animal Neglect II. Doug has been taken to a rescue where he is receiving the necessary care to recover. Ms. Solorzano was taken to the Marion County Jail and later released, she is set to appear in court September 12th at 9:30 a.m. at the Circuit Court Annex.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1294/96884/Solorzano.jpg , 2016-08/1294/96884/IMG952016072995123153355.jpg , 2016-08/1294/96884/IMG_20160808_123711225.jpg , 2016-08/1294/96884/IMG_20160808_122934339.jpg
Drive-By Shooting in Roseburg
Roseburg Police Dept. - 08/14/16 7:59 PM
On Sunday, August 14th, 2016 at approximately 1122 hours, Officers responded to the report of several gunshots being fired from a vehicle in the 2700 block of Edenbower in Roseburg. The vehicle was described as a silver colored 2 door sedan, occupied by at least two people. Witnesses said they observed the occupants of the vehicle speak to a female in the parking lot of Applebee's, just prior to the shooting. Witnesses also stated it appeared the female and the occupants of the vehicle were having an argument, as the female started walking away.

As the vehicle pulled onto Edenbower, witnesses said someone in the vehicle fired a gun several times out the window, in the direction of the female. The vehicle then fled the area, driving south on Edenbower. Officers checked the area but did not locate the suspect vehicle.

Once on scene, Officers checked the surrounding area and were unable to find anyone who had been struck by the gunshots. There was one gunshot hole found on the side of a shed that was near the female. Officers are continuing the investigation and any new developments will be updated when they become available.
Deputy and K9 Find Missing Autistic Boy Near Mt. Angel (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/14/16 4:09 PM
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/1294/96880/thumb_Rolo__and__Austin.jpg
Today at 2:00 p.m., deputies with the Marion County Sheriff's Office were called after parents found their 14 year old Autistic son missing in the 11000 block of Beyer Lane NE near Mt. Angel. Austin Davis, age 14 went hunting for bugs around 1:00 p.m and had not returned, when his parents became concerned. After searching for Austin they found his clothing near the Pudding River, prompting the call to the Sheriff's Office.

Deputy Jason Bernards and his K9 partner Rolo along with water rescue teams from the Sheriff's Office and the Salem Fire Department were dispatched to the scene. At about 3:00 p.m., Deputy Bernards and Rolo found Austin alive and well on the opposite side of the Pudding River, Austin swam back across the river to Deputy Bernards and he was returned to his parents.

The Sheriff's Office would like to thank all of our public safety partners who responded to help search for Austin.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1294/96880/Rolo__and__Austin.jpg
Linn Deputies Arrest Two Men for Sex Crimes
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 08/14/16 2:38 PM
Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley reports his deputies have arrested two individuals for sex abuse. The arrests are the result of two unrelated reports of incidents that occurred at the Willamette Country Music Festival in Brownsville.

The first report came in today at approximately 4:00 a.m., when the female victim, 20, from Harrisburg, told deputies she woke up unclothed and did not remember what had occurred due to her intoxication and sleep deprivation. The victim was staying with friends in a motor coach RV located on the festival site.

Through the investigation deputies learned that Terry Allen Pepiot, 56, of Harrisburg was one of the individuals staying in the motor coach. Pepiot was interviewed and told deputies there had been an arrangement that he would sleep on a couch and two females would sleep in the bedroom of the RV.

At some point during the evening Pepiot entered the bedroom where the victim was sleeping. Pepiot confessed to sexually abusing the victim. Pepiot was arrested for Unlawful Sexual Penetration in the first degree and lodged in the Linn County Jail.

The second report came in today at 8:14 a.m. The female victim, 20, from Albany, told deputies she left the concert last night with a female friend when they met the suspect, who was not known to her, and began drinking alcohol with him at his campsite. The victim said she later woke up to the suspect sexually assaulting her.

As a result of the investigation, Jeremy Russell Janssen, 37, of Ridgefield, WA, was arrested for Sex Abuse I and taken to the Linn County Jail. Alcohol was a factor in this incident.

Numerous citations have been issued for MIP Alcohol during the weekend event. All minors found in possession of alcohol have been trespassed off the property by festival staff.

No mugshots are available at this time. They will become available later at linnsheriff.org
Lebanon Fire District Responds to a Four Vehicle Crash (Photo)
Lebanon Fire District - 08/14/16 1:34 PM
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/1191/96876/thumb_20160814_105806.jpg
Lebanon Fire District Responds to Four Vehicle Crash
At 10:32am Lebanon Fire District was dispatched to a four vehicle accident at milepost 9 on Highway 20, north of Lebanon. This was a head-on collision involving an eastbound SUV towing a boat and a westbound car. Another westbound pickup hauling a camping trailer crashed into the boat and a fourth vehicle, a small car hit the truck and camping trailer. Two people were transported to Lebanon Community Hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.
Both lanes of Highway 20 were shut down for an hour. Lebanon Fire District responded to this first alarm incident with one chief, one engine, and two ambulances. LFD was assisted on scene by Oregon State Police and the ODOT incident response team. Sweet Home Fire and Ambulance District and Albany Fire Department covered Lebanon's District during the event


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1191/96876/20160814_105806.jpg , 2016-08/1191/96876/20160814_105730.jpg , 2016-08/1191/96876/20160814_105656.jpg
Five Injured In Early Morning Highway 20 Crash East Of Bend - Deschutes County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/14/16 12:22 PM
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On August 13, 2016 at about 12:55AM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a single vehicle rollover on Highway 20 near milepost 5 (near Powell Butte Highway).

Preliminary investigation revealed a 2001 Isuzu SUV was traveling southbound on Powell Butte Highway at a high rate of speed when it failed to stop at the stopsign with Highway 20. The Isuzu left the roadway and rolled multiple times. Emergency crews had to extricate the occupants following the crash. A total of five occupants were taken to the hospital for injuries ranging from minor to serious.

The driver, Shawn W SEAGRAVES HALL, age 23, of Redmond, was cited at the hospital for Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants, Reckless Driving, Reckless Endangering, and Assault II.

Speed and Alcohol is being considered contributing factors. This is an ongoing investigation; more information will be released when it becomes available


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1002/96875/IMG_0612.JPG , 2016-08/1002/96875/IMG_0593.JPG
Sat. 08/13/16
Red Cross Responds to South Beach, OR Fire
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/13/16 4:15 PM
At 8:30 a.m. On August 13th disaster responders with the American Red Cross Cascades Region responded to a single family fire that occurred in the 12000 block of SE Chittum Rd. In South Beach. The fire affected one adult and 4 children.

The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs including temporary housing and information about recovery services, and health and mental health services.

Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross Cascades Region (Oregon and Southwest Washington) responds to an average of two home fires every day. We provide hope and comfort to people affected, helping victims anywhere and anytime. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.
Subject Arrested In Relation To Redwood Highway Fire - Josephine County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/13/16 3:53 PM
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On August 12, 2016, a fire near Selma broke out burning approximately 50 acres.

The Oregon State Police Arson Unit and the Oregon Department of Forestry began an investigation. During the investigation, a Selma area transient was arrested on an unrelated warrant and lodged at the Josephine County Jail.

This person, Marcus A YEOMAN, age 35, quickly became the person of interest in the fire. Investigators determined it was human caused and that YEOMAN had built a campfire which led to the wildland fire. On August 13, 2016 YEOMAN was cited for Reckless Burning.

This is an ongoing investigation and no further information will be released at this time.



Oregon Department of Forestry Release:

Wildfire in Selma Burns Three Homes - 08/13/16

Fire crews worked through the night cooling hot spots and monitoring fire lines on the Redwood Highway Fire in Selma, located on Highway 199 near the California border in southwest Oregon. Cooler nighttime temperatures and calm winds allowed for continued progress to be made on the fire line, which is 87 percent contained. The fire size remains at approximately 50 acres. The cause of the fire is under investigation.

No other fires larger than 100 acres were reported Friday or early Saturday on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands.

Just before sunrise today on the Redwood Highway Fire, firefighters discovered a small spot fire 1,000 feet outside of the current fire line. Within minutes, firefighters extinguished the flames and formed a wet line along the perimeter. Throughout the day, ground crews and aircraft will continue to monitor fire activity and watch for burning snags, spotting and flare ups. The goal is to ensure the fire perimeter is 100 percent lined by this evening.

Firefighters working on structural protection this morning uncovered three homes, and at least five outbuildings destroyed by the fire. It was originally thought by fire crews that only two homes were lost on Deer Creek Road in Selma; however, the daylight revealed that there were two homes on one property, a main house and guest house. All residents managed to safely evacuate. Firefighters will continue to search for additional structures damaged or threatened in the burned area.

Deer Creek Road remains under evacuation this morning. Residents on the 975 block and above on Deer Creek Rd. are at a "Be Set" Level 2 evacuation notice. Residents on the 974 block and below on Deer Creek Rd. remain at a "Go" Level 3 evacuation status. The road is closed to the public. After an additional assessment early this afternoon, Incident Command will revisit the option of reopening the road and changing evacuation levels. Residents seeking shelter assistance should visit the evacuation center, located in Cave Junction at 200 W. Watkins Street.

Redwood Highway is open but travelers are advised to drive slowly through the Selma area. Firefighting operations are still occurring next to the road and areas of smoke may be present.

The weather forecast today in southwest Oregon includes a Red Flag Warning for the Rogue River, Applegate River and Illinois River basins. Hot temperatures, 100-105, low relative humidity and potentially strong afternoon winds are expected across the region.

In the rest of Oregon, temperatures along the Coast remain moderate with highs in the mid-70s and lows in the mid-50s. East of the Cascades, high temperatures are expected in low-to-mid 90s and light winds. On Sunday, there is a chance of thunderstorms in the southern Oregon Cascade Range and the Klamath Basin.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1002/96873/YEOMAN.jpg
Medical Personnel Sought To Fill Vacancies For Oregon State Athletic Commission
Oregon State Police - 08/13/16 1:20 PM
Qualified candidates are being sought to serve as medical personnel (as needed) with the Oregon State Athletic Commission. This is a great opportunity to see Oregon, support small business, and help protect the health and safety of all parties involved in professional boxing and mixed martial arts. Interested candidates from across the state are encouraged to apply.

The Oregon State Athletic Commission (OSAC) is charged with regulating Professional Boxing, Mixed Martial Arts and Entertainment Wrestling in the state of Oregon. OSAC is comprised of an Event Administrator, Governmental Auditor, Compliance Specialist, and an Office Specialist who are responsible for the program's day to day operation. OSAC also has a five member volunteer board that makes recommendations to the Superintendent of State Police, as well as a Medical Advisory Committee that recommends Medical Personnel prior to being chosen as an OSAC team member.

Medical Personnel receive payment for their services at OSAC sanctioned events. Lodging and travel expenses are also included. Interested persons should contact Sergeant Bob Charpentier, of the Oregon State Athletic Commission, at (503)378-8739, or email at bcharpe@osp.state.or.us.

Medical Personnel have the opportunity to qualify competitors before competing in a professional boxing or mixed martial arts bout, complete a post bout exam, and occasionally provide post bout care. Medical Personnel sit ringside and cage side during events and have an up close view of bouts between competitors to ensure both competitors are safe and not exposed to any unnecessary risks.

Medical Personnel must meet the following minimum qualifications, must be approved by the Medical Advisory Committee and consent to and pass a background investigation:

(1) Must be a medical doctor, osteopath or physician's assistant licensed in the State of
Oregon;

(2) Must be familiar with the physical standards for licensing boxers and mixed martial
arts contestants as outlined in Oregon Administrative Rule 230 and Oregon Revised
Statute Chapter 463 or be willing to learn;

(3) Must be willing to provide pre and post-fight medical exams prior to and during
events; and

(4) Must be willing to travel to events on weekends when able.

More information is available on the Commission website at: http://www.oregon.gov/osp/OSAC/Pages/Home.aspx
Red Cross Responds to South Beach, OR Fire
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/13/16 12:47 PM
At 8:30 a.m. On August 13th disaster responders with the American Red Cross Cascades Region responded to a single family fire that occurred in the 12000 block of SE Chittum Rd. In South Beach. The fire affected one adult.

The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs including temporary housing and information about recovery services, and health and mental health services.

Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross Cascades Region (Oregon and Southwest Washington) responds to an average of two home fires every day. We provide hope and comfort to people affected, helping victims anywhere and anytime. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.
Wildfire in Selma Burns Three Homes
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/13/16 11:16 AM
Fire crews worked through the night cooling hot spots and monitoring fire lines on the Redwood Highway Fire in Selma, located on Highway 199 near the California border in southwest Oregon. Cooler nighttime temperatures and calm winds allowed for continued progress to be made on the fire line, which is 87 percent contained. The fire size remains at approximately 50 acres. The cause of the fire is under investigation.

No other fires larger than 100 acres were reported Friday or early Saturday on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands.

Just before sunrise today on the Redwood Highway Fire, firefighters discovered a small spot fire 1,000 feet outside of the current fire line. Within minutes, firefighters extinguished the flames and formed a wet line along the perimeter. Throughout the day, ground crews and aircraft will continue to monitor fire activity and watch for burning snags, spotting and flare ups. The goal is to ensure the fire perimeter is 100 percent lined by this evening.

Firefighters working on structural protection this morning uncovered three homes, and at least five outbuildings destroyed by the fire. It was originally thought by fire crews that only two homes were lost on Deer Creek Road in Selma; however, the daylight revealed that there were two homes on one property, a main house and guest house. All residents managed to safely evacuate. Firefighters will continue to search for additional structures damaged or threatened in the burned area.

Deer Creek Road remains under evacuation this morning. Residents on the 975 block and above on Deer Creek Rd. are at a "Be Set" Level 2 evacuation notice. Residents on the 974 block and below on Deer Creek Rd. remain at a "Go" Level 3 evacuation status. The road is closed to the public. After an additional assessment early this afternoon, Incident Command will revisit the option of reopening the road and changing evacuation levels. Residents seeking shelter assistance should visit the evacuation center, located in Cave Junction at 200 W. Watkins Street.

Redwood Highway is open but travelers are advised to drive slowly through the Selma area. Firefighting operations are still occurring next to the road and areas of smoke may be present.

The weather forecast today in southwest Oregon includes a Red Flag Warning for the Rogue River, Applegate River and Illinois River basins. Hot temperatures, 100-105, low relative humidity and potentially strong afternoon winds are expected across the region.

In the rest of Oregon, temperatures along the Coast remain moderate with highs in the mid-70s and lows in the mid-50s. East of the Cascades, high temperatures are expected in low-to-mid 90s and light winds. On Sunday, there is a chance of thunderstorms in the southern Oregon Cascade Range and the Klamath Basin.
Fri. 08/12/16
State Unveils New Tool for Firefighter Driver Training (Photo)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/12/16 3:24 PM
Skid Truck
Skid Truck
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/1187/96858/thumb_DPSSt_Skid_Truck_8-2016.jpg_3.jpg
The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is the home of the Fire Training and Certification Programs for the State of Oregon. Today, DPSST unveiled its newest fire service training tool, a 2016 Freightliner truck with a skid frame. This new resource became possible through an Assistance to Firefighters Grant (AFG) from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). This new tool will be added to DPSST's Skid Avoidance for Fire Apparatus Drivers (SAFAD) Program that addresses the second leading cause of line-of-duty deaths in the nation's fire service; driving emergency vehicles.

Most fire apparatus drivers learn to drive expensive emergency vehicles on the streets of the communities they serve. Approximately 80% of the state of Oregon is served by dedicated volunteers who drive their personal vehicles to the fire station and then respond to an emergency incident with a multi-ton emergency vehicle with lights and sirens active, in some cases without any formalized training.

To accomplish its goals, which mirror many of the 16 Firefighter Life Safety Initiatives of the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation (http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/16-initiatives/), the DPSST SAFAD Program uses both classroom and hands-on training. The classroom training incorporates information from the various national programs listed above and begins to lay the foundation for belief, misconception, and consequence. The class includes a review of state motor vehicle codes and regulations, analysis of accidents involving fire apparatus, and basic driving instruction. Case studies are used throughout the classroom portion so that fire apparatus drivers understand they are accountable for their actions and that they play an important part in changing the culture of the fire service, both when responding to and returning from incidents in fire apparatus as well as personal vehicles.

The innovative hands-on portion is accomplished using a specially designed training platform. The platform is called a "skid truck" and mounts under the Freightliner truck which simulates a fire engine. The skid truck, equipped with lights and siren, has hydraulic cylinders attached to each corner which allow the vehicle to be lifted while in operation simulating a skid but in a controlled setting. Oregon's geography, weather and population are diverse. From the high desert of Eastern Oregon, the mountains of Central Oregon, the urban and suburban communities in the Willamette Valley, to the Pacific Coast Highway (101) that follows the Oregon Coast. The SAFAD program is ideal in preparing Oregon firefighters for the driving and weather challenges they will encounter when responding to incidents across the state.

Since DPSST implemented SAFAD in 2009 over 6,000 firefighters have received the training program. Oregon has seen a marked decrease in the number of vehicle crashes involving fire apparatus responding to and returning from emergency incidents. Before the program was implemented, on average ten crashes occurred each year involving fire apparatus. After DPSST's SAFAD program was implemented, that number has been drastically reduced. More important, since the program has been implemented, there have been no line-of-duty deaths in fire apparatus in the state. While this change can be attributed to a number of factors including increased awareness by state and national fire service organizations and publications, we believe the SAFAD program has also played a major role in changing the culture of the Oregon fire service.

In 2012 Oregon's SAFAD Program was recognized by the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation and the Congressional Fire Service Institute which bestowed DPSST with its Senator Paul S. Sarbanes Fire Service Safety Leadership Award.

DPSST serves more than 41,000 public safety professionals of which approximately 13,000 are career and volunteer firefighters. On an annual basis, DPSST's Fire Training Program reaches approximately 10,000 firefighters through classes offered at the Oregon Public Safety Academy and through its regional delivery program.

For more information on Skid Car and Skid Truck http://www.skidcar.com/


Attached Media Files: Skid Truck , Skid Truck , Skid Truck , Skid Truck
Oregon Virtual Academy
Oregon Virtual Academy - 08/12/16 3:22 PM
NOTICE OF REGULAR MEETING OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS MONDAY AUGUST 22, 2016 @ 6:00 pm
via teleconference 1-888-824-5783 Ext.90095991# and via Blackboard Collaborate at
http://tinyurl.com/BoardORVA
OSP arrests suspects in fire on Weyco near Scappoose (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/12/16 3:21 PM
2016-08/1072/96855/Holaday_Rd_Fire_3.jpg
2016-08/1072/96855/Holaday_Rd_Fire_3.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/1072/96855/thumb_Holaday_Rd_Fire_3.jpg
The Oregon State Police arrested four suspects on suspicion of starting a fire that burned Aug. 5 on Weyerhaeuser property along Holaday Road in the Scappoose area. The wildfire, thought to have resulted from an illegal campfire that spread out of control, ignited several logging slash piles.

An OSP trooper arrested four males ranging in age from 19-23 on Aug. 6. They were charged with reckless burning, trespass and littering. The suspects later confessed to having built the campfire, which is prohibited under current fire safety rules. OSP obtained video from social media that shows the individuals at the campfire site. Text messages accompanying the video contained comments to the effect that they thought they had extinguished the campfire.

Weyerhaeuser security could file a complaint against the men. The Oregon Department of Forestry intends to take legal action against the suspects to collect fire suppression costs.

Regulated Use rules were in force when the wildfire occurred and will continue in effect until significant fall rains allow them to be lifted. These heightened safety restrictions prohibit campfires and other open fires in order to prevent wildfires during periods of high fire danger.

"Oregon State Police would like to remind the public that having a campfire when prohibited is a potential criminal act," said OSP's Bill Fugate. "If an unintended wildland fire occurs, the crime would be more severe. Please obey fire restrictions so all may enjoy our forests."

Firefighting crews worked through the night last Friday to control the wildfire. No homes were threatened by the blaze. Scappoose Fire District was assisted in the suppression effort by Columbia River Fire & Rescue and the Oregon Department of Forestry.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1072/96855/Holaday_Rd_Fire_3.jpg , 2016-08/1072/96855/Holaday_Rd_Fire_2.jpg , An illegal campfire on Weyerhaeuser land near Scappoose Aug. 5 spread to logging slash piles and caused an intense wildfire. (Photos by Kelly Niles, ODF)
Five ways to beat the heat
Pacific Power - 08/12/16 2:57 PM
Pacific Power media hotline: Aug. 12. 2016
1-800-570-5838 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Five ways to beat the heat
Tips from Pacific Power to be safe, stay cool and use less energy

PORTLAND, Ore. --With forecasts predicting triple-digit temperatures throughout the Northwest over the coming weekend, Pacific Power wants to remind customers to stay safe and use these tips to beat the heat, use less energy and save money.

Stay hydrated and watch for others
Drink water and stay out of direct sunlight as much as possible. Use hats and sunscreen.
Check on neighbors who you know have few outside contacts. Keep a close eye on children and pets to make sure they have water available and have some place to cool down after bouts of fun in the sun.

Don't let the sun shine in
On hot days, close blinds and drapes, especially in south-facing windows which allow in the most heat.

Open windows in the evening and circulate cool air
Open windows in the evening and early morning to let in cool air. Be aware, however, of any safety or security issues.
Use fans to bring in and circulate cool air. Ceiling and window fans use less electricity than an air conditioner when the compressor is engaged. Running an air conditioner in fan-only mode can also be effective as outside temperatures drop.

Reduce the heat inside
Use heat-producing appliances like ovens, dishwashers and dryers in the early morning or late evening when temperatures are cooler.
Grill outside or use a microwave or toaster oven. A toaster oven uses one-third to one-half as much energy as a regular oven and releases less heat into the home.
Turn off heat-generating devices when not in use, including lamps, televisions and computers.

Be air conditioner smart
Set your thermostat at 78 degrees. This will keep you comfortable and cooling your house below that temperature can increase your air conditioning bill as much as 8 percent.
Don't turn off the air conditioner when you're gone; instead set it higher, at 85 degrees. That setting allows your air conditioner to use less electricity to cool the house than if the air conditioning has been off all day, but doesn't shut down altogether.
Use a programmable or smart thermostat; set it to start bringing your home's temperature from 85 degrees down to 78 degrees no more than 30 minutes before you get home.
Replace air conditioner filters once a month. The dirtier your filter, the less efficient it is.
Lamps, televisions or any other appliance that creates heat needs to be kept away from the thermostat; they will impact its accuracy.
Your air conditioner will operate most efficiently if you trim nearby foliage to allow adequate air flow around the unit.
Don't block inside distribution vents with furniture or other objects.

For more information and tips, visit bewattsmart.com.

About Pacific Power
Pacific Power provides electric service to more than 740,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. The company works to meet growing energy demand while protecting and enhancing the environment. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with almost 1.8 million customers in six western states Information about Pacific Power is available on the company's website, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube pages.
UPDATE #2: Inmate Escapes from Work Crew at Pittock Mansion - Officers Searching Parks, Trails, Neighborhood (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 08/12/16 12:53 PM
2016-08/3056/96842/Jasson_Ray_Photos.jpg
2016-08/3056/96842/Jasson_Ray_Photos.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/3056/96842/thumb_Jasson_Ray_Photos.jpg
Ray was last seen at Good Samaritan Hospital, located at 1015 Northwest 22nd Avenue, at approximately 10:30 a.m. after he was given a ride by an unwitting person from the area of Pittock Mansion. Ray gave the name "Aaron Ray" to hospital staff and claimed to be suffering from an arm injury.

Ray was last seen wearing a dark blue shirt, dark blue shorts, and wearing heavy socks (no shoes).

Additional photos are being released, including a hospital surveillance photo and one of Ray's Facebook photos.

Anyone seeing Ray is asked to immediately call 9-1-1. Anyone with non-emergency information should call Police Non-Emergency Line at 503-823-3333.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

The inmates name is Jasson Lewis Ray, not Jasson Ray Lewis as initially released.

He was possibly last seen in the 2900 block of Northwest Cumberland Road, which is the neighborhood northeast of Pittock Mansion.

Officers and a Canine Unit are continuing to search the area.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

On Friday August 12, 2016, at 10:37 a.m., Central Precinct officers responded to assist the Oregon Department of Corrections in the area of Pittock Mansion to find an inmate that walked away from a work crew.

37-year-old Jasson Lewis Ray is described as a white male, 5'8" tall, 200 pounds, shaved head, blue eyes, goatee, lots of tattoos, last seen wearing blue jeans with "INMATE" printed in orange and a blue or black t-shirt.

Ray may have walked off into neighborhoods South of Pittock Mansion. Area residents and recreational park users are asked to call 9-1-1 immediately if Ray is seen in the area.

Ray was serving time with the Oregon Department of Corrections on firearm and theft charges. Ray has prior convictions for assault and has criminal history in California and Arizona.

Updates will be provided when they become available.

###PPB###

#PA


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/3056/96842/Jasson_Ray_Photos.jpg
Oregon State Library Board Meeting in Salem, August 26, 2016
Oregon State Library - 08/12/16 9:44 AM
The Oregon State Library Board will meet at the State Library in Salem on Friday August 26, 2016 from 9:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Aletha Bonebrake of Baker City will chair the meeting.

At the meeting on August 26th, the board will review the Board Work Plan, the Agency Operational Plan, and the annual Board Best Practices evaluation. An open forum is scheduled for 11:45 a.m. Anyone may address the Board on any topic at the open forum.

Sign language interpretation will be provided for the public if requested prior to 48 hours before the meeting; notice prior to 72 hours before the meeting is preferred. Handouts of meeting materials may also be requested in alternate formats prior to 72 hours before the meeting. Requests may be made to Jessica Rondema at 503-378-2464.

-30-

OREGON STATE LIBRARY BOARD MEETING
August 26, 2016
Oregon State Library
Room 103
Salem, OR
Aletha Bonebrake, Chair

Agenda

9:30 a.m. Approval of the Minutes of the June 10, 2016 Meeting Bonebrake

9:35 Reports of Board Chair and Members Bonebrake

10:00 State Librarian Reports Dahlgreen
Activities since the last meeting
Operational Plan Update

10:45 Staff Reports Hanning, Krueck, Henderson, McGann/Wann

11:45 Open Forum Bonebrake

Noon Lunch

1:00 New Business
Board Work Plan Bonebrake
Board Best Practices Bonebrake

2:00 Adjournment Bonebrake

Any person may address the Oregon State Library Board at this meeting on any topic.

NOTE: The times of all agenda items are approximate and subject to change.
Deputies Arrest Man After Attempting to Light Local Business on Fire (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/12/16 8:58 AM
2016-08/1294/96836/371729.jpg
2016-08/1294/96836/371729.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/1294/96836/thumb_371729.jpg
Last night at 10:50 p.m., deputies arrested Jesus Ochoa-Oliveros, age 31, after witnesses say he lit several rags in an attempt to burn Hearthbeat Florist a flower shop located at 500 Lancaster Drive SE in Salem. After a short foot chase, Mr. Ochoa-Oliveros was arrested and found to be in possession of 3 knives, brass knuckles and a lighter.

On August 10th, Deputies contacted Mr. Ochoa-Oliveros near a series of criminal mischiefs and a dumpster fire in this instance Mr. Ochoa-Oliveros ran from deputies and was able to escape. Mr. Ochoa-Oliveros is currently at the Marion County Jail where he will appear in court today for the crimes of Arson II, Resisting Arrest, Interfering with a Police Officer x 2 and Carrying a Concealed Weapon.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1294/96836/371729.jpg
Health advisory lifted August 12 for Odell Lake
Oregon Health Authority - 08/12/16 8:57 AM
August 12, 2016

Reduced blue-green algae and toxin levels confirmed; continued caution with pets advised

The Oregon Health Authority has lifted the health advisory issued July 28 for Odell Lake, located 75 miles southeast of Eugene off Highway 58 in Klamath County.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of blue-green algae toxins are below guideline values for human exposure. However, the Oregon Health Authority recommends that people continue to be cautious with their pets in the lake because toxins are still above the very low exposure levels established for dogs.

Oregon health officials advise recreational visitors to always be alert to signs of algae blooms in Oregon waters, because only a fraction of the many lakes in Oregon are monitored for blue-green algae by state and federal agencies. People and their pets should avoid areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of blue-green algae is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water column. If you observe these signs in the water you are encouraged to avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

For health information, to report human or pet illnesses due to blooms, or to ask questions about a news release, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0400. For information about advisories issued or lifted for the season, contact the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767 or visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://healthoregon.org/hab and select "Algae Bloom Advisories."

# # #
Thu. 08/11/16
Deputies Investigating Two Car Crash Involving Pedestrian (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/11/16 8:25 PM
2016-08/1294/96828/Crash1.jpg
2016-08/1294/96828/Crash1.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/1294/96828/thumb_Crash1.jpg
Deputies are currently on scene and investigating a two car crash that has seriously injured a pedestrian. Deputies believe a black Chevrolet passenger car was driving east on Silverton Road NE and ran a red light as it turned north on to Lancaster Drive NE.

The Chevrolet was struck by a westbound Chrysler 300 and the impact pushed the Chevrolet into a pedestrian that was crossing Lancaster Drive NE on a skate board. The pedestrian was taken by ambulance to Salem Hospital with serious injuries but he is expected to survive.

No further details are available regarding the crash at this time. The release will be updated as those details become available.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1294/96828/Crash1.jpg
One banana, two banana, three banana, four... (Photo)
ODOT: SW Oregon - 08/11/16 7:24 PM
Aug. 11 banana truck fire 3
Aug. 11 banana truck fire 3
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/1202/96827/thumb_Banana_truck_3.jpg
The Interstate 5 Exit 11 northbound off-ramp in Ashland reopened at 6:18, following a brief closure caused by a commercial truck fire. This is the second commercial truck fire on I-5 near Ashland involving a load of bananas this summer. The previous semi fire occurred on July 13. (If you can't get "The Tra La La Song" out of your head, check out this link to the Ashland Daily Tidings story from the first banana truck fire: http://goo.gl/tNoKYm).


Attached Media Files: Aug. 11 banana truck fire 3 , Aug. 11 banana truck fire 2 , Aug. 11 banana truck fire
Fatal Crash Highway 30 Saint Helens
Oregon State Police - 08/11/16 5:21 PM
Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Thursday afternoons two vehicle fatal crash that occurred on Highway 30 within the city limits of Saint Helens.

Preliminary investigation revealed that on August 11, 2016 at about 12:54 PM, a member of the Scappoose Police Department attempted to make an enforcement contact with a 2004 Toyota Highlander, driven by an adult male, in relation to a driving complaint on Highway 30. The operator of the Toyota Highlander initially pulled over and then fled the stop westbound on Highway 30. Scappoose Police pursued the Toyota Highlander for a short time and distance and terminated the pursuit in the interest of public safety.

At about 12:57 PM, after the pursuit had been terminated, the operator of the Toyota Highlander crashed into the back of a westbound 2012 Honda Civic, driven by an adult female, on Highway 30 within Saint Helens. The Toyota Highlander left the roadway to the north over railroad tracks and came to an uncontrolled rest down an embankment. The Honda Civic went across three lanes and left the roadway to the south going through a fence and came to an uncontrolled rest in the yard of a residence.

The male operator of the Toyota Highlander died from injuries sustained at the scene of the crash. The female operator of the Honda Civic sustained serious injuries and was transported to a local hospital in Portland for treatment.

It was determined by investigators that the operator of the Toyota Highlander was not wearing a safety belt. The female operator of the Honda Civic was wearing a safety belt at the time of the crash.

OSP troopers from the Saint Helens Worksite are continuing the investigation into the crash.
Names of involved are being withheld pending next of kin notification. More information will be released when it becomes available.

At the request of Scappoose Police Department, OSP will be conducting the crash investigation. Any inquiries regarding the initial driving complaint and pursuit prior to the crash should be directed to Scappoose Police Department for information.

No photographs available for release.

###
Health advisory for water contact at Rockaway Beach and Seal Rock State Park Beach lifted August 11
Oregon Health Authority - 08/11/16 3:41 PM
August 11, 2016

Testing shows fecal bacteria levels have subsided

The Oregon Health Authority today lifted a public health advisory for contact with marine water at Rockaway Beach, located in Tillamook County and Seal Rock State Park Beach, located in Lincoln County. OHA issued the advisory for Rockaway Beach August 9 and for Seal Rock State Park Beach August 10, after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Ongoing samples taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) show that contamination has subsided and the water no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk associated with water contact activities. However, officials recommend staying out of large pools on the beach that are frequented by birds, and runoff from those pools, because the water may contain increased bacteria from fecal matter.

State officials continue to encourage other recreational activities at all Oregon beaches, suggesting only that water contact be avoided when advisories are in effect.

Since 2003 state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are OHA, DEQ and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

For more information, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0400, or call OHA toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767.

# # #
Three days of fun at Tillamook Forest Center featuring 'Return from the Burn' Aug. 19-21
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/11/16 2:06 PM
Throughout the weekend the Tillamook Forest Center will host engaging activities and displays representing the history of the forest before, during and after the catastrophic fires that began in 1933.

All Three Days . . .
Get a hug from Smokey Bear and receive a free goodie bag! 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. daily
Meet forest firefighters and spray a fire hose! 11:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. daily
Create arts and crafts to take home

Saturday, August 20, 11:30 a.m. | Cheryl Hill - Stories from Oregon's Lookout History
Local author Cheryl Hill will talk about the history of Oregon's fire lookouts and discuss current lookouts in Oregon, as well as share hiking opportunities and offer tips on renting a fire lookout.

A STEP BACK IN TIME
This year's Tillamook Forest Center Return from the Burn no-cost event is held in conjunction with Tillamook County's "A Step Back in Time". Visit area museums and take a scenic train ride for $20. For more information, call the Tillamook County Pioneer Museum at 503-842-4553.

LOCATION, DAYS AND HOURS
The Tillamook Forest Center is located on Highway 6 at milepost 22, approximately one hour from Portland and 20 minutes from the city of Tillamook. Summer hours daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. continue through Sept. 7. Fall hours, Wednesdays -- Sundays, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. begin on Sept. 8. For more information about the Tillamook Forest Center, visit www.tillamookforestcenter.org or call 866-930-4646.
Corps seeks comments on Bandon, Coos County permit application
US Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District - 08/11/16 1:14 PM
US Army Corps of Engineers
Portland District

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is seeking comments on a request by The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife to conduct work in Bandon, Coos County,

Oregon. Public Notice NWP-2015-186 is available at http://www.nwp.usace.army.mil/Missions/Regulatory/Notices/
Health insurers agree to serve rural counties in 2017
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 08/11/16 11:32 AM
Salem -- Several health insurance companies have agreed to continue to offer statewide individual coverage -- and in one case, expand coverage -- in 2017, the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS) announced today.

All counties in Oregon will have at least two carriers participating both on and off Oregon's Health Insurance Marketplace and at least two carriers participating exclusively off the marketplace. Many of these counties were facing significant decreases in the number of health insurance companies available in the individual market in 2017.

"We are concerned about the shrinking number of options in certain areas of the state, and we asked insurance companies to reconsider their decisions to withdraw," said Patrick Allen, director of the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services. "This is a short-term solution to provide more options in 2017, but we need to focus on long-term solutions to stabilize the individual market."

The changes include the following:

BridgeSpan Health, Providence Health Plan, and Regence Blue Cross Blue Shield of Oregon will once again offer statewide coverage in 2017. They previously planned to limit their coverage to certain geographic areas for 2017.
ATRIO Health Plans will expand its coverage to Deschutes County.

Because these four insurers are taking more risk than they expected, Allen is allowing them to adjust their rates upward. The rate changes result in more consistent rates across the state and include the following:
BridgeSpan and Regence's statewide rates are between 3 percent and 6 percent higher than the final rates the DCBS Division of Financial Regulation approved in July.
For the counties included in Providence's original filing, the rates are about 5 percent higher than the final rates approved in July.
For the counties included in ATRIO's original filing, the rates are 2 percent to 8 percent higher than the final rates approved in July.
For the counties Providence and ATRIO added after rates were approved, the state assigned new rates equivalent to BridgeSpan's new rates.

"While bringing back these plans throughout the state is in the best interest of consumers, we know continued rate increases are not sustainable," Allen said. "In the coming months, we will work with the Governor's office, legislators, and stakeholders to develop proposals for the 2017 legislative session that address the underlying costs of health care so that Oregonians throughout the state continue to have coverage options."

For county-by-county details about coverage in the individual market, visit dfr.oregon.gov/public-resources/Documents/individual-coverage.pdf. The Division of Financial Regulation will post final premium tables for each county later this month on oregonhealthrates.org/.

###

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit dcbs.oregon.gov and dfr.oregon.gov.
Corrections Deputies and Officers to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/11/16 9:40 AM
The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of Basic Corrections Local #BCL023 on Friday August 19, 2016 at the Oregon Public Safety Academy, 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon.

We would like to invite you to join us in observing the ceremony and congratulating Basic Corrections #BCL023 on their successful completion of basic training.
The event will begin at 11 am with a reception to follow after the ceremony. Sheriff Byron Trapp of the Lane County Sheriff's Office will be the guest speaker.

The graduating students appreciate the family, friends and guests who make graduation an appropriate conclusion to their basic training at the Oregon Public Safety Academy.

Members of Graduating Class BCL023

Deputy Sheriff Spencer Bell
Coos County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Elaine Benade
Washington County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Jeremy Bowman
Coos County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Jennifer Crandell
Curry County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Bradley Davis
Klamath County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Mason Dawson
Columbia County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Jennifer Essick
Josephine County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Steven Fierro
Washington County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Zachery Fierro
Lincoln County Sheriff's Office

Corrections Officer Arthur Galaviz
Washington County Community Corrections

Deputy Sheriff Tyler Gill
Lane County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Tanner Hanes
Lane County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Lex Harrold
Lane County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Jonathan Hart
Josephine County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Samuel Hatch
Polk County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff William Koenig
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Yumi Kong
Polk County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Cody Libbett
Coos County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Rebecca Maples
Clackamas County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Reece McClendon
Douglas County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Jordan McDonald
Marion County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Joshua Merritt
Douglas County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Christopher Read
Lincoln County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Mark Rhodes
Washington County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Laura Rouse
Washington County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Asmir Sacirovic
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Ryan Sansom
Lane County Sheriff's Office

Corrections Officer Stephanie Sansom
Florence Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Elijah St. Helen
Clatsop County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Stefanie Thelin
Klamath County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Amy Thomas
Linn County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Jarett Villafane
Lincoln County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Arryn White
Marion County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Erica Whitney
Marion County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Joshawa Wilson
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Kelci Woodbury
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Christopher Younger
Polk County Sheriff's Office



## Background Information on the BPSST and DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff's Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.
Murder Investigation and Arrest (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/11/16 8:53 AM
Gunnar Vachon
Gunnar Vachon
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/5204/96796/thumb_vachon_gunnar_dale.jpg
On Wednesday, August 10, 2016, at about 1438 hours, Douglas County Communications received a 911 call from the residents of 185 Surprise Avenue, Myrtle Creek, Oregon advising that a subject had been stabbed there. Upon arrival, first responders found Chris A. Bell, age 41 of Myrtle Creek, suffering from multiple stab wounds. Initial medical interventions by EMT's were unsuccessful and Bell was declared deceased at the scene.

Responding Deputies from the Douglas County Sheriff's Office learned from persons at the residence that Gunnar D. Vachon, age 22 of Myrtle Creek, had left the scene after the stabbing in an unknown direction. Vachon was located nearby a short time later by Deputies and detained without incident. After Detectives spoke with Vachon, he was lodged at the Douglas County Jail on a charge of Murder.

The Sheriff's Office was assisted in the investigation by members of the Roseburg Police Department, Oregon State Police and the Douglas County District Attorney's Office. An autopsy of Chris Bell is scheduled at the Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office in Portland.

Next of kin has been notified.

###


Attached Media Files: Gunnar Vachon
Delays expected for bridge inspection work on northbound Interstate 5 south of Salem
ODOT: Valley, No. Coast - 08/11/16 8:21 AM
Motorists traveling northbound on Interstate 5 this weekend can expect delays south of Salem for bridge inspection work on the Mill Creek Bridge (milepost 252.54). The bridge is located between the Kuebler and Mission Street interchanges.

Inspections are scheduled between 6 a.m. to noon on both Saturday and Sunday, August 13-14. If needed, inspections may also occur on Saturday-Sunday, August 20-21. Motorists can expect to see at least two lanes of I-5 closed during that time which will cause delays.

The inspections are being conducted by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) as part of its Long-Term Bridge Performance Program. FHWA is inspecting a number of bridges in several western states. The Oregon Department of Transportation is coordinating the inspection work and traffic control for the Mill Creek Bridge inspection.

Motorists are encouraged to visit TripCheck.com to get the latest on any traffic delays.
Pearl Harbor launches WWII 75th Anniversaries w/Oregon Dove Release on Nat'l Spirit of '45 Day, Aug 14: Brave WWII sailors honored at Willamette Nat'l Cemetery 11AM (Photo)
Oregon Spirit of '45 - 08/11/16 7:32 AM
Congressional Dignitaries and US Navy representatives will recognize the "Greatest Generation' and commemorate the upcoming 75th Anniversary of the 1941 Pearl Harbor attack ~ Bring your WWII hero's military photo to this Aug 14,11 AM Event

PORTLAND: Join us for Spirit of '45 Day at the amphitheater at Willamette National Cemetery on Sunday, August 14 at 11 am for a ceremony of honor, gratitude and remembrance to recognize the incredible contributions of the World War II generation. 75 Doves will be released signifying the 75st Anniversary of Pearl Harbor.

Spirit of '45 Day, the 2nd Sunday of every August (this year Victory in Japan 'V-J' Day), is keeping the Spirit of '45 Alive to honor the 16.1 million Americans who defended our freedom 1941-1945.

This year, the Spirit of '45 commemorates the 75th Anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor and honors those WWII service members of the US Navy, Marines, Merchant Marines and Coast Guard, specifically those who fought and lost their lives in the December 7,1941 attack. When you arrive at the Cemetery site, you will 'REMEMBER AND BE INSPIRED' by the Wall of Honor -- 'their faces' -- of these brave men and women surrounding the podium and displayed in the amphitheater.

Special presentations from US Senator Merkley's Office and the US Navy will honor Pearl Harbor survivor Ed Johann and the youngest WWII sailor to receive a Medal of Honor, Robert E. Bush.

Ed Johann, at age 17, rescued men on the USS Arizona on 7 December 1941 and later received the Navy commendation medal with valor for his heroic efforts. Ed, 93 years young. lives on the Oregon coast and is expected to be joined this weekend by his great grandson, one-year active duty Marine Lance Corporal Benjamin Jennings stationed at Camp Pendleton, CA.

Robert E Bush, at the age of 18, is the Navy's youngest sailor to receive the Medal of Honor. He was awarded his medal of honor by President Truman for his gallantry and intrepidity in Okinawa on May 2, 1945 --putting the life of his fellow officer before his own. Tom Brokaw dedicates a chapter to Robert in his book, "The Greatest Generation." Bush will be represented by his only daughter, Susan Ehle.

US Navy Sea Cadets and Civil Air Patrol will participate. The ceremony will include full military honors, color guard, patriotic music, the traditional salute of 21 guns and taps to recognize the contributions made by the "Greatest Generation.' Attendance is expected to exceed 1,000. The ceremony will be held in the Assembly Area near the flagpole and the Pearl Harbor Memorial. All military branches will be honored for the 16 million Americans who served (152,000 Oregonians) and nearly 500,000 (7,200 Oregonians) who lost their lives.
HELP US BUILD THE 'WWII WALL OF HONOR -- FACES OF HEROES.' Oregon Spirit of '45 enlists all families, friends and communities to bring your WWII hero's military photo to our August 14 event to honor the men and women of the WWII generation--all service branches from any state welcome. Your hero's service branch, hometown and other optional data will be helpful for our volunteers ready to add your photo to our 'wall.' You can also UPLOAD your photo and information to www.orspiritof45.org.

In 2020, during the WWII 75th Anniversary Spirit of '45 Commemorative Weekend of Aug 7-9, America will honor the achievements and virtues of men and women of this incredible generation by displaying a Wall of Honor banner of their photos collected by all states--stretching the 2-mile-long mall from The Nation's Capital steps to the Lincoln Memorial, and back to the reflecting pool of the National World War II Memorial.
__________________________________

The Oregon Spirit of '45, Inc. is a 501(c)3 non-profit dedicated to commemorating the achievements and virtues of the World War II generation, on the 2nd Sunday of every August, so as to inspire future generations.

KEEP THE SPIRIT OF '45 ALIVE! is a non-profit, non-partisan initiative to preserve the legacy of the men and women of the Greatest Generation so that their example of courage, self-sacrifice, "can-do" attitude and commitment to community can help inspire a renewal of national unity in America at a time when our country once again must come together to meet historic challenges. Its goal is to establish an annual day of remembrance and national renewal to remind America of the values and accomplishments of the generation who endured the hard times of the Great Depression, fought to defeat the greatest tyranny in history, and then went on to rebuild their shattered world in an unprecedented effort to help assure a better future for both friend and former foe alike.


Attached Media Files: OR Spirit of '45 Fact Sheet , OR Spirit of '45 Aug 14 Event Flyer , WWII 75th Anniversaries Timeline , WWII Wall of Honor -- SUBMIT PHOTO , OR Spirit of '45 Logo
LFD Responds to 2nd Alarm Structure Fire at Entek Manufacturing (Photo)
Lebanon Fire District - 08/11/16 12:20 AM
2016-08/1191/96791/entek.JPG
2016-08/1191/96791/entek.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/1191/96791/thumb_entek.JPG
At 6:12 PM on Wednesday evening fire crews were dispatched to a report of a structure fire at the Entek Manufacturing plant. Initial reports stated the fire was discovered in one of the extruder processing lines. Firefighters from LFD found fire burning the plastic battery separator material on one of the units.

An aggressive attack by the crews stopped the fire spread within ten minutes of arrival. Crews spent approximately one hour and twenty minutes on scene to ensure all hot spots were extinguished. The Lebanon Fire District was assisted by the Sweet Home Fire and Ambulance District and the Albany Fire Department, as well as the invaluable staff at Entek. The Scio Fire District and Medic 71 covered all additional emergency calls while crews tended to the Entek incident.

This is the second fire involving similar equipment in the past six months. There were no injuries reported, however there was approximately $10,000 in equipment damage. All together there were nine fire apparatus on scene, two chiefs, and 27 total fire personnel.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1191/96791/entek.JPG
Wed. 08/10/16
Red Cross Responds to Scio, Oregon Fire
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/10/16 11:22 PM
At 9:20 p.m. on August 10th disaster responders with the American Red Cross Cascades Region responded to a single family fire that occurred in the 38000 block of W. Scio Rd. in Scio, Oregon. The single family fire affected one adult.

The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs including temporary housing and information about recovery services, and health and mental health services.

Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross Cascades Region (Oregon and Southwest Washington) responds to an average of two home fires every day. We provide hope and comfort to people affected, helping victims anywhere and anytime. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.
Oregon Students compete in national robotics competition aboard the International Space Station
Evergreen Aviation and Space Museum - 08/10/16 2:37 PM
itucatey August 12th, 2016 students from across Oregon will gather at Evergreen 3D theater on the Museum Campus, starting at 6 am, to watch a live broadcast of astronauts, Jeffrey Williams and Oleg Skripochka. They will be controlling satellites aboard the International Space Station with computer code written by Oregon students as part of their Zero Robotics summer learning program.

Zero Robotics is a robotics programming competition that allows middle-school and high school students to work in teams to code and control Synchronized, Position, Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES). The game/challenge is designed by MIT students and changes every year to reflect a current need/research area of NASA. This year's game, SpySPHERES challenged teams to retrieve broken satellite debris while at the same taking and uploading pictures of the other SPHERE. Players also have to be wary of fuel and energy consumption and plan accordingly. During the five-week program middle school students have worked to learn physics, mathematics, and computer programming through interactive activities and hands-on experience programming the SPHERES. Students spent much of the summer learning to write computer programs and formulating strategies for their SPHERES in anticipation of the final competition.

The Middle School Zero Robotics Summer Program began five years ago in the Boston area, centered around the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and has since grown to a program with locations around the country, including Alabama, California, Colorado, D.C. Metro/Maryland, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Oregon, Texas, West Virginia and Washington. "The true innovators of the future are the ones that know how to
program computers, not just how to use them." says Alvar Saenz-Otero, Director of the MIT Space Systems Laboratory. "That is why Zero Robotics teaches programming starting in Middle School." Zero Robotics is led by MIT's Space Systems Laboratory, which originally designed the SPHERES, with partners MIT, Aurora Flight Sciences and the Innovation Learning Center. The Middle school competition is sponsored by the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS), the Northrop Grumman Foundation, and NASA.

Learn more about Zero Robotics and SPHERES research by visiting www.zerorobotics.mit.edu or www.nasa.gov/spheres/home; Or by contacting Dr. Alvar Saenz-Otero, SPHERES Lead Scientist & MIT Space Systems Laboratory Director:zerorobotics@mit.edu

Evergreen Museum Campus:
Located in the heart of Oregon's Willamette Valley wine country, the Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum ("EASM") is the home of the world's largest wooden flying boat, the "Spruce Goose," the SR-71 "Blackbird," and the Titan II SLV Missile. Located on over 200 acres and encompassing four massive and magnificent buildings, the EASM exhibits more than 200 historic aircraft, spacecraft, accessible to visitors of all ages and enhanced with artwork and traveling exhibits. The Museum values its educational mission "to inspire and educate" and it's partnerships with the Academy of Model Aeronautics, the NASA Jet Propulsion Lab, the Oregon Space Consortium and the Civil Air Patrol Cadet Program, and scores of regional educational institutions.
Expect detours on U.S. 20 until fall east and west of Interstate 5
ODOT: Valley, No. Coast - 08/10/16 12:54 PM
Through the end of September, travelers on U.S. 20 should expect detours on the west and east sides of Interstate 5 due to construction road closures just west of Eddyville (west) and 26 miles east of Sweet Home at the Sheep Creek Bridge (east). Many travelers take this route as a scenic trip across Oregon.

U.S 20 Sheep Creek Bridge closure will last through the end of September. The highway is fully closed from milepost 54 to 56.9. The bridge is out. There is no local detour.
Eastbound travelers should take OR 20 from Lebanon to OR 226 to OR 22, or OR 126 from Springfield.
Westbound travelers should take OR 22 to OR 226, or OR 126 from Santiam Junction.
The road is open between Sweet Home and the bridge on the west side and from Santiam Junction to the bridge from the east. Campgrounds and recreation areas will continue to be open and accessible. A span of the bridge and abutments are being repaired due to damage from an active slide area.
For more information, including a detour map and videos on the project, go to:
https://oregon.gov/ODOT/HWY/REGION2/Pages/US-20-Sheep-Creek-Bridge-Phases-1-and-2--.aspx

U.S. 20 Pioneer Mountain-Eddyville Project overnight road closures are scheduled to begin on August 14 and will last through the end of October between mileposts 15.84 and 16.91. Closures will occur Sunday through Thursday between the hours of 7:30 p.m. and 5:30 a.m. There is no local detour. Minimal construction delays should be expected in the area during the day.
Travelers should take OR 18 or OR 34 when the roadway is closed.
This project will create five-and-a-half miles of new road, bypassing a 10-mile section of the original U.S. 20 that was built in 1917. For more information, go to:
http://us20pme.com

U.S. 20 travelers are encouraged to check TripCheck or call 511 for the latest in travel information.
Oregon Cultural Trust awards record $2.9 million to Oregon cultural nonprofits (Photo)
Oregon Arts Commission - 08/10/16 11:57 AM
The DAlles-Wasco County Library Foundation Little Makers program in The Dalles
The DAlles-Wasco County Library Foundation Little Makers program in The Dalles
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/1418/96768/thumb_Little_Makers_dalles_wasco_county_library_foundation.jpg
Salem, Ore. -- A record 149 grants totaling $2.9 million will be awarded to Oregon's cultural nonprofits by the Oregon Cultural Trust in fiscal year 2016-17, a 9 percent increase over last year. The increase is the direct result of another record year of fundraising.

The awards include a total of $714,045 to the Cultural Trust's five statewide partners (Oregon Arts Commission, Oregon Heritage Commission, Oregon Humanities, Oregon Historical Society and the State Historic Preservation Office); $714,045 to 45 county and tribal cultural coalitions -- for regranting in their communities; and $1,433,798 in competitive Cultural Development Grants to a record 99 cultural organizations across the state. Cultural coalition base awards rose from $6,000 to $6,300; total coalition grants include a per capita multiplier that ranges from $15.62 for the Burns Paiute Tribe to .12 for the Multnomah County Cultural Coalition.

"The uniqueness of the Cultural Trust in the national landscape is a testament to Oregonians' dedication to supporting culture," said Carole Morse, chair of the Cultural Trust Board. "More than 10,000 families, individuals and businesses invest in the Trust every year to ensure future generations have access to active and culturally vibrant communities."

"It is extremely gratifying to see the numbers continue to rise," said Brian Rogers, the Cultural Trust's executive director. "We are grateful to the legislature for the flexibility to award more of the money we raise to the groups contributing to Oregon's cultural vitality. It's an investment in the creative expression and cultural exchange that makes Oregon so special."

The Cultural Development Grants include first-time awards to 45 organizations and the largest grants ever awarded -- $40,000 -- to eight groups: The Benton County Historical Society; The Dalles-Wasco County Library Foundation; Japanese Garden; Miracle Theatre Group; National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in Oregon; Oregon Public Broadcasting; Oregon Shakespeare Festival; and Portland Center Stage. More than half of the grants were awarded to organizations outside of the Portland Metro area. Cultural Development Grants fund projects that address access, capacity, creativity and preservation.

Cultural Development Grants were awarded to:
Note: Grant recipients are organized alphabetically by geographic regions (Central Oregon, Coast, Eastern Oregon, Gorge, Portland Metro, Willamette Valley and Southern Oregon)Photos available by request.

Central Oregon
Camp Sherman Historical Society, Camp Sherman (Preservation): $8,013
Fireplace Restoration: To support restoration and repair of the masonry fireplace in a shelter constructed by the Civilian Conservation Corp at the Camp Sherman Campground.

Deschutes Public Library Foundation, Bend (Creativity): $12,994
A Novel Idea: To support the community read program, which includes more than 30 book discussions, cultural programs, art workshops, exhibits and scholarly presentations.

OperaBend, Bend (Access): $14,881
Puccini's "La Boheme:" To support the presentation of the touring production across rural parts of Oregon.

Playa, Summer Lake (Creativity): $31,239
Residencies: To support the confluence of artists and scientists coming together for residencies and related activities.

Women's Civic Improvement League DBA KPOV, Bend (Capacity): $7,835
Radio Signal Expansion: To support an expansion of KPOVs signal throughout Central Oregon in order to reach new audiences and better serve existing listeners.


Coast
Chetco Historical Memorial Committee, Brookings (Preservation): $15,428
Native American Historical Site Preservation: To support Oregon's cultural heritage by preserving the remains of a prehistoric Native American site at the Port of Brookings Harbor, Oregon.

Coos Art Museum, Coos Bay (Creativity): $8,390
50th Anniversary Art Exhibitions: To support the 16 special art exhibitions from October 2016 through July 2017 for the organization's 50th anniversary.

Little Theatre on the Bay, North Bend (Capacity): $16,984
Restroom Construction: To support the needs of patrons of North Bend's historic Liberty Theatre by adding accessible and appropriately sized restrooms.

Oregon Coast Council for the Arts, Newport (Capacity): $13,353
Designing an Expansion: To support a community planning process that refines the architectural and infrastructure designs for the expansion of Newport's Performing Arts Center.

South Coast Folk Society, North Bend (Creativity): $11,349
Folk Orchestra Formation: To support a permanent folk orchestra on the Southern Oregon Coast to enrich cultural life and bring new resources to local communities.

Monday Musical Club of Tillamook, Tillamook (Capacity): $9,133
Executive Director Hire: To support hiring the Monday Musical Club of Tillamook's first employee, an executive director, to increase organizational stability.


Eastern Oregon
Drexel H. Foundation, Vale (Capacity): $16,585
Programming Staff Hire: To support Cultural Programming Staff to improve capacity to coordinate volunteers and to improve marketing and outreach.

Eastern Oregon Regional Arts Council, La Grande (Capacity): $8,548
Additional Staff: To increase capacity with additional staff to manage local and regional arts programming.

Four Rivers Cultural Center, Ontario (Preservation): $11,376
The Preservation of Photographs of Japanese Americans: To support the digitization of 40,000 to 60,000 negative photos from two local commercial photographers essential to the history of Ontario from 1945-1985.

Grande Ronde Symphony Association, La Grande (Access): $12,143
Orchestral and Chamber Music Concerts: To support four public orchestral concerts and a series of four chamber concerts serving audiences in a rural isolated region.


Gorge
Arts in Education of the Gorge, Hood River (Access): $13,107
Art of Community: To support the creation of a bilingual art map and other activities to increase Hispanic access to the Art of Community public art project.

Columbia Arts, Hood River (Creativity): $9,688
Japanese Culture and Art Celebration: To support and explore the richness of Japanese culture and art in Oregon through a variety of art forms in a month-long celebration.

Confluence Project, Hood River (Access): $21,303
Confluence Oral History Project: To reconnect generations of Native people to place, each other and the broader community through the power of storytelling and art making.

The Dalles-Wasco County Library Foundation, The Dalles (Capacity): $40,000
Teen Programming Room and Digital Media Lab: To support repurposing an existing library facility to create a teen programming room and digital media lab for students in 6th-12th grades.


Portland Metro
Bag&Baggage Productions, Hillsboro (Creativity): $8,254
The Drowning Girls: To support the Pacific Northwest Premiere of "The Drowning Girls," a haunting drama featuring an all-women production and performance team.

Boom Arts, Inc., Portland (Creativity): $7,100
Spiritrials: To support the Portland presentation of "Spiritrials," a timely, imaginative theatre production about racial profiling and drug sentencing laws.

Chamber Music Northwest, Portland (Creativity): $23,490
2017 Festival: To support Chamber Music Northwest's 2017 Festival, to focus on music created by women composers, including five new commissions as well as classic works.

Classical Up Close, Tigard (Access): $5,562
Classical Up Close Spring Chamber Music Festival: To support the fifth annual Classical Up Close Spring Chamber Music Festival, with free concerts presented all over Portland.

CymaSpace, Portland (Access): $6,045
Purchase New Equipment: To support the purchase of new equipment in order to expand access to cultural programming available to deaf and hard of hearing communities.

Ethos, Portland (Access): $17,992
Music Education Access: To support in-school music education opportunities for youth in rural Oregon communities.

Experience Theatre Project, Beaverton (Creativity): $9,133
The Tempest: To ensure and grow vibrant theatre arts in Beaverton and greater Washington County by producing a free outdoor production of "The Tempest" in the summer of 2017.

Friends of Historic Forest Grove, Forest Grove (Preservation): $7,621
The A.T. Smith House: To support the creation of a preservation plan for the Historic A.T. Smith House for contextual, educational and historic tourism programming.

Hand2Mouth, Portland (Creativity): $11,087
Psychic Utopia: To support the early development of a theatre work inspired by Oregon communes and created through engagements with communities across the state.

Historic Preservation League of Oregon dba RESTORE OREGON, Portland (Preservation): $20,352
Oregon's Most Endangered Places: To support an expanded program to save Oregon's Most Endangered Places by increasing staff and state-wide programming.

Hollywood Theatre, Portland (Creativity): $18,522
Hollywood Theatre Annex: To support the creation of a Hollywood Theatre multimedia art space showcasing local film/video works at the Portland International Airport.

Imago Theatre, Portland (Creativity): $7,727
Presentation of a Greek Tragedy: To support presenting a Greek tragedy in which text, stagecraft and staging are unified into one powerful force accessible to a wide audience.

Japanese Garden, Portland (Capacity): $40,000
Construction of Gallery and Performance Venues: To support exhibiting and demonstrating Japanese and Japan-inspired visual and performing arts.

Kukatonon Childrens African Dance Troupe, Portland (Capacity): $12,261
West African Dance and Drumming program: To support a culturally authentic West African dance and drumming program serving primarily low-income youth.

Literary Arts, Portland (Access): $17,949
Oregon Book Awards Tour: To support literary excellence in writing by Oregonians, and to facilitate a statewide author tour.

MediaRites, Portland (Preservation): $9,288
Crossing East Archive-Oregon Stories: To support the Crossing East Archive-Oregon Stories, part of an oral history archive project highlighting Asian American and Pacific Islander history.

Metropolitan Youth Symphony, Portland (Access): $8,881
Beginning Strings Programs: To create access to music through peer-to-peer education at underserved schools as well as the Tuition Assistance and tuition-free Beginning Strings programs.

Miracle Theatre Group, Portland (Capacity): $40,000
El Centro Milagro and El Zocalo: To support improvements to El Centro Milagro's exterior and El Zocalo to improve amenities and services for community and creative partners.

Mittleman Jewish Community Center, Portland (Creativity): $5,000
Lobby Gallery Update: To support the creation of a flexible gallery space supporting visual art exhibits at the Mittleman Jewish Community Center.

My Voice Music, Portland (Access): $13,650
Learning Opportunities for Youth: To help marginalized youth cope, heal and thrive through ongoing musical instruction, leadership opportunities and positive adult mentorship.

Newspace Center for Photography, Portland (Access): $17,164
Hidden Assembly: To support Hidden Assembly, an exhibition, and corresponding public programs to reach new audiences and increase awareness of the hidden labor market.

Northwest Childrens Theater and School, Portland (Creativity): $21,905
Sleeping Beauty: To support Northwest Childrens Theater and School's first puppet play and the development of five distinct characters that will become new playful faces representing the organization's mission.

Obo Addy Legacy Project, Portland (Access): $6,533
Expressions of Africa: To support a two-day event to encourage youth participation in a jazz and African music event.

Oregon Ballet Theatre, Portland (Creativity): $28,168
Choreography XX: To support the creation and free public presentation of three world premiere ballets by female choreographers with Oregon Ballet Theater's new Choreography XX initiative.

Oregon Children's Theatre, Portland (Access): $18,272
Tomás and the Library Lady: To support the production and tour of "Tomás and the Library Lady" in Oregon communities, coupled with community engagement and literacy programs.

Oregon College of Art and Craft, Portland (Access): $18,739
A. Susana Santos Journeys in Creativity: To support the A. Susana Santos Journeys in Creativity program for Native American communities, primarily high school students, throughout Oregon.

Oregon Contemporary Theatre, Portland (Creativity): $9,229
Blue Door: To support a production of Tanya Barfield's "Blue Door" in Oregon Contemporary Theatre's 2016-2017 season, a first-time partnership with Profile Theatre.

Oregon Public Broadcasting, Portland (Access): $40,000
Oregon Experience: To support the production of the 2016-2017 season of Oregon Public Broadcasting's award-winning history documentary series Oregon Experience.

Oregon Repertory Singers, Portland (Creativity): $7,563
The Armed Man: To support the Portland premiere of "The Armed Man," a multicultural mass for peace by Karl Jenkins performed by Oregon Repertory Singers and orchestra.

Pendulum Aerial Arts, Portland (Capacity): $7,528
Head of School Hire: To support the addition of a new Head of School, a senior-level position in charge of the training academy, the defining element of Pendulum Aerial Arts' mission.

PHAME, Portland (Capacity): $11,535
PHAME Forward: Phase 1: To support a multi-year capacity building and program expansion initiative.

Portland Baroque Orchestra, Portland (Creativity): $19,681
PBO Chamber Series: To support an innovative chamber series to create artistic opportunities that attract a new generation of top period musicians to the region for the Portland Baroque Orchestra.

Portland Center Stage, Portland (Creativity): $40,000
2017 JAW-A Playwrights Festival: To support the creation of new theatrical works during Portland Center Stage's 2017 JAW-A Playwrights Festival.

Portland Chamber Orchestra, Portland (Creativity): $30,341
Global Harmonies: To support 70 years of music in five programs culminating in Global Harmonies, a program of brotherhood with the Chief Joseph Symphony featuring Beethoven's Ninth Symphony.

Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, Portland (Access): $16,632
Time-Based Art Festival: To support the planning and implementation of the 14th annual Time-Based Art Festival.

Portland Piano International, Portland (Creativity): $5,000
The Clearing: To support the inaugural presentation of The Clearing, a contemporary music festival scheduled for Nov. 7-13, 2016 at Portland State University.

Portland State University Foundation, Portland (Preservation): $5,000
Preservation of Historic Newspapers: To support preservation of the historic newspapers of Oregon's African American community to ensure the paper's long-term security and accessibility.

Portland Story Theater, Portland (Access): $5,000
Urban Tellers-Refugee Stories: To support a workshop and show dedicated to personal narratives from Portland's refugee community.

Portland SummerFest, Portland (Creativity): $6,076
Opera in Portland's Washington Park: To support the presentation of a free annual concert-style Opera in Portland's Washington Park with world-class singers and a professional local chorus and orchestra.

Portland Youth Philharmonic Association, Portland (Creativity): $8,113
Symphony Performance by Tomas Svoboda: To support the world premiere of a 1963 symphony by Tomas Svoboda to be performed in Corvallis, Newberg and Portland, and distributing a recording.

Profile Theatre, Portland (Creativity): $7,426
Commissioning of a Play: To support the commissioning and development of a new play by the featured 2018 season playwright, resulting in a world premiere.

SMART (Start Making A Reader Today), Portland (Access): $8,363
Purchase Literature: To support increased access to literature representing diverse cultural perspectives for children.

Staged! Musical Theatre, Portland (Creativity): $5,000
John Hughes High: To support workshops and a presentation of an original musical theatre piece written by Mark LaPierre and Eric Nordin with leading roles for teens.

Tavern Books, Portland (Creativity): $15,251
Tavern Books' Wrolstad Contemporary Poetry Series: To support the expansion of Tavern Books' Wrolstad Contemporary Poetry Series, including the addition of a writer's residency for young female poets.

The Library Foundation, Portland (Access): $6,527
Everybody Reads Program: To support the Everybody Reads program for 2,000 teens in high-risk schools, including books, study guides and transportation to an author visit.

The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America in Oregon, Newberg (Preservation): $40,000
Hoover-Minthorn House Museum: To support structural stabilization of the Hoover-Minthorn House Museum as a necessary step to the preservation of the museum.

The Portland Ballet, Portland (Capacity): $9,174
Studio Expansion: To support expansion of the smallest of the Portland Ballet's three studios, adding 400 square feet.

The Shadow Project, Portland (Access): $15,449
SuperSensory Literacy: To support the installation of SuperSensory Literacy spaces in public schools, making reading more accessible to children with learning challenges.

triangle productions!, Portland (Access): $6,002
The Brown Paper Bag Series: To support the production of a play and a workshop project in order to expand triangle's community outreach programming.

Third Rail Repertory Theatre, Portland (Capacity): $20,463
Third Rail's Membership Model: To support the Third Rail's Membership Model and programming with increased marketing resources and a dedicated marketing position.

Vibe of Portland, Portland (Capacity): $12,295
Fundraising Project: To support Vibe's fundraising capacity, enabling Vibe to expand its arts education programs to meet community demand for arts education.

Wisdom of the Elders, Inc, Portland (Access): $20,950
Documentary Film Series: To support a documentary film series with cultural arts of Oregon tribes, including storytelling, music and dance, carving and basket weaving.


Southern Oregon
Ballet Folklorico Ritmo Alegre, Talent (Capacity): $8,968
Business Plan Development: To support the creation of a strategic business plan to ensure the long-term sustainability of Ballet Folklorico Ritmo Alegre.

Chamber Music Concerts, Ashland (Access): $6,255
Creating Access for Audience Members: To support presentations of chamber music to potential audience members who are precluded from enjoying performances due to hearing and mobility impairments.

JPR Foundation, Ashland (Preservation): $13,233
Holly Theatre Restoration: To support the restoration of auditorium chandeliers and the fabrication of period lobby light fixtures as part of the Holly Theatre restoration in Medford.

Oregon Shakespeare Festival, Ashland (Creativity): $40,000
Off the Rails: To support the development, rehearsal, premiere and surrounding community partnerships for "Off the Rails" by Native American playwright Randy Reinholz.

Rogue Valley Chorale, Rogue River (Creativity): $6,287
A Festival of Choirs: To support the presentation of a multi-generational concert celebrating the joy of life-long singing.

Rogue Valley Symphony Association, Ashland (Capacity): $17,780
Development Manager Hire: To support the hiring of a permanent, full-time development manager to increase staff capacity in the area of fundraising.

Southern Oregon Film Society, Ashland (Access): $7,971
Ashland Independent Film Festival: To support regional filmmaking by giving access to youth and adults throughout rural Southern Oregon to produce and experience local films.

Southern Oregon Historical Society, Medford (Preservation): $11,316
Textile Collection Project: To support improved care of and access to the Southern Oregon Historical Society's three-dimensional collection through a textile cataloging and preservation project.

Umpqua Valley Arts Association, Roseburg (Capacity): $5,000
Social Marketing: To support implementation of the social marketing component of the Umpqua Valley Arts Association's marketing plan.


Willamette Valley
Antique Powerland Museum Association, Salem (Capacity): $14,003
Volunteer Program and Event Manager Hire: To improve the volunteer program and to increase use of the Antique Powerland Museum Association's facility for rentals and events.

Ash Creek Arts Center, Independence (Capacity): $7,424
Administrator Hire: To support hiring a half-time administrator, Ash Creek Arts Center's first staff member, to coordinate activities, be the primary contact person and manage the membership program.

Benton County Historical Society, Philomath (Access): $40,000
New Museum Building: To increase public access to collections by developing a new museum building, designed by Allied Works Architecture, in downtown Corvallis.

Cascadia Concert Opera, Eugene (Access): $5,000
Opera for All: To support the presentation of opera in English at community and retirement centers to underrepresented audiences at no or little cost.

Corvallis Arts Center, Corvallis (Creativity): $12,069
Microbiomes-Seeing the Unseen: To support an art and science collaboration project resulting in a multi-media arts exhibition and show catalog in 2017.

Cottage Grove Historical Society, Cottage Grove (Access): $8,895
The General: To support the commissioning of an original score for the silent film "The General" and a tour with live music for the film's 90th anniversary.

Delgani String Quartet, Eugene (Creativity): $8,389
Astonished by Music: To support Delgani's upcoming 2016/2017 season, titled "Astonished by Music," which includes four concerts and educational programs.

Elkton Community Education Center, Elkton (Capacity): $6,413
Fort Umpqua Awareness: To support increased public awareness and enjoyment of the recently completed replica of Fort Umpqua, a historic Hudson's Bay Company trading fort.

Eugene Symphony, Eugene (Access): $8,910
Symphony Connect: To support a series of barrier-reducing chamber music performances and cultural experiences for clients of Eugene and Springfield human service agencies.

Hallie Ford Museum of Art, Willamette University, Salem (Preservation): $6,251
African and Oceanic Objects Conservation: To support an assessment of conservation needs and build storage mounts for the African and Oceanic objects in the permanent collection.

Historic Elsinore Theatre, Salem (Capacity): $17,867
Audience Development Program: To fund an audience development program through new investment in communications, marketing, online resources and event programming.

Huitzilopochtli Dancing and Teaching our Indigenous Heritage, Woodburn (Access): $5,000
Aztec Dance Circle: To support increased access to the Aztec Dance Circle program in a low-income, underserved community.

Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (University of Oregon Foundation), Eugene (Preservation): $22,568
Campbell Courtyard Preservation: To replace the historic Campbell Courtyard reflecting pool, restore garden plantings and protect the basement storage vault art from water damage.

Lane Arts Council, Eugene (Access): $10,926
Fiesta Cultural: To support celebrating local Latino art and culture while increasing integration opportunities for Latinos in our community.

Oregon Mozart Players, Eugene (Access): $16,133
Education Coordinator Hire: To support the expansion of Oregon Mozart Players education and community engagement programs.

Salem Art Association, Salem (Preservation): $9,872
Online Database of Asahel Bush II Letters: To support digital access to historical letters written by notable Oregonians to Asahel Bush II, editor of the Oregon Statesman, from 1850 to 1863.

Salem Concert Band, Salem (Creativity): $7,582
A Poem by Eric Ewazen: To support commission of a musical tone poem depicting the Oregon Coast by Eric Ewazen to be premiered by Salem Concert Band.

Shelton McMurphey Johnson House, Eugene (Preservation): $21,140
Shelton McMurphey Johnson House Preservation: To support the completion of the preservation and restoration of the 128 year-old wooden windows of the Shelton McMurphey Johnson House.

Willamette Heritage Center at The Mill, Salem (Preservation): $8,190
Large Object Storage Building: To support the preservation and inventory of heritage artifacts by installing an HVAC system for climate control in the Center's Large Object Storage Building.

# # #


Attached Media Files: The DAlles-Wasco County Library Foundation Little Makers program in The Dalles , Recent production of Die Fledermaus by OperaBend/ , A traditional flute player near the Sapporo Lantern at the Japanese Garden in Portland , A cultural performance at Four Rivers Cultural Center in Ontario
Health advisory issued August 10 for water contact at Seal Rock State Park Beach
Oregon Health Authority - 08/10/16 9:06 AM
August 10, 2016

The Oregon Health Authority issued a public health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Seal Rock State Park Beach, located in Lincoln County.

Water samples indicate higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria, which can result in diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. Direct contact with the water should be avoided in this area until the advisory is lifted, especially by children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at Seal Rock State Park Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory. Neighboring beaches are not affected by this advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0400, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Since 2003 state officials have used a U.S.Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state organizations participating in this program are the Oregon Health Authority, Department of Environmental Quality and Parks and Recreation Department.

# # #
Homeowners rely on word of mouth to find construction contractors
Construction Contractors Board - 08/10/16 8:54 AM
Homeowners still rely on word of mouth to find a contractor and that's a good thing, according to the Construction Contractors Board (CCB).

"Using a licensed contractor that has done quality work for friends, relatives or neighbors is the best way to ensure your project is a success," Enforcement Manager Stan Jessup said.

The CCB commissions an annual survey of Oregon homeowners and 75 percent of those interviewed this year said they would use a referral from someone they know to find a contractor. Another 32 percent identified Internet lists such as Angie's List or Craigslist as places to find contractors.

"Getting ideas from online lists is OK but you still must vet the contractor thoroughly," Jessup said. "That means verifying that the person's CCB license is active and that the name matches the person you might do business with."

"It also means you still need to check references," he added. "Don't rely on online reviews for all your information."

Other survey findings:

While 82 percent of Oregonians agree that it's important to use licensed contractors, only 41 actually verify the license by contacting the CCB or using its website to look up a license. The easiest way to check a license is to obtain a CCB license number and enter it in the "search" feature at www.oregon.gov/ccb. Anyone who is advertising online must include his or her CCB number. If you have questions or need assistance, contact the CCB at 503-378-4621.

A total of 67 percent of those surveyed know that it is illegal to use an unlicensed contractor to build a home or assist with a home improvement project. Homeowners can also report suspected unlicensed contractors on the CCB website.

Most projects are a success -- 86 percent of homeowners with recent projects said in the survey they were satisfied with the work. However, 9 percent were dissatisfied.

Licensing in Oregon carries important protections for homeowners. It means the contractor is bonded and insured, and the CCB may be able to mediate disputes.

"Taking the time to really check out contractors at the front end will help avoid problems in the long run, and finding quality contractors through people you trust is key," Jessup said.


About the CCB
The CCB is the state agency licensing more than 36,000 contractors. Contractors that are paid to repair, improve or build a home must be licensed. Learn more about how to have a successful project at www.oregon.gov/ccb.
Live Online Family Caregiver Event, Aug 25th
Lane Council of Governments - LCOG - 08/10/16 8:51 AM
AARP and co-sponsors the Alzheimer's Association and LCOG Senior & Disability services will host a live online family caregiving event at the Eugene Public Library (100 W. 10th Ave., Eugene) on Thursday August 25th at 4PM.

Peter Rosenberger, founder of Caregivers With Hope, will be featured in this free interactive webinar titled "Unstuck: Lightening the Heart of the Family Caregiver with Humor."

Participants will learn how to lighten their heart, rediscover their identity and find a safe emotional path -- with a healthy dose of Peter's humor and candor.

"After more than 30 years on the path as a family caregiver for my wife Gracie -- including 78 operations, the amputation of both her legs, 60 doctors in 12 hospitals and $9 million medical bills -- I've learned: it's okay to laugh," Rosenberg said.

Those who attend the in-person watch party at the Eugene Public Libary will have the chance to win door prizes.

The webinar, which is part of AARP's nationwide educational series on family caregiving, will be open to participants nationwide and simulcast at AARP offices around the country.

"Humor is a healthy express of a healthy heart -- not a defense mechanism," said Rosenberger, founding of Caregivers with Hope. "I've learned that family caregivers cannot only survive, but thrive in the midst of oftentimes grim circumstances. "

Participants are asked to register at http://tinyurl.com/unstuckeugene. The event may also be viewed from home, to register to view from home visit http://tinyurl.com/hr5g4fv. All those that register will receive Peter's free e-book.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1580/96714/CAREGIVING_EVENT_Eugene_Public_Library.pdf
Tue. 08/09/16
Two Killed In Highway 199 Crash Near Grants Pass - Josephine County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/09/16 9:52 PM
2016-08/1002/96754/IMG_0186.JPG
2016-08/1002/96754/IMG_0186.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/1002/96754/thumb_IMG_0186.JPG
On August 09, 2016 at about 2PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of head-on collision on Highway 199 near milepost 11 (southwest of Grants Pass).

Preliminary investigation revealed a 2016 Nissan Altima was traveling northbound on Highway 199 when it began to pass vehicles in a designated passing lane (one southbound, two northbound lanes). The Nissan crossed over the double yellow line where it collided with a southbound 2001 Dodge pickup head-on.

The driver of the Dodge, Larry E TYLER, age 73, of Kerby was taken to Rogue Regional Medical Center in Medford where he remains in critical condition. The passenger of the Dodge, Virginia TYLER, age 72, also of Kerby, was pronounced deceased at the scene. The driver of the Nissan, Gary J MARTINICH, age 61, of Brookings, was as transported to Three Rivers Community Hospital in Grants Pass where he died as a result of his injuries.

Highway 199 was closed temporarily but reopened shortly after for restricted traffic flow for approximately 2 hours. OSP was assisted by AMR ambulance, Rural Metro Fire, Oregon Department of Forestry and the Oregon Department of Transportation. Speed and alcohol are both being investigated as contributing factors to the crash. More information will be released when it becomes available as this is an ongoing investigation.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1002/96754/IMG_0186.JPG
Sheriff's Office Investigates Crash Involving Police Motorcycle (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/09/16 6:18 PM
2016-08/1294/96749/KZP.jpg
2016-08/1294/96749/KZP.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/1294/96749/thumb_KZP.jpg
The Marion County Sheriff's Office Traffic Safety Team has been requested by the Keizer Police Department to investigate a crash involving one of their police motorcycles.

According to deputies, today at 4:00 p.m., Officer Tyler Wampler was operating his marked police motorcycle east on Chemawa Road NE near the Safeway. The vehicle Officer Wampler was traveling behind turned into the parking lot, as Officer Wampler negotiated around the turning vehicle, a black Mercedes being driven by Tellif McClyde, age 39 exited the Safeway and struck Officer Wampler.

Officer Wampler has been taken to Salem Hospital with non-life threatening injuries, Mr. McClyde was not injured in the crash and he is cooperating with investigators. Traffic is slowed in the area while deputies complete their investigation, we ask motorists use caution if you are in the area.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1294/96749/KZP.jpg
Oregon National Guard Soldiers conclude training in Romania (Photos and Video)
Oregon Military Department - 08/09/16 4:42 PM
Story by Spc. Timothy Jackson, 115th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment.

CINCU, Romania -- More than 250 Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers with 3rd Battalion, 116th Cavalry Regiment, mobilized to Romania with the 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team (CBCT) to participate in Exercise Saber Guardian 2016, a multinational military training exercise, from July 27 to August 7.

Exercise Saber Guardian 16 officially ended with a closing ceremony, August 7, at the Romanian Land Forces Training Center in Cincu, Romania. Col. Robert Bertrand, the Saber Guardian exercise co-director and Brig. Gen. Nicolae Tonu, the deputy commander of the Romanian Land Forces 4th Infantry Division, both spoke at the ceremony to congratulate and thank all those who participated.

"Today we finish an exercise that brought all of us closer together as nations and partners. This exercise gave us the opportunity to prove ourselves and to anyone else that we can work together as a team," Tonu said.

Saber Guardian is an annual multinational exercise hosted alternately by Romania, Bulgaria and Ukraine. The exercise is part of U.S. European Command's Joint Exercise Program designed to enhance joint combined interoperability with allied and partner nations.

Saber Guardian 16 involved more than 2,800 troops from five NATO countries (Bulgaria, Canada, Poland, Romania and the USA) and five Partnership for Peace states (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Republic of Moldova and Ukraine) participated in the exercise.

Among those participating were 1,700 American Soldiers with M1A2 Abrams tanks and Bradley Fighting Vehicles, more than 900 Romanian Land Forces Soldiers, and almost 50 Canadian Soldiers with Infantry Armored Vehicles. Soldiers from the other countries participated in computer-assisted command and training exercises connected with the Training Centre in Novo Selo, Bulgaria and the Training and Peacekeeping Centre in Yavoriv, Ukraine.

Exercise Saber Guardian 16 was planned and commanded by the Romanian Land Forces Staff and NATO Integration Units. The exercise unfolded in four stages. The command stage trained commanders and staff in the development of combined planning, standard operating procedures and staff battle drills in a force-on-force environment at the brigade level. In stage two, the command post exercise (CPX) cross-trained Romanian officers with officers from Bulgaria, Ukraine and the U.S. to develop and improve communications and procedures. Soldiers worked with their Romanian counterparts in stage 3, the field training exercise (FTX), using a combination of mechanized and ground engagements. In the final stage, Soldiers conducted an array of live fire exercises with vehicles, aircrafts, and weapons systems from U.S. Army, Romanian and Canadian militaries.

"During these two weeks all of us made a great effort, we understood each other, we manage all obstacles and issues and we end this exercise in outstanding conditions," Tonu said.

The officers from both countries thanked the soldiers, officers, civilian employees and allies, as well as all citizens for their kindness and understanding for the exercises that occurred throughout the country.

"We stand in formation as countries, but today we stand as one," Bertrand said in closing.

The majority of Oregon Soldiers who deployed for the exercise are traditional Guardsmen who drill one weekend a month and two weeks in the summer. Many of them have families, are attending college, and work for civilian employers. The 3-116th Cavalry Battalion consists of Oregon Army National Guard units from Baker City, Hermiston, Hood River, La Grande, Ontario, Pendleton, The Dalles, and Woodburn, Oregon.

PHOTOS AND VIDEO of 3rd Battalion, 116th Cavalry Regiment, Oregon Army National Guard, training in Romania (please credit the photographers and videographers):

Photo gallery: https://www.flickr.com/photos/oregonmildep/albums/72157672232918995

U.S. Army Sergeant talks about Romanian Exercise experience (interview): https://www.dvidshub.net/video/478405/us-army-sergeant-talks-about-romanian-exercise-experience

Tanks in Romania (aerial footage): https://www.dvidshub.net/video/478361/tanks-romania-aerial-footage

Tank Live Fire in Romania (video): https://www.dvidshub.net/video/478354/tank-live-fire-romania
Don't be fooled by the rain - Fire season remains in effect (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/09/16 4:35 PM
An abandoned campfire on Aug. 1 in Douglas County burned one-half acre and cost more than $12,000 to put out.
An abandoned campfire on Aug. 1 in Douglas County burned one-half acre and cost more than $12,000 to put out.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/1072/96745/thumb_Basin_Creek_Fire.jpg
The 2016 fire season is off to a promising start. Following three consecutive prolific fire seasons, the Oregon Department of Forestry is having early success. But as always, there is room for improvement. To date, 470 wildfires have burned 2,685 acres on ODF-protected land. Acres burned at this time each of the last three years accounted for 93,613 (2013), 46,583 (2014) and 17,800 (2015) respectively.

Preparedness has played a key role. The state's wildfire organization, which protects nearly 16 million acres of private, county, state and some federal lands, coordinates with other private landowners, forest workers, fire districts, and state and federal partners to keep fires small. With Red Flag Warnings and Fire Weather Watches forecasted for central and eastern Oregon over the previous weekend, ODF shifted several west-side crews, engines and aircraft east of the Cascades to prepare for lightning and high winds. The strategy paid off as initial-attack crews and supporting resources worked nonstop to keep up with multiple lightning ignitions from Friday through Sunday.

Weather and conditions on the ground have also attributed to the low number of acres burned as the state continues to recover from four consecutive years of drought. Cooler conditions and the occasional shot of rain this summer have been a nice reprieve from the previous three sweltering summers. But don't be fooled. Fire risk models still indicate high potential for fires to start and spread out of control. And we still have a long way to go before the risk is reduced. Fire season generally lasts well into October.

The wildcard is people. To date, 87 percent of all fires started on ODF-protected lands have been caused by people. And leading the way are things that can and should be prevented: burning back yard debris and campfires escaping control.

"This is troubling," said ODF Fire Prevention Coordinator Tom Fields. "We have been preaching fire prevention for over 100 years. That's why our organization and several other forestry agencies were originally formed: to prevent fires from occurring and keep them small when they do happen. We absolutely need the public's help to be successful. Keep campfires in established fire pits within campgrounds; put them out when you leave; and wait until fire season is over to burn back yard debris."

Fields said that while campfires and debris burning have been restricted statewide for several weeks, 74 fires have burned over 135 acres since July 1.

"There's a perfectly good reason why we need to regulate these activities," he said. "Summer conditions are conducive to pushing what seem to be innocent campfires and debris burning fires out of the control of a person's capabilities, especially when they walk away without completely extinguishing the fire."

Other known fire starters currently restricted statewide include smoking, off-road vehicle use, mowing dry grass, and cutting and welding metal. Check ODF's interactive fire restrictions map on the web, www.oregon.gov/odf to find out what is allowed where you live and where you plan to travel.

Today is Smokey Bear's Birthday, the most recognized mascot in the world. In the spirit of Smokey's legacy, ODF and its partners want to remind everyone to do their part to prevent careless wildfires and Keep Oregon Green.

http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Fire/Pages/FirePrevention.aspx
https://www.facebook.com/odfprevention
http://keeporegongreen.org
https://www.facebook.com/keeporegongreen


Attached Media Files: An abandoned campfire on Aug. 1 in Douglas County burned one-half acre and cost more than $12,000 to put out.
Health advisory issued August 9 for water contact at Rockaway Beach
Oregon Health Authority - 08/09/16 11:36 AM
August 9, 2016

The Oregon Health Authority issued a public health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Rockaway Beach, located in Tillamook County.

Water samples indicate higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria, which can result in diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. Direct contact with the water should be avoided in this area until the advisory is lifted, especially by children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at Rockaway Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory. Neighboring beaches are not affected by this advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0400, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Since 2003 state officials have used a U.S.Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state organizations participating in this program are the Oregon Health Authority, Department of Environmental Quality and Parks and Recreation Department.

# # #
City of Roseburg Fire Department Transitions to Social Media
Roseburg Fire Dept. - 08/09/16 10:32 AM
The City of Roseburg Fire Department is transitioning all press correspondence to social media by integrating with Facebook and Flash Alert. The department is excited to be incorporating additional means of communication. The City of Roseburg Fire Department website will continue to be maintained throughout this transition. We would like to invite you to "Like" our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/roseburgfire/ as well as subscribing to Flash Alert and select "Roseburg Fire Department" as the organization to follow. The Flash Alert website is www.flashalert.net/
National Organizations Recognize Oregon's Leadership in Responsible Gambling
Oregon Lottery - 08/09/16 9:10 AM
Aug. 9, 2016 - Salem, Ore. -- The North American Association of State and Provincial Lotteries and the National Council on Problem Gambling has certified the Oregon Lottery's responsible gambling program. The Oregon Lottery is one of the first four lotteries-and the first with a video lottery program-in the county to receive the prestigious certification.

NASPL and the council are partners in establishing this certification program to help elevate the quality of lottery responsible gambling programs, recognize quality programs and promote best practices. Program certification officials examine all elements of a lottery's responsible gambling program. Officials award a "Plan" certification for a lottery that is still in the planning phase of its program, an "Implementation" certification for implementing an advanced responsible gambling program with measured results, and a "Sustaining" certification for successfully sustaining a program.

An independent assessment panel, under the guidance of the National Council on Problem Gambling, reviewed applications to assess lotteries' responsible gambling programs in research, employee training, retailer training, player education, new and existing product oversight, budget, advertising, stakeholder engagement and awareness. The Oregon Lottery received an Implementation Certification.

"Responsible gambling programs are as important to our mission as creating revenue for Oregon's parks, schools, watersheds and jobs," said Barry Pack, acting Lottery director. "For the last three years the Lottery has worked closely with our commission and our partners at the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling to create a meaningful and effective responsible gambling program. I'm proud of the work of the Lottery and our staff. This certification, as well as two recent corporate citizenship awards from the National Council for Problem Gambling and La Fleur's, is recognition of our commitment to embedding responsible gambling practices into every aspect of our business."

Helping guide and direct the Lottery's responsible and problem gambling efforts is the agency's Responsible Gambling Code of Practice, which was adopted in 2014. "The code spells out how the Lottery will approach mitigating the potential harm from gambling," said Lottery Responsible Gambling Consultant Stacy Shaw. "Some of the initiatives that helped us achieve this certification included our responsible gambling training program for lottery retailers and their employees, and our use of television, radio and internet ad campaigns to inform players about how lottery games really work, and how to access the effective and free support available for people with gambling issues."
Oregon Lottery proceeds provide funding for free, confidential and effective problem gambling treatment programs statewide. Since 1992, over $92 million in Lottery funds has been directed to fund problem gambling treatment.

About NASPL
The North American Association of State and Provincial Lotteries was founded in 1971. Evolving from an informal exchange of information among three pioneering lottery directors, the organization has grown into an active association representing 52 lottery organizations. NASPL's basic mission is to assemble and disseminate information on the lottery industry through education and communications, and where appropriate publicly advocate the positions of the Association on matters of general policy.
Media contact: David Gale, Executive Director, (440) 466-5630, dgale@nasplhq.org

About NCPG
The National Council on Problem Gambling is the national advocate for problem gamblers and their families. NCPG is neutral on legalized gambling and works with all stakeholders to promote responsible gaming. The organization's vision is to improve health and wellness by reducing the personal, social and economic costs of problem gambling.
Media contact: Keith Whyte, Executive Director, (202) 547-9204, keithw@ncpgambling.org
###
Oregon Comic Artists Profiled in New Oregon Historical Society Exhibition; Opens Friday, August 12
Oregon Historical Society - 08/09/16 8:55 AM
PRESS KIT:
Downloadable press kit, including artist headshots and select artwork, available via http://bit.ly/2aD0vtt

MEDIA PREVIEW:
Preview tours with OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk are available all week by appointment. Text 971.409.3761 or email rachel.randles@ohs.org to schedule a tour.


Portland, OR -- With recent blockbuster smashes featuring superhero legends, the comic book industry has experienced a surge of popular support. While there are many Oregonians picking up a comic book for their first time, the comic industry in Oregon has a long and influential history. Opening August 12 at the Oregon Historical Society, Comic City, USA celebrates this history and profiles fifteen of the most iconic artists that have made the industry into the global powerhouse it is today.

"Oregon has a thriving comic industry, and while many Oregonians are familiar with names like Jack Ohman and Dark Horse Comics, fewer know about the artists and writers who laid the path back in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries," said OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk. "Comic City, USA will give visitors a chance to meet these creative giants through an immersive exhibit experience that is sure to delight the kid in all of us."

All are invited to a public celebration on Sunday, August 14 from 12pm -- 5pm at the Oregon Historical Society. Admission to the exhibit is free, and costumed representatives from the Portland Superheroes Coalition will be on site for photo ops. Artists Anina Bennett & Paul Guinan will also be presenting a free public lecture at 2pm on the evolution of the comic industry from "geek to chic."

With over $579 million in national comic sales in 2015, the popularity of what is known as "The Ninth Art" is only expanding and gaining more recognition. The power of the comic industry in Oregon is undeniable, evidenced in the range of mediums at play and the growing popularity of Rose City Comic Con, which celebrates its fifth anniversary next month.

Comic City, USA highlights fifteen Oregon comic artists, writers, and cartoonists:

- Carl Barks - Anina Bennett and Paul Guinan
- John Callahan - Colleen Coover
- Homer Davenport - Jan Eliot
- Cat Farris - Dylan Meconis
- Jack Ohman - Bill Plympton
- Mike Richardson - Joe Sacco
- Alex Schomburg - Basil Wolverton

In addition to displays on each artist, the exhibition will offer interactive experiences, from a comic book store style living room for flipping through comics, a station where people can design and print their own comic book, and a photo booth complete with superhero inspired props.

This exhibition is designed to share an important part of Oregon history, inspire people who wish to communicate through an artistic medium, and fascinate those who already have an appreciation of this continuously evolving art form. As editorial cartoonist Jack Ohman admitted in an interview, "I really feel like I am doing the work of my career, and I enjoy each day. I started winning awards when I stopped thinking about winning awards. I started liking my work when I listened to my own voice, and not feeling so constrained by the old model. When you like your work, others will probably like it too."

The Oregon Historical Society's museum (1200 SW Park Avenue, Portland) is open seven days a week, Monday -- Saturday from 10am -- 5pm and Sunday from 12pm -- 5pm. Admission is $11, and discounts are available for students, seniors, and youth. Admission is free for OHS members and Multnomah County residents thanks to the recent renewal of the Oregon Historical Society levy.


About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state's collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon's history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon's cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.
Oregon Talent Council Awards $1.4 Million in Grants for Talent Development
Oregon Employment Dept. - 08/09/16 8:35 AM
The Oregon Talent Council has awarded $1.4 million to five projects that provide students and existing workers with applied skills and experience to significantly increase their employability in Oregon's pivotal and high demand occupations. These investments align with other state education and workforce system priorities by investing in cost-effective, responsive training and education programs, and supporting small and medium-sized businesses across the state to find and develop the talent they need.

"These grants will support the upgrading and retooling of skills for Oregon's existing and future workers," said David Childers, Chair of the Talent Council. "We forget the majority of the workers needed to support our economy are already in the workforce. It is critically important that we invest in the projects that keep skills fresh in the face of new technology and build new models for education and training that keep pace with changing business needs."

"With these awards, the Talent Council continues to provide leadership and raise awareness about the importance of talent to our economy and communities," said Kay Erickson, Acting Director of the Oregon Employment Department. "These grants support delivery of training and education in critical occupations to Oregonians, regardless of where they live or work, and underscore the powerful partnership of education and industry in meeting talent and workforce needs."

The Talent Council was established by the 2015 Oregon Legislature, which also established an Oregon Talent Council Fund of $6.1 million, to seed investments in talent development programs. The Talent Council works with industry, workforce organizations and the Oregon higher education community to help fill high wage, high demand occupations in the state. More information on the Council and the Oregon Talent Plan can be found at the Council's website: www.oregontalentcouncil.org.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/930/96726/2016-06-30Round2Awards.pdf , 2016-08/930/96726/Oregon_Talent_Council_Awards_8-9-16.pdf
Mon. 08/08/16
Woman Killed In Highway 20 Crash Near Sweet Home - Linn County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/08/16 8:10 PM
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On August 8, 2016 at about 2PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report a single vehicle crash on Highway 20 near milepost 23 (5 miles west of Sweet Home).

Preliminary investigation revealed a 2001 GMC pickup was traveling eastbound on Highway 20 when it drove off the highway and rolled over. The driver, Deborah L GERIG, age 42, of Sweet Home, was ejected from the vehicle and pronounced deceased while being transported to the hospital.

Both eastbound lanes of Highway 20 were blocked for several hours with an established detour in place. OSP was assisted by the Linn County Sheriff's Office, Sweethome EMS and the Oregon Department of Transportation. More information will be released when it becomes available.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1002/96722/100_0168.JPG
Salem Man Killed In Highway 126 Crash Near Belknap Springs (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/08/16 7:07 PM
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On August 7, 2016 at about 2:30PM, Oregon State Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a single vehicle crash on Highway 126 at milepost 19 (near Belknap Springs Road).

Preliminary investigation revealed a vehicle was traveling eastbound on Highway 126 when it crossed the centerline and into the path of a 2007 Toyota Tacoma towing a travel trailer. The vehicle then moved back into the eastbound lane but the driver of the Toyota lost control while trying to avoid a collision.

The Toyota crashed into a dirt embankment, collided with several trees and rolled over. The driver, Kermit N LISLE JR, age 64, of Salem, was pronounced deceased on scene.

The driver of the other vehicle continued eastbound but was located a short time later. The driver was identified as Leslie A WRIGHT, age 64, of Wilder, Idaho and is cooperating with the investigation.

OSP was assisted by the Bureau of Land Management Law Enforcement, Upper McKenzie Fire and EMS and the Oregon Department of Transportation. More information will be released when it becomes available.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1002/96720/100_0724.JPG
Washington Man Killed In Highway 34 Crash Near Waldport - Lincoln County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/08/16 2:02 PM
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On August 7, 2016 at about 5:45PM OSP Troopers and emergency vehicles responded to the report of a motor vehicle crash on Highway 34 near milepost 2 (just outside of Waldport).

Preliminary investigation revealed a 1989 Ford Ranger pickup was traveling westbound on Highway 34 when it swerved to avoid a 2001 Saturn sedan pulling from a driveway. The Ford left the roadway, traveled down a 25 foot embankment and rolled over into the Alsea River. The driver of the Ford, Evert L REDDING, age 61, of Waldport was taken to Samaritan Pacific Coast Hospital in Newport for non-life threatening injuries. A passenger, Stanley D WHITTLER, age 59, of Spokane, Washington, was pronounced deceased at the scene.

The two vehicles did not make contact. The operator of the Saturn, Odette A DUNBAR, age 53, of Waldport is cooperating with the investigation.

OSP was assisted by the Lincoln County Sheriff's Office, Central Coast Fire Department, Waldport Fire Department, the Oregon Department of Transportation, and Pac West Ambulance. This is an ongoing investigation and more information will be released when it becomes available.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1002/96709/100_0186.JPG
Conference in Bend puts spotlight on workplace safety
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 08/08/16 1:22 PM
(Salem) -- A two-day event in Bend will offer employers and workers a full menu of opportunities to sharpen their skills at creating and maintaining safe and healthy workplaces. Those opportunities include topics on everything from reinvigorating safety committees and safely handling chemicals to understanding updated rules for firefighters and learning how to be a safer driver.

Oregon's Occupational Safety and Health Division (Oregon OSHA), a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, is one of several partners presenting the Sept. 20-21 Central Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Conference at the Riverhouse on the Deschutes.

On Tuesday, Sept. 20, keynote speaker Dale Lesinski, vice president of sales and training for DiVal Safety Equipment, an international leader in safety supplies and training, will present "Safe 4 the Right Reasons." Incorporating audience participation, humor, and real-world situations, Lesinski will discuss how understanding human behavior provides the key to motivating employees to value safe behavior and avoid accidents.

Lesinski said he will seek to inspire attendees to reflect on their personal values and to make safety a core value. "I also hope to enable everyone to watch out for one another," he said, "and I will demonstrate a very simple technique that they can incorporate immediately."

Other conference topics include:
Building a mature safety culture
Putting Total Worker Health to practice
Severe weather: Preparing yourself and your employees for extreme weather conditions
Safety-at-heights fall protection training
Navigating OSHA regulations and resources
Temporary/contingent workers -- America's most vulnerable workers

Registration for the two-day event is $135, with an optional pre-conference workshop for $45. Attend any one day for $95. For more information or to register, go to https://safetyseries.cvent.com/central16.

###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit www.orosha.org.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter: twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on insurance, mortgages, investments, workplace safety, and more.
Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue Search For an Overdue hiker in the Jefferson wildnerness *** Search Suspended Update*** (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/08/16 11:54 AM
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Family members of Riley Zickel have elected to continue the search for their son. Acting on a tip provided by a private helicopter pilot who is assisting the Zickel family in their search efforts, the Sherriff's Office requested the assistance of the Corvallis Mountain Rescue Team who has ascended Mt. Jefferson to check a crevasse on the Jefferson Glacier in Linn County.

The search mission was coordinated by the Linn County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue Team, unfortunately no signs of Riley were located and the team has turned back because of a snow storm hitting the mountain. The Sheriff's Office is still asking anyone with any information regarding the possible location of Riley Zickel to please call 503-584-SRCH or 503-584-7724.




After seven days of searching, the decision has been made to suspend the active search for missing hiker Riley Zickel. Mr. Zickel went missing after entering the Mt. Jefferson Wilderness area Wednesday, July 27th. Mr. Zickel departed from Breitenbush Lake Road at the Pacific Crest Trail head where he intended to hike for one day and return the following day to visit friends in Seattle. Mr. Zickel was last seen on the Pacific Crest Trail just north of Jefferson Park where he visited with another hiker along the trail.

The decision to suspend the active search was made after exhausting all available leads. Mr. Zickel's family members were present at the Command Post throughout the search and have been made aware of the decision to suspend the search.

Over 340 searchers dedicated approximately 5000 hours to search 350 square miles of the Willamette National Forest north and south of Mt. Jefferson. The main focus of the search was the area between Mt. Jefferson, Jefferson Park, Park Butte and the surrounding areas. The area is heavily forested and has many ridges and valleys. Areas of snow complicated the search and, in spite of the snow, daytime temperatures occasionally reached 90 degrees. The elevation of the search area varied from 5000-7500' above sea level.

The Incident Commander, Sergeant Shane Burnham, directed the Marion County Search and Rescue Teams (SAR) and support personnel throughout the duration of the search. Our teams were backed up by SAR teams from Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, Lane County Sheriff's Office, Linn County Sheriff's Office, Polk County Sheriff's Office, Benton County Sheriff's Office, Clackamas County Sheriff's Office Pacific NW SAR, Multnomah County Sheriff's Office, Washington County Sheriff's Office, Corvallis Mountain Rescue, Mountain Wave, Warm Springs Police, Fire and Fish and Game, United States Forrest Service, the Portland Police Bureau, Detroit and Idanaha Fire District and the Oregon State Parks Department. The Sheriff's Office would like to thank the citizens and business owners in the city of Detroit for their support during this very difficult search.

Salem based helicopters from the Oregon Army National Guard and Cessna 182 aircraft from the Civil Air Patrol flew daily above the search area, but were unable to spot any sign of Mr. Zickel. Hundreds of hikers were contacted during the search and missing person flyers were posted at trail heads along the Pacific Crest Trail as far south as Big Lake Youth Camp and north to Timberline Lodge.

Marion County Sheriff Jason Myers commented, "It is a very difficult decision to withdraw resources from this search. Our SAR teams and staff worked tirelessly to find Mr. Zickel. We're very grateful for the assistance provided by our public safety partners, and our thoughts and prayers are with Mr. Zickel's family".

The search for Mr. Zickel will remain open until he is found. We will respond to any new information regarding his whereabouts. Anyone with information is encouraged to contact our tip line at 503-584-SRCH or 503-584-7724.




Today 30 searchers checked north and south of the Mt. Jefferson wilderness area and still have not located Riley Zickel. A large effort is planned for tomorrow with some 60 plus searchers that will be covering areas surrounding Russel Lake and north and south of the park along the Pacific Coast Trail.

Searchers will be utilizing K9's, air assets, horses and vehicles in their attempt to locate Mr. Zickel. We are asking that if you have seen Riley Zickel or anything that seemed out of place while hiking in the area please call 503-584-SRCH or 503-584-7724. This story will be updated as soon as additional information is available.




Tonight deputies were contacted by a hiker who saw the widely spread image of a man standing next to a tent at Sprague Lake on the news. The man confirmed for deputies that the picture was of him and not the missing hiker Riley Zickel.

The Sheriff's Office and its Search and Rescue partners have wrapped up the search activities for today, Wednesday August 3rd. 40 searchers will set out tomorrow morning at 8 a.m., focusing north and south along the Pacific Coast Trail. The Sheriff's Office would like to thank all of the volunteers that have been searching the Mt. Jefferson Wilderness since Sunday. We are asking that if you have seen Riley Zickel please call 503-584-SRCH or 503-584-7724. This story will be updated as soon as additional information is available.




IMAGES ADDED

The Sheriff's Office and its Search and Rescue partners are wrapping up the search activities for today, Tuesday August 2nd. Attached to the release are pictures of similar items being worn and used by Riley Zickel.

We are asking that if you have seen any signs of Riley Zickel please call 503-584-SRCH or 503-584-7724. The Sheriff's Office will resume their search tomorrow morning at 8 a.m., we would like to thank the all of the volunteers that have been searching the Mt. Jefferson Wilderness sine Sunday. This story will be updated as soon as additional information is available.




This morning at 7:00 a.m., 30 searchers resumed their efforts in the Willamette National Forrest near Mt. Jefferson. Searchers have completed checking the Mt. Jefferson area and have now moved north toward Park Butte and the Pacific Crest Trail.

Searchers are working on foot, horseback and by air in an attempt to locate Riley. Deputies still have no recent positive sightings of Riley Zickel and are asking anyone who may have seen Riley please call our tip line at 503-584-SRCH.




The Sheriff's Office and its Search and Rescue partners are wrapping up the search activities for today, Monday August 1st. Deputies and searchers have had contact with numerous hikers on the Pacific Coast Trail but have still not been able to locate an exact area Riley Zickel was last seen.

The Sheriff's Office will resume their search tomorrow morning at 7 a.m., we would like to thank the all of the volunteers that have been searching the Mt. Jefferson Wilderness sine Sunday. We are asking that if you have seen Riley Zickel please call 503-584-SRCH or 503-584-7724. This story will be updated as soon as additional information is available.




The Sheriff's Office has set up a tip line for anyone with information on the whereabouts of Mr. Zickel. If you were in the Jefferson Wilderness and had contact with or saw Mr. Zickel please call 503-584-7724 or 503-584-SRCH. The Sheriff's Office has spoken with Mr. Zickel's family and they are currently declining any media interviews.

This release will be updated periodically as information becomes available.




Searchers are continuing the efforts to locate Riley Zickel, age 21, of Portland who has been missing since last Wednesday. Mr. Zickel is believed to have entered the Jefferson Wilderness with the intent to explore the park and possibly summit Mt. Jefferson. Mr. Zickel told family he intended to exit the park Thursday to meet friends for another hike in the Seattle area. Mr. Zickel is believed to be carrying a cell phone but attempts to locate or "ping" the phone have been unsuccessful, searchers believe the phone may be turned off.

Currently there are 34 searchers and a K9 on the ground scouring the area for Mr. Zickel, agencies assisting in the search are Lane County Sheriff's Office, Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, Benton County Sheriff's Office, Crook County Sheriff's Office, Mountain Wave Radio, Corvallis Mountain Rescue, US Forest Service, Army National Guard and the Civil Air Patrol.

Recap:

Mr. Zickel entered the park Wednesday morning 07/27/2016.

MCSO was contacted by family 07/30/2016 notifying Mr. Zickel was missing.

07/30/2016 at 6:30 p.m., Deputies located Mr. Zickel's vehicle on a trail head that enters Jefferson Park.

07/31/2016 a massive search effort was launched putting some 45 searchers into the park attempting to locate Mr. Zickel.

08/01/2016 34 searchers and K9 on the ground searching the park focusing on Mt. Jefferson and the surrounding park areas.




Searchers have discontinued their search efforts, in the Jefferson wilderness, for the night due to darkness. They will resume searching tomorrow morning first thing for Mr. Zickel who is overdue from hiking in the area.

Briefing is at 0700 and the staging area for media will be in the gravel parking lot on the southeast corner of Detroit Ave and Forrest Ave, in Detroit across from Korners Restaurant. Additional resources are being brought in to help with search efforts tomorrow. They are, civil air patrol, Lane County Sheriff's Office, and Corvallis mountain rescue.

We have learned Mr. Zickel is a experienced hiker who is reported to have appropriate equipment for this trip and adequate amount of food. It should be noted Mr. Zickel's first name is Riley and not Ryan as previous mentioned.

Anyone with any information about Mr. Zickel is encouraged to call 503-588-5032.




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Marion County Sheriff's Office, Search and Rescue, has launched a search for a 21 year old overdue hiker. His name is Ryan Zickel from the Portland area. Ryan arrived in the Jefferson Wilderness on Wednesday and initially planned on staying one night at Jefferson Park.

Marion County Search and Rescue is being assisted by Linn County Sheriff's Office, Polk County Sheriff's Office, United State Forest Service, and the Air National Guard. We have search parties on the ground, via Posse and Air.

Attached is a photograph of Ryan, which is from when he was younger. We are told Ryan still looks very much like this picture.


Attached Media Files: 2016-07/1294/96521/ZICKEL.jpg , 2016-08/1294/96521/Hat.jpg , 2016-08/1294/96521/Tent.jpg
Newport City Center Fire - Update 5 - Victims Identifed
Newport Police Dept. - 08/08/16 11:47 AM
Police and fire personnel have accounted for all guests registered at the City Center Motel. At 4:00 P.M, two bodies, one male and one female, were discovered deceased beneath burned rubble. The bodies were later identified as motel guests Tammi Sue Hepner, 51 years of age, and Allen Arthur Hepner, 63 years of age; Portland, Oregon residents. They had been staying in room 221. Next of kin has been notified.

At approximately 8:00 P.M., two additional bodies were discovered deeper in the burned rubble. The bodies were later identified as motel guests Sandra Sue Shoemaker, 60 years of age, and Danny Keith Shoemaker, 64 years of age; Springfield, Oregon residents. They had been staying in room 220. Next of kin has been notified.

As a result of the fire, room 220 and 221 became engulfed in flames, which blocked the entry/exit of each room. As the fire spread, the second floor collapsed onto the first floor. Preliminary investigation showed that the Hepners and the Shoemakers died from causes related to the fire.

The cause of the fire is still under investigation. The origin of the fire was determined to be in room 103, which is a ground level room. The cause of the fire and additional details surrounding the fire, including smoke detector operation is still under investigation. The investigation is being conducted by the Newport Police Department, and Newport Fire Department, with assistance by the State of Oregon Fire Marshall's Office.
Linn Deputies Respond to Car Crash into Apartments (Photo)
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 08/08/16 11:18 AM
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Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley reports on August 07, 2016 at 10:38 p.m., Deputies responded to 33808 Melody Lane, east of Corvallis, for a report of a car that crashed into an apartment complex.

The investigation revealed a 1999 gold Pontiac Montana van, had driven around to the back side of the apartment complex onto the lawn. The van then intentionally drove into the back wall of one of the apartments causing extensive damage and then left the scene. Although the residence was occupied at the time of the crash, no one was injured. The gas line into the apartment was ruptured and Corvallis Fire Department responded to the scene to shut the gas off.

During the course of the investigation, the operator, Steven Ray Pugh, 35, of Corvallis, drove the van back to the apartment complex where he lived and crashed into. Pugh refused to stop for the deputies and returned to Hwy 34 driving east. Deputies pursued Pugh on Hwy 34, reaching top speeds of 55 MPH.

Upon reaching the city limits of Albany, members of the Albany Police Department spiked all four of Pugh's tires. The pursuit continued east on Queen Avenue to Pacific Boulevard, and then east on Santiam Hwy where Pugh's tires began to come apart.

Pugh lost control of his vehicle and stopped in the parking lot of Pick-A-Part located at 4646 Santiam Hwy SE, Albany.

Pugh was taken into custody and charged with Criminal Mischief I, Reckless Endangering, Fail to Perform Duties of an Operator, and Attempting to Elude Police.

Linn County Deputies were assisted at the scene by the Corvallis Police Department, Benton County Sheriff's Office, Albany Police Department and Oregon State Police.

This case remains under investigation.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/2993/96705/IMG_4238.JPG , 2016-08/2993/96705/IMG_4204.JPG
Corps seeks comments on Albany, Linn County, Ore. permit application
US Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District - 08/08/16 10:28 AM
US Army Corps of Engineers
Portland District

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is seeking comments on a request by the Albany Parks Department to conduct work in Linn County, Oregon.

Public Notice NWP-2016-180 is available at http://www.nwp.usace.army.mil/Missions/Regulatory/Notices/
Sun. 08/07/16
Waldport Man Killed on Highway 101 North of Florence - Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/07/16 8:53 PM
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On Sunday, August 7, 2016 at about 8:46 a.m., OSP Troopers and emergency crews responded to the report of a two-vehicle, head-on collision on Highway 101 near milepost 174 (14 miles north of Florence).

Preliminary investigation revealed a 2008 Honda CRV operated by Eugene Earl WEIGANT , age 92, of Waldport, was traveling northbound when it crossed the center line striking a 1994 Chevrolet Imperial Van operated by Tanner Benjamin DICKINSON, age 23, of Columbus, Ohio, head-on. Both vehicles sustained heavy front-end damage.

WEIGANT was transported by Western Lane Ambulance to Peace Harbor Hospital in Florence where he later succumbed to his injuries. DICKINSON was transported by Pac West Ambulance to Peace Harbor Hospital and treated and released for minor injuries.

One lane of Highway 101 was closed for approximately four hours while the investigation was conducted. OSP was assisted by the Central Coast Fire and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

More information will be released as it becomes available.


Attached Media Files: Photo2 , Photo1
Oregon Army National Guard medevac helicopter unit restructures under new name (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 08/07/16 4:41 PM
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SALEM, Oregon -- The Oregon Army National Guard's medical evacuation helicopter unit, well-known for assisting with mountain rescues, underwent a name change due to the restructuring of the Army National Guard. The unit, formerly known as Company C (Charlie), 7-158th Aviation Regiment, was deactivated during a ceremony, August 7, at the Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF #1) in Salem, Oregon.

The unit was renamed Company G (Golf) 1-189th Aviation Regiment. The unit conducts medical evacuations (medevac), search and rescues, as well as wild land fire suppression operations utilizing HH-60M Black Hawk helicopters.

"This change is a very positive thing for us," said Oregon Army National Guard Maj. Brady Phillips, commander of the new Golf Company, 1-189th Aviation Regiment. "It increases our unit's force structure [personnel manning] for enlisted Soldiers, allowing us to promote more people and get more flight medics qualified as nationally registered paramedics."

While their mission remains the same, the unit is a new company structured under the Montana Army National Guard's 1st General Support Aviation Battalion, 189th Aviation Regiment. Although the battalion is headquartered in Helena, Montana, the medevac company will remain stationed in Salem, Oregon, as part of the Oregon Army National Guard and will continue to support civil authorities throughout the State of Oregon as needed.

The unit received new colors, known as a guidon flag, during the ceremony to symbolize the activation of Company G (Golf) 1-189th Aviation Regiment. Armies have followed their unit flags into combat since ancient times when they were used to direct soldiers, foster esprit de corps and provide a rallying point in the confusion of battle. Flags still represent the soul of a military unit as a reminder of their deeds, glory and valor throughout history.

When a unit undergoes a permanent change of station, deployment/redeployment or deactivation, the guidon flag is furled and placed inside a canvas case to signify that the command has completed its mission and ceased operations at that location. The guidon flag representing Charlie Company, 7-158th Aviation, was rolled and cased during the ceremony, symbolizing the deactivation of the former unit.

The history of Charlie Company, 7-158th Aviation, dates back to 1996, when it was originally formed as the 1042nd Medical Company Air Ambulance. The unit first deployed to Bosnia and then twice to the Middle East in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

In 2007, the 1042nd Medical Company was reflagged and structured under the U.S. Army Reserve's 7th Battalion, 158th Aviation Regiment, headquartered at Fort Hood, Texas. The unit deployed three times under the 7-158th Aviation flag; to Iraq during Operation Iraqi Freedom, to Kuwait in support of Operation New Dawn, and to Kosovo in support of Operation Joint Guardian.

PHOTO CAPTIONS:
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Maj. Brady Phillips (left), company commander, and 1st Sgt. Patrick Casha, company senior enlisted leader, case their unit's guidon flag to symbolize the deactivation of Company C (Charlie), 7-158th Aviation, Oregon Army National Guard, during a ceremony, August 7, at the Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF #1) in Salem, Oregon. The unit was activated under a new name as Company G (Golf) 1-189th Aviation under the restructuring of the Army National Guard. The unit conducts medical evacuations, search and rescues, as well as wildland fire suppression operations utilizing HH-60M Black Hawk helicopters. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class April Davis, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

160807-Z-OT568-019:
Maj. Brady Phillips (left), company commander, and 1st Sgt. Patrick Casha, company senior enlisted leader, unroll their unit's new guidon flag, symbolizing the activation of Company G (Golf) 1-189th Aviation, Oregon Army National Guard, during a ceremony, August 7, at the Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF #1) in Salem, Oregon. The unit, formerly known as Company C (Charlie), 7-158th Aviation, underwent a name change due to the restructuring of the Army National Guard. The unit conducts medical evacuations, search and rescues, as well as wildland fire suppression operations utilizing HH-60M Black Hawk helicopters. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class April Davis, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

150805-Z-PL993-060: Oregon Army National Guard pilots with Charlie Company, 7-158th Aviation, navigate through smoke in an HH-60M Black Hawk helicopter equipped with a bambi bucket of water in support of fire suppression efforts at the Stouts Fire, August 5, 2015. The unit underwent a name change due to the restructuring of the Army National Guard and is now called Company G (Golf) 1-189th Aviation. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

Mt. Jefferson rescue: The Oregon Army National Guard's Charlie Company, 7-158th Aviation, hovers at 9,000 feet on Mt. Jefferson during a climber rescue and recovery operation, December 1, 2015, as Mt. Hood is seen in the distance. The unit underwent a name change due to the restructuring of the Army National Guard and is now called Company G (Golf) 1-189th Aviation. (Courtesy photo by Nate Meehan)


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/962/96693/Mt_Jefferson_rescue_Dec_1_2015.jpg , 2016-08/962/96693/150805-Z-PL993-060.jpg , 2016-08/962/96693/160807-Z-OT568-019.JPG , 2016-08/962/96693/160807-Z-OT568-013.JPG
Oregon State Penitentiary reports inmate death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 08/07/16 3:35 PM
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An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) inmate died unexpectedly Saturday in a local area hospital. As with all unanticipated deaths in state prisons, the Oregon State Police Criminal Investigation Division is conducting an investigation.

Tommie Rae Norton, 55, was transported off-site for medical care Saturday, August 6, 2016. He was pronounced deceased on Saturday, August 6, at 11:55 a.m. He had been housed at Oregon State Penitentiary in Salem.

Norton entered Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) custody on July 15, 2016 on one count of identity theft out of Clackamas County. His earliest release date was February 11, 2018.

No other details are available at this time.

OSP is Oregon's only maximum-security prison, located in Salem, and houses over 2,000 male inmates. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including death row, disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, inmate work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon's only prison.

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Attached Media Files: Tommie Norton
Sat. 08/06/16
Death Investigation
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/06/16 1:32 PM
On August 5th, 2016, at about 6:00 p.m., deputies responded to a location on the Rouge River near mile post 10 on Highway 230, to investigate the death of Oregon State Senator Alan Bates, age 71 of Medford.

Senator Bates had been fishing with his son. They stopped at this location to clean fish and Senator Bates walked down to the river. After about 10 minutes, the Senator's son went looking for his father and found Senator Bates in the water, deceased.

It appears that Senator Bates may have suffered some sort of medical event. There is no sign of foul play. The cause of death is under investigation by the Medical Examiner's office and an autopsy has been scheduled.

Next of kin has been notified.

No further information is available at this time.

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Penitentiary on modified operations
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 08/06/16 10:56 AM
Oregon State Penitentiary (OSP) was placed on lockdown Friday, August 5, following a series of fights between inmates. The institution is currently running on modified operations and visitation is canceled until further notice.

At approximately 2:30 p.m., multiple fights broke out prompting OSP officials to place the institution on lockdown. Additional fights occurred into the evening and the following morning.

A total of 155 inmates were placed in special housing for their involvement in the altercations. Five inmates required outside medical treatment for non-life threatening injuries. No staff injuries were reported.

An investigation is being conducted to determine the cause of the incidents.

OSP is Oregon's only maximum-security prison, located in Salem, and houses over 2,000 male inmates. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including death row, disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, inmate work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon's only prison.

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Search Warrant
Lebanon Police Dept. - 08/06/16 7:50 AM
Nature of Crime or Event: Search Warrant
Date / Time Occurred: August 5, 2016 @ 1700 hours
Occurred Location: 35380 Riverside Drive, Albany, Oregon

On Friday, August 5, 2016 at about 1700 hours, Lebanon Police detectives served a search warrant at the above listed address in regards to a stolen property investigation. During the course of this investigation, detectives seized 2 stolen guns and user amounts of narcotics. Detectives arrested Patricia Raye Sansone, 39, of Albany, Oregon, for Theft I and PCS -- Methamphetamine.

The Lebanon Police Department was assisted by the Linn County Sheriff's Office.

Anyone with additional information is asked to contact Detective Justin Bach at 541-258-4328.

For additional information, please refer to the article located at www.ci.lebanon.or.us.
Fri. 08/05/16
Lane ESD Board of Directors to Meet on August 11, 2016
Lane ESD - 08/05/16 5:19 PM
The Lane Education Service District Board of Directors will meet on Thursday, August 11, 2016. A Special Session will begin at 3:00 p.m. with Jim Green, OSBA, presenting on Legislation 101. A regular meeting of the Board will begin at 6:00 p.m. Agenda materials are available on the Lane Education Service District website at www.lesd.k12.or.us.
OHA to assess long-term risks near Precision Castparts Corp.
Oregon Health Authority - 08/05/16 4:25 PM
August 5, 2016

OHA to assess long-term risks near Precision Castparts Corp.
Agency forming a community advisory committee to inform health assessment process

PORTLAND, Ore.--The Oregon Health Authority's Environmental Health Assessment Program will begin work on a public health assessment in the area surrounding Precision Castparts Corp., also known as PCC Structurals Inc.

The public health assessment (PHA) of the area was prompted by significant community concerns about health risks from past, present and future exposures to heavy metals in the southeast Portland metro area including Milwaukie. The Environmental Health Assessment Program (EHAP) will follow the standard PHA process of the Agency for Toxic Substance and Disease Registry.

PHAs use available environmental to assess health risks. The Precision Castparts assessment will be based on soil and air data collected near the facility. PHAs are not community health studies and will not determine whether existing health issues are caused by environmental exposures. The PHA will, however, evaluate whether exposures are harmful and should be stopped or reduced. It also will enable OHA to better respond to community concerns, and to identify and prioritize actions that protect public health.

"Community members are key participants and partners in our assessment work," said Julie Early Sifuentes, EHAP program manager. "Our community advisory committees offer us important information about concerns and information needs, and help us better understand exposures. At the same time, these committees build community capacity and establish transparency."

The Environmental Health Assessment Program will hold a series of meetings focused on the long-term health risk assessment for the communities living near the Precision Castparts site on Southeast Harney Drive in Portland. OHA will be recruiting interested community members who are willing and able to participate in the community advisory committee.

The purposes of the community advisory committee are to:
-- Receive input and feedback from local residents into exposure assumptions and recommendations.
-- Educate participants about the PHA process and build capacity in environmental health.
-- Develop relationships with local residents and establish transparency in the long-term public health assessment process.
-- Identify the most relevant ways of communicating to the broader community about the PHA process and about the conclusions and recommendations.
-- Ensure that community concerns are highlighted, incorporated and addressed through the PHA process.

The PHA process will require participation in three to five advisory committee meetings. Each meeting will be two to three hours long on a weekday evening. Advisors may want to spend time between meetings reading, relaying information to others, and other activities, but the commitment OHA is asking for is to attend all meetings and stay engaged in the process through its final stages.

The Environmental Health Assessment Program is seeking:
-- Seven to 10 volunteers who live, work, learn or play within a half-mile of Precision Castparts site on Harney Drive.
-- Individuals who can commit to attending every meeting.
-- A diversity of experience and perspectives.
-- Individuals who are at greatest risk from the effects of environmental contamination, including pregnant or nursing women, parents or guardians of children, traditionally underrepresented groups, the elderly, those who have low income, and those with existing health conditions.

Those interested can call 971-673-0970 or email ehap.info@state.or.us by August 24.

# # #


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/3687/96676/Metals-plan-for-public-health-assessment-plan.pdf
Guided Mountain Biking Tour Aug. 21 at LaPine State Park (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/05/16 3:46 PM
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LaPine, OR--Experience the thrill of a two-hour mountain biking tour at LaPine State Park from 9-11 a.m. on Sunday, Aug. 21. This introduction to mountain biking will lead participants through the trees and along the Deschutes River on one of the most scenic park trails. Participants will learn off-road biking skills and drills, as well as basic information about proper equipment and safety gear.

Cog Wild mountain bike tour guide Gernot Bartels will lead the way. The Bend-based company designs a variety of specialized tours for mountain bike enthusiasts.

The event is free--participants just need an interest in learning trail rules on wheels and an adventurous attitude. Participants can bring their own bikes, or the park has 10 loaner bikes available as first-come, first-served. Participants should bring water, snacks and helmets. All participants must wear bike helmets and be at least 12 years old. Sunglasses and gloves are also recommended.

Registration is required. Call the LaPine State Park office at 541-536-2428.

The mountain bike tour is one of many skill-based recreational activities for beginners offered this summer by Oregon State Parks. Visit www.oregonstateparks.org for the full schedule.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1303/96673/mountain_biking_(3).jpg
Oregon Century Farm & Ranch Program Awards Century Status to 6 Farms & Ranches and 5 Sesquicentennial Farms in 2016
Oregon Farm Bureau - 08/05/16 2:26 PM
Oregon Century Farm & Ranch Program Awards Century Status to 6 Farms & Ranches and 5 Sesquicentennial Farms in 2016

(Salem, OR) -- At the annual awards ceremony at the Oregon State Fair, families from across the state will receive recognition for operating as Century or Sesquicentennial (150-year) Farm or Ranch.

The 2016 ceremony will be held on Saturday, August 27, 2016, at 11:00 am at the Oregon State Fair. The public recognition ceremony and awards celebration will be held in the Picnic Grove Boots N' Brew Area. Please join us for this special event that celebrates Oregon's agricultural heritage.

Six farms and ranches from six different counties will be honored this year as Century Farms or Ranches and five farms from four different counties reached Sesquicentennial status, bringing the total number of Oregon Century Farms and Ranches to 1,181 & Sesquicentennial to 38.

The Century farm and ranch families being honored in 2016 are: Mel & Linda Omeg, Omeg Family Orchards: Wasco County; Doris Alley, Alley Ranch: Sherman County; Carman Ranch LLC, Carman Ranch: Wallowa County; Lois Mills, M Christensen Family Farm: Yamhill County; David Grossen, Peter Fred Grossen Farm: Washington County; Kenneth & Earl Davenport, Alder Glade Farm: Marion County. (See narratives below)

The Sesquicentennial Award program began in 2008 in honor of Oregon's 150th birthday celebration. Sesquicentennial awards recognize Oregon families who have continuously farmed portions of their original family acreage for 150 years or more. Thirty-eight families have now received this prestigious sesquicentennial award.

The families being honored this year are Carolyn Colson, Mosby Century Farm: Lane County; Louise Cox/Smith L. Cox, Jesse & Ruby Looney Farm: Marion County; Thomas and Zan Ewing, Maple Hill Farm: Marion County; Gordon Zimmerman, Gordon Zimmerman Farm: Yamhill County; Floyd & Betty Jo Smith, Smith Bros Farms, LLC: Linn County. (See narratives below)

Every Oregon farm and ranch has a unique history and special family story. The Oregon Century Farm & Ranch program encourages agriculture families to share, with a broader audience, these stories. By promoting family stories, rich cultural heritage is passed down to future generations while educating Oregonians about the social and economic impact of Oregon agriculture.

The Oregon Century Farm & Ranch Program began in 1958 to honor farm and ranch families with century-long connections to the land. To qualify for a century or sesquicentennial award, interested families must follow a formal application process. Members of the Application Review Committee review each application against the qualifications, which include continuous family operation of the farm or ranch; a gross income from farm use of not less than $1,000 per year for at least three years out of five prior to application; and family members must live on or actively manage the farm or ranch activities. Application documentation may include photos, original deeds, personal stories, or other historic records. These records help support Oregon's agricultural history by providing valuable information about settlement patterns or statistics on livestock and crop cycles. All documents are archived for public access.

Award winners receive a certificate signed by the Governor and Director of the Oregon Department of Agriculture. Historic roadside signs are imprinted with the founder's name and the year the ranch or farm was established.

The Oregon Century Farm & Ranch Program is administered by the Oregon Farm Bureau Foundation for Education. It is supported by a partnership among the Oregon Farm Bureau, the State Historic Preservation Office, OSU University Archives, and by generous donations of Oregonians.

For information about the Oregon Century Farm & Ranch Program, contact Andréa Kuenzi, Program Coordinator, at 503-400-7884 or cfr@oregonfb.org. The application deadline for 2017 is May 1. For more information about the program, visit www.oregonfb.org/centuryfarm

See PDF of this release: http://bit.ly/2asrCHx

Family Narratives:

Century Awards:

Omeg Family Orchards-Founded in Wasco County in 1905 by August & Edna (Morgan) Renken. Applicants are Mel & Linda Omeg.

August (Gus) purchased the land in 1905. Early crops included cattle, hay, apricots, cherries, peaches, & watermelon. As the region became more oriented to apple, pear, & cherry production, the farm followed suit and went from raising a variety of crops and animals to a large-scale fruit production (mainly cherries, but some apples as well). The main crop today is sweet cherries and the farm has been able to grow and acquire adjacent lands that had once been owned by the Morgan family (Edna's) as well. Mel's son Michael and his family now manage the farm. Mel is the current owner and grandson of the Founders.

Alley Ranch-Founded in Sherman County in 1915 by Tom (TW) Alley. Applicant is Doris Alley TR of Douglas P. Alley Family Trust.

TW Alley came to Sherman County in the early 1900's and bought and sold various properties in the county. In December 1915 he bought the property, 639 acres that is now known as the "home place". The early crops were wheat, oats, barley, cattle and horses. Over the years, the farm has continued to grow wheat and barley utilizing conservation practices to keep the land is optimal condition. Dwight and Charmayn Alley (son of Doug & Doris Alley) now farm the land with many family members helping out throughout the seasons. Doris as trustee of the Douglas P Alley Family Trust is the current owner and Doug was the grandson of the founder.

Carman Ranch-Founded in Wallowa County in 1913 by Jacob Weinhard. Applicant is Carman Ranch LLC.

Jacob Weinhard purchased 2500 acres in 1913. An additional 40 acres was added in 1915. Early crops included wheat, barley, oats, alfalfa, cattle and pigs. In the early 1970's this changed to wheat, cattle, and hay. The ranch currently raises cattle and pigs and no longer raises wheat. Kent Carman, Cory Carman Flynn, & Dave Flynn make up Carman Ranch LLC and are the current operators and owners of the ranch. Kent is the great grandson of founder, while Cory is great-great granddaughter of the founder. Dave Flynn is the husband of Cory.

M Christensen Family Farm, LLC-Founded in Yamhill County in 1900 by John D. and Louisa Goffrier. Applicant is Lois Mills.

John and Louisa Goffrier purchased approximately 300 acres from D.S. Holman and his wife, Martha, in August 1900. The early crops were grains and grass seed. Lois can remember crops of vetch, rye grass, wheat, oats, barley and red clover. Horses worked the land in the early years. For a time, there were some dairy cows as well as pigs and sheep. By the 1950's the livestock was gone and today, the primary crop is grass seed and grain. The straw from the fields has become a marketable commodity for the farm. Lois Mills is the granddaughter of the founder and is the current principal owner along with her four children who each hold a small percentage of ownership. Marianne, Lois' daughter, is regularly involved in the farm management discussions. Lois' grandson, Jeff Hendricks, now resides on the farm with his family.

Peter Fred Grossen Farm-Founded in Washington County in 1904 by Peter Fred Grossen. Applicant is David Fred Grossen.

Peter bought 72 acres from Peter Wolfe in 1904. Peter finished clearing the land, planted an apple orchard, and established a dairy farm and creamery with Brown Swiss cows. Early crops also included wheat, oats, barley, hay, potatoes, & Swiss cheese. Today, the apples and potatoes are no longer grown as the market for them in the area changed and weren't marketable in Portland area. The main crops currently are hay, wheat, Brown Swiss Cattle and Swiss cheese. David Grossen is the great grandson of Peter Fred the Founder. He owns 25 of the original 72 acres, while remaining family members own and operate the balance.

Alder Glade Farm-Founded in Marion County in 1916 by John H. and Mollie Markland Davenport. Applicants are Kenneth & Earl Davenport

John and Mollie Markland purchased the approximately 85 acres from Charles F. Hicks in 1916. The land was part of the original donation land claim of Thomas L. Coon. It is believed he and two others are buried on the property and the grave markers were still present when John bought the property. The early crops were sheep, Jersey cattle, chickens and hogs. They grew the hay, grain, & corn to feed the livestock. They farmed with horses as well. The main farming activities today are a registered flock of Cheviot sheep, Wagyu cattle, hay, & other commercial sheep. The applicants are grandsons of John & Mollie Markland.

Sesquicentennial Awards:

Mosby Century Farm-Founded in Lane County in 1852 by David & Isabelle Mosby. Applicant is Carolyn D. Colson.

David Mosby came to Oregon in 1850, settling his donation land claim of approximately 283 acres just outside of Cottage Grove in 1852. Mosby Farm has passed through inheritance in the family as an operating farm and ranch since the original donation land claim. Early grain crops, hay, and timber were farmed and harvested with horses. Hogs were raised and hams smoked in the smokehouse to be sold in Portland. Cattle have been raised and grazed since the early days, moving from polled Herefords to Black Angus twenty years ago. Over the past ten years the farm has produced less hay and grazed more cattle. The farm currently runs up to 100 cow/calf pairs or 200 feeders and harvests winter hay as the grass volume allows. The applicant is the niece of Polly Hatch Mosby wife of David C. Mosby who was the grandson of the founder.

Jesse & Ruby Looney Farm/Cox Family-Founded in Marion County in 1846 by Jesse & Ruby Looney. Applicants are Louise Cox & Smith L. Cox.

Jesse and Ruby Looney traveled on the first wagon train to Oregon, led by Dr. Marcus Whitman and arrived in the Oregon Territory in 1843. Opposing slavery, they left Missouri to seek human freedom and a home elsewhere to raise their family. They homesteaded land south of Salem and secured their provisional land grant in April 1846. The land had to be cleared by Jesse by manual labor and with the use of oxen and horses. Early crops were oats, barley, wheat, garden produce, beef, dairy cattle and oxen. For many years, the Looney homestead was a station of the California Stage Company route that ran between Portland and San Francisco. Today the 400-acre farm raises grass seed, sweet corn, peppermint, broccoli, squash, and cauliflower. Sheep production was a major crop for 45 years and for the past 20 years a herd of purebred Hereford cattle are being raised. The farm has remained in the Looney family for 173 years and continues today. The applicant Louise (Looney) Cox, age 92, is the great, great, great granddaughter of the founders. She's attended every Oregon State Fair since she was a little girl. Her son, Smith Cox is the 6th generation living on the farm and continues the family heritage. Both his sons Brad and Wade Cox are in the ranching/farming business.

Maple Hill Farm-Founded in Marion County in 1866 by Alexander & Christina Esson. Applicants are Thomas Ewing & Zan Ewing.

Alexander and Christina Esson bought the farm from Milton Young in 1866. It was part of the John and Sarah Carey donation land claim in 1850. The original farm had 320 acres with 290 in use today. The early crops grown on the farm included wheat, oats, logging/timber, fruit trees, pigs, horses, dairy cattle. Today there is no longer a dairy and row crops and grass seed are the predominant crops grown on the farm. Corn, squash, spinach, & ryegrass for seed are the current crops. The applicants are great grandsons of the founders.

Gordon Zimmerman Farm-Founded in Yamhill County in 1863 by Alexander Fryer. Applicants are Gordon Zimmerman & Gordon Dromgoole.

Alexander Fryer purchased the land in 1863. The land was part of the W.D. Clark donation land claim. The original acreage was 500+, with 83 being in use today. The farm passed through generations of family through Alexander's daughter Orpha Fryer Swingle to her daughter Oka Fryer Zimmerman who married George Zimmerman, and then to their son Gordon Zimmerman life estate interest and grandson Gordon Dromgoole who holds the beneficiary ownership interest in property. Early crops were hay, wheat & oats. The Fryer's had a large prune orchard and dryer starting in the late 1800's. The last of the orchard was removed about 1950. During and after WWII, vetch both common and hairy was raised on the farm. In the 1950's George Zimmerman and his son in law raised the grain crops, hairy vetch, field peas and feeder lambs. From the 1970's-90's Gordon Dromgoole raised various field crops such as wheat, clover seed & alfalfa. The current crop today is grass for seed. The intent for the future of the property is for Gordon D. to work with his grandkids on a hazelnut operation. The applicant, Gordon Zimmerman is the great grandson of Alexander Fryer and still lives in the home that replaced the original house of 1863 that burned in 1918. The applicant Gordon Dromgoole is the great great grandson of Mr. Fryer.

Smith Bros. Farm LLC-Founded in Linn County in 1853 by John & Sara McCoy. Applicants are Floyd & Betty Jo Smith.

John & Sara McCoy came to Oregon in 1845 on the Ben Holliday wagon train. Brother William McCoy Jr. and brother in law Dr. Washington Maley and wife Margaret McCoy Maley accompanied them on this journey. The donation land claim of John and Sara was officially recorded on an 1853 DLC map. The daughter of Dr. Maley, Irene, niece of John & Sara, married a Robert L. Smith. They became owners of the north half about 305 acres of the McCoy DLC in 1890. The original acreage was 640 and there are 180 in use today. The early crops were wheat, sheep, dairy, hogs, chickens, corn, oats and barely. Today the farm raises wheat, clover, meadow foam, fescue and other grasses. The applicant Floyd Smith is the great grandson of Irene & Robert Smith. Irene Maley Smith is the niece of founders.

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Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Update August 5
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/05/16 1:28 PM
FIRES
Rail Fire

The 6,543 acre Rail Fire is burning 10 miles WSW of Unity in timber and beetle-killed lodgepole pine, in a mix of moderate to steep terrain. As a result of a wind event on Tuesday, the fire spread onto adjacent private property protected by ODF. Approximately 8 acres of private land has been affected.

Suppression along the east side of the fire has lessened the threat to private lands. The fire is 5 percent contained.

An estimated 621 people are assigned to the fire. Objectives for today include improving fire lines, protecting a communication tower site, and minimizing private acres burned. ODF fire managers, personnel and equipment have been involved in the firefighting operations.

Ten residences along Cemetery Road, South Fork Road and Bull Run Road are under a Level 1 Ready evacuation order. This evacuation notice is downgraded from the previously issued Level 2 Set evacuation order. Forest Service campgrounds Mammoth Springs, Elk Creek, Stevens Creek and South Fork remain closed to the public.

The forecast for Friday and Saturday calls for a chance of mostly dry thunderstorms in the area. Thunderstorms often produce gusty winds which can be problematic for firefighters on the line. Temperatures are expected to be in the mid-80s to lower 90s today.

Current fire restrictions for forestlands in Northeast Oregon can be found at www.bmidc.org

http://bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com/ is the spot for current fire information in the Blue Mountains.

Neal Creek Fire
The Neal Creek Fire was reported yesterday evening burning in dense second growth Douglas-fir on steep terrain approximately eight miles south of Hood River, in the Oregon Department of Forestry's Dalles Unit. The fire is estimated to be 15 acres in size.

Winds up to 20 miles an hour and steep terrain could be challenging as hand crews lay hose around the fire today. The fire is now 50 percent contained.

Resources on scene include four 20 person hand crews and 2 engines. A Type 2 and Type 1 helicopter is available.

The cause of the fire is under investigation.

FIRE STATISTICS:
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2016, through Friday, Aug. 5, 2016:


Lightning-caused fires: 47 fires burned 2,126 acres
Human-caused fires: 392 fires burned 459 acres
Total: 439 fires burned 2,675 acres
10-year average (for this period of the year)
Lightning-caused fires: 162 fires burned 17,020 acres
Human-caused fires: 380 fires burned 4,136 acres
Total: 542 fires burned 21,156 acres

For information on breaking fires, go to:

http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/
Meeting on Lane Co. forestland classification for fire protection to be held Aug. 8 in Veneta
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/05/16 11:45 AM
The Forestland Classification Committee for Lane County will hold a meeting and work session in Veneta Monday, Aug. 8, to continue review of lands within the county to determine which should be classified as forestland for the purpose of fire protection.

The Oregon Department of Forestry provides wildfire protection services to forestlands in the county, and a Forest Patrol Assessment on protected lands helps fund firefighting.

The meeting will be held at 9 a.m. at the Oregon Department of Forestry's Western Lane District office, 87950 Territorial Road. It is open to the public.

More information on the Lane County forestland classification review can be obtained by contacting Tom Soward, Western Lane District, 541-935-2283.
BLM Approves Path Forward to Increase Timber Harvest and Environmental Protections in Western Oregon Forests
Bureau of Land Management Oregon & Washington - 08/05/16 11:29 AM
Portland, Ore. --The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) today approved an historic path forward for local communities in Western Oregon with Resource Management Plans (RMPs) that will increase job growth, tourism and recreation while also creating predictability for timber harvest, and offering strong protections for the northern spotted owl, listed fish species, and water resources.

"With this Resource Management Plan, the BLM has achieved an extraordinary balance that will create predictability and sustainability in Western Oregon," BLM Deputy Director Steve Ellis said. "We are creating timber harvest opportunities for local communities, increasing tourism and recreation and protecting threatened and endangered species. We look forward to continue working with Oregonians on plan implementation."

Throughout the course of the planning process, the BLM held 41 public meetings, workshops, and forums in Western Oregon. The agency received more than 7,000 comments, 4,500 of which were sent in during the formal comment period in 2015. The BLM also worked closely with other federal and state agencies and Oregon counties to develop strategies to protect fish, water, and threatened and endangered species.

The BLM estimates that with full implementation of the RMPs it will be able to provide 278 million board feet (mmbf) per year in total timber harvest. The BLM will create harvest timber opportunities using the principles of ecological forestry, which incorporates principles of natural forest development. In the reserves, the BLM would allow timber harvest to help meet management objectives such as increasing fire resiliency, developing habitat for northern spotted owl and other species, and protecting listed fish species and water resources. Also in the reserves, the BLM would protect stands of older, structurally complex forests. These stands include nearly 100 percent of all older forests, which protect high quality habitat for spotted owl.

In response to public input, the plan will also increase recreation and tourism opportunities in Western Oregon by designating 20 percent of the planning areas as Recreation Management Areas (RMAs), which are areas on the landscape that will be developed to create recreation opportunities, reduce user conflicts, and protect natural and recreational resources. There are approximately 491,000 acres of RMAs in the planning area. The BLM focused on providing close-to-home recreation access based on 30 and 60 minute travel distances from the 12 most populated communities in the planning area.

"The Forest Service commends the Bureau of Land Management on the impressive effort put for on their Resource Management Plans for Western Oregon, including their clear commitment to public engagement throughout the process," said Jim Peña, Regional Forester for the Pacific Northwest Region of the Forest Service. "We thank the BLM for their close partnership and coordination during this management planning effort."

The BLM estimates the RMPs will increase annual harvest value from $23 million to $51 million, the value of recreation will increase from $223 million to $271 million, and the contributions to jobs will increase from 7,900 to 8,500.

The BLM signed two decisions: a Northwestern and Coastal Oregon Record of Decision (ROD)/RMP and a Southwestern Oregon ROD/RMP. The Northwestern and Coastal Oregon ROD will include the Salem, Eugene, Coos Bay, and northern half of the Roseburg Districts, and the Southwestern Oregon ROD will include Medford and southern half of the Roseburg Districts, and the Klamath Falls Resource Area in the Lakeview District. The RODs each contain a rationale for the decision, provide an allowable sale quantity declaration, describe how the BLM will transition to the new plan, and outline direction for mitigation, plan monitoring, and evaluation. The completion of the RODs is a culmination of a four year effort by the BLM to use new science, policies, and technology to protect natural resources and support local communities.

The BLM released the Proposed RMPs for a 30-day protest period beginning April 15, 2016, and received 46 protests. Descriptions of how each was addressed can be found in the Director's Protest Resolution Report available at http:// www.blm.gov/wo/st/en/prog/planning/planning_overview/protest_resolution/protestreports.html.

Copies of this document are available at the Coos Bay, Eugene, Medford, Roseburg, and Salem Districts and the Lakeview District's Klamath Falls Field Office. The document is also available to view or download online at http://www.blm.gov/or/plans/rmpswesternoregon/.

All elements of the Resource Management Plan will be effective immediately. The implementation timeline for projects will be decided at the District or Field Office level. All District-level projects, including timber sales, development of recreation opportunities, and restoration projects, will need to go through site-specific planning.

The RODs and RMPs for the six Western Oregon BLM districts were last approved in 1995. In 2011, the BLM conducted plan evaluations of the 1995 RMPs, and concluded that a plan revision was needed to address necessary changes to timber and wildlife programs, and minor changes to most other programs as a result of new scientific information.

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land, the most of any Federal agency. This land, known as the National System of Public Lands, is primarily located in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The BLM's mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America's public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. In Fiscal Year 2015, the BLM generated $4.1 billion in receipts from activities occurring on public lands.


Attached Media Files: News Release
Polk County Sheriff's Office Investigating Theft of Disabled Veteran's Wheelchair
Polk Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/05/16 11:22 AM
UPDATE On 08/04/16 the wheelchair was located on the property and will be turned over to the owner. A suspect has been identified and the investigation is ongoing with charges pending.

The Polk County Sheriff's Office is seeking the public's assistance in locating a stolen electric wheelchair. The wheelchair was stolen on 08/03/16 from a disabled veteran in the Falls City area. The wheel chair was donated to the Veteran to help him be able to regain some of his mobility that he lost from an injury while he was in the Army. Anyone with information is asked to contact Deputy Hutchison at the Polk County Sheriff's Office (503) 623-9251 and reference case number DAS16-1396.
Fire at City Center Motel in Newport results in damage, evacuation of guests from adjacent lodgings (Photo)
Newport Police Dept. - 08/05/16 10:48 AM
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On Friday, 08/05/2016, Willamette Valley Communications Center received a report of a fire at the City Center Motel, located at 538 SW Coast Highway. The caller reported one room was on fire.

Newport Fire and Newport Police responded to the fire. Upon arrival, the motel was reported to be fully engulfed in flames. Fire personnel began to evacuate the motel and suppress the fire. The fire continued to spread, and additional resources were dispatched to the scene. Fire apparatus and personnel from Toledo, Depoe Bay, North Lincoln, Seal Rock, Waldport, and Yachats responded to assist.

Fire personnel conducted an initial sweep of the motel, and did not locate any persons. Three guests were transported to Good Samaritan Hospital; two with minor injuries that were treated and released. One guest was admitted for burns and smoke inhalation, and is being transported to the Legacy Emmanuel Burn Center.

Guests at the Days Inn, south of the City Center Motel, were evacuated as the fire spread to the north part of the Days Inn complex. Temporary shelter was established at the Newport Armory. Red Cross responded to the scene to assist with displaced guests. Hwy 101 was closed and traffic diverted around the fire scene. Hwy 101 will remain closed for several hours while fire personnel continue to suppress the fire.

Due to the amount of water being used to suppress the fire, users of Newport water may notice a dirty color to the water. The water is safe to drink. Newport Public Works will monitor the City's water, and will flush water lines as needed.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/5016/96660/City_Center_Motel_Fire_2.JPG , 2016-08/5016/96660/City_Center_Motel_Fire_1.JPG
Vehicle and Foot Pursuit
Lebanon Police Dept. - 08/05/16 9:43 AM
Nature of Crime or Event: Vehicle and Foot Pursuit
Date / Time Occurred: August 5th, 2016
Occurred Location: Knot Hole Market in Lebanon to the 37000 block of Northern Drive, Brownsville

On August 5, 2016 at 1:31 a.m., Lebanon Police Officer Eric Stein stopped a 2001 Dodge Ram in the parking lot of the Knot Hole Market in Lebanon. Officer Stein had observed the truck containing two occupants driving slowly in an industrial area, where no businesses were open due to the hour of day. The vehicle then made a moving violation, and Officer Stein initiated the stop.
The driver gave a false name, but was recognized from numerous prior contacts by Sgt. John Trahan, who was backing up Officer Stein, as 51-year old Randy Edward Drake. Just after Officer Stein ran Drake's name, Drake fled in the truck. The officers learned that Drake had a statewide felony warrant for his arrest for parole violation, a warrant for his arrest out of the Lebanon Municipal Court, and that his license was suspended at a criminal level.
The officers pursued Drake south on Santiam Highway, and then on backroads around Mountain Home Drive and Northern Drive. Deputies from the Linn County Sheriff's Office joined the pursuit. Speeds exceeded 100 mph on the highway. Spike strips, which are designed to disable the tires, were deployed on the truck on Mountain Home Drive near Northern Drive. Drake continued to flee from officers in the vehicle. Drake drove through a closed gate and then went off-road and drove through two fences.
The officers tracked Drake's path with the assistance of a Linn County Sheriff's Office deputy and K9. The officers and deputy located Drake's truck, which had become stuck in a creek bed, and was now unoccupied. They located Drake hiding in some bushes; Drake refused to come out or show the officers his hands. The K9 was sent in and was 'on bite' until the officers could detain Drake. The passenger was located hiding in the bushes and complied with officers' commands.
Drake was taken to the Lebanon Community Hospital to receive treatment, and then transported to the Linn County Jail on his warrants. Charges related to the pursuit are pending. The passenger was interviewed and released at the scene. The Linn County District Attorney's office will review the case for possible charges against the passenger.
Red Cross is Assisting 50 People Displaced by Hotel Fire in Newport; Temporary Shelter Established
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/05/16 9:33 AM
Disaster responders with the American Red Cross Cascades Region are assisting approximately 50 people displaced by a multiple structure fire in Newport, OR. The fire affected two Newport hotels, the City Center Motel and the Days Inn.

The Red Cross is providing a food and a safe place for evacuees to stay while the fire is contained and damage is assessed. The temporary Red Cross shelter is located at the Newport Armory, 541 SW Coast Hwy in Newport, OR.

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org/Cascades, like us on Facebook at Red Cross Cascades Region or follow us on Twitter @RedCrossCasc.
Linn Deputies Arrest Lebanon Man for Drugs (Photo)
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 08/05/16 9:11 AM
2016-08/2993/96652/guns.cash.jpg
2016-08/2993/96652/guns.cash.jpg
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Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley reports that on August 4, 2016, at 3:10 p.m., the Linn County Sheriff's Office served a search warrant on Gary Gene Deal, 40, and his residence in the 37000 block of Pony Lane in Lebanon. The search warrant was a result of a yearlong narcotics investigation and a reported rape that occurred during June of this year.

Among the items seized by Investigators was evidence relating to the rape, approximately six ounces of methamphetamine, digital scales, packaging material, drug paraphernalia, drug records, surveillance cameras, stolen property, eight firearms, and $4,284 in cash. Of the firearms seized, a Glock .380 pistol was reported stolen to the Salem Police Department in January 2016 and was located on Gary Deal at the time of his arrest. In addition, a Ruger AR-556 rifle was reported stolen to the Albany Police Department within the past week, a Mossberg .22 Caliber rifle had the barrel cut to nine inches in length, and a Remington 20 gauge shotgun had an obliterated serial number.

As a result of the investigation, Deal was arrested and charged with Unlawful Delivery of Methamphetamine, Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine, eight counts of Felon in Possession of a Firearm, two counts of Theft I, Obliteration of/or Change of a Firearm, Possession of a Short-Barreled Rifle, Identity Theft, and Giving False Information to Police.

The investigation is continuing and additional charges are pending. Anyone with information on the reported rape is asked to contact Detective Brandon Fountain at (541) 917-6667.

The Linn County Sheriff's Office was assisted by the Lebanon Police Department.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/2993/96652/guns.cash.jpg , 2016-08/2993/96652/Gary_Deal.jpg
State warns Oregonians about insurance scam -- seeks information from victims
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 08/05/16 9:00 AM
(Salem) -- The Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services recently uncovered an insurance scam after an Oregon transportation company discovered its commercial auto and cargo insurance was non-existent.

The agency, through its Division of Financial Regulation, believes Umer M. Masood, under the alias Josh Capello, and Ahmed Salam are fraudulently operating Proactive Indemnity Corp., Proactive Financial Services, and ContingentCargo Co. The primary business addresses for the companies is listed in Los Angeles. However, there are no registered businesses in California with those names and none of the businesses are licensed to sell insurance in Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services has ordered Proactive Indemnity Corp., Proactive Financial Services, and ContingentCargo Co. to stop selling the fraudulent insurance and issued a fine of $120,000.

An Oregon transportation company purchased its insurance online and paid $20,000 in premiums over the course of four years, and received invoices and a certificate of coverage via email from Josh Capello. These certificates were fake; the premiums paid were deposited into banks in Pakistan.

The division believes there may be more Oregon companies that have purchased fraudulent insurance through these entities. Oregonians who have done business with Josh Capello, Ahmed Salam, Proactive Indemnity, Proactive Financial, or ContingentCargo Co. or with information about the entities should contact the division immediately at 888-877-4894 (toll-free).

"We want to hear from anyone who has done business with these entities so that we can prevent further harm," said Laura Cali, insurance commissioner and administrator of the Division of Financial Regulation. "If you have concerns about an insurance or financial issue, or would like to know more about how to spot a potential scam, contact the division for help."

To check a license online or get help with a concern or a question, go to dfr.oregon.gov or call 888-877-4894 (toll-free).

The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit dcbs.oregon.gov and dfr.oregon.gov.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1073/96651/DCBS_Order_-_Proactive.pdf
Thu. 08/04/16
North Bend School District Public Meetings -- August 2016
North Bend Sch. Dist. - 08/04/16 4:52 PM
Below are North Bend School District public meetings currently scheduled for August:


August 8, 2016
Regular School Board Meeting with Executive Session at 7:00 p.m.
North Bend City Council Chamber
835 California St., North Bend, OR

The board will meet in executive session to consider the dismissal or disciplining of, or to hear complaints or charges brought against, a public officer, employee, staff member or agent, unless he or she or the agent requests an open meeting. ORS 192.660(2)(b)

The board will meet in executive session to conduct deliberations with persons designated by the governing body to carry on labor negotiations, pursuant to ORS 192.660(2)(e)


August 23, 2016
Board Meeting Special Work Session at 5:30 p.m.
North Bend District Office
1913 Meade St., North Bend, OR

The schedule is subject to change.
Please email cschreiber@nbend.k12.or.us or visit www.nbend.k12.or.us for agenda information.
Red Cross Responds to Home Fire Affecting 2 adults in Lane County
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/04/16 3:36 PM
Disaster responders with the American Red Cross Cascades Region responded to a home fire disaster on August 4, 2016, at approximately 2 p.m. in the 60 block of N Grand St in Eugene,OR. The fire affected two adults. The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross Cascades Region (Oregon and Southwest Washington) responds to an average of two home fires every day. We provide hope and comfort to people affected, helping victims anywhere and anytime. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.
Oregon Military Department installs multi-million dollar solar array in Pendleton (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 08/04/16 3:03 PM
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PENDLETON, Oregon -- U.S. Senator Ron Wyden and Oregon Senator Bill Hansell joined the Oregon Military Department in officially dedicating the new 150-kilowatt solar panel array at the Oregon Army National Guard's Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF #2) at the airport in Pendleton, Oregon, August 4.

The Oregon Military Department partnered with Energy Trust of Oregon, the federal government and Pacific Power to bring the project to completion, working toward the larger goal of making the Oregon National Guard net zero by 2020. The project also benefits the state of Oregon as it works toward complying with Executive Order 13693, which sets multiple clean energy milestones including the state to have 30 percent of its electricity produced by renewable sources.

Senator Ron Wyden, in his remarks stated that the project was a success on a number of levels.

"I know we are calling this net zero, but I call it a net win for the state of Oregon," Wyden said, remarking how it not only helps with energy security goals but the panels being built in Oregon means more jobs for fellow Oregonians.

The array consists of 475 315-watt panels. To date the solar panels have already created 166,644 KWh of power equaling 13,496 gallons of gasoline, 119 tons of C02, 2,999 trees saved or 951 60 watt light bulbs.


PHOTO CAPTIONS:
160804-Z-YP317-016:
U.S. Senator Ron Wyden helps dedicate the new Oregon Military Department solar panel array outside the Oregon Army National Guard's Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF #2) at the airport in Pendleton, Oregon, August 4. The Oregon Military Department partnered with Energy Trust of Oregon, the federal government and Pacific Power to bring the project to completion, working toward the larger goal of making the Oregon National Guard net zero by 2020. (Photo by Christopher L. Ingersoll, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

160804-Z-YP317-021:
State Senator Bill Hansell, District 29, Oregon, helps dedicate the new Oregon Military Department solar panel array outside the Oregon Army National Guard's Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF #2) at the airport in Pendleton, Oregon, August 4. The Oregon Military Department partnered with Energy Trust of Oregon, the federal government and Pacific Power to bring the project to completion, working toward the larger goal of making the Oregon National Guard net zero by 2020. (Photo by Christopher L. Ingersoll, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

160804-Z-YP317-036
Betsy Kauffman, with Energy Trust of Oregon, presents a check for $84,319 to Col. Kenneth Safe, construction and facilities management officer for the Oregon Army National Guard, as part of the dedication of the Oregon Military Department's new solar panel array at the Oregon Army National Guard's Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF #2) at the airport in Pendleton, Oregon, August 4. The Oregon Military Department partnered with Energy Trust of Oregon, the federal government and Pacific Power to bring the project to completion, working toward the larger goal of making the Oregon National Guard net zero by 2020. (Photo by Christopher L. Ingersoll, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/962/96634/160804-Z-YP317-036.JPG , 2016-08/962/96634/160804-Z-YP317-021.JPG , 2016-08/962/96634/160804-Z-YP317-016.JPG
**UPDATE** Fatal Motorcycle Crash
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/04/16 1:53 PM
UPDATE
The deceased motorcycle rider has been identified as 50 year old Alexander Mcinnis Smith, a citizen of the United Kingdom. Smith was in the United States on a 30 day motorcycle tour that began in Alaska on July 6th.

Next of kin has been notified.
END UPDATE

PREVIOUS RELEASE
On August 3rd, 2016, at about 4:10 p.m., deputies were dispatched to a motorcycle crash at mile post 4 on Windigo Pass Road (U.S. Forest Service Road 60). The location of the crash is about 16 miles north of Diamond Lake. Emergency personnel responded to the crash scene and found an adult male deceased.

Two adult males were riding motorcycles across Windigo Pass Road when one of the men lost control in the loose gravel and crashed. CPR efforts by bystanders were unsuccessful.

Further details are pending next of kin notification.

###
Media Advisory: Press Conference on BLM Plan to Increase Timber Harvest and Environmental Protections in Western Oregon Forests
Bureau of Land Management Oregon & Washington - 08/04/16 12:00 PM
Portland, Ore. -- The Bureau of Land Management will be holding a press conference on Friday, August 5, at 11:30am, to discuss the signing of the Records of Decision for the Resource Management Plans of western Oregon. The BLM is proposing a path forward for local communities in Western Oregon with a plan that will increase job growth, tourism and recreation, create predictability for timber harvest, and offer strong protections for the northern spotted owl, listed fish species, and water resources.

Call in information: 888-810-6803

Participant Passcode: 8977046

The BLM will be releasing the Records of Decision, an Interactive Map, a Story Map, and additional information online at 11:30am:

http://www.blm.gov/or/plans/rmpswesternoregon/index.php


Attached Media Files: News Release
Oregon selected to participate in Comprehensive Primary Care Plus initiative
Oregon Health Authority - 08/04/16 11:48 AM
August 4, 2016

Improving options and results for patients and providers: Oregon selected to participate in Comprehensive Primary Care Plus initiative

Selection underscores progress of health care transformation initiatives underway in Oregon and strengthens primary care delivery

PORTLAND, OR----Oregon is one of 14 regions selected to implement a national model that provides more care options for patients and new ways for paying health care providers.

The model, Called Comprehensive Primary Care Plus (CPC+), builds on primary care options and delivery, and serves as a critical piece in transforming Oregon's health care system.

The model furthers Oregon's commitment and progress toward changing the way health care is paid for between providers and payers or insurers. By moving away from fee-for-service reimbursement to one that rewards value, Oregon has made great strides toward achieving better health, better care and lower costs. The CPC+ initiative brings Medicare, commercial insurers and coordinated care organizations together under a common model that aligns payment methods, engages patients and allows for better coordination.

Administered by the Centers for Medicare and Medicare Services (CMS), CPC+ is designed to improve the quality of care patients receive and their overall health, while spending health care dollars better. To encourage outcomes, CPC+ also provides financial incentives for health care providers when they meet performance measures are met.

"The CPC+ model strengthens the foundation of primary care by aligning payment options and giving providers the flexibility they need to provide the best care to patients," said Leslie Clement, Oregon Health Authority's (OHA) director of health policy and programs. "In the past, a health care provider may have been limited in the type of care they could provide based on a patient's coverage or how they would be reimbursed for their services."

By aligning Medicare, Medicaid and private insurance, the payment model continues to move the health care system away from a rigid, fee-for-service environment to a model that supports clinicians delivering the care that best meets the needs of their patients.

"The CPC+ primary care home model builds on our momentum toward providing better health, better care and lower costs," said Jim Rickards, M.D., OHA's chief medical officer. "Being chosen to implement this model speaks to our success in working together toward solutions while propelling work already underway."

This innovative approach aligns with CMS's and other payer partners' approaches to improving care delivery and health outcomes. Building on the initial Comprehensive Primary Care initiative that launched in late 2012, the CPC+ model will benefit patients by helping primary care practices:

-- Ensure patient access.
-- Engage patients and their families in their own care.
-- Work together with hospitals and other clinicians, including specialists, to provide better coordinated care.

CPC+ is aligned with Oregon's Primary Care Transformation Initiative outlined by the Oregon Legislature in Senate Bill 231. The CPC+ program begins in January 2017. Applications from primary care practices will be accepted through Sept. 15, 2016.

For more information:
-- Comprehensive Primary Care Plus background and details: https://innovation.cms.gov/initiatives/comprehensive-primary-care-plus
-- CPC+ FAQ: https://innovation.cms.gov/Files/x/cpcplus-faqs.pdf
-- CPC+ one-pager: https://innovation.cms.gov/Files/x/cpcplus-brief.pdf
-- Senate Bill 231 Collaborative information: http://www.oregon.gov/oha/Transformation-Center/Pages/SB231-Primary-Care-Payment-Reform-Collaborative.aspx

# # #
NEWS RELEASE: Corps begins accepting permit applications electronically
US Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District - 08/04/16 10:59 AM
US Army Corps of Engineers
Portland District

News Release

Release No. 16-027

Contact:
Jeffrey Henon
503-808-4529
Jeffrey.M.Henon@usace.army.mil

For Release: Aug. 4, 2016

Corps begins accepting permit applications electronically

PORTLAND, Ore. -- The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is accepting permit applications electronically for all applicants proposing work under the jurisdiction of the Portland District Regulatory Branch. This includes all counties in Oregon and applicants in Washington that obtain permits from the Portland District.

The use of electronic communications and digital information processing is expected to reduce transmittal delays and improve timeliness of the permit process. This paperless transition does not alter the permit process. The Corps will continue to accept hard copies of applications from applicants who do not have the ability to submit an electronic version.

Joint permit applications, wetland delineations, permit modification requests, monitoring reports, jurisdictional determination requests, and other requests up to 10 MB should be emailed to PortlandPermits@usace.army.mil. All documents should be submitted as Adobe Acrobat PDF files. Application packages containing documents over 10 MB can be submitted through a secure file transfer site. Instructions on using the secure file transfer site are available from the "How to apply for a permit" page on the Portland District website at http://www.nwp.usace.army.mil/Missions/Regulatory/Apply.aspx. Applications and documents can also be mailed to the appropriate office on a CD or DVD.

Applicants will receive an electronic notification with the project number and contact information for the project manager assigned to the review. Correspondence, including the final permits, will be provided electronically unless permittees request a hard copy of these documents.

The Corps evaluates permit applications for construction activities that occur in the Nation's waters, including wetlands. The Portland District administers one of the largest regulatory permitting programs within the Corps of Engineers, providing for the protection of waters of the United States, including federally delineated wetlands and navigable waters. Portland District has regulatory jurisdiction for the state of Oregon.

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Oregon Virtual Academy
Oregon Virtual Academy - 08/04/16 8:53 AM
Charter Renewal Sub-Committee Meeting Thursday August 4th, 2016 at 5:30 pm.
Oregon Heritage Commission to meet August 22 by phone
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/04/16 8:44 AM
The Oregon Heritage Commission will meet by phone at 1 p.m. August 22. The agenda includes approval of an Oregon Heritage Tradition. For a meeting agenda and access information, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity. For more information, contact coordinator Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or kuri.gill@oregon.gov.

The meeting is open to the public. A public listening room will be available at the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department offices, 725 Summer St. NE, Salem. The meeting is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations may be arranged up to 72 hours in advance of the meeting by calling 503-986-0690.

For more information about the commission, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

###


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1303/96620/08-04__Heritage_Commission_to_meet_Aug22.docx.pdf
WOU receives grant to conduct important research on experiences among Oregon's "Deaf community": Researchers seek participants for their research
Western Oregon University - 08/04/16 7:52 AM
Monmouth, Ore. -- Western Oregon University (WOU) assistant professor Dr. Denise Thew Hacket, in collaboration with WOU's Regional Resource Center on Deafness, received a $200,000 grant from the State of Oregon's Department of Human Services. The funding allows for research targeting Oregon's Deaf, hard of hearing, and hearing loss communities. It will provide information regarding how well the State is meeting the distinct needs of these communities to the Oregon Legislature during the 2017 session.

Thew Hacket seeks participants from across the state from all those who experience any level of hearing loss. The survey will be available until August 30, 2016. It is vital that those with hearing loss participate to ensure quality results.

The research
A community needs assessment (CNA) will be conducted to identify gaps in service for members of Oregon's Deaf, hard of hearing, and hearing loss communities. These are understudied groups whose experiences in employment and health access in Oregon is virtually unknown. The research will include surveys, focus groups, and key informant interviews asking Oregonians and those who receive services in Oregon where they experience gaps or barriers in service (and to what extent) in the areas of abuse, alcohol & drug treatment services, education, employment, health & mental health services, housing, legal, state, county, and city services, and transportation.

For example, after a domestic violence or sexual abuse incident, is a deaf or hard of hearing individual able to contact emergency or medical services? In these specialized situations, it would be important to have an interpreter or other appropriate service provider (for example, someone who could transcribe into text what the doctor or officer is saying) who is familiar with the systems and the process so as not to further traumatize the victim. Knowing this, will the individual report the crime or deal with it outside of the system? These are the types of situations the researchers in this project seek to understand.

Want to participate?
The researchers encourage everyone who has any degree of hearing loss in either or both ears, whether or not they use hearing aids or cochlear implants or have additional disabilities, to participate. Parents and guardians of children with hearing loss are also sought to respond for their children, as well as caregivers and support personnel of individuals with severe disabilities. Links to the survey can be found at wou.edu/rrcd/home/cna/. There are options for written English, written Spanish, and American Sign Language videos. For more information, contact Denise Thew-Hackett via thewd@wou.edu.

How the research will be used
The funding stems from Senate Bill 449 (Creates Office for Deaf, Deaf-Blind and Hard of Hearing Services in Department of Human Services) in the 2015 legislative session. The intent behind the creation of the commission is to identify needs of the Deaf community and those who support members of it, as well as provide resources. Full details of the bill can be found at https://olis.leg.state.or.us/liz/2015R1/Measures/Overview/SB449.

Advocates for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing communities in Oregon have long been requesting and fighting for a Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing to ensure that the service needs of these Oregonians are being met. Oregon is one of only 13 states lacking this agency. The most recent time this was brought up to the legislature, the bill was approved at each step, but was held up in appropriations. Rather than fund a commission now, the legislature determined that they needed more information on the communities of individuals who are Deaf, Hard of Hearing, or who have hearing loss in Oregon and their needs. The research team will examine the data they collect and make a recommendation about service needs in their final report.

About RRCD
The Regional Resource Center on Deafness is housed in WOU's College of Education along with the Divisions of Deaf Studies and Professional Studies, Teacher Education, and Health and Exercise Science. For over 50 years, RRCD has written grants to support students in fields such as interpreter training, deaf and hard of hearing education, and rehabilitation counseling. Grant awards from the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) and the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) allow them to provide over $620,000 each year in stipends and tuition remissions for students in their programs. They also provide outreach and technical assistance to interpreters through the Western Region Interpreter Education Center (a part of the National Consortium of Interpreter Education Centers, funded by RSA), and to adult settings such as colleges and vocational rehabilitation programs that are unfamiliar with providing access to individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf with co-occurring disabilities through a contract with Pepnet 2.
About WOU
Western Oregon University (WOU), founded in 1856 and located in Monmouth, is Oregon's oldest public university. The university has received national recognition for excellence for its focus on student learning and success by the Education Trust, US. News and World Report, American Association of State Colleges and Universities, National Association of Academic Advisors, and Parade Magazine. In 2015 WOU was recognized by the Education Trust as being a leader in graduating Pell Grant recipients and in 2010 as the top university in America at eliminating the Latino graduation gap. WOU is fully accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities.
Wed. 08/03/16
Reason for Reform Campaign Highlights New Data Showing the Economic Impact of Immigrants in Oregon
Oregon Association of Nurseries - 08/03/16 4:58 PM
Local leaders call for immigration reform in National Day of Action with 55 events across all 50 states

Portland, OR -- Today, local leaders from Oregon came together for a Day of Action to showcase new research on immigration contributions in Oregon and highlight the critical need for immigration reform. The event marked the launch of the Reason for Reform campaign, an effort taking place in all 50 states today, sponsored by the Partnership for a New American Economy (NAE).

The Reason for Reform campaign brings together state business, civic, and cultural leaders to urge Congress to take action on immigration reform. Today's Oregon Day of Action event coincides with the release of new research, including data on the foreign-born population in Oregon, their tax contributions, their spending power, and their role in Oregon's key industries as leaders and job creators. Today, NAE is also launching a new mobile tool that lets users make a video telling their Reason for Reform. Videos will be sent directly to Congress. The tool is available online at www.reasonforreform.org.

At the event, several speakers from the business, labor and faith communities and both major political parties said the time has come for Congress to enact comprehensive immigration reform. It has been nearly 30 years since Congress has dealt with the issue.

"Here, in Oregon, we can bring together a broad range of people to unite for this day of action," said Oregon Speaker of the House Tina Kotek (D-Portland). "We may not agree on everything, but we can agree that all people should be treated with dignity and respect. We can embrace people from all walks of life, and value their contributions to our communities and our economy. So, today, I urge Oregon's federal delegation and elected leaders across the country to keep pushing for sensible, comprehensive immigration reform."

The Contributions of New Americans in Oregon shows that immigrants make up 9.8 percent of the state's population and contributed $2.4 billion in taxes, or 9.3 percent of the total share in 2014. In that same year, immigrants earned $9.9 billion, or over 9 percent of all earnings in the state.

Immigrants in Oregon contribute to key industries, such as crop production, fruit and vegetable preserving, animal production, and manufacturing. They make up 10.7 percent of all entrepreneurs in the state, and play a large role in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields, a major component of U.S. economic growth. These and other key statistics on immigrants in Oregon can be found in the NAE report here.

Oregon Assistant House Republican Leader Rep. John Davis (R-Wilsonville) noted that immigrants "punch above their weight class as entrepreneurs." He added that due to immigration laws, the students who come here to learn in critical STEM fields are not always able to stay and invest their newly gained knowledge. "We need comprehensive immigration reform that brings qualified workers, the best and the brightest, to Oregon to fill the needs that we have," he said.

Oregon Assistant Senate Democratic Leader Sen. Michael Dembrow (D-NE and SE Portland) serves on a national task force of legislators addressing immigration. "I've learned that many of the myths that are out there about immigrants and refugees are simply wrong," he said. Dembrow added that the employment rate for immigrants is higher than the general population, that immigrants are generally healthier, and that they have lower crime, arrest and incarceration rates than the U.S.-born population.

The Reason for Reform campaign is launching in all 50 states today to urge Congress to take action on immigration reform. More information can be found at www.RenewOurEconomy.org.

###

About the Partnership for a New American Economy

The Partnership for a New American Economy brings together more than 500 Republican, Democratic and Independent mayors and business leaders who support immigration reforms that will help create jobs for Americans today. The Partnership's members include mayors of more than 35 million people nationwide and business leaders of companies that generate more than $1.5 trillion and employ more than 4 million people across all sectors of the economy, from Agriculture to Aerospace, Hospitality to High Tech and Media to Manufacturing. Partnership members understand that immigration is essential to maintaining the productive, diverse and flexible workforce that America needs to ensure prosperity over the coming generations. Learn more at www.RenewOurEconomy.org.

About the Oregon Association of Nurseries
The Oregon Association of Nurseries, based in Wilsonville, represents more than 800 wholesale growers, retailers, landscapers and suppliers. Oregon's ornamental horticulture industry is among the state's largest agricultural commodities, with annual sales of nearly $830 million. Oregon's nursery industry is a traded sector; nearly 75 percent of the nursery plants grown in Oregon are shipped out of state. For information, visit www.oan.org or call 503-682-5089.


Attached Media Files: Contributions of New Americans in Oregon (report)
Conference of Local Health Officials meets August 18 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 08/03/16 4:54 PM
August 3, 2016

What: The monthly public meeting of the Conference of Local Health Officials

Agenda: Updates; public health modernization update; and Triennial Review Schedule Proposal

When: Thursday, August 18, 9:30 a.m. to noon. The meeting is open to the public. No conference call option is available for the public.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1E, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland

The Conference of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the rules and standards for public health specified in ORS 431.345 and 431.350.

Program contact: Danna Drum at 971-673-1223 or danna.k.drum@state.or.us

# # #
Public Health Advisory Board meets August 18 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 08/03/16 4:51 PM
August 3, 2016

What: The monthly public meeting of the Public Health Advisory Board

Agenda: Accountability Metrics Subcommittee report; phasing in of public health modernization priorities over the next three biennia; and the role of the Public Health Advisory Board in promoting health equity.

When: Thursday, August 18, 2:30-5:30 p.m. A 15-minute public comment period is scheduled at 5:15 p.m.; comments may be limited to three minutes.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1E, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. The meeting will also be live-streamed through the Public Health Advisory Board website at http://www.healthoregon.org/phab.

Oregon's Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for the state's governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon's State Health Improvement Plan.

Program contact: Cara Biddlecom at 971-673-2284 or cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us

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Fire Policy Committee of Board on Public Safety Standards and Training to Meet in Salem
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/03/16 4:34 PM
DPSST Contact: Tina Diehl
(503) 378-2254

NOTICE OF REGULAR MEETING

The Fire Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 9:00 a.m. on August 24, 2016. The meeting will be held in the Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above.

Dial-in number: 888-398-2342 and Participant code: 4256088

If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group.
Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.

Agenda items:

Committee Vote on new Chair and Vice-Chair

1. Minutes / Approve May 25, 2016 meeting minutes

2. OAR 259-009-0062 - Proposed Rule Change: NFPA 1002 Fire Apparatus Driver/Operator Presented by Julie Olsen-Fink

3. OAR 259-009-0063 - Proposed Rule Change: NFPA 1003 Airport Fire Fighter Presented by Julie Olsen-Fink

4. Robert Norris #F25799 - NFPA Fire Fighter I, Firefighter Type 2 (FFT2), and NFPA Apparatus Driver/Operator Certifications, Eligibility Determination Presented by Kristen Hibberds

5. Next scheduled FPC meeting - November 16, 2016 at 9:00 a.m.


# Background Information about the Board and Department #

The Board consists of 24 members representing city, county and state public safety professionals representing each of the disciplines (police, fire, 9-1-1, corrections, private security), and a private citizen appointed by the Governor. The current Board Chair is Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff's Office. The Board includes administrators as well as non-management representatives from statewide organizations. The Board represents more than 40,000 public safety professionals and establishes minimum standards for the training and certification of city, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security/private investigator providers, and makes determinations on waiver requests. The Board is supported by six policy committees and a number of sub-committees representing the public safety disciplines, which provide technical expertise and serve as vital links to public safety organizations. The Board operates in close partnership with the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST).

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) implements minimum standards established by the Board for training and certification of city, county, tribal and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers. DPSST provides training to more than 20,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director of DPSST.
Local Red Cross Responds to 83 Disasters in the Past Month
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/03/16 3:24 PM
PORTLAND, OR, August 3, 2016 -- Between July 1 and July 31, the local Red Cross responded to 83 disasters (largely home fires and wildfires) and helped to address the needs of people affected by these disasters in communities throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington. Red Cross staff and volunteers provided disaster assistance, such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services in locations spanning from Longview, WA to Klamath Falls, OR and Milton-Freewater, OR to North Bend, OR.

The attached document contains a full list of July disaster responses for the Cascades Region Red Cross.

About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org/Cascades or visit us on Twitter and Instagram at @RedCrossCasc.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1190/96609/News_Release_-_Local_Red_Cross_Responds_to_83_Disasters_in_the_Past_Month.pdf
World War II Generation honored on NATIONAL SPIRIT OF '45 DAY ~ BRING YOUR PHOTO to Willamette National Cemetery, Aug 14 (Photo)
Oregon Spirit of '45 - 08/03/16 3:17 PM
WWII OR Spirit of '45 Logo
WWII OR Spirit of '45 Logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/5573/96570/thumb_spiritof45.png
Oregon Senators and US Navy representatives will recognize the "Greatest Generation' and commemorate the upcoming 75th Anniversary of the 1941 Pearl Harbor attack ~ Bring your WWII hero's military photo to this Aug 14,11 AM Event

PORTLAND: Join us for Spirit of '45 Day at the amphitheater at Willamette National Cemetery on Sunday, August 14 at 11 am for a ceremony of honor, gratitude and remembrance to recognize the incredible contributions of the World War II generation.

Spirit of '45 Day, the 2nd Sunday of every August (this year Victory in Japan 'V-J' Day), is keeping the Spirit of '45 Alive to honor the 16.1 million Americans who defended our freedom 1941-1945.

This year, the Spirit of '45 commemorates the 75th Anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor and honors those WWII service members of the US Navy, Marines, Merchant Marines and Coast Guard, specifically those who fought and lost their lives in the December 7,1941 attack. When you arrive at the Cemetery site, you will 'REMEMBER AND BE INSPIRED' by the Wall of Honor -- 'their faces' -- of these brave men and women surrounding the podium and displayed in the amphitheater.

Special presentations from US Senator Merkley's Office and the US Navy will honor Pearl Harbor survivor Ed Johann and the youngest WWII sailor to receive a Medal of Honor, Robert E. Bush.

Ed Johann, at age 17, rescued men on the USS Arizona on 7 December 1941 and later received the Navy commendation medal with valor for his heroic efforts. Ed, 93 years young. lives on the Oregon coast and is expected to be joined this weekend by his great grandson, one-year active duty Marine Lance Corporal Benjamin Jennings stationed at Camp Pendleton, CA.

Robert E Bush, at the age of 18, is the Navy's youngest sailor to receive the Medal of Honor. He was awarded his medal of honor by President Truman for his gallantry and intrepidity in Okinawa on May 2, 1945 --putting the life of his fellow officer before his own. Tom Brokaw dedicates a chapter to Robert in his book, "The Greatest Generation." Bush will be represented by his only daughter, Susan Ehle.

US Navy Sea Cadets and Civil Air Patrol will participate. The ceremony will include full military honors, color guard, patriotic music, the traditional salute of 21 guns and taps to recognize the contributions made by the "Greatest Generation.' Attendance is expected to exceed 1,000. The ceremony will be held in the Assembly Area near the flagpole and the Pearl Harbor Memorial. All military branches will be honored for the 16 million Americans who served (152,000 Oregonians) and nearly 500,000 (7,200 Oregonians) who lost their lives.
HELP US BUILD THE 'WWII WALL OF HONOR -- FACES OF HEROES.' Oregon Spirit of '45 enlists all families, friends and communities to bring your WWII hero's military photo to our August 14 event to honor the men and women of the WWII generation--all service branches from any state welcome. Your hero's service branch, hometown and other optional data will be helpful for our volunteers ready to add your photo to our 'wall.' You can also UPLOAD your photo and information to www.orspiritof45.org.

In 2020, during the WWII 75th Anniversary Spirit of '45 Commemorative Week of Aug 9-15, America will honor the achievements and virtues of men and women of this incredible generation by displaying a Wall of Honor banner of their photos collected by all states--stretching the 2-mile-long mall from The Nation's Capital steps to the Lincoln Memorial, and back to the reflecting pool of the National World War II Memorial.
__________________________________

The Oregon Spirit of '45, Inc. is a 501(c)3 non-profit dedicated to commemorating the achievements and virtues of the World War II generation, on the 2nd Sunday of every August, so as to inspire future generations.

KEEP THE SPIRIT OF '45 ALIVE! is a non-profit, non-partisan initiative to preserve the legacy of the men and women of the Greatest Generation so that their example of courage, self-sacrifice, "can-do" attitude and commitment to community can help inspire a renewal of national unity in America at a time when our country once again must come together to meet historic challenges. Its goal is to establish an annual day of remembrance and national renewal to remind America of the values and accomplishments of the generation who endured the hard times of the Great Depression, fought to defeat the greatest tyranny in history, and then went on to rebuild their shattered world in an unprecedented effort to help assure a better future for both friend and former foe alike.


Attached Media Files: WWII Wall of Honor, Faces of Heroes - SUBMIT FORM , WWII OR Spirit of '45 Fact Sheet , WWII OR Spirit of '45 Aug 14 Event Flyer , WWII OR Spirit of '45 Logo
Lebanon Police has new App to allow citizens to connect with the Police Department
Lebanon Police Dept. - 08/03/16 2:13 PM
Citizens Can Now Download the MyPD App for Android and iPhone phones and tablets
August 2, 2016, Lebanon, Oregon -- Lebanon Police would like to announce the launch of their new app, 'MyPD' (My Police Department). The free app allows citizens to easily connect with the police department by downloading it to their Android or iPhone device.
"Members of the public can get important updates from us as push notifications", said Chief Stevenson. "We can send the notifications through our dashboard and the user doesn't need an account or to worry about missing an important message. We encourage users to opt-in to messages if they want to be informed quickly of new updates or alerts."
Crime and safety issues are always important topics for citizens to be informed about. The app includes resources and links on a number of topics such as victim resources, domestic violence, press releases, missing children, and many more. There are also four background screens to swipe through and which can be updated with pictures of wanted persons, missing people, or announcements.
Sending in tips about crimes or other quality-of-life issues is another way citizens can use the Lebanon Police MyPD app. It allows the user to either attach their contact information or send it anonymously. Photos and GPS locations of incidents can also be attached from either the phone's photo gallery or live camera.
While the app links to or can be integrated with some social media, it is not another social network. There are also no ads on the app and no account is necessary to use MyPD.
"We have been using social media like Facebook for some time now", said Dala Johnson, Community Policing Officer. "The MyPD app is not meant to replace those or be another social network. It is a tool for citizens to keep on their phones so when they need a phone number, to send a crime tip, or want to research something, they have it readily available in an easy-to-use app."
While the app is not a social media platform, it does have some social aspects to it and has a feature where users can "unlock" badges the more they use the app and interact with the police department. "Basically the app user can climb in rank and unlock new badges", said Dala Johnson. "We will build on this idea with future versions and find new ways to interact with our app users."
The app also now lets users share some basic anonymous data about their age, gender, or how they found out about the app. This is optional, and if provided, will help the department to better understand who is using the app, how they found it, and if they live or work in the city.
For additional information about the My Police Department, app users can contact Dala Johnson at (541) 258-4339 or MyPDapp.com.
Death Investigation - Interstate 5 near North Ashland Exit in Jackson County
Oregon State Police - 08/03/16 1:06 PM
Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into the death of a 23-year old female who was suspected to have fallen from an Ashland area Interstate 5 overpass Tuesday night and was struck by several vehicles.

Preliminary information indicates that on August 2, 2016 at about 10:25 p.m., OSP troopers were dispatched to a report of a person lying in the roadway and was struck by several vehicles on Interstate 5 near milepost 19. (North Ashland exit). The person was pronounced deceased and identified as Kasha Rose JENSON, age 23, of Ashland.

OSP troopers from the Central Point Area Command office, with the assistance of the Jackson County Medical Examiner's office, are continuing the investigation.

Sergeant Jeff Proulx is the lead investigator. OSP is asking for anyone who witnessed this event to please contact OSP Southern Command Center (SCC) at (541) 664-4600.

OSP was assisted at the scene by Jackson County Sheriff's Office, Ashland Fire and Rescue, and Oregon Department of Transportation. The southbound lanes were restricted to one lane for two hours during the incident response and investigation.

No photographs regarding this incident are available.

Help is available for community members struggling from a mental health crisis and/or suicidal thoughts. Suicide is preventable. If you or someone you know needs help with suicidal thoughts or is otherwise in an immediate mental health crisis, professionals are on call to handle mental health emergencies 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

There are several resources available through Jackson County Public Health and the Jackson County Suicide Prevention Program. More information is available online at:

http://suicidepreventionjacksoncounty.com/
http://www.community-works.org/programs-services/victim-services/helpline/

In addition to local resources in your community, a toll free line is available for Oregon Partnership Lifeline/National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255).

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359th Basic Police Class to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/03/16 11:24 AM
The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 359th Basic Police Class.

The Basic Police Class is 16-weeks in length and includes dozens of training areas including survival skills, firearms, emergency vehicle operations, ethics, cultural diversity, problem solving, community policing, elder abuse, drug recognition, and dozens of other subjects.

Basic Police Class 359 will graduate at the Oregon Public Safety Academy at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE in Salem, Oregon on Friday, August 12, 2016 at 11:00 a.m. with a reception immediately following the graduation. Police Chief Jim Burge, of the Roseburg Police Department, will be the guest speaker.

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training would like to invite you to join us in observing the ceremony and congratulating Basic Police #BP359 on their successful completion of basic training.

The graduating students appreciate the family, friends and guests who make graduation an appropriate conclusion to their basic training at the Oregon Public Safety Academy.

Graduating members of BP359

Police Officer Austin Adams
Forest Grove Police Department

Police Officer Dylan Amen
Salem Police Department

Police Officer Thomas Ammon
Salem Police Department

Police Officer Kevin Berry
Astoria Police Department

Police Officer Thomas Charles
Bend Police Department

Police Officer Cameron Cunningham
Central Point Police Department

Police Officer Bryan Cutright
St.Helens Police Department

Police Officer Joshua Dumas
Cottage Grove Police Department

Police Officer Grant Foster
Salem Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Michael Hart
Douglas County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Aaron Huson
Washington County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Sean Kelty
Bend Police Department

Police Officer Travis Killens
Scappoose Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Scott Krause
Clackamas County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer James Kristich
Central Point Police Department

Police Officer David McVeigh
Milwaukie Police Department

Police Officer Chandler Miranda
Salem Police Department

Police Officer Thomas Namba
Portland Police Bureau

Police Officer Jeremy Patrick
Gresham Police Department

Police Officer Mike Patterson
Lakeview Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Bryan Phillips
Washington County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff David Rambin
Washington County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff John Reiter
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Thomas Roberts
Salem Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Matthew Rohrer
Washington County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Alexander Salisbury
Salem Police Department

Police Officer Alexander Salterio
Roseburg Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Justin Scott
Washington County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Mark Shuart
Jackson County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Shane Simon
Josephine County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Ariel Siqueiros
Salem Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Lucas Tobias
Curry County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Thomas Vollmer
Warm Springs Police Department

Police Officer Jordan Waddington
Bandon Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Randall Walker
Washington County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Christopher Ward
St. Helens Police Department

Police Officer Timothy Williams
Bend Police Department

Police Officer Seth Wingfield
Portland Police Bureau

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Chief Kent Barker of the City of Tualatin Police Department serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.
Linn County Sheriff's Office National Night Out (Photo)
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 08/03/16 11:15 AM
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Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley reports his office took part in another successful National Night Out on August 2, 2016. Several members of his office spent time with National Night Out events throughout the county that included gatherings in Shedd, Harrisburg, Albany, Crabtree, Lyons, Gates, Lebanon, Sweet Home and Mill City; enjoying burgers, hot dogs and root beer floats.

It has never been more important than now for neighbors to come together with law enforcement to get to know each other, share concerns and interact in a friendly, casual environment. Over 300 people attended and all had a great time. Sheriff Riley would like to thank the citizens of Linn County for the outpouring of support. He added, "We are blessed to live and work in a community that appreciates law enforcement. Linn County is and continues to be a great place to live. We appreciate the citizens that opened their homes and the hard work and time that went into organizing the individual events."

For more information about community services, and to organize a Neighborhood Watch or National Night Out in your area, please Contact us right away!


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/2993/96599/IMG_3524.jpg , 2016-08/2993/96599/IMG_3517.jpg , 2016-08/2993/96599/IMG_3510.jpg
Cloverdale Man Killed In Highway 130 Crash - Near Pacific City - Tillamook County
Oregon State Police - 08/03/16 9:53 AM
Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Tuesday afternoon's single vehicle fatal crash along State Route 130 near milepost three, which resulted in the death of a Cloverdale man.

On August 1, 2016, a report of an overdue driver was taken by Tillamook County Sheriff's Office in efforts to locate Roger Thomas TRACEY, age 76, of Cloverdale, who was operating a white 2008 Nissan Versa at the time.

On August 2, 2016, at about 12:57 p.m., tire tracks were observed in the gravel at the location of State Route 130, near milepost three. (Four miles south of Pacific City).

Upon further investigation, Mr. TRACEY's vehicle was confirmed to be located 150 feet down an embankment and in the Little Nestucca River. Upon closer examination, Mr. TRACEY was located in the vehicle and succumbed to his injuries.

OSP troopers from the Tillamook Worksite are continuing the investigation and Mr. TRACEY's medical conditions are being investigated as possible contributing factors.

OSP was assisted by the Tillamook County Sheriff's Department, the Nestucca Rural Fire Department, and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

No photographs are available for release at this time.

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Benton County Sheriff's Office Investigates Fatal Crash Highway 20 (Photo)
Benton County Sheriff's Office - 08/03/16 9:30 AM
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On 8/2/2016, at 4:56 pm, deputies responded to a head on crash at 23222 Highway 20, west of Philomath.
Initial investigation revealed that A 1998 Dodge Pickup, driven by Donna Michele Heavrin, date of birth 5/31/54, of Blodgett, Oregon was eastbound on Highway 20.
For unknown reasons, the Dodge pickup crossed over to the west bound lane and struck a 1986 Toyota pickup.
The Toyota pickup was driven by Riley Andrew Russell, date of birth 11/12/1998, of Alsea, Oregon.
Ms. Heavrin was deceased at the scene. Mr. Russell appeared to have suffered extremely serious trauma. Mr. Russell was transported by Reach Ambulance for medical treatment. Benton County Sheriff's Office does not have a medical condition update as of 8/3/2016 9:00 am.
The investigation of cause and contributing factors to the crash are continuing. Toxicology test results will not be immediately available.
At this time there are no known eyewitnesses to the crash and anyone having information is asked to contact Benton County Sheriff's Office Sgt. David Iverson, 541-766-6858.

Undersheriff Greg Ridler
Benton County Sheriff's Office


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1505/96596/Fatal_crash_8.2.16_photo.PNG
Children at greatest risk for drowning.
Eugene Springfield Fire Dept. - 08/03/16 8:49 AM
Warm weather and sunny skies have Oregonians enjoying time outdoors. Eugene Springfield Fire encourages you to explore your surroundings for safety hazards while you are out and about to prevent a tragedy from dampening your summer fun.

Young children are quick, mobile and inquisitive. This can lead to trouble in the blink of an eye. Unintentional drowning is the second leading cause of death of children age 1 to 14 and the leading cause of death of children age 1 to 4. Drowning can occur in less than 2 inches of water, places where you would least expect it: a sink, toilet bowl, bucket, fountain, pond, inflatable pool or accumulated water in a ditch or low spot. People who are drowning are usually not able to call out for help and irreversible brain damage or death can occur in minutes.

Eugene Springfield Fire encourages all parents and caregivers to review these safety reminders.
Create a barrier such as fences, grates or covers to all pools, ponds and fountains.
Consider door alarms on doors leading to areas with known water hazards.
Closely supervise children, keeping toddlers within arm's reach.
Empty all buckets, coolers, tubs and small pools when not in use. Keep toilet lids
closed.
Maintain CPR and First Aid training
Enroll kids in swimming lessons. Parent & child lessons are available for kids as young
as 6 months.
Wear approved life jackets when recreating near or in rivers, lakes and oceans
Tue. 08/02/16
Oregon achieves its 100th Firewise Community!
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/02/16 6:36 PM
In the heat of summer, the threat of wildfire is on the minds of many Oregonians. Today, we celebrate a milestone in Oregon's fire prevention and preparedness program by recognizing over 100 communities that have taken steps to become Firewise!

Squaw Creek Canyon Estates located just outside of Sisters is now the 100th community to commit to their own wildfire preparedness by becoming a Firewise Community. State Forester Doug Decker, NFPA, USFS and other community leaders will honor Oregon's Firewise Communities at a celebration at the Camp Sherman Fire District in Sisters, Oregon on August 12th.

Since 2004, the National Firewise Communities USA Program has empowered Oregon communities to work together in reducing their wildfire risk. After 12 short years, the growing network includes over 100 recognized Firewise Communities in Oregon taking action to protect and prepare their neighborhoods from wildfire.

The Firewise program is a unique, community-led initiative supported by state, local and federal fire professionals designed to engage homeowners in reducing losses from fire at the neighborhood scale. Firewise community members and fire professionals have invested over $3.85 million to reduce wildfire risk and build safer communities throughout Oregon.

Sixty homes have been lost to wildfires in just the last three years. A staggering 751,672 Oregonians (occupying about 342,000 homes) live in forested areas, making them vulnerable to wildfire. Simple actions such as reducing flammable vegetation around homes and using fire resistant siding and roofing materials can significantly reduce the threat of fire.

Be a part of the solution! Contact your local Oregon Department of Forestry office to learn how your community can become Firewise!
Deputies Investigating Shooting NE Salem ***Update 3*** (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/02/16 3:43 PM
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Detectives have arrested Denzel Cortez Hawthorne, age 22, of Michigan and Eloy Carrera Jr., age 20 of Illinois. Both men have been taken to the Marion County Jail, where they will be arraigned tomorrow at 3 p.m., for the crimes of Felony Murder, Robbery I and Burglary I. The Sheriff's Office does not anticipate any further release regarding this case, any further inquiries should be made to the Marion County District Attorney's Office. Both men are still being processed at the Marion County Jail please watch our web page for their images.



Name correction: The deceased is Brett White, 44, of Salem



At 5:30 a.m., this morning, Detectives detained two suspects believed to be responsible for last night's shooting on Jean Court NE in Salem. The pair were arrested after the Marion County SWAT Team served a search warrant at the Budget Inn Hotel at 485 North Pacific Highway in Woodburn.

Detectives believe both men came to Jean court to rob William White Jr., age 20, for marijuana, tragically Mr. Whites father, Brett White, age 44, ended up in the middle of the robbery and was shot during the confrontation. Brett White died last night as a result of the gun shot he received during the robbery.

The Sheriff's Office is not prepared to release the identity of either suspect in this case at this point. Once both men have been booked into the Marion County Jail an additional release will follow.





Deputies are on scene and investigating a disturbance that has left one man shot in the 4800 block of Jean Court NE in Salem. Deputies were dispatched to a disturbance at a residence and when they arrived they found one man with a single gunshot wound to the head.

The man has been transported to an area hospital where he is being treated for his injury. Deputies are asking for the public's help in locating the two possible suspects in tonight's shooting. The first suspect is described as a white or Hispanic male, 25 years of age, 5'05" tall, thin build, with dark hair, a thin mustache, wearing a blue shirt and blue jeans.

The second male is described as black male adult, 5'09" tall, stocky build, wearing black pants, black hat and black shirt with yellow lettering. Both males fled in a red or maroon, Pontiac Grand AM, with black steel rims and no hub caps. Anyone with information is asked to call the Sheriff's Office at 503-588-5032, both men are considered armed and dangerous.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1294/96560/WIN_20160801_215336.JPG , 2016-08/1294/96560/Car.jpg , 2016-08/1294/96560/Warrant.jpg
WWII Heroes Honored @ Willamette National Cemetery, OR Spirit of '45-V-J Day, Aug 14
Oregon Spirit of '45 - 08/02/16 2:00 PM
Oregon Commemorates National Spirit of '45 Day to Honor the World War II Generation at Willamette National Cemetery, Sunday, Aug 14, 2016, 11 AM

Oregon Senators and US Navy representatives will recognize the "Greatest Generation' and commemorate the upcoming 75th Anniversary of the 1941 Pearl Harbor attack ~ Bring your WWII hero's military photo to this Aug 14 Event

PORTLAND: Join us Spirit of '45 Day at the amphitheater at Willamette National Cemetery on Sunday, August 14 at 11:00am for a ceremony of honor, gratitude and remembrance to recognize the incredible contributions of the World War II generation. Spirit of '45 Day, the 2nd Sunday of every August (this year Victory in Japan 'V-J' Day), is keeping the Spirit of '45 Alive to honor the 16.1 million Americans who defended our freedom 1941-1945.

This year, the Spirit of '45 commemorates the 75th Anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor and honors those WWII service members of the US Navy, Marines, Merchant Marines and Coast Guard, specifically those who fought and lost their lives in the December 7,1941 attack. When you arrive at the Cemetery site, you will 'REMEMBER AND BE INSPIRED' by the Wall of Honor (their faces) of these brave men and women surrounding the podium and displayed in the amphitheater.

Special presentations from US Senator Merkley's Office and the US Navy will honor Pearl Harbor survivor Ed Johann and the youngest WWII sailor to receive a Medal of Honor, Robert E. Bush.

Ed Johann, at age 17, rescued men on the USS Arizona on 7 December 1941 and later received the Navy commendation medal with valor for his heroic efforts. Ed, 93 years young. lives on the Oregon coast and is expected to be joined this weekend by his great grandson, one-year active duty Marine Lance Corporal Benjamin Jennings stationed at Camp Pendleton, CA.
Robert E Bush, at the age of 18, is the Navy's youngest sailor to receive the Medal of Honor. He was awarded his medal of honor by President Truman for his gallantry and intrepidity in Okinawa on May 2, 1945 --putting the life of his fellow officer before his own. Tom Brokaw dedicates a chapter to Robert in his book, "The Greatest Generation." Bush will be represented by his only daughter, Susan Ehle.

US Navy Sea Cadets and Civil Air Patrol will participate. The ceremony will include full military honors, color guard, patriotic music, the traditional salute of 21 guns and taps to recognize the contributions made by the "Greatest Generation." Attendance is expected to exceed 1,000. The ceremony will be held in the Assembly Area near the flagpole and the Pearl Harbor Memorial. All military branches will be honored for the 16 million Americans who served (152,000 Oregonians) and nearly 500,000 (7,200 Oregonians) who lost their lives.

HELP US BUILD THE 'WWII WALL OF HONOR, FACES OF HEROES. Oregon Spirit of '45 enlists all families, friends and communities to bring your WWII hero's military photo to our August 14 event to honor the men and women of the WWII generation, all service branches from any state welcome. Your hero's service branch, hometown and other optional data will be helpful for our volunteers ready to add your photo to our 'wall.' You can also UPLOAD your photo and information to www.orspiritof45.org.

In 2020, during the WWII 75th Anniversary Spirit of '45 Commemorative Week of Aug 9-15, America will honor the achievements and virtues of men and women of this incredible generation by displaying a Wall of Honor banner of their photos collected by all states--stretching the 2-mile-long mall from The Nation's Capital steps to the Lincoln Memorial, and back to the reflecting pool of the National World War II Memorial.
__________________________________
The Oregon Spirit of '45, Inc. is a 501(c)3 non-profit dedicated to commemorating the achievements and virtues of the World War II generation, on the 2nd Sunday of every August, so as to inspire future generations.

KEEP THE SPIRIT OF '45 ALIVE! is a non-profit, non-partisan initiative to preserve the legacy of the men and women of the Greatest Generation so that their example of courage, self-sacrifice, "can-do" attitude and commitment to community can help inspire a renewal of national unity in America at a time when our country once again must come together to meet historic challenges. Its goal is to establish an annual day of remembrance and national renewal to remind America of the values and accomplishments of the generation who endured the hard times of the Great Depression, fought to defeat the greatest tyranny in history, and then went on to rebuild their shattered world in an unprecedented effort to help assure a better future for both friend and former foe alike.


Attached Media Files: 75th Anniversaries -Yr Time-line 2016-2020 , Fact Sheet, 2016 Spirit of '45 Day Aug 14 , Event Flyer, 2016 Spirit of '45 Day
Private College Week Camp Helps Rural, Low-Income Students "Find The Right Fit" (Photo)
Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges & Universities - 08/02/16 1:30 PM
Photo by Bob Kerns
Photo by Bob Kerns
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/4829/96578/thumb_2016_OPCW_GEARUP_Dinner-7652-72_DPI.JPG
OREGON GEAR UP AND THE ALLIANCE PARTNER BRING HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS FROM ACROSS THE STATE FOR 1-WEEK CAMP

Portland, Ore. - In conjunction with Oregon Private College Week (www.oregonprivatecolleges.com), Oregon GEAR UP and The Alliance hosted a one-week summer program for rural, low-income students to explore opportunities available at private, nonprofit colleges across the state. 21 rising seniors from Taft High School (Lincoln City), Hermiston High School, Woodburn High School, Cottage Grove High School, Gaston Junior/Senior High School, Newport High School, Dayton High School, La Pine High School, and South Umpqua High School (Myrtle Creek) spent a week visiting and learning about private, nonprofit colleges in Oregon.

Students toured seven campuses and participated in workshops about the college search and application process. "I feel prepared to tackle my senior year because of the new understanding that I have gained by all the different admission counselors and the GEAR UP staff," said Jade Stanford-Whightsil, a rising senior at South Umpqua High School. 95% of students have an unchanged or more positive opinion of Oregon's private colleges after the experience and 100% of students said the information they learned on campus tours and info sessions was useful and that the camp was a valuable experience.

In addition, students learned about other private colleges at a mock College Fair and connected with college students who serve as near-peer mentors. "The opportunity to view colleges side by side rather than individually has been wonderful," said Dawson Oliver, a 12th grade student at Gaston Junior/Senior High School. "When deciding college fit, it really helps to be able to compare colleges directly, and this week has definitely helped me in my college search." Hear more from students about the impact of the camp: https://youtu.be/r2UzGAOa4Z8.

Low-income students are less likely to attend higher education, less likely to attend a four-year college, and less-likely to attend an independent college than their higher-income peers. Yet, a study by The Council of Independent Colleges (http://www.cic.edu/Programs-and-Services/Programs/Documents/ExpandingAccessReport-2015.pdf) found that students from first-generation and low-income backgrounds routinely experience better outcomes if they attend a smaller private college. "Our goal is to dispel the myth for our schools and students that private colleges are only for affluent students," said Adrienne Enriquez, a program manager with Oregon GEAR UP. "Oregon Private College Week Camp helps students 'find the right fit' and explore postsecondary options at many different institutions."

The Oregon GEAR UP program -- which stands for Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Program -- is designed to increase the number of low-income students who are prepared to enter and succeed in college. The Alliance represents and serves private, nonprofit colleges and universities across the state. Private College Week Camp is one of several collaborations between Oregon GEAR UP and The Alliance.

"Partnering with organizations such as Oregon GEAR UP allows us to reach promising young people and make an introduction to our member colleges, who offer a supportive, personalized environment where students from all backgrounds can thrive," said Brent Wilder, Vice President of The Alliance. "This partnership advances an Alliance objective to ensure that all young people have equal opportunity to access a quality and personalized education experience at one of Oregon's leading private, nonprofit colleges and graduate with the skills to immediately impact the state's talent needs."

More information about Oregon GEAR UP: oregongearup.org. More information about The Alliance: oaicu.org.


Attached Media Files: Photo by Bob Kerns , Photo by Bob Kerns , Photo by Bob Kerns
The Client and Staff Safety Task Force meets August 5 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/02/16 11:19 AM
The Client and Staff Safety Task Force will meet Friday, Aug. 5, 2016 from 2 to 4:30 p.m. at the Oregon State Capitol at 900 Court Street NE in Salem, in Room 350. The meeting is open to the public.

An agenda is attached.

Those who are unable to attend in person can participate by conference call:

Conference Call Number: 1-877-873-8017
Participant Code: 772325#

The task force is directed to make recommendations on staff safety, resident care, and the operation of Stabilization and Crisis Units. The task force will provide a report to the Oregon State Legislature by Sept. 15, 2016.

The task force will consider and make recommendations for:
Ensuring the dignity and self-determination of each resident in a Stabilization and Crisis Unit
Improving the safety of staff employed by a Stabilization and Crisis Unit
Improving training and support for staff
Staffing levels
Reducing incidents of aggressive and assaultive behavior by residents
Reducing the need for staff to work overtime
Improving access to appropriate mental health supports and intervention methods
Ensuring the timely transition of residents in Stabilization and Crisis Units when ready to be placed with a residential service provider in the community, including recommendations for building capacity in community-based care settings.

All meetings of this task force conform to Oregon public meetings laws. Requests for accommodation for a people with disabilities should be made to Angie Allbee and should be made at least 24 hours before the meeting. For more information, contact Angie Allbee, DHS Legislative Coordinator, at 503-689-5034.


Attached Media Files: Agenda for Cleint and Staff Safety 8-5-16 meeting
Farm Bureau calendar seeks pics of Oregon agriculture through 9/15 (Photo)
Oregon Farm Bureau - 08/02/16 9:54 AM
2016-08/5507/96571/2016OFBcalendar.jpg
2016-08/5507/96571/2016OFBcalendar.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/5507/96571/thumb_2016OFBcalendar.jpg
Through Sept. 15, Oregon Farm Bureau invites the public to submit their best photos of Oregon agriculture for possible inclusion in the 2017 Oregon's Bounty calendar.

The award-winning calendar celebrates all aspects of Oregon agriculture: the products, the people, the crops, the cultivation, the landscape, anything that depicts the beauty, culture, enjoyment, technology, or tradition of family farming and ranching.

"What makes the Oregon's Bounty calendar so special is that the images are sourced from the public," said OFB Communications Director Anne Marie Moss. "Oregon agriculture is beautiful and an ideal subject for photographers.

"We're looking for what I call 'gaze-worthy' images, photos that you can enjoy for a month as the calendar hangs on the wall," said Moss. "The Oregon's Bounty calendar is mailed to over 60,000 Farm Bureau members around the state and thousands more are distributed throughout the year. It is truly an exceptional opportunity for both amateur and professional photographers to get their work shown."

Horizontal-format, high-resolution (at least 300 dpi) images -- both close-ups and panoramic shots -- are needed of all types of agriculture in all seasons. Subject ideas include rural scenery; portraits of farmers and ranchers; farmers and ranchers at work; planting or harvest shots; scenes from farm stands, on-farm events, farmers markets, or county fairs; and close-ups of fruits, vegetables, flowers, crops in the field, or farm animals.

The deadline for entries is Sept. 15, 2016, and there is no limit to the number of photos that can be submitted.

As thanks for participating, everyone who shares photos, along with their mailing address, will receive a complimentary copy of the 2017 Oregon's Bounty calendar. Photographers with images selected for month pages in Oregon's Bounty, along with six runners up, will receive a photo credit in the calendar and numerous copies of the calendar.

Photographers can email their digital photo(s) to annemarie@oregonfb.org, upload them to OFB's dropbox at www.hightail.com/u/OregonFarmBureau, or mail a CD or prints to Anne Marie Moss, Oregon Farm Bureau, 1320 Capitol St. NE, Suite 200, Salem, OR 97301.

Detailed photo specifications and contest rules are available at www.oregonfb.org/calendar.

Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit, general farm organization representing the interests of farming and ranching families in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon in 1919, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties.

For more information, contact Anne Marie Moss, OFB Communications Director, at annemarie@oregonfb.org, 503.399.1701.

###

Note to Editors: "Farm Bureau" is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit, general farm organization representing the interests of farming and ranching families in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon in 1919, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties.

Oregon Farm Bureau President Barry Bushue is a third-generation farmer raising a variety of vegetables and berries at a nearly century-old farm near Boring, Oregon. He is OFB's 15th president.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/5507/96571/2016OFBcalendar.jpg , 2016-08/5507/96571/2017calendar.jpg
Linn County Dog Fest 2016 (Photo)
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 08/02/16 8:12 AM
2016-08/2993/96566/dog_fest_treasure_hunt.JPG
2016-08/2993/96566/dog_fest_treasure_hunt.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/2993/96566/thumb_dog_fest_treasure_hunt.JPG
Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley would like to thank everyone who attended the third annual Linn County Sheriff's Office Dog Festival held on Saturday July 30, 2016. We had a great turnout from the public.

We are pleased to announce during this event, six shelter dogs were adopted. We would like to thank the families who made those adoptions possible. In addition, 49 dogs were microchipped, 75 dog baths were given and 72 licenses were issued.

We would like to thank the many vendors and sponsors for their support to make this happen; as well as the Linn County Search & Rescue and the Albany Police Department.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/2993/96566/dog_fest_treasure_hunt.JPG , 2016-08/2993/96566/dog_fest_obstacle_course.JPG , 2016-08/2993/96566/Deputy_Finn_new_drug_dog.JPG
Mon. 08/01/16
Grand Ronde Man Killed In Highway 22 Crash - Yamhill County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/01/16 5:23 PM
2016-08/1002/96558/20160801_103534.jpg
2016-08/1002/96558/20160801_103534.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/1002/96558/thumb_20160801_103534.jpg
On August 1, 2016, at about 9:24 AM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a two vehicle serious injury crash with entrapment on Highway 22 at Grand Ronde Road in Yamhill County.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a 2003 Nissan Sentra was stopped northbound on Grand Ronde Road at the intersection of Highway 22. The Nissan pulled out onto Highway 22 in front of a 1994 Honda Civic traveling eastbound on Highway 22. The Civic attempted to avoid the collision, but ultimately struck the Nissan in the driver door.

The operator of the Nissan, Michael L TUBBS, age 62, of Grand Ronde, was pronounced deceased on scene. The driver of the Honda, Tyler R PORTER, age 27, of Tillamook, was transported to Willamette Valley Medical Center in McMinnville with non-life threatening injuries.

Highway 22 was closed for approximately four hours with an established detour. The Oregon State Police was assisted by the Grand Ronde Police, Yamhill County Sheriff's Office, the Oregon Department of Transportation and West Valley Fire.

More information will be released as it becomes available.


Attached Media Files: 2016-08/1002/96558/20160801_103534.jpg , 2016-08/1002/96558/20160801_095852.jpg
U.S. 20 Closes at Sheep Creek Bridge tonight (Photo)
ODOT: Valley, No. Coast - 08/01/16 4:11 PM
Sheep Creek Bridge North Side
Sheep Creek Bridge North Side
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/1201/96554/thumb_Sheep_Creek_Bridge_span_North_side.jpg
Beginning tonight at midnight (August 2, 2016), U.S. 20 Santiam Highway will be closed at milepost 56.6 to repair the Sheep Creek Bridge. The closure will last through September. There is no local detour. Travelers should take Highways 34, 22, and 126 to bypass the area.

The bridge is located 26 miles east of Sweet Home. The road will be open between Sweet Home and the bridge on the west side, and from Santiam Junction to the bridge from the east. Campgrounds and recreation areas will continue to be open and accessible.

Repairs are needed because the bridge's eastern abutment rests on an active landslide with earth movement measured at six to seven inches a year. The bridge was built to move with the slide, but has reached the point that it must be replaced. The new bridge span and abutment will be built to ride on top of the slide if it keeps moving, making impact to the bridge more consistent and manageable.


Attached Media Files: Sheep Creek Bridge North Side , Detour Routes
Oregon Parks and Recreation Department to accept comments on Oregon Main Street Revitalization Grant rules
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/01/16 3:38 PM
The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) has filed Notice of Rulemaking with the Secretary of State in Chapter 736, Division 056, Rule 0000. The Notice of Rulemaking was published in the August 1, 2016 edition of the Oregon Bulletin.

Rule Caption: Establishes procedures and criteria that the OPRD will use in awarding Oregon Main Street Revitalization Grants.

Rule Summary: The Administrative Rules establish procedures and criteria that the OPRD will use to administer the Oregon Main Street Revitalization Grant Program that will award grant funds as provided in ORS 390 Sec. 262 and 264.

The Parks and Recreation Department requests public comment on these proposed rules. There will be a public hearing on August 16, 2016, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 124B in the North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer St NE Suite C in Salem, Oregon. Written comments must be received by 5:00 PM on August 19, 2016. Submit e-mail comments at OPRD.publiccomment@oregon.gov or mail written comments to Sheri Stuart, Oregon Parks and Recreation, 725 Summer Street NE, Suite C, Salem, Oregon, 97301.

Visit the following link to see this and other Oregon Parks and Recreation rulemaking notices and supporting documentation:
http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/RULES/Pages/Rulemaking%20Notices.aspx.

Questions? Contact Sheri Stuart, Main Street Coordinator, at 503-986-0679 or sheri.stuart@oregon.gov.
Board on Public Safety Standards and Training's Telecommunications Policy Committee to Meet in Salem
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/01/16 3:17 PM
DPSST TELECOMMUNICATIONS POLICY COMMITTEE MEETING SCHEDULED

Contact: Kristina Follis Mwepu - DPSST at(503) 378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Telecommunications Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 9:00 a.m. on August 3, 2016. The meeting will be held in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above.

Dial-in number: 888-273-3658

Participant code: 4711910

If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group. Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.

Agenda Items:

1.Minutes of February 3, 2016 Meeting
Approve Minutes of February 3, 2016 Meeting

2.Emergency Medical Dispatch Field Training Manual Presented by Tamara Atkinson

3.Proposed Rule Change for OAR 259-008-0025 Presented by Jennifer Howald

4.Proposed Rule Change for OAR 259-008-0060 Presented by Jennifer Howald

5.Proposed Rule Change for OAR 259-008-0020 Presented by Jennifer Howald

6.Proposed Rule Change for OAR 259-008-0010, 259-008-0011, 259-008-0075, and 259-008-0080 Presented by Jennifer Howald

7.Proposed Rule Change for OAR 259-008-0025, 259-008-0064, 259-008-0065, and 259-008-0066 Presented by Jennifer Howald

8.Proposed Rule Change for OAR 250-008-0045 and 259-008-0060 Presented by Jennifer Howald

9.Correspondence from Christina Gilman, #55776 Presented by Linsay Hale

10. Recommended National Minimum Training Guidelines 9-1-1 Call-Takers Presented by Eriks Gabliks

11. Department Update

12. Next Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting November 2, 2016 Wednesday, November 2, 2016 at 9:00 a.m.


# Background Information about the Board and Department #

The Board consists of 24 members representing city, county and state public safety professionals representing each of the disciplines (police, fire, 9-1-1, corrections, private security), and a private citizen appointed by the Governor. The current Board Chair is Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff's Office. The Board includes administrators as well as non-management representatives from statewide organizations. The Board represents more than 40,000 public safety professionals and establishes minimum standards for the training and certification of city, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security/private investigator providers, and makes determinations on waiver requests. The Board is supported by six policy committees and a number of sub-committees representing the public safety disciplines, which provide technica l expertise and serve as vital links to public safety organizations. The Board operates in close partnership with the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST).

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) implements minimum standards established by the Board for training and certification of city, county, tribal and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers. DPSST provides training to more than 20,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director of DPSST.
Board on Public Safety Standards and Training's Police Policy Committee to Meet in Salem
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/01/16 3:15 PM
BPSST POLICE POLICY COMMITTEE MEETING SCHEDULED

Contact: Kristina Follis Mwepu /(503) 378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Police Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 10:00 a.m. on August 18, 2016. The meeting will be held in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above.

Dial-in number: 888-273-3658 and Participant code: 4711910

If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group. Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.

Agenda Items:

1.Elect a Chair

2.Approve Minutes - May 19, 2016

3.Proposed Rule Change for OAR 259-008-0045 and 259-008-0060: Amends language regarding college education credits and adds military education recommendations as recognized education credits Presented by Jennifer Howald

4.Proposed Rule Change for OAR 259-008-0060: Amends language regarding supervisory certification; removes old language regarding expired chart for Intermediate/Advanced certifications Presented by Jennifer Howald

5.Proposed Rule Change for OAR 259-008-0010, 259-008-0011, 259-008-0075 and 259-008-0080: Amends language to require public safety professionals to report arrests to DPSST Presented by Jennifer Howald

6.Proposed Rule Change for OAR 259-008-0020: Amends language to require the signature of a department head or currently certified public safety professional on the F4 Personal Action Report Form Presented by Jennifer Howald

7.Proposed Rule Change for OAR 259-008-0025, 259-008-0064, 259-008-0065, 259-008-0066: Amends language to recommend completion of annual ethics training Presented by Jennifer Howald

8.Jason P. Duncan, DPSST# 35361- Oregon State Police - Basic Police Certification Presented by Kristen Hibberds

9.Danielle Llamas, DPSST#56358- Malheur County Sheriff's Office - Application for Training and Subsequent Certification Presented by Kristen Hibberds

10. Staff Updates

11. Next Police Policy Committee Meeting - November 17, 2016 at 10:00 a.m.


# Background Information about the Board and Department #

The Board consists of 24 members representing city, county and state public safety professionals representing each of the disciplines (police, fire, 9-1-1, corrections, private security), and a private citizen appointed by the Governor. The current Board Chair is Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff's Office. The Board includes administrators as well as non-management representatives from statewide organizations. The Board represents more than 40,000 public safety professionals and establishes minimum standards for the training and certification of city, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security/private investigator providers, and makes determinations on waiver requests. The Board is supported by six policy committees and a number of sub-committees representing the public safety disciplines, which provide technical expertise and serve as vital links to public safety organizations. The Board operates in close partnership with the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST).

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) implements minimum standards established by the Board for training and certification of city, county, tribal and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers. DPSST provides training to more than 20,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director of DPSST.
Board on Public Safety Standards and Training's Corrections Policy Committee to Meet in Salem
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/01/16 3:12 PM
BPSST CORRECTIONS POLICY COMMITTEE MEETING SCHEDULED

Contact: Kristina Follis-Mwepu /(503) 378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Corrections Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 1:30 p.m. on Tuesday, August 9, 2016. The meeting will be held in the Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above.

Dial-in number: 888-273-3658 and Participant code: 4711910

If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group. Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.

Agenda Items:

1.Minutes - May 10, 2016
Approve the minutes of the May 10, 2016 Corrections Policy Committee meeting.

2.Second Quarter Review of DOC BCC
Presented by Theresa King

3.Proposed Rule Change for OAR 259-008-0010, 259-008-0011, 259-008-0075 and 250-008-0080: Amends language to require public safety professionals to report arrests to DPSST Presented by Jennifer Howald

4.Proposed Rule Change for OAR 259-008-0020: Amends language to require the signature of a department head or currently certified public safety professional on the F4 Personal Action Report Presented by Jennifer Howald

5.Proposed Rule Change for OAR 259-008-0025, 259-008-0064, 259-008-0065, 259-008-0066: Amends language to recommend completion of annual ethics training
Presented by Jennifer Howald

6.Proposed Rule Change for OAR 259-008-0045 and 259-008-0060: Amends language regarding college education credits and adds military education recommendations as recognized education credits
Presented by Jennifer Howald

7.Proposed Rule Change for OAR 259-008-0060: Amends language regarding supervisory certification; removes old language regarding expired chart for Intermediate/Advanced certifications Presented by Jennifer Howald

8.Paul Miller, DPSST # 45838 - Department of Corrections - Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Corrections Certifications Presented by Kristen Hibberds

9.Jared Long, DPSST# 56117- Department of Corrections - Application for Training and Subsequent Certification Presented by Kristen Hibberds

10.John Ware, DPSST# 30288 - Department of Corrections - Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Corrections Certifications Presented by Kristen Hibberds

11.Jason Holton, DPSST# 48099 - Department of Corrections- Basic Corrections Certification Presented by Kristen Hibberds

12. Department Update

13. Next Regularly Scheduled Meeting - November 17, 2016 at 1:30 p.m.


# Background Information about the Board and Department #

The Board consists of 24 members representing city, county and state public safety professionals representing each of the disciplines (police, fire, 9-1-1, corrections, private security), and a private citizen appointed by the Governor. The current Board Chair is Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff's Office. The Board includes administrators as well as non-management representatives from statewide organizations. The Board represents more than 40,000 public safety professionals and establishes minimum standards for the training and certification of city, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security/private investigator providers, and makes determinations on waiver requests. The Board is supported by six policy committees and a number of sub-committees representing the public safety disciplines, which provide technical expertise and serve as vital links to public safety organizations. The Board operates in close partnership with the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST).

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) implements minimum standards established by the Board for training and certification of city, county, tribal and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers. DPSST provides training to more than 20,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director of DPSST.
Accidental Death
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/01/16 2:07 PM
On Sunday, July 31, 2016, at about 12:15 p.m., the 911 center received a report of a badly injured female at the edge of the North Umpqua river, in the 26000 block of the North Umpqua Highway. Emergency personnel responded and located Sydney Craft, age 23 of Roseburg, at the edge of the river. Craft was deceased.

Craft had been taking photographs of a male subject jumping into the river when she apparently slipped and fell approximately 90 feet to the river's edge.

The Sheriff's Office, Oregon State Police, Glide Fire, Fire District 2 and the Fire District 2 Steep Angle Rescue Team all responded to the incident.

Next of kin has been notified.

###
Task Force on School Nursing meets August 12 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 08/01/16 1:14 PM
August 1, 2016

What: The monthly public meeting of the Task Force on School Nursing.

Agenda: Determine recommendations to include in task force report; review draft report.

When: Friday, Aug. 12, 12:30-3:30 p.m. The meeting is open to the public.

Where: Oregon Public Service Building Room 251A and B, 255 Capitol St., Salem

Details: The Task Force on School Nursing is a governor-appointed task force legislatively mandated by SB 698 (2015). The task force is charged with:
-- Examining health care funding sources to support school health services.
-- Recommending sustainable funding sources for school health services.
-- Recommending standards of school nursing practices.
-- Recommending ways to create a coordinated school health services model that directs an appropriate level of funding to school nursing and school-based health centers.

Contact: Jamie Smith, 971-673-0724, jamie.leon.smith@state.or.us, for any questions related to the Task Force on School Nursing.

# # #
Bipartisan group to launch campaign for immigration reform
Oregon Association of Nurseries - 08/01/16 11:51 AM
- Reason for Reform campaign begins Wednesday with a Day of Action, including events in 50 states and DC
- New report shows that immigrants make key contributions to Oregon and the nation

Portland, OR -- On Wednesday, August 3, 2016, a coalition of business and community leaders from across Oregon will come together to launch the Reason for Reform campaign. The event, hosted by the Partnership for a New American Economy (NAE) and Oregon Association of Nurseries, will highlight the need for immigration reform and present new Oregon-specific data on the contributions of immigrants.

The Reason for Reform campaign brings together state business, civic and cultural leaders to urge Congress to take action on immigration reform. Portland's Day of Action event coincides with the release of a new study, including data on the foreign-born population in Oregon, their tax contributions, their spending power, and their role in Oregon's key industries as leaders and job creators.

The Contributions of New Americans in Oregon shows that immigrants make up 10 percent of the state's population and contributed $2.4 billion in taxes, or 10 percent of the total in 2014. In that same year, immigrants earned $9.9 billion, or over 9 percent of all earnings in the state.

Immigrants in Oregon contribute to key industries, such as crop production, fruit and vegetable preserving, animal production, and manufacturing. They make up 11 percent of all entrepreneurs in the state, and play a large role in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields, which are a major component of U.S. economic growth. These and other key statistics on immigrants in Oregon will be released in the NAE study on August 3.

The Reason for Reform campaign will kick off with the release of 51 new reports (one for every state plus Washington, DC) and events in all 50 states urging Members of Congress to take action to enact reform.

WHO:
Rep. Tina Kotek, Oregon House Speaker (D - N/NE Portland)
Rep. John Davis, Oregon House Assistant Republican Leader (R - Wilsonville)
Sen. Michael Dembrow, Oregon Senate Assistant Democratic Leader (D - Portland)
Andrea Williams, Executive Director, CAUSA
Ryan Deckert, President, Oregon Business Association
Leigh Geschwill -- F & B Farms & Nursery
Jeff Stone, Executive Director, Oregon Association of Nurseries (moderator)

WHAT:
Reason for Reform Oregon Day of Action

WHEN:
August 3, 2016 at 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM Pacific

WHERE:
The Portland Business Alliance
200 SW Market St #150, Portland, OR 97201
(Building Conference Room--on the left in the lobby)

###

About the Partnership for a New American Economy
The Partnership for a New American Economy brings together more than 500 Republican, Democratic and Independent mayors and business leaders who support immigration reforms that will help create jobs for Americans today. The Partnership's members include mayors of more than 35 million people nationwide and business leaders of companies that generate more than $1.5 trillion and employ more than 4 million people across all sectors of the economy, from Agriculture to Aerospace, Hospitality to High Tech and Media to Manufacturing. Partnership members understand that immigration is essential to maintaining the productive, diverse and flexible workforce that America needs to ensure prosperity over the coming generations. Learn more atwww.RenewOurEconomy.org.
Weigh Station Fire: 10 a.m. update, 08-01-16
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/01/16 11:35 AM
Contact: Jamie Knight, 541-786-2039

Fire crews worked through the night cooling hotspots on the Weigh Station Fire near Meacham, Oregon. Weather conditions were cool and calm allowing continued progress to be made on the line with 35 percent containment. The fire size remains at approximately 500 acres.

Conditions today call for warm temperatures with a light and variable wind. There is a fire weather watch in effect from Tuesday afternoon through Tuesday evening calling for gusty winds and low humidity.

The lands north and south of Interstate 84 from the Weigh Station on Deadman Pass to Emigrant Springs State Park remain at a "SET" Level 2 evacuation status, and the Emigrant Springs State Park remains closed. Residents seeking shelter assistance from American Red Cross can call the Red Cross Dispatch phone, 888-680-1455.

Interstate 84 has continued to remain open to all travelers, but caution is advised. Firefighting operations are still occurring along the freeway and areas of smoke may be present so travelers are urged to be alert. The Deadman Pass rest area will reopen today for westbound travelers but the eastbound rest area will remain closed until further notice.

Firefighters will work today to continue to strengthen control lines and work on mopping up hot spots. Work on hazard tree removal as well as utility right of way rehab are objectives for today. New fire starts in the region will cause increased competition for resources.

Citizens are asked to continue to use caution and adhere to regulations. The public is reminded that ODF is currently in Regulated Use Closure in Northeast Oregon and federal lands are currently under public use restrictions. Current fire restrictions for forestlands in Northeast Oregon can be found at www.bmidc.org.

http://bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com/ is your spot for current fire information in the Blue Mountains.
Oregon CAP To Assist Marion County Sheriff In Mt. Jefferson Missing Hiker Search. (Photo)
Oregon Civil Air Patrol - 08/01/16 10:47 AM
2 specially equipped Oregon Civil Air Patrol Cessna 182 Search aircraft have been assigned to assist the Marion County Sheriff Office in the missing hiker search in the Mt. Jefferson area. CAP will be providing aerial communications support in the remote
2 specially equipped Oregon Civil Air Patrol Cessna 182 Search aircraft have been assigned to assist the Marion County Sheriff Office in the missing hiker search in the Mt. Jefferson area. CAP will be providing aerial communications support in the remote
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-08/1184/96535/thumb_Airborne-2.jpg
At the request of Oregon Emergency Management, the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center
Has assigned the Oregon Wing Civil Air Patrol to assist the Marion County Sheriff in their
Search for missing hiker, Ryan Zickel, in the Mt. Jefferson Area. The CAP will be using it's specially equipped Cessna 182 search aircraft to assist by providing aerial communications support due to the rugged mountainous terrain in this mission which makes normal ground radio communications difficult.


Attached Media Files: 2 specially equipped Oregon Civil Air Patrol Cessna 182 Search aircraft have been assigned to assist the Marion County Sheriff Office in the missing hiker search in the Mt. Jefferson area. CAP will be providing aerial communications support in the remote
Sun. 07/31/16
Red Cross Responds to Multi-Family Home Fire Affecting Six People in Eugene
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 07/31/16 10:08 PM
Disaster responders with the American Red Cross Cascades Region responded to a multi-family home fire disaster on July 31, 2016, at approximately 7:30 p.m. in the 3000 block of Colony Oaks Drive in Eugene. The fire affected five adults and one child.

The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross Cascades Region (Oregon and Southwest Washington) responds to an average of two home fires every day. The Red Cross provides hope and comfort to people affected, helping victims anywhere and anytime. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.
Weigh Station Fire: 8 p.m. update 07-31-16
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/31/16 9:31 PM
Contact: Jamie Knight, 541-786-2039

Firefighters had a productive day on the Weigh Station Fire near Meacham, Oregon. Weather conditions moderated some, providing firefighters the opportunity to work on strengthening fire lines. Helicopters supported crews on the ground by delivering bucket drops to cool hotspots along the lines and support burning operations to remove unburnt islands of fuel. Due to more accurate mapping, the reported fire size has decreased and is approximately 500 acres. The fire is 25% contained.

Meacham has been removed from any evacuation notice. The lands north and south of Interstate 84 from the Weigh Station on Deadman Pass to Emigrant Springs State Park are currently at a Level 2 "SET." Residents seeking shelter assistance from American Red Cross can call the Red Cross Dispatch phone, 888-680-1455.

After nearly 24 hours of closure, the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) has opened the freeway to all traffic. Travelers are advised that firefighting activity continues directly adjacent to the freeway and to use caution when traveling in the fire area. Check www.tripcheck.com for up to date information regarding travel conditions in Oregon.

Ongoing efforts to protect cultural resources in the area have been coordinated with Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR).
This week's weather forecast calls for slightly cooler temperatures and the potential for low relative humidity. High winds are forecast across the region on Tuesday. Firefighters will continue to work over the next two days on strengthening control lines in preparation for the possibility of that event.

The public is reminded that ODF is currently in Regulated Use Closure in northeastern Oregon. Fire managers recommend that recreationists and travelers check the fire regulations before heading out to enjoy the forest.

http://bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com/ is the spot for current fire information in the Blue Mountains.

To report a fire, call Blue Mountain Interagency Dispatch at (541)963-7171 or dial 9-1-1.

Department of Forestry
Northeast Oregon District
611 20th Street
La Grande, OR 97850
Phone: 541-963-3168
FAX: 541-962-1058
Boise Woman Loses Her Life In Highway 97 Crash Near Chemult - Klamath County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/31/16 8:22 PM
2016-07/1002/96527/100_1145.JPG
2016-07/1002/96527/100_1145.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/1002/96527/thumb_100_1145.JPG
On July 31, 2016 at about 10:30AM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a head-on collision on Highway 97 near milepost 214 (just south of the junction with Highway 138E, 10 miles south of Chemult).

Preliminary investigation revealed a 2015 Honda Pilot was southbound on Highway 97 when it drifted across the centerline and struck a northbound 2005 Toyota Matrix head-on.

The driver of the Toyota, Melissa Kay GIBSON, age 27, of Boise, Idaho, was declared deceased on scene by emergency personnel. Her passenger, Simona ARNAUTOV, age 22, of Oregon City, received non-life threatening injuries and was taken to Sky Lakes Medical Center. The driver of the Honda, Elizabeth A BROWN, age 19, of Klamath Falls, also received non-life threatening injuries and was taken to Sky Lakes Medical Center.

Fatigue is being investigated as a contributing factor in the crash. The highway was closed for about an hour and a half until one lane was opened for alternating traffic. Both lanes were open by 4PM. OSP was assisted at the scene by Chemult Fire and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

This is an ongoing investigation. More information will be released when it becomes available.


Attached Media Files: 2016-07/1002/96527/100_1145.JPG , 2016-07/1002/96527/100_1105.JPG , 2016-07/1002/96527/100_1165.JPG
Weigh Station Fire: 12 p.m. update 07-31-16
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/31/16 1:10 PM
The Weigh Station Fire burning near Meacham, Oregon, has consumed approximately 700 acres and is uncontained as of this morning. An Interagency Type 3 Incident Command Team has taken control of the fire and is working to strengthen containment lines today. Fire managers are currently assessing the evacuation areas to determine when residents will be allowed to return to the area.

The Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) has opened traffic going westbound. Crews are completing hazard tree removal operations along the eastbound lanes. ODOT hopes to have eastbound traffic moving sometime this afternoon when the area is deemed safe for the public. Check www.tripcheck.com for up to date information regarding travel conditions in Oregon.

The fire is burning on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. Working on the fire today are three Type 1 hand crews, three Type 2 hand crews, the Umatilla National Forest Veteran's Crew, six Oregon Department of Corrections crews, two bulldozers, 13 fire engines, four water tenders, one air attack and two helicopters, along with miscellaneous overhead. Approximately 282 personnel are battling the blaze.

American Red Cross has opened a shelter for evacuees. It is located at Sunrise Middle School in Pendleton. The shelter coordinator can be reached at 541-419-4159.

The near-term weather report calls for continued warm temperatures and low relative humidities. The public is reminded that ODF is currently in Regulated Use Closure in northeastern Oregon. Fire managers recommend that recreationists and travelers check the fire regulations before heading out to enjoy the forest.

http://bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com/ is the spot for current fire information in the Blue Mountains.

To report a fire, call Blue Mountain Interagency Dispatch at (541)963-7171 or dial 9-1-1.

Department of Forestry
Northeast Oregon District
611 20th Street
La Grande, OR 97850
Phone: (541) 963-3168
FAX: (541) 962-1058
Sat. 07/30/16
Two Arrested For Murder And Robbery Following Incident Near Cave Junction - Josephine County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/30/16 8:57 PM
2016-07/1002/96466/EDRINGTON.jpg
2016-07/1002/96466/EDRINGTON.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/1002/96466/thumb_EDRINGTON.jpg
On July 27, 2016 at about 6:30AM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a single vehicle crash on Highway 199 near milepost 30 (near Cave Junction). A nearby resident told a trooper he had heard what he thought was a vehicle crash around 1:45AM.

Initial investigation revealed the driver William A ROBERTS, age 36, of Cave Junction, had drifted off the roadway and struck a tree. It was later discovered ROBERTS had suffered a gunshot wound to the back of the head. It was also discovered his wallet, cell phone and a handgun were missing from the vehicle.

An extensive investigation began which led to identifying two suspects as Renee Lee EDRINGTON, age 39 and Kyle James FORESTER, age 29 (both of Cave Junction). Information was developed they both resided on a large piece of property located at 22503 Redwood Highway in Cave Junction.

On July 30, 2016 at about 4:45AM, OSP Detectives and the Oregon State Police SWAT Team served a search warrant on the residence. Upon arrival, EDRINGTON was outside the residence and was armed with a handgun. EDRINGTON failed to comply with commands of the troopers while remaining armed with the handgun and advancing on them. Troopers deployed less lethal impact rounds which subsequently subdued EDRINGTON. FORESTER exited the residence and was taken into custody without incident.

It is believed by investigators that FORESTER and EDRINGTON were in some sort of confrontation with ROBERTS in the early hours of July 27th. At some point FORESTER and EDRINGTON were in a separate vehicle following ROBERTS when they shot at him, fatally striking him in the back of the head leading to the vehicle crash. Investigators believe FORESTER and EDRINGTON returned to the crash scene and took items from ROBERTS' vehicle.

Both FORESTER and EDRINGTON were lodged at the Josephine County Jail for Murder, Robbery and Theft.

OSP has been assisted by the Grants Pass Department of Public Safety during this investigation. More information will be released when appropriate.

End Release

Previous Release:
On July 27, 2016 at about 6:30AM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a single vehicle crash on Highway 199 near milepost 30 (near Cave Junction).

Preliminary investigation revealed a 2000 Ford Ranger drifted out of its lane of travel and off the roadway where it struck a tree. The driver, William A ROBERTS, age 39, of Cave Junction was pronounced deceased at the scene.

OSP was assisted by the Illinois Valley Fire and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

This is an ongoing investigation; more information will be released as it becomes available.


Attached Media Files: 2016-07/1002/96466/EDRINGTON.jpg , 2016-07/1002/96466/FORESTER.jpg
Weigh Station Fire expands to 400 acres
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/30/16 8:32 PM
The Weigh Station Fire reported Saturday afternoon in the Oregon Dept. of Forestry's Pendleton Unit had spread to 400-plus acres by evening. Resources fighting the fire include: one heavy air tanker, 10 single-engine air tankers, two helicopters, 12 fire engines, three bulldozers and three hand crews. The fire is uncontained. Cause is under investigation.
[No photos/video available at this time]
Weigh Station Fire burning in Pendleton Unit
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/30/16 5:33 PM
The 40-plus-acre Weigh Station Fire was reported burning in the Oregon Department of Forestry's Pendleton Unit Saturday afternoon. Resources fighting the fire include three heavy tankers, six single-engine air tankers, two helicopters, six fire engines, two hand crews and two bulldozers. Cause is under investigation.

Wind is pushing the blaze and conditions are quite dry.
Fri. 07/29/16
Stouts Creek Fire: One year later
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/29/16 2:47 PM
One year ago, a careless act sparked a wildfire near the community of Milo that changed the course of the summer for firefighters, community members and landowners. Multiple homes in the path of the fire were evacuated as the fire went on to burn thousands of acres of timberland and critical wildlife habitat. This fire became known as the Stouts Creek Fire.

Fire investigators working on the Stouts Creek Fire determined that the fire was human caused and related to an individual mowing dry grass. Investigators discovered that the responsible party violated the Public Use Fire Restrictions by mowing dry grass during prohibited hours. Under Oregon law, those found to be willful, malicious, or negligent in the cause and spread of a wildfire are liable for the complete cost of suppressing the fire. Because of this, the Oregon Department of Forestry will be billing the responsible party for the cost of suppressing the Stouts Creek Fire, which is estimated in excess of $37 million.

"It's critical that everyone living, working or recreating in wildland areas know and follow the Public Use Fire Restrictions that are in place throughout the summer," said Melvin Thornton, district manager for the Douglas Forest Protective Association.

"Individuals that are found to be in violation of the regulations will be cited and if a fire results from their actions, they may be held liable for all fire suppression costs," he said.

Currently, Public Use Fire Restrictions are in effect throughout the entire Douglas District and include restrictions on mowing dry grass, non-industrial chainsaw use, the cutting, grinding and welding of metal, off road driving, campfires, debris burning, fireworks, smoking, and electrical fence controllers. State law also prohibits the use of exploding targets, tracer ammunition and sky lanterns during fire season. For a detailed list of restrictions, visit www.dfpa.net or call DFPA's 24-hour information line at 541-672-0379.

The Stouts Creek Fire ignited on July 30, 2015, and went on to burn 26,452 acres of private, BLM, and National Forest lands.
David H. Anderson Begins Tenure as NW Natural CEO (Photo)
NW Natural - 07/29/16 11:35 AM
David H. Anderson
David H. Anderson
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/3843/96492/thumb_Anderson-Crop.jpg
Grant Yoshihara promoted to senior vice president

PORTLAND, Ore. -- The Board of Directors of Northwest Natural Gas Company (NYSE: NWN), dba NW Natural, has approved the appointment of David H. Anderson as CEO of the company, in addition to his current role as president, effective Aug. 1.

Anderson succeeds Gregg Kantor who is retiring after holding the CEO position since 2009.

Anderson will also join NW Natural's board of directors. "David Anderson is ready and enthusiastic to lead this 157-year-old company," said Tod Hamachek, chairman of NW Natural's Board, which voted on the promotion at its July meeting. "David's strong financial, operational and leadership skills will be key assets to ensuring NW Natural's continued success in the coming years."

"It's an honor to be the next CEO of this company and to lead our employees who are so committed to delivering natural gas to our customers safely, reliably and affordably each day," said Anderson. "I intend to uphold this company's strong legacy of customer service and community support as we move ahead."

Anderson joined NW Natural in 2004 as senior vice president and chief financial officer. In 2013, he was elected executive vice president of Operations and Regulation. In 2014, Anderson was promoted to president and chief operating officer. Prior to joining NW Natural, he served in various executive positions at TXU Corporation (formally Texas Utilities) including chief accounting officer of the parent company and chief financial officer of TXU Gas.

Anderson is a director on the Portland State University Foundation Board, the Portland Business Alliance, Oregon Business Council and Greater Portland, Inc. He is a past board member of the Northwest Gas Association and a past chair of the American Gas Association (AGA) Finance Committee, the AGA Fiscal and Tax Committee, and the Association of Oregon Industries Fiscal Policy Committee. Anderson holds a BBA in Accounting from Texas Tech University and is a CPA (Ret.) and CGMA.

At its July meeting, the board of directors also promoted Grant Yoshihara to senior vice president of Operations. Yoshihara will report to Anderson.
Yoshihara has been with NW Natural since 1991, serving in the roles of vice president of Utility Operations, general manager of Consumer Services and managing director of Utility Services.

Yoshihara is a member of the American Gas Association Operations Section Executive Committee. He also serves on the boards of the Multnomah Athletic Club and the Japan-America Society of Oregon. Yoshihara holds bachelor and master's degrees in nuclear engineering from Oregon State University and an MBA from the University of Oregon. He is a licensed professional engineer in the State of Oregon.

About NW Natural
NW Natural (NYSE:NWN) is headquartered in Portland, Ore., and provides natural gas service to about 718,000 residential, commercial and industrial customers in Oregon and Southwest Washington. It is the largest independent natural gas utility in the Pacific Northwest. Additional information is available at nwnatural.com.
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Attached Media Files: David H. Anderson
Oregon Dairy Farmers Association Urges Assistance from USDA Secretary Vilsack for Dairy farmers
Oregon Dairy Farmers Assn. - 07/29/16 10:51 AM
Salem, Oregon (THURSDAY, July 28, 2016) -- Today, a letter signed by 57 members of Congress from both the House and Senate was sent to USDA Tom Secretary Vilsack asking for assistance for dairy producers struggling with declining milk prices. Specifically, the members are asking for the USDA to use its authority under the Commodity Credit Corporation Charter Act to expand and maintain U.S. domestic markets.

"Oregon's dairy farmers are struggling with the 40% decline in milk prices we are receiving today. The Oregon Dairy Farmers Association championed this Bi-Partisan, Bi-Cameral effort and especially appreciate the support from four of Oregon's Congressional Members: Senators Merkley and Wyden together with Congressman Schrader and Congresswoman Bonamici", said ODFA President Chad Allen.

Oregon was home to more than 1,000 dairy farms at its prime. Today, only 228 dairy farms remain in business in 21 of Oregon's 36 counties. Oregon's Dairies are family businesses. These businesses contributed more than $650 million dollars to Oregon's economy in 2014. Unfortunately, the decline in milk price is putting tremendous pressure on these farmers. "We are anxiously awaiting the signal from Secretary Vilsack that he will bring to bear all of his statutory authority to address the issues to bring meaningful relief," said Tammy Dennee, ODFA Legislative Director.

Farm milk prices have dropped 40 percent since 2014, due to both an increase in U.S. production levels and changes in the European Union's regulation of milk production. In vastly different dairy market regions of the United States, farmers are facing similar margin shortfalls while still adjusting to changes in federal dairy support programs from the 2014 Farm Bill. The Secretary of Agriculture has the authority, under the Commodity Credit Corporation Charter Act, to expand and maintain U.S. domestic markets. By taking such action, the USDA can make an immediate market injection to directly and equally support struggling dairy farmers nationwide.

The full text of the letter is available online and below:

July 28, 2016

The Honorable Tom Vilsack?
Secretary of Agriculture?
1400 Independence Avenue, S.W.?
Washington, D.C. 20250

Dear Secretary Vilsack:

We write today to express our concern about the troubling economic challenges facing U.S. dairy farmers and the entire U.S. dairy industry. We have seen farm milk prices drop forty percent since 2014 and in May the nation's cheese stocks were recorded at their highest level since the data was first recorded in 1917. Current expectations are that the dairy market will continue to struggle with depressed prices and we seek your help as we search for ways to swiftly assist our nation's struggling dairy farmers.

Our dairy farmers have been hit extremely hard by low farm milk prices that have resulted in sharply reduced incomes, which is placing our nation's dairy industry in an extremely vulnerable position. A number of factors have contributed to this crisis. U.S. milk production has increased almost two percent above last year's level, while global milk production is up significantly, partly as a result of the European Union's decision to remove its milk production quotas and the loss of their export market to Russia. Furthermore, we are seeing an increase in production in other major milk-producing countries that have led to these depressed prices globally. All of this comes as our dairy farmers are still adjusting to the new Farm Bill, and the many changes that were made to our dairy support programs.

We are deeply concerned that U.S. dairy farmers, who are a key part of our agriculture community and agriculture economy, are in greater need of stability and support as they face these significantly lower prices, which for many are below their actual cost of production. As this industry is reeling from low prices, a glut of imports, challenges in our export markets, and poor economic growth projections we urge the USDA to use its secretarial authority under the Commodity Credit Corporation Charter Act (15 U.S.C. 714c), Section 32 of the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1935 (7 U.S.C. 612c), and look to past precedent for how to take action to protect all of our nation's dairy farmers from further crisis and to aid in the expansion and maintenance of domestic markets. We encourage USDA to take any and all actions available in order to make an immediate market injection and offer financial assistance that will directly support U.S. dairy farmers equally, while being cautious to not stimulate overproduction further.

The family business of dairy farming has long been woven into our nation's agricultural history. Across the country, in all 50 states, dairy farms large and small are economic drivers providing local jobs and local products. During the 2009 dairy collapse, we saw far too many families have to sell off their cows and close the doors for good. Through the support of USDA, we can hopefully prevent many farms from needing to make that same difficult decision today and we hope you will work to support all of our dairy farmers across the country. ?

We look forward to working closely with you in determining the best course of action to take in managing the current dairy industry financial crisis. Thank you for taking the time to address this important matter. ?

Sincerely,

Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT)
Rep. Joe Courtney (D-CT)
Sen. Robert P. Casey, Jr. (D-PA)
Sen. Tammy Baldwin (D-WI)
Sen. Kelly A. Ayotte (R-NH)
Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-CA)
Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-CT)
Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH)
Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-WA)
Sen. Susan M. Collins (R-ME)
Sen. Al Franken (D-MN)
Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY)
Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND)
Sen. Angus S. King, Jr. (I-ME)
Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN)
Sen. Edward J. Markey (D-MA)
Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-MO)
Sen. Jeffrey A. Merkley (D-OR)
Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski (D-MD)
Sen. Christopher S. Murphy (D-CT)
Sen. Jack Reed (D-RI)
Sen. Bernard Sanders (I-VT)
Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-NY)
Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH)
Sen. Jon Tester (D-MT)
Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA)
Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI)
Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR)
Rep. Lou Barletta (R-PA)
Rep. Suzanne Bonamici (D-OR)
Rep. Chris Collins (R-NY)
Rep. Jim Costa (D-CA)
Rep. Ryan A. Costello (R-PA)
Rep. John K. Delaney (D-MD)
Rep. Suzan K. DelBenne (D-WA)
Rep. Elizabeth H. Esty (D-CT)
Rep. Christopher P. Gibson (R-NY)
Rep. Andy Harris (R-MD)
Rep. John Katko (R-NY)
Rep. Mike Kelly (R-PA)
Rep. Ron Kind (D-WI)
Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick (D-AZ)
Rep. Ann MCLane Kuster (D-NH)
Rep. James R. Langevin (D-RI)
Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham (D-NM)
Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-NY)
Rep. Tom Marino (R-PA)
Rep. James P. McGovern (D-MA)
Rep. Patrick Meehan (R-PA)
Rep. Tim Murphy (R-PA)
Rep. Richard E. Neal (D-MA)
Rep. Collin C. Peterson (D-MN)
Rep. Chellie Pingree (D-ME)
Rep. Mark Pocan (D-WI)
Rep. Kurt Schrader (D-OR)
Rep. Jason Smith (R-MO)
Rep. Elise M. Stefanik (R-NY)
Rep. Glenn 'GT' Thompson (R-PA)
Rep. Timothy J. Walz (D-MN)
Rep. Peter Welch (D-VT)
Governor's Commission on Senior Services is meeting with the Oregon Disabilities Commission, Thursday, August 11 in Keizer
Oregon Department of Human Services - 07/29/16 10:40 AM
The Governor's Commission on Senior Services and the Oregon Disabilities Commission will meet Thursday, Aug. 11, 2016 from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Human Services Building, 3406 Cherry Ave., Room 123 in Keizer. The meeting is open to the public.

The agenda includes: commission business; public comment; Legislative update; discussion on how Advocacy and Development is reshaping its approach to Senate Bill 21; per diem allowance refresher; discussion on how the commissions can collaborate; presentation from the Home Care Home Choice Program; updates on Aging and People with Disabilities programs, including service level priorities, live-in program and the budget; an update and marketing brainstorming session for the Oregon Conference on Aging; information on the Pendleton Meet and Greet.

People also can call into the meeting or attend through a webinar: Conference line: 888-363-4735 code: 3439085; or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/52446762.

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Kelsey Gleeson at Kelsey.Gleeson@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting.

For questions about the meeting, please contact: Rebecca Arce, policy analyst at Rebecca.E.Arce@state.or.us.
Roseburg Man Arrested on Sexual Abuse Charges (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/29/16 9:17 AM
Sylas Fain
Sylas Fain
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/5204/96484/thumb_fain_sylas_marley.jpg
On July 22, 2016, the Douglas County Sheriff's Office received information that 22 year old Sylas Fain, of Roseburg, was having a sexual relationship with a 16 year old female juvenile during the Spring of 2016. The incidents occurred in the Green District of Roseburg.

On July 28, 2016, Sheriff's Detectives met and spoke with Fain. Afterwards, Fain was arrested and lodged at the Douglas County Jail. He was charged with 2 counts of Second Degree Sexual Abuse and 2 counts of Contributing to the Sexual Delinquency of a Minor.

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Attached Media Files: Sylas Fain
Oregon Health Policy Board to meet August 2 in Portland at OHSU
Oregon Health Authority - 07/29/16 9:08 AM
July 27, 2016

Contact: Alissa Robins 503-490-6590 or Robb Cowie 503-421-7684 (media inquiries)
Jeff Scroggin, 541-999-6983 (meeting information or accommodations)

Includes discussions and possible action regarding nurse home visiting as well as updates and discussion regarding hospital transformation performance, health insurance survey data and CCO performance

The Oregon Health Policy Board will hold its monthly meeting August 2 in Portland. The meeting will be held at the OHSU Center for Health and Healing. The Board will hear regular updates as well as take action regarding nurse home visiting and discuss health system performance and status reports.

When: Tuesday, August 2, 8:30 a.m. -- 12 p.m.

Where: OHSU Center for Health & Healing, 3303 SW Bond Ave., third floor, Room 4. The meeting will also be available via live web stream. A link to the live stream and a recording of the meeting will be posted on the board's meeting page at www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/2016-OHPB-Meetings.aspx. Members of the public can also call in to listen by dialing 1-888-808-6929, participant code 915042#.

Agenda:

--Welcome;
--Director's Report;
--Nurse Home Visiting Update;
--Oregon Health Insurance Survey;
--CCO Metrics 2015 Final Report;
--Hospital Transformation Performance Project Report;
--Public testimony.

For more information on the meeting, visit the board's meeting page at www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/2016-OHPB-Meetings.aspx .

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Individuals requiring accommodation may request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations by calling the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.


# # #
Thu. 07/28/16
Police Actively Searching For Armed Suspect South Of Salem - Marion County
Oregon State Police - 07/28/16 10:45 PM
On July 28, 2016 at about 7:15PM, an OSP Trooper spotted a stolen vehicle in the area of Interstate 5 and Delaney Road SE. Prior to backup units arriving in the area, the vehicle came to a stop and the driver fled on foot. An adult male passenger was detained and stated the driver was armed with a handgun.

Witnesses observed the male running south along Interstate 5. Additional troopers, Salem Police Department and the Marion County Sheriff's Office responded to assist. A perimeter was established and a search of the area began. The suspect was described as a black male wearing a black tank top with the number "7" on the back.

A police canine track led to a vacant residence at 8232 Squirrel Hill Road. Police discovered a door on the residence had been recently kicked in. Efforts were made to contact any occupants inside the residence without success.

The OSP SWAT Team has been activated and will respond to clear the residence. The public is asked to avoid this area on Squirrel Hill Road. More information will be released when it becomes available.
Red Cross Responds to Home Fire Affecting Three adults in Coquille
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 07/28/16 10:40 PM
Disaster responders with the American Red Cross Cascades Region responded to a home fire disaster on July 28, 2016, at approximately 10:00 p.m. in the 94000 block of Frontier Lane in Coquille, Oregon. The fire affected three adults and their pets.

The Red Cross usually provides, if needed, resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services. Additional
information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross Cascades Region (Oregon and Southwest Washington) responds to an average of two home fires every day. The Red Cross provides hope and comfort to people affected, helping victims anywhere and anytime. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.
Red Cross Assists Junction City Family In Residential Fire
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 07/28/16 7:14 PM
Disaster responders with the American Red Cross Cascades Region responded to a home fire disaster on July 28, 2016, at approximately 5:30 pm a.m.
in the 29,000 block of Meadowview Road in Junction City. This single-family fire affect 2 adults and 2 children. Red Cross provided assistance for temporary lodging, assistance to address immediate basic needs, and information about recovery services. 

The Red Cross Cascades Region (Oregon and Southwest Washington) responds to an average of two home fires every day. The Red Cross provides hope and comfort to people affected, helping victims anywhere and anytime. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.
Four Fire Departments Converge On Two Alarm Fire In Lebanon (Photo)
Lebanon Fire District - 07/28/16 5:17 PM
2016-07/1191/96472/20160728_151237.jpg
2016-07/1191/96472/20160728_151237.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/1191/96472/thumb_20160728_151237.jpg
The Lebanon Fire District received mutual aid from three surrounding departments as they battled a two alarm grass fire in a cut wheat field near Ridge Drive on Thursday afternoon. The fire, which consumed 28 acres, was believed to have been started during harvesting operations. With temperatures hovering around 93 degrees and humidity below 30%, fire conditions were not favorable for firefighters. The first alarm came in at 2:56 pm and a second alarm was called at 2:59 pm while units were still en route to the fire as a large black header was visible near the west side of Peterson's Butte. Firefighters from Albany, Halsey, and Tangent Fire responded to assist the Lebanon crews and had the fire under control in about 30 minutes. Crews were on scene for approximately two and a half hours mopping up hot spots. There were no firefighter or civilian injuries.

For HD video visit the LFD YouTube Channel at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjTxDBuPbD3DPAybCkCgEvg

For HD photos visit the LFD Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/LebanonFireDistrict/


Attached Media Files: 2016-07/1191/96472/20160728_151237.jpg , 2016-07/1191/96472/20160728_151018.jpg , 2016-07/1191/96472/IMG_0912.JPG , 2016-07/1191/96472/IMG_0910.JPG , 2016-07/1191/96472/IMG_0907.JPG , 2016-07/1191/96472/IMG_0903.JPG
Update- Health advisory issued for all of Agency and Upper Klamath Lakes has been updated to cover only Howard Bay in Upper Klamath Lake
Oregon Health Authority - 07/28/16 2:15 PM
High toxin levels found in Klamath County lake

The health advisory issued July 8 for all of Agency and Upper Klamath lakes has been updated to cover only Howard Bay. Howard Bay is located in the southwest corner of Upper Klamath Lake, northwest of Klamath Falls in Klamath County.
Additional samples collected at several locations have confirmed that toxins are confined to the Howard Bay area of Upper Klamath Lake and that all other samples taken on Agency and Upper Klamath lakes were below Oregon Health Authority guideline values. The presence of high levels of blue-green algae toxin concentrations can be harmful to humans and animals.

Swallowing water while swimming or inhaling water droplets as a result of high-speed water activities, such as water skiing and power boating, should be avoided in areas where blooms are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy, red rash at the affected area.

Drinking water directly from the Howard Bay area is especially dangerous at this time. Oregon Public Health officials advise campers and other recreational visitors that toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating the water with camping-style filters.

People who may draw in-home water directly from the Howard bay area of Upper Klamath Lake are advised to use an alternative water source because private treatment systems are not proven effective at removing algae toxins. However, public drinking water systems can reduce algae toxins through proper filtration and disinfection. If people on public water systems have questions about treatment and testing, they should contact their water supplier. If people have questions about water available at nearby campgrounds they should contact campground management.

Oregon health officials recommend that people who choose to eat fish from waters where algae blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, because toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water. Public health officials also advise people to not eat freshwater clams or mussels from the Howard Bay area and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations do not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

Exposure to toxins can produce symptoms of numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems, and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of skin irritation, weakness, diarrhea, nausea, cramps and fainting should also receive medical attention if they persist or worsen. Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets fishing with them should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in the Howard Bay area of Upper Klamath Lake.

The public will be advised when the concern no longer exists.

With proper precautions to avoid water contact, people are encouraged to visit the Howard Bay area of Upper Klamath Lake and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

For health information or to report an illness, to include your pet, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0400.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website. To find out if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://www.healthoregon.org/hab and select "algae bloom advisories," or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767.

###
DPSST Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/28/16 1:56 PM
For Immediate Release
July 15, 2016
Contact: Kristina Follis Mwepu
(503) 378-2431


Notice of Regular Meeting
The Telecommunications Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 9:00 a.m. on August 3, 2016. The meeting will be held in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above.

Dial-in number: 888-273-3658
Participant code: 4711910
If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group. Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.

Agenda Items:

1.Minutes of February 3, 2016 Meeting
Approve Minutes of February 3, 2016 Meeting

2.Emergency Medical Dispatch Field Training Manual
Presented by Tamara Atkinson

3.Proposed Rule Change for OAR 259-008-0025
Presented by Jennifer Howald

4.Proposed Rule Change for OAR 259-008-0060
Presented by Jennifer Howald

5.Proposed Rule Change for OAR 259-008-0020
Presented by Jennifer Howald

6.Proposed Rule Change for OAR 259-008-0010, 259-008-0011, 259-008-0075, and 259-008-0080
Presented by Jennifer Howald

7.Proposed Rule Change for OAR 259-008-0025, 259-008-0064, 259-008-0065, and 259-008-0066
Presented by Jennifer Howald

8.Proposed Rule Change for OAR 250-008-0045 and 259-008-0060
Presented by Jennifer Howald

9.Correspondence from Christina Gilman, #55776
Presented by Linsay Hale

10. Recommended National Minimum Training Guidelines 9-1-1 Call-Takers
Presented by Eriks Gabliks

11. Department Update

12. Next Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting November 2, 2016
Wednesday, November 2, 2016 at 9:00 a.m.
Medford Fire-EMS Battalion Chief Mark James Burns approved for Addition to State Fallen Firefighters Memorial
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/28/16 1:24 PM
This morning at its quarterly meeting, the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training (BPSST) unanimously approved the recommendation of its Fire Policy Committee to add the name of Medford Fire-Rescue Battalion Chief Mark James Burns to state Memorial Wall during the 2016 Fallen Fire Fighter Memorial ceremony on September 15, 2016.

Background: At approximately 1649 hours on August 24, 2010, resources from Medford Fire-Rescue were requested to assist Ashland at a fire at 825 Oak Knoll Drive. Medford Fire-Rescue responded under a mutual aid agreement to a wildfire that began on the west side of Interstate 5 and was driven by strong winds and warm temperatures to the east side of the freeway. Upon their arrival, Medford Fire-Rescue units encountered multiple residential structures on fire in the Oak Knoll subdivision. Ultimately 11 homes were destroyed and two others were damaged but the firefighters efforts kept the fire from spreading to more homes across the street. After this incident, Battalion Chief Burns reported he was injured from heavy smoke and intense radiant heat while conducting reconnaissance of the area and evacuating residents. This injury led to Battalion Chief Burns' medical retirement from Medford Fire-Rescue and sadly his death on March 6, 2016.

The Board's Fire Policy Committee determined that Battalion Chief Burns' death met the criteria for the Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial and was unanimously approved at its meeting on May 25, 2016. The Board's vote this morning was the final step necessary for the name to be added.

DPSST's Director Eriks Gabliks said "The Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial is a tribute to fire service professionals and their families who have made the ultimate sacrifice while protecting lives and property across the state. The State memorial, which was established eleven years ago on the campus of the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, honors 168 structural and wildland fire fighters, both career and volunteer. The memorial serves as a daily reminder of the sacrifices made by men and women who have served as fire fighters in our state and have died while protecting our communities, natural resources and airports. It also is a way to share with the families of the fallen that we will never forget."


More information on the Oregon Fallen Fire Fighter Memorial and the names of the men and women it honors can be found online at: http://www.oregon.gov/DPSST/FC/FallenFireFighterMemorial.shtml
Medicaid Long Term Care Quality and Reimbursement Advisory Council meets August 10 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 07/28/16 12:59 PM
The Medicaid Long Term Care Quality and Reimbursement Advisory Council will meet Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2016 from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. at the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, 500 Summer St. NE, Room 166, in Salem. The meeting is open to the public.

The agenda includes public comment, approval of June 8, 2016 meeting minutes, Advocacy and Development program updates, council budget process information and other council business.
Those who are unable to attend in person can participate by conference call:

Conference call number: 1-888-808-6929
Participant code: 4517555#
The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Kelsey Gleeson at kelsey.gleeson@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting.

For questions about the meeting, please contact Max Brown, policy analyst, at 503-945-6993 or max.brown@state.or.us.
Seaside Police Sgt. Jason Goodding Approved for Addition to State Memorial (Photo)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/28/16 12:59 PM
2016-07/1187/96458/2014_Engraving_Day_Lt_Jim_Anglemier_Salem_Police.jpg
2016-07/1187/96458/2014_Engraving_Day_Lt_Jim_Anglemier_Salem_Police.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/1187/96458/thumb_2014_Engraving_Day_Lt_Jim_Anglemier_Salem_Police.jpg
At its quarterly meeting this morning, the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training unanimously approved the recommendation of its Police Policy Committee to add the name of Sgt. Jason Goodding of the Seaside Police Department to the Oregon Fallen Law Enforcement Officers Memorial during the 2017 ceremony.

Sgt. Goodding's name will be formally added during next year's ceremony scheduled for Tuesday, May 2, 2017 at the Oregon Public Safety Academy.

Seaside Police Sergeant Jason Goodding (DPSST# 43017)who was shot and killed while serving a felony warrant on Friday evening, February 5, 2016 at around 9:20 pm is the 183rd Oregon law enforcement officer to have died in the line of duty since the first was recorded in the 1880s.

183 law enforcement officers across Oregon including city, county, state, tribal and federal officers who work in law enforcement, corrections and parole and probation agencies have died in the line of duty.

For more information on the Oregon Fallen Law Enforcement Officer Memorial please visit http://www.oregon.gov/DPSST/AT/pages/olememorial.aspx

For more information on the Concerns of Police Survivors please visit
http://www.nationalcops.org/

The Memorial is under the oversight of the Oregon Law Enforcement Memorial Trust Fund Committee, a 501C3 non-profit. This Committee administers funds raised from the Oregon Fallen Public Safety Officer License Plate and proudly sponsors both the Fallen Firefighter and Law Enforcement Memorial Ceremonies held at the Academy each year.

The Oregon Fallen Public Safety Officer License plate was developed during the 2009 legislative session to honor Oregon fallen firefighters and law enforcement officers that are killed in the line of duty. Money earned from the Fallen Public Safety Officer License plate is placed in a fund managed by the Oregon Law Enforcement Memorial Trust Fund which is a special committee comprised of law enforcement, fire department, and citizen members. Proceeds from the Oregon Fallen Public Safety Officer License plate support the law enforcement and fire memorials located at the Oregon Public Safety Academy, financial support for families and honor guard members traveling to Emmitsburg, MD for the National Fallen Firefighter Memorial or Washington, D.C. for the National Law Enforcement Memorial in the year the fallen officer is honored, Oregon Chapter of Concerns of Police Survivors, Oregon Fallen Badge Foundation, Oregon Fire Service Honor Guard, NW Peer Support Team, and the placement of Oregon Fallen Officer Memorial Highway signs.

For license plate updates https://www.facebook.com/fallenpublicsafetyofficerlicenseplate?ref=hl

For more information on the Oregon Fallen Public Safety Officer license plate http://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/DMV/pages/vehicle/platenonprof.aspx#fallen


Attached Media Files: 2016-07/1187/96458/2014_Engraving_Day_Lt_Jim_Anglemier_Salem_Police.jpg
Health advisory issued for Odell Lake
Oregon Health Authority - 07/28/16 12:40 PM
High toxin levels found in Lane County lake

A health advisory was issued today for Odell Lake, located 75 miles southeast of Eugene off Highway 58 in Lane County.

Water monitoring has confirmed the presence of blue-green algae and the toxins they produce. These toxin concentrations can be harmful to humans and animals.

Swallowing water while swimming or inhaling water droplets as a result of high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, should be avoided in areas where blooms are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy, red rash at the affected area.

Drinking water directly from Odell Lake at this time is especially dangerous. Oregon public health officials advise campers and other recreational visitors that toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters.

People who draw in-home water directly from the affected area are advised to use an alternative water source because private treatment systems are not proven effective for removing algae toxins. However public drinking water systems can reduce algae toxins through proper filtration and disinfection. If people connected to public water systems have questions about treatment and testing, they should contact their water supplier. If community members have questions about water available at nearby campgrounds, they should contact campground management.

Oregon health officials recommend that those who choose to eat fish from waters where algae blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, as toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water. Public health officials also advise people to not eat freshwater clams or mussels from Odell Lake and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

Exposure to toxins can produce a variety of symptoms including numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems, and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of skin irritation, weakness, diarrhea, nausea, cramps and fainting should also receive medical attention if they persist or worsen. Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to Odell Lake for recreation activities should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in Odell Lake.

The advisory will be lifted when the concern no longer exists.

With proper precautions to avoid water contact, people are encouraged to visit Odell Lake and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0400.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website. To learn if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://www.healthoregon.org/hab and select "algae bloom advisories," or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767.
Monthly Housing Stability Council Meeting | August 5, 2016
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 07/28/16 12:33 PM
August 5, 2016 |9:00 a.m. -- 1:00 p.m.
Oregon Housing and Community Services | Conference Room 124 A&B
725 Summer St NE, Salem OR 97301

AGENDA:
9:00 Meeting Called to Order
9:05 Public Comment
9:30 Draft Meeting Minutes | July 8, 2016
9:35 Consent Calendar |
- Community Services Block Grant Plan/Application
- Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program State Plan
10:00 Multifamily Bond Approvals
Plaza Townhomes
10:15 Federal Rent Subsidy Preservation NOFA Timing
10:45 State of the Oregon Economy Briefing
Mark McMullen, State Economist
11:30 2017-19 Budget Environment Briefing
Linnea Wittekind, Budget Analyst, Department of Administrative Services
12:15 Report of the Interim Director
12:35 Report of the Chair
1:00 Meeting Adjourned
DOGAMI Governing Board to meet August 1
Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries - 07/28/16 11:26 AM
PORTLAND, Ore.-The Governing Board of the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) will meet via teleconference at 9 a.m. on Monday, August 1.

The meeting agenda is available at www.OregonGeology.org. Interested parties may listen to the teleconference at DOGAMI's Portland offices, 800 NE Oregon St., Ste. 965.

The DOGAMI Governing Board sets policy and oversees general operations, and adopts a strategic plan every six years to guide DOGAMI's mission and objectives. The Board meets at least quarterly at sites around the state. As active members of their communities, Board members provide an important connection between Oregonians and DOGAMI's mission of providing earth science information and regulation to make Oregon safe and prosperous.
Zane Grey Cabin Officially Designated Under the National Register of Historic Places (Photo)
Bureau of Land Management Oregon & Washington - 07/28/16 9:25 AM
2016-07/5514/96445/Zane_Grays_Cabin_people_5_03.jpg
2016-07/5514/96445/Zane_Grays_Cabin_people_5_03.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/5514/96445/thumb_Zane_Grays_Cabin_people_5_03.jpg
Grants Pass, Ore. -- The Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Grants Pass Field Office, is pleased to announce that the historic Zane Grey Cabin at Winkle Bar has been officially designated for preservation under the National Register of Historic Places. This honor is intended to provide recognition of the site's significance and to encourage its continued preservation.

The historic cabin is located at Winkle Bar, one of the most unique sites along the world-famous Rogue Wild and Scenic River. This spot--and the entire Rogue River--was popularized by the western novelist and angler Zane Grey, who fell in love with and wrote about the pristine wilderness and abundant fishing opportunities on the river.

In 1925, Grey launched an expedition down the Rogue River from Grants Pass to Gold Beach with nine other adventurers in seven wooden boats. Of the places Grey encountered on the trip, Winkle Bar proved to be the most influential. In 1926 he purchased the mining claim there and had this now-famous cabin built. In Tales of Freshwater Fishing, Grey described his new acquisition:

"The rushing river at this point makes a deep bend round a long oval bar, with rocky banks and high level terraces above, and both wooded and open land. Here it flows through a lonely valley set down amid the lofty green mountain slopes. A government forest trail winds out some twenty miles to the nearest settlement. Far indeed it is across the dark Oregon peaks to railroad or automobile road!"

It was here, and along other portions of the Rogue River, that Grey was inspired to write such books as Rogue River Feud, Shooting the Rogue, and Tales of Freshwater Fishing. Grey's prose drew visitors by the thousands, and helped make the Rogue River a premiere destination for world class steelhead fishing, recreation, and wildlife viewing.

In 2008, the BLM purchased the property to help preserve its unique historic values. In 2012, the BLM began the process of documenting the site's historic significance for designation for preservation under the National Register of Historic Places. With funding and volunteer support from the Farley Tyas Foundation, considerable work was done to the property and to the cabin itself so that visitors can experience the scenery and history of Grey's era.

Today, visitors to the site at Winkle Bar will notice that the shake roof, windows, and log walls of the cabin have been repaired. This was done with careful attention to the historical details and construction techniques of the period of significance--1926. Visitors can also see the remains of a well-weathered wooden boat, thought to be one of the original vessels from Grey's first journey down the river in 1925.

Visitors today will also find a recently-installed interpretive display at Winkle Bar. Entitled "The Country Gentleman," the display commemorates Zane Grey's time on the Rogue River and describes how his writing helped bring attention to the river's wild and scenic values.

The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of the Nation's historic places worthy of preservation. Authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Register of Historic Places is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect America's historic and archeological resources. With this official listing, the Zane Grey cabin will be better protected for the public to visit and appreciate for generations.

Photos of the Zane Grey Cabin can be found on the BLM Flickr site at https://flic.kr/s/aHsk5PdfC3.

Additional information about the BLM's Medford District is available online at: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/index.php.

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land, the most of any Federal agency. This land, known as the National System of Public Lands, is primarily located in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The BLM's mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America's public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. In Fiscal Year 2015, the BLM generated $4.1 billion in receipts from activities occurring on public lands.


Attached Media Files: 2016-07/5514/96445/Zane_Grays_Cabin_people_5_03.jpg , Zane Grey Cabin , Zane Grey Cabin - Front
Performance Plan to address the needs of adults with serious and persistent mental illness finalized by the Oregon Health Authority
Oregon Health Authority - 07/28/16 8:56 AM
CORRECTED LINK

EDITORS: A media briefing with Oregon Health Authority Director Lynne Saxton and Project Director for the Oregon Performance Plan Cissy Bollinger will be held at 10:30 a.m., Pacific. Call 888-808-6929, 915042#.

July 28, 2016

Contact: Tami Rust, 503-756-8808

Performance Plan to address the needs of adults with serious and persistent mental illness finalized by the Oregon Health Authority

On July 28, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) finalized the Oregon Performance Plan, which calls for expanding services and improving outcomes for adults with serious and persistent mental illness.

"Under this three-year plan, Oregon will meet robust performance metrics that hold the state, its providers, counties and coordinated care organizations accountable for improving our behavioral health system," said Lynne Saxton, OHA Director. "This plan builds on and accelerates Oregon's continuing efforts to expand community-based mental health services, better integrate behavioral and physical health across the state and reduce commitments to the state hospital."

The Plan is the result of a unique collaborative process with the U.S. Department of Justice (USDOJ), which began in 2012.

To carry out Oregon's goals under the Performance Plan, the state will be required to make significant changes in how it delivers and invests in behavioral health services. These steps include:
-- Improving the way adults with severe and persistent mental illness transition to integrated community-based treatment from higher levels of care.
-- Increasing access to crisis services and community-based supports to avoid incarceration or unnecessary hospitalization for adults with severe and
persistent mental illness.
-- Expanding services and supports that enable adults with severe and persistent mental illness to successfully live in the community, including strengthening housing and peer support services.

Beyond improving services for adults with serious and persistent mental illness, the Plan adds greater urgency and accountability to statewide efforts to reform behavioral health in Oregon.

Independent consultant Pam Hyde has been contracted by OHA to assess its performance under the plan and provide reports to OHA and the USDOJ. From 2009 to 2015, Hyde led the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

OHA has convened a Behavioral Health Collaborative (BHC) to develop recommendations to better align Oregon's behavioral health system, focus new investments and deliver better results for consumers and families. The collaborative is made up of consumers, clinicians, hospital representatives, county officials, community mental health providers, judges, public safety officials and others with expertise and experience in addressing mental health issues in Oregon.

The BHC's work will be informed by the Oregon Performance Plan, OHA's Behavioral Health Mapping Tool, OHA's Behavioral Health Town Hall Report, and the Oregon State University Boarding Study. The BHC will develop prioritized recommendations for consideration by the 2017 Oregon Legislature.

"I appreciate USDOJ's partnership in developing this Performance Plan," said Saxton. "It reflects the commitment so many consumers, family members, state leaders, advocates, clinicians and others have made to improve our state's behavioral health system. Oregon's success in fulfilling the terms of this agreement depends on their continued focus. I look forward to continuing to report on our progress."

The Oregon Performance Plan, a one-page overview and the letter of transmittal are available at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/bhp/Pages/Oregon-Performance-Plan.aspx

A media briefing with Oregon Health Authority Director Lynne Saxton and Project Director for the Oregon Performance Plan Cissy Bollinger will be held at 10:30 a.m., Pacific. Call 888-808-6929, 915042#.

###
Performance Plan to address the needs of adults with serious and persistent mental illness finalized by the Oregon Health Authority
Oregon Health Authority - 07/28/16 8:32 AM
EDITORS: A media briefing with Oregon Health Authority Director Lynne Saxton and Project Director for the Oregon Performance Plan Cissy Bollinger will be held at 10:30 a.m., Pacific. Call 888-808-6929, 915042#.

July 28, 2016

Contact: Tami Rust, 503-756-8808, Tami.Rust@state.or.us

Performance Plan to address the needs of adults with serious and persistent mental illness finalized by the Oregon Health Authority

On July 28, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) finalized the Oregon Performance Plan, which calls for expanding services and improving outcomes for adults with serious and persistent mental illness.

"Under this three-year plan, Oregon will meet robust performance metrics that hold the state, its providers, counties and coordinated care organizations accountable for improving our behavioral health system," said Lynne Saxton, OHA Director. "This plan builds on and accelerates Oregon's continuing efforts to expand community-based mental health services, better integrate behavioral and physical health across the state and reduce commitments to the state hospital."


The Plan is the result of a unique collaborative process with the U.S. Department of Justice (USDOJ), which began in 2012.

To carry out Oregon's goals under the Performance Plan, the state will be required to make significant changes in how it delivers and invests in behavioral health services. These steps include:
-- Improving the way adults with severe and persistent mental illness transition to integrated community-based treatment from higher levels of
care.
-- Increasing access to crisis services and community-based supports to avoid incarceration or unnecessary hospitalization for adults with severe and
persistent mental illness.
-- Expanding services and supports that enable adults with severe and persistent mental illness to successfully live in the community, including strengthening housing and peer support services.

Beyond improving services for adults with serious and persistent mental illness, the Plan adds greater urgency and accountability to statewide efforts to reform behavioral health in Oregon.

Independent consultant Pam Hyde has been contracted by OHA to assess its performance under the plan and provide reports to OHA and the USDOJ. From

2009 to 2015, Hyde led the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services
Administration.

OHA has convened a Behavioral Health Collaborative (BHC) to develop recommendations to better align Oregon's behavioral health system, focus new investments and deliver better results for consumers and families. The collaborative is made up of consumers, clinicians, hospital representatives, county officials, community mental health providers, judges, public safety officials and others with expertise and experience in addressing mental health issues in Oregon.

The BHC's work will be informed by the Oregon Performance Plan, OHA's Behavioral Health Mapping Tool, OHA's Behavioral Health Town Hall Report, and the Oregon State University Boarding Study. The BHC will develop prioritized recommendations for consideration by the 2017 Oregon Legislature.

"I appreciate USDOJ's partnership in developing this Performance Plan," said Saxton. "It reflects the commitment so many consumers, family members, state leaders, advocates, clinicians and others have made to improve our state's behavioral health system. Oregon's success in fulfilling the terms of this agreement depends on their continued focus. I look forward to continuing to report on our progress."

The Oregon Performance Plan, a one-page overview and the letter of transmittal are available at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/bhp/Pages/Oregon-Performance- Plan.aspx

A media briefing with Oregon Health Authority Director Lynne Saxton and Project Director for the Oregon Performance Plan Cissy Bollinger will be held at 10:30 a.m., Pacific. Call 888-808-6929, 915042#.
Wed. 07/27/16
Linn Deputies Investigate Logging Death (Photo)
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 07/27/16 7:16 PM
2016-07/2993/96435/log_truck.jpg
2016-07/2993/96435/log_truck.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/2993/96435/thumb_log_truck.jpg
Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley reports his deputies are investigating a fatal logging accident reported today at 11:52 a.m. The accident occurred near milepost 14 of U.S. Plywood Mainline off of Trask Road, outside of Lyons. This property is owned by Weyerhaeuser Columbia Timberlands and is currently being logged by Ridgeway Logging, Inc.

The victim, Jerry Dean Sramek, 55, of Salem, was a contracted independent truck driver and had just loaded logs from the logging site and was in route to a mill. Sramek was found by Brent Richmond, another truck driver traveling the same route at about 11:26 a.m.

The investigation revealed Sramek stopped to re-secure his load on the trailer approximately four miles away from the landing site where he was loaded. When he undid the forward chain, a log approximately 20 feet long and ten inches in diameter, fell from the top of his trailer onto Sramek causing fatal head and neck injuries.

Sramek was found to be wearing the proper protective equipment.

OSHA and the Linn County Medical Examiner were both notified due to this being a job-related death.

Deputies were assisted by the Lyons Fire Department.

Weddle's funeral home of Stayton responded and removed the body from the scene.


Attached Media Files: 2016-07/2993/96435/log_truck.jpg
State launches first Veterans Rental Assistance Program
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 07/27/16 2:20 PM
The Oregon Health Authority (OHA), in partnership with the Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs (ODVA), has launched the Veterans Rental Assistance Program, designed to provide transitional housing for military veterans who have serious mental illness and are homeless or at risk for homelessness.

The new program will provide funding for transitional housing to accommodate up to 147 veterans who do not have permanent homes in Clackamas, Marion, Columbia, Yamhill and Jackson counties. Transitional housing is a stable, but temporary, arrangement meant to help bridge the gap from homelessness to permanent housing.

"OHA is pleased to partner with the Oregon Department of Veterans' affairs on this innovative and critical program," said Karen Wheeler, integrated health programs director for OHA's Health Systems Division.

OHA started the Rental Assistance Program in 2013 for individuals with serious mental illness, but this is the first time it has specifically targeted veterans. This year, OHA made $2.5 million available for veterans' rental assistance and a similar program, which serves young adults who meet the eligibility criteria for serious mental illness and homelessness.

The programs will be administered with the help of several nonprofit agencies, which were granted funding by OHA and will provide a certain number of housing "slots" in the areas and populations they serve.

The partnering providers serving veterans are Clackamas County Housing, Clackamas County, 30 slots; Salem Housing Authority, Marion County, 42 slots; Medicine Wheel Recovery Services Inc., Columbia County, 40 slots; Transition Projects Inc., Yamhill County, 20 slots; and ColumbiaCare Services-Jackson, Jackson County, 15 slots (and an additional 15 slots for young adults).

"We know from our efforts supporting crisis services, including mobile crisis interventions, that veterans in Oregon are experiencing behavioral health challenges that are unique to their circumstances and we have been looking for ways to help," Wheeler said.

Besides receiving rental subsidies, eligible individuals may receive assistance with moving costs. Residential housing specialists and peer support specialists are available to help individuals in becoming rent-ready and in locating, securing and maintaining a rental unit.

"This is something we've been working on for six months," said Mitch Sparks, director of statewide veterans services for ODVA. "One of the things I love about this program is that it has a definitive support network built in to help guarantee success in finding permanent housing. It's really a preventative measure for homelessness, designed to reduce the number of Oregon veterans who are out on the streets."

The program will begin in October 2016.

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Deputies Investigating Fatal Motor Vehicle Crash North Marion County *** UPDATE 2 ***
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/27/16 1:32 PM
Correction the first name of the deceased is Samantha Stover, Not Stephanie.

___________________________________

The passenger who died in Sunday's fatal crash has been identified as 25 year old Stephanie Stover. She was is in the Navy and stationed in Everett, Washington on the USS Gridley.

The investigation is ongoing and we don't anticipate another release of information for at least a couple weeks.


____________________________________________________________________

Deputies are on scene and investigating a fatal motor vehicle crash involving two vehicles that collided at the intersection of Ehlen Road NE and Butteville Road NE. Early indicators show a passenger car was north on Butteville when it failed to stop at the intersection causing a collision with a truck pulling a horse trailer westbound on Ehlen Road NE.

The driver of the passenger car was seriously injured and life flighted to a Portland hospital, the drivers passenger died on scene. The truck's occupants were both taken to area hospitals but are expected to live. The trailer contained two horses that are being attended to by a veterinarian on scene.

Members of the Marion County Crash Team and Oregon State Troopers are on scene investigating and expect the intersection will be closed in all directions for the next several hours.
State announces fair market value of school lands within the Elliott State Forest: $220.8 million
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 07/27/16 11:55 AM
Salem -- Interested buyers heard today that the Common School Fund lands within the Elliott State Forest -- approximately 82,500 acres -- are valued at $220.8 million.

About 50 people gathered at the Department of State Lands to hear the results of a review process that involved analyzing appraisals provided by three independent firms. Mason, Bruce & Girard, an Oregon natural resource consulting firm, prepared the final report and valuation.

The announcement is a key piece of information for the public, private, and nonprofit entities that have expressed an interest in acquiring the Elliott property in Coos and Douglas counties. Interested buyers have until November 15, 2016, to submit plans to acquire the acreage. For plans to be deemed "responsive" they must:

- Demonstrate how the purchaser will pay the fair market value of the forest
- Be for the entire school land acreage
- Show how certain public values will be preserved, including:
1) Ensuring public recreational access on at least half of the forest
2) Protecting older forest stands on at least 25 percent of the forest
3) Conserving high quality watersheds through the protection of riparian areas along streams containing salmon, steelhead and bull trout
4) Providing at least 40 direct or indirect full-time jobs annually for at least 10 years

"Today's announcement comes after years of dedicated work on how to solve the dilemma of the Elliott State Forest -- a dilemma created by the forest consistently losing money for its owners, the schoolchildren of Oregon," said Department of State Lands Director Jim Paul.

"We've conducted a very rigorous process over the past two years that included outreach with a wide variety of interest groups and detailed technical analyses. Our goal has always been to strike the right approach towards ensuring the Common School Fund is fully compensated, while also protecting a range of natural resources important to the public," he said.

The Elliott State Forest is made up primarily of lands owned by Oregon's Common School Fund, an endowment that generates distributions from the fund's earnings to Oregon's 197 public school districts twice a year. These 82,500 acres are a portion of the school lands given to the state by the federal government at statehood with the express legal condition they be used primarily to produce revenue for K-12 schools. Oregon's constitution confirms the State Land Board's fiduciary responsibility to act as trustees of the fund and to meet the requirement of providing revenue for schools.

Before 2013, the Elliott generated millions of dollars from harvesting about one percent of the forest each year. Since 2013, because of harvest limitations prompted by a lawsuit over federal protected species and the ongoing costs of maintaining the land in compliance with state and federal laws, owning the Elliott has meant a net loss to the Common School Fund of more than $4 million.

Current estimates predict that the forest will continue to require more money to manage than it produces in revenue for the fund. In order to protect the financial health of the fund, while still acting within their limited capacity to consider other public benefits, the Land Board is providing an opportunity for public, private and nonprofit entities to come up with acquisition plans to purchase the property in a way that will benefit the fund and provide enhanced public benefits.

Under the process set up by the Land Board, the proceeds of the sale will be invested in the Common School Fund, generating a more secure stream of funding for schools.

The next steps in the Elliott ownership transfer are to continue to provide information and answer questions for interested parties (August through October); review plans submitted by Nov. 15 (November and early December); and to work with the State Land Board to select and make an offer to the preferred buyer (December).

"Protecting and enhancing the Common School Fund is perhaps the most important thing we do as an agency, and a successful transfer of ownership of the Elliott State Forest as a result of this work will be a huge achievement towards this end," says Jim Paul.

Additional information on the appraisal process:

Three appraisal firms were selected through a Request for Proposal process conducted by the Department of State Lands in the fall of 2015. They included Ted Foster & Associates, The Healy Company, LP and James W. Sewall Company. Their completed appraisals ranged from $192 million to $262 million.

The Appraisal Review Report was prepared by Mason, Bruce & Girard, a Portland-based consulting firm established in 1921. Roger G. Lord, a state-certified General Real Property Appraiser, conducted the review and established the fair market value of $220.8 million after analyzing and reconciling the three appraisals.

The report was prepared to meet standards specified in the Uniform Appraisal Standards for Federal Land Acquisition (UASFLA) and the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice. UASFLA standards require that the property be appraised for its highest and best economic use.

The State Land Board consists of Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of State Jeanne P. Atkins and State Treasurer Ted Wheeler. The Department of State Lands administers diverse natural and fiscal resources. Many of the resources generate revenue for the Common School Fund, such as state-owned rangelands and timberlands, waterway leases, estates for which no will or heirs exist, and unclaimed property. Twice a year, the agency distributes fund investment earnings to support K-12 public schools. The agency also administers Oregon's Removal-Fill Law, which requires people removing or filling certain amounts of material in waters of the state to obtain a permit.


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www.oregonstatelands.us
Low Water Means High Vigilance for Boaters (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 07/27/16 10:26 AM
Marine Deputy Ernie Fields scouting out an area for safe passage on the lower Rogue River
Marine Deputy Ernie Fields scouting out an area for safe passage on the lower Rogue River
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/4139/96424/thumb_IMG_1068.JPG
It's easy to see the exposed gravel bars and shoals that formed on area waterways as the water levels drop and the temperature steadily creeps up. Many reservoirs too, are showing previously submerged stumps. Low water levels can create specific challenges that boaters need to be aware of.

The dynamic landscape, especially in rivers, changes from week to week. It's important for boaters to be aware that what wasn't visible or dangerous a week ago, could be now, and to know how to alter their boat operation for a safe and enjoyable time on the water. The Oregon State Marine Board offers the following tips on how to have fun and stay safe:

Boat with a buddy. Especially in paddlecraft. Have at least two boats and a plan if the party is separated. Always let a friend or family member know where you're going, when you expect to return, what clothing you're wearing, and who's with you.
Stand Up Paddleboards are considered boats in Oregon, and require having a properly fitting life jacket and a sound-producing device like a whistle, on board. Better yet --wear the jacket and attach the whistle. If you use a leash, ensure it's the appropriate leash for the waterway you're paddling.
Keep a proper lookout and look what's ahead, not what's just in front of you.
Scouting ahead is worth your time. Determine the safest course around boulders, gravel bars, or fallen trees/root wads.
Read the water. Where is there whitewater? Where does the water eddy? How is the water riffling? These water characteristics indicate what's below the surface, a sense of depth and gives key information on how to safely navigate.
Go with your "gut feeling." If something doesn't feel right, listen to your gut. When in doubt, portage (drag or carry) the boat over and around an obstruction. Skill level and confidence can mean the difference between an easy run and a potentially dangerous one.
Stay well clear of log jams and strainers (root wads, trees, branches, logs). They allow water through them, but can catch and entrap paddlers underwater or entangle lines on boats.
Know your limits. --Not when you're at your best, but at that specific moment. Stick to rivers with Class I or II rapids unless you have the skill and conditioning for advanced water levels.
Use the right gear for the type of boating. When running Class III or higher rapids, a helmet, properly fitting life jacket, a throw bag and secured gear are incredibly important.
On reservoirs and lakes, sharp drop-off's are a given. Tree stumps, boulders and fallen trees may not be visible. Take special care when operating near the banks, where many of these obstructions lie just below the surface. Always wear a life jacket when on the banks. Banks are often unstable.
On coastal bays, pay attention to the weather and the tide. A receding tide could leave a boater "stuck" at the wrong place at the wrong time.
Check the Marine Board's website for reported navigation obstructions and report serious or unexpected ones. The Marine Board will coordinate an evaluation of the obstruction with local law enforcement. By reporting obstructions, you can help ensure safe navigation on popular waterways for everyone.

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Attached Media Files: Marine Deputy Ernie Fields scouting out an area for safe passage on the lower Rogue River , Paddling Oregon Safely Infographic
New report shows financial health of Oregon hospitals has improved as more people have gained health insurance coverage
Oregon Health Authority - 07/27/16 9:51 AM
EDITORS: Report researchers Stacey Schubert and Steve Ranzoni will be available to answer questions about the report between 1:30 - 3:00 p.m. on Wednesday, July 27. Call Tony Andersen at 971-239-6483 to arrange an interview time.

Salem, Oregon----A new report issued by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) finds that as more people in Oregon have become insured, the financial standing of most hospitals has improved. Across Oregon's hospitals, operating margins have increased, while uncompensated care decreased.

The Highlights report----issued for the first time this year----also finds that hospital revenue has increased under the Affordable Care Act.

Each year OHA is required to collect financial data from acute care hospitals under ORS 442.400-442.463, providing an annual snapshot of the healthcare needs of Oregon communities and assessing the fiscal health of hospitals under the ACA.

The report, "Oregon Acute Care Hospitals: Annual Financials Reporting Highlights," aims to provide a transparent source of healthcare information and inform policy conversations.

"This data shows us that the new healthcare environment is providing more people access to affordable care while improving the financial stability of hospitals in Oregon," said Lynne Saxton, director of the OHA. "Hospitals are a critical part of our healthcare delivery system, and their financial viability ensures that essential community services are delivered effectively and efficiently. This report provides patients and policymakers an accessible and transparent vantage point for exploring future opportunities."

Major changes to Oregon's healthcare system in 2014 impacted charity care services provided by Oregon hospitals. As the ACA increased access to health care coverage through expanded Medicaid eligibility and the health insurance exchange, the proportion of uninsured individuals in Oregon fell sharply from 14.5 percent to 5.3 percent (Oregon Health Insurance Survey, 2013 and 2015). This significantly reduced the need for financial assistance and charity care as more people became insured and the cost of services provided to them were recouped by hospitals.

According to the data provided in the report between 2014 and 2015:
Uncompensated care----a combination of charity care and bad debt----dropped by $342 million, or 38.4 percent.
Net hospital income in Oregon increased $367 million, or 53.8 percent.
Oregon hospitals' operating margins increased nearly 35%. Operating margins indicate whether a hospital is operating at a profit or loss.
Overall, rural hospitals experienced more fluctuation in income and operated with tighter margins from 2010-2015, however, all hospital types had greater net income in 2015.

The report is available as a PDF file and as a data file on the OHA Health Analytics website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/analytics/Pages/index.aspx, linked to as "Hospital Financial Report."

Media availability
Report researchers Stacey Schubert and Steve Ranzoni will be available to answer questions about the report between 1:30 - 3:00 p.m. on Wednesday, July 27. Call Tony Andersen at 971-239-6483 to arrange an interview time.

# # #
Shot Fired During Domestic Disturbance
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 07/27/16 8:16 AM
Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley reports his deputies responded to a domestic disturbance between Lynnette McConnel, 60, and her husband Steve McConnel, 63, today at their residence 41055 Shimanek Bridge Drive in Scio.

Lynnette was armed with a shotgun and confronted the deputies as they approached the scene. Deputies used exceptional restraint and were able to get Lynnette ultimately to put the shotgun away.

During the investigation, deputies learned that a verbal altercation between Lynette and Stephen, had escalated in the driveway of the residence. Lynnette armed herself with a shotgun and fired a shot into the vehicle Stephen was driving.

Lynnette McConnel was arrested and lodged at the Linn County Jail for Assault IV, Menacing, Pointing a Firearm at Another, Unlawful Use of a Weapon, and Attempted Assault II.